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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Gas-recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear explosions have been proposed as a means for recovering gas from underground gas-bearing rock formations. In present practice, the nuclear device is positioned at the end of a long pipe which is subsequently filled with grout or concrete. After the device is exploded, the grout is drilled through to provide a flow path for the released gas to the ground surface. As settled grout is brittle, often the compressive shock of the explosion fractures the grout and deforms the pipe so that it may not be removed nor reused. In addition, the pipe is sometimes pinched off completely and the gas flow is totally obstructed. (2 claims)

Heckman, R.A.

1971-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

2

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE Name Affiliation Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2011-2013 Name Affiliation Sector Dernovsek, David Bonneville Power Defenbach, Byron Intermountain Gas Distribution Dragoon, Ken NWPCC Council Friedman, Randy NW Natural Gas Distribution Gopal, Jairam Southern CA Edison Electric Utility Hamilton, Linda Shell Trading Gas & Power

3

Optimization models of gas recovery and gas condensate processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a complex of mathematical models that formalize gas recovery and processing. Optimization problems for gas recovery and gas condensate processing are stated and corresponding solution algorithms are suggested. These mathematical models provide ...

M. Kh. Prilutskii; V. E. Kostyukov

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Du Page County, Illinois Coordinates 41.8243831°, -88.0900762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8243831,"lon":-88.0900762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Alameda County, California Coordinates 37.6016892°, -121.7195459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6016892,"lon":-121.7195459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CSL Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Broward County, Florida Coordinates 26.190096°, -80.365865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.190096,"lon":-80.365865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Lake Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CID Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Anderson County, Tennessee Coordinates 36.0809574°, -84.2278796° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0809574,"lon":-84.2278796,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility BJ Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Gwinnett County, Georgia Coordinates 33.9190653°, -84.0167423° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9190653,"lon":-84.0167423,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location St. Joseph County, Indiana Coordinates 41.6228085°, -86.3376761° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6228085,"lon":-86.3376761,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility DFW Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Denton County, Texas Coordinates 33.1418611°, -97.179026° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.1418611,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Marketers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

17

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent)

18

The Agricultural Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Agricultural Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG) Uwe A. Schneider Bruce A. Mc Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG Taxes and Sequestration Subsidies...............................66 3.8.2.4 Special Greenhouse Gas

McCarl, Bruce A.

19

Annual Real Natural Gas Prices by Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Major regulatory reforms at the Federal level began at the end of the 1970s with the passage of the Natural Gas Policy Act, and have affected most phases of the industry and markets Over time the movement to a more competitive model led to lower prices starting around 1983, which was accentuated by the drop in world oil prices in 1986 Gas consumers in all sectors seem to have benefited, on average, from a more competitive marketplace However, several factors have come together recently that have pushed spot gas prices up sharply and which are expected to reverse the downward trend in in real gas prices for the next year or so: U.S. gas production has been relatively flat. Expected demand is high under normal weather assumptions. Gas storage levels are below normal.

20

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

22

ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS IN CANADA by Rose: Analysis of Measures for Reducing Transportation Sector Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Canada Project Number the problem of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Canadian transportation sector. Reductions

23

Flare Gas Recovery in Shell Canada Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two of Shell Canada's refineries have logged about six years total operating experience with modern flare gas recovery facilities. The flare gas recovery systems were designed to recover the normal continuous flare gas flow for use in the refinery fuel gas system. The system consists of liquid knock-out, compression, and liquid seal facilities. Now that the debugging-stage challenges have been dealt with, Shell Canada is more than satisfied with the system performance. A well-thought-out installation can today be safe, trouble-free, and attractive from an economic and environmental viewpoint. This paper highlights general guidelines for the sizing, design and operation of a refinery flare gas recovery facility.

Allen, G. D.; Wey, R. E.; Chan, H. H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

Madden, M.P.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Sector-Specific information infrastructure issues in the oil, gas, and petrochemical sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this chapter we have discussed vulnerabilities and mitigating actions to improve safety, security and continuity of the information and process infrastructure used in the oil, gas and petrochemical sector. An accident in the oil and gas industry can ...

Stig O. Johnsen; Andreas Aas; Ying Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Landfill gas recovery: a technology status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas, which consists mainly of methane and carbon dioxide, can be recovered and used as a fuel. Processing will upgrade it to a high-Btu gas of pipeline quality. There are more than a dozen commercial landfill-gas recovery facilities in the US at present, all at relatively large sites. The amount of gas produced by a given site is a function of size, composition, and age of the landfill. Various techniques can be used to enhance gas production and yield, including controlled addition of moisture and nutrients; bacterial seeding and pH control also appear useful. Several computer models have been developed to examine the effects of various parameters on gas production and yield; these can aid in predicting optimum gas recovery and in maintaining the proper chemical balance within the producing portion of the landfill. Economically, a site's viability depends on its location and potential users, current competing energy costs, and legislation governing the site's operation. Legal problems of site operation can occur because of environmental and safety issues, as well as from questions of gas ownership, liability, and public utility commission considerations. Currently, R and D is under way to improve present recovery techniques and to develop new technologies and concepts. Cost comparisons and potential environmental impacts are being examined. Additional research is needed in the areas of gas enhancement, decompositional analysis, computer modeling, gas characterization, instrumentation, and engineering cost analysis. 77 references, 11 figures, 23 tables.

Zimmermann, R.E.; Lytwynyshyn, G.R.; Wilkey, M.L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Seeking prospects for enhanced gas recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Institute of Gas Technology's (IGT) ongoing research on unconventional natural gas sources, a methodology to locate gas wells that had watered-out under over-pressured conditions was developed and implemented. Each year several trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas are produced from reservoirs that are basically geopressured aquifers with large gas caps. As the gas is produced, the gas-water interface moves upward in the sandstone body trapping a portion of gas at the producing reservoir pressure. The methodology for identifying such formations consisted of a computer search of a large data base using a series of screening criteria to select or reject wells. The screening criteria consisted of depth cutoff, minimum production volume, minimum pressure gradient, and minimum water production. Wells chosen by the computer search were further screened manually to seek out those wells that exhibited rapid and large increases in water production with an associated quick decline in gas production indicating possible imbibition trapping of gas in the reservoir. The search was performed in an attempt to characterize the watered-out geopressured gas cap resource. Over 475 wells in the Gulf Coast area of Louisiana and Texas were identified as possible candidates representing an estimated potential of up to about 1 Tcf (2.83 x 10/sup 10/ m/sup 3/) of gas production through enhanced recovery operations. A process to determine the suitability of a watered-out geopressured gas cap reservoir for application of enhanced recovery is outlined. This paper addresses the identification of a potential gas source that is considered an unconventional resource. The methodology developed to identify watered-out geopressured gas cap wells can be utilized in seeking other types of watered-out gas reservoirs with the appropriate changes in the screening criteria. 12 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

Doherty, M.G.; Randolph, P.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Industry, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion[2] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or Mobil Sources[3]

30

Natural gas consumption reflects shifting sectoral patterns ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. natural gas consumption since 1997 reflects shifting patterns. Total U.S. natural gas consumption rose 7% between 1997 and 2011, but this modest ...

31

Enhanced Gas Recovery Using Pressure and Displacement Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work contained in this thesis combines two previous enhanced gas recovery techniques; coproduction of water and gas from water-drive reservoirs and waterflooding of low (more)

Walker, Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

33

Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project  

SciTech Connect

The Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project was a technical success and demonstrated the following: CKD can be used successfully as the sole reagent for removing SO2 from cement kiln flue gas, with removal efficiencies of 90 percent or greater; Removal efficiencies for HCl and VOCs were approximately 98 percent and 70 percent, respectively; Particulate emissions were low, in the range of 0.005 to 0.007 grains/standard cubic foot; The treated CKD sorbent can be recycled to the kiln after its potassium content has been reduced in the scrubber, thereby avoiding the need for landfilling; The process can yield fertilizer-grade K2SO4, a saleable by-product; and Waste heat in the flue gas can provide the energy required for evaporation and crystallization in the by-product recovery operation. The demonstration program established the feasibility of using the Recovery Scrubber{trademark} for desulfurization of flue gas from cement kilns, with generally favorable economics, assuming tipping fees are available for disposal of ash from biomass combustion. The process appears to be suitable for commercial use on any type of cement kiln. EPA has ruled that CKD is a nonhazardous waste, provided the facility meets Performance Standards for the Management of CKD (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1999d). Therefore, regulatory drivers for the technology focus more on reduction of air pollutants and pollution prevention, rather than on treating CKD as a hazardous waste. Application of the Recovery Scrubbe{trademark} concept to other waste-disposal operations, where pollution and waste reductions are needed, appears promising.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Rate and Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

35

Natural gas consumption reflects shifting sectoral patterns ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For many years, while coal-fired generation was less expensive, those natural gas-fired combined-cycle units were used at relatively low rates.

36

Energy Recovery During Expansion of Compressed Gas Using Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery During Expansion of Compressed Gas Using Power Plant Low-Quality Heat Sources Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is...

37

Automatic flue gas heat recovery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic flue gas heat recovery system for supplementing or replacing a conventional, separate hot water system. In the example described, the heat recovery system is applied to a pizza restaurant where large quantities of heat energy are normally wasted up an oven chimney stack, and large quantities of hot water also are required for restaurant operations. An electric motor driven pump circulates water in a closed loop between a storage tank and a heat exchanger tube located in the oven chimney stack. A thermostat control automatically starts the pump when the oven heats the chimney stack to an effective water heating temperature. When temperature in the storage tank reaches a predetermined maximum, the thermostat control stops the pump, opens a drain valve, and dumps water quickly and completely from the heat exchanger tube. Three different embodiments are shown and described illustrating systems with one or more storage tanks and one or more pumps. In the plural storage tank embodiments, an existing hot water heating tank may be converted for use to augment a main tank supplied with the present system.

Whalen, D.A.

1983-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

38

Greenhouse gas action plan for the transportation sector in Iowa  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research has been to identify ways in which the state of Iowa can do its part in reducing greenhouse gas emissions in its transportation sector. A variety of strategies and policy actions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Iowa are explored in this report. Some of these actions would be relatively easy to implement, while others would require significant changes in how people live and travel. The authors` work on this research effort has been conducted in tandem with a larger study to develop a greenhouse gas action plan for Iowa.

Ney, R.A.; Schnoor, J.L.; Foster, N.S.J.; Forkenbrock, D.J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

NETL: Natural Gas Resources, Enhanced Oil Recovery, Deepwater Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Projects and Natural Gas Projects Index of Research Project Summaries Use the links provided below to access detailed DOE/NETL project information, including project reports, contacts, and pertinent publications. Search Natural Gas and Oil Projects Current Projects Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas Environmental Other Natural Gas Resources Ehanced Oil Recovery CO2 EOR Environmental Other EOR & Oil Resources Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture Safety & Environmental Other Deepwater Technology Methane Hydrates DOE/NETL Projects Completed Projects Completed Natural Gas Resources Completed Enhanced Oil Recovery Completed Deepwater Technology Completed E&P Technologies Completed Environmental Solutions Completed Methane Hydrates Completed Transmission & Distribution

40

Non-isothermal, compressible gas flow for the simulation of an enhanced gas recovery application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we present a framework for numerical modeling of CO"2 injection into porous media for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) from depleted reservoirs. Physically, we have to deal with non-isothermal, compressible gas flows resulting in a system of ... Keywords: Carbon dioxide sequestration, Enhanced gas recovery, Equation of state, Finite element method, Numerical simulation, Real gas behavior

N. BTtcher; A. -K. Singh; O. Kolditz; R. Liedl

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas reservoirs are obvious targets for carbon sequestration by direct carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection by virtue of their proven record of gas production and integrity against gas escape. Carbon sequestration in depleted natural gas reservoirs can be coupled with enhanced gas production by injecting CO{sub 2} into the reservoir as it is being produced, a process called Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR). In this process, supercritical CO{sub 2} is injected deep in the reservoir while methane (CH{sub 4}) is produced at wells some distance away. The active injection of CO{sub 2} causes repressurization and CH{sub 4} displacement to allow the control and enhancement of gas recovery relative to water-drive or depletion-drive reservoir operations. Carbon dioxide undergoes a large change in density as CO{sub 2} gas passes through the critical pressure at temperatures near the critical temperature. This feature makes CO{sub 2} a potentially effective cushion gas for gas storage reservoirs. Thus at the end of the CSEGR process when the reservoir is filled with CO{sub 2}, additional benefit of the reservoir may be obtained through its operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this paper, we present discussion and simulation results from TOUGH2/EOS7C of gas mixture property prediction, gas injection, repressurization, migration, and mixing processes that occur in gas reservoirs under active CO{sub 2} injection.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

42

Industrial sector natural gas use rising - Today in Energy - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... Industrial customers form an important gas-use sector, using natural gas for a variety of purposes, including the following:

43

Greenhouse Gas Programs, Energy Efficiency, and the Industrial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States has made significant progress in reducing total energy use through energy efficiency improvements over the past decade, yet the United States still ranks as the highest absolute greenhouse gas (GHG) emitter in the world with 23.6 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per capita in 2006. The industrial sector (agriculture is excluded) is responsible for 28.7 percent of the GHG emissions in the U.S. However, the U.S. industrial sector has numerous economically viable opportunities to reduce energy use and GHG emissions. Energy efficiency, including new clean technologies, plays a significant role in increasing productivity and reducing energy intensity, and thus emissions. Increasing energy efficiency in industrial processes is central to addressing climate change issues in the industrial sector. This paper describes the energy-efficiency programs, methodologies, and technologies that can economically lead to significant GHG reductions in the industrial sector. The paper also discusses the impacts of climate change policies and programs to the application of advanced low-carbon industrial technologies.

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas. How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature? Links: The technology of Condensing Flue Gas Heat Recovery natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building

45

Flare-gas recovery success at Canadian refineries  

SciTech Connect

It appears that some North American refining companies still cling to an old philosophy that flare gas recovery systems are unsafe, unreliable, uneconomic, or unnecessary. Shell Canada's recent experience with two modern systems has proven otherwise. Two of Shell Canada's refineries, at Sarnia, Ont., and Montreal East, Que., have now logged about 6 years' total operating experience with modern flare gas recovery units. The compression facilities in each utilize a two-stage reciprocating machine, one liquid seal drum per flare stack, and an automated load control strategy. The purpose was to recover the normal continuous flow of refinery flare gas for treatment and use in the refinery fuel gas system.

Allen, G.D.; Chan, H.H.; Wey, R.E.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

been expensive to simulate. Performance results were sufficiently promising to justify a commercial-scale test under the CCT program. A flowsheet of the Recovery Scrubber(tm) is...

47

Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17...

50

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17...

51

Case study: City of Industry landfill gas recovery operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of civic, recreation, and conservation facilities throughout a 150-acre site which had been used for waste disposal from 1951 to 1970 is described. The history of the landfill site, the geology of the site, and a test well program to assess the feasibility of recoverying landfill gas economically from the site are discussed. Based on results of the test well program, the City of Industry authorized the design and installation of a full-scale landfill gas recovery system. Design, construction, and operation of the system are described. The landfill gas system provides fuel for use in boilers to meet space heating and hot water demands for site development (MCW)

None

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery: Identifying...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley CA 94720 Abstract Depleted natural gas reservoirs are promising targets for carbon dioxide sequestration. Although depleted, these reservoirs are not devoid of...

53

Gas Market Transition: Buildup of Power Sector Demand: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Just how fast is natural gas demand for power generation growing in response to the many new gas-fired units being built? This simple question has a far from simple answer, due to confusing streams of data, the interplay between new efficient gas combined cycle units and existing capacity, and the surprisingly low overall levels of capacity utilization observed among the new units. This report dissects each component of gas use in the power sector and provides a novel, integrated view of near term trends...

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-56144 Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use andAC02-05CH11231. ii Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use andConsumption iii iv Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use and

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES: Agricultural Economics #12;AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation in the United States. (December 2000) Uwe Schneider, M.Ag., Humboldt

McCarl, Bruce A.

56

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis (Siemens) We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas recovery and compare the difference between conventional and unconventional gas reservoir and recovery technologies. Then we did theoretical analysis on the shale gas production. According

Ge, Zigang

57

Brine and gas recovery from geopressured systems. I. Parametric calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of parametric calculations was run with the S-CUBED geopressured-geothermal simulator MUSHRM to assess the effects of important formation, fluid and well parameters on brine and gas recovery from geopressured reservoir systems. The specific parameters considered are formation permeability, pore-fluid salinity, temperature and gas content, well radius and location with respect to reservoir boundaries, desired flow rate, and possible shale recharge. It was found that the total brine and gas recovered (as a fraction of the resource in situ) were most sensitive to formation permeability, pore-fluid gas content, and shale recharge.

Garg, S.K.; Riney, T.D.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description:...

59

Figure 7. U.S. dry natural gas consumption by sector, 2005-2040 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 7. U.S. dry natural gas consumption by sector, 2005-2040 (trllion cubic feet) Residential Commercial Transportation Gas to liquids

60

Secondary recovery of gas from Gulf Coast reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Studies funded by the Gas Research Institute have provided insight into the investment decisions of a small operator engaged in SGR from an abandoned Frio sandstone reservoir in Galveston County, Texas. Favorable gas-brine ratios were obtained by rapid brine production using gas lift. The lowered reservoir pressure allowed imbibition-trapped gas bubbles to expand and merge, forming a mobile phase which greatly improved recovery. Brine was disposed by environmentally benign reinjection into a shallower, unconsolidated sand unit, although the disposal formation suffered permeability damage due to iron hydroxides in the brine. Brine solids were reduced by keeping oxygen out of the surface plumbing and performing gas-brine separation in several steps inside pressurized vessels. Periodic backflowing of the disposal well dislodged the damaged surface layer of the unconsolidated disposal sand, which was then removed from the hole by swabbing, exposing a fresh formation surface to the brine. This work has shown that the technical problems involved in secondary gas recovery can be overcome by using relatively simple solutions in line with the budget constraints of a small operator. Because secondary gas production occurs in known fields located near major gathering systems and transmission lines, it is expected to supply a significant portion of future domestic natural gas.

Soeder, D.J.; Randolph, P.L.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Foam and emulsion effects on gas driven oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this research was to investigate the gas mobility reducing effects that a gas driven surfactant slug has on enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Three chemically similar surfactants whose properties graded from foaming agent to emulsifying agent were used to study the effects that foam and emulsion formation have on enhanced oil recovery in an unconsolidated Ottawa sand model at room temperature. Both the foam lamellae and the emulsion droplets act to reduce the mobility of the injected gas in the swept zone, thus increasing the vertical sweep efficiency. Shell's Enordet series of alcohol ethoxylate surfactants were used in the study at three different concentrations of, 0.01%, 0.03% and 0.100% (wt.). The experimental procedure consisted of displacing oil from a porous medium at residual water saturation by injecting carbon dioxide, followed first by the injection of a 0.20 pore volume slug of surfactant solution, then by carbon dioxide gas at low pressure. Measurements were made of the cumulative produced gas and liquids. Performance differences between different surfactants are small but consistent. Combining the foam and emulsion mechanisms seems to lead to more efficient oil recovery than either mechanism alone. 33 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Farrell. J.; Marsden, S.S. Jr.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all fuels including electricity and syngas will be used forGas Electricity Biomass Syngas Space Heating Coal Oil Gas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors for production of coal products -- patent fuel, cokeoven coke,coke oven gas, blast furnace gas and briquettes (BKB) --

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2013-2015 Name Affiliation Phone E-mail Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2013-2015 Name Affiliation Phone E-mail Sector Cocks, Michael BPA Natural Gas (503) 721-2475 randy.friedman@nwnatural.com Distribution Finklea Edward NW Ind. Gas Users (503@ci.tacoma.wa.us Electric Utility Defenbach, Byron Intermountain Gas (208) 377-6080 bdefen@intgas.com Distribution Dahlberg

65

Low-Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal/Recovery System  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. Much raw gas is `subquality`, that is, it exceeds the pipeline specifications for nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and/or hydrogen sulfide content, and much of this low-quality natural gas cannot be produced economically with present processing technology. Against this background, a number of industry-wide trends are affecting the natural gas industry. Despite the current low price of natural gas, long-term demand is expected to outstrip supply, requiring new gas fields to be developed. Several important consequences will result. First, gas fields not being used because of low-quality products will have to be tapped. In the future, the proportion of the gas supply that must be treated to remove impurities prior to delivery to the pipeline will increase substantially. The extent of treatment required to bring the gas up to specification will also increase. Gas Research Institute studies have shown that a substantial capital investment in facilities is likely to occur over the next decade. The estimated overall investment for all gas processing facilities up to the year 2000 alone is approximates $1.2 Billion, of which acid gas removal and sulfur recovery are a significant part in terms of invested capital. This large market size and the known shortcomings of conventional processing techniques will encourage development and commercialization of newer technologies such as membrane processes. Second, much of today`s gas production is from large, readily accessible fields. As new reserves are exploited, more gas will be produced from smaller fields in remote or offshore locations. The result is an increasing need for technology able to treat small-scale gas streams.

Lokhandwala, K.A.; Ringer, M.; Wijams, H.; Baker, R.W.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17 until the Riser Insertion Tube was disconnected...

67

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17 until the Riser Insertion Tube was disconnected...

68

Carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery: Identifying candidate sites for pilot study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Process modeling of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas2001. Reichle, D. et al.. Carbon sequestration research andCarbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery: Identifying

Oldenburg, C.M.; Benson, S.M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Four subprograms are reported on: methane recovery from coalbeds, Eastern gas shales, Western gas sands, and methane from geopressured aquifers. (DLC)

Manilla, R.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of oil and gas related programs with relevance to the Climate VISION program: Deep Trek Water, Air, and Soil Protection Natural Gas Infrastructure Methane Hydrates Hydrogen...

72

Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low quality natural gas processing with the integrated CFZ/CNG Claus process is feasible for low quality natural gas containing 10% or more of CO{sub 2}, and any amount of H{sub 2}S. The CNG Claus process requires a minimum CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the feed gas of about 100 psia (15% CO{sub 2} for a 700 psia feed gas) and also can handle any amount of H{sub 2}S. The process is well suited for handling a variety of trace contaminants usually associated with low quality natural gas and Claus sulfur recovery. The integrated process can produce high pressure carbon dioxide at purities required by end use markets, including food grade CO{sub 2}. The ability to economically co-produce high pressure CO{sub 2} as a commodity with significant revenue potential frees process economic viability from total reliance on pipeline gas, and extends the range of process applicability to low quality gases with relatively low methane content. Gases with high acid gas content and high CO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}S ratios can be economically processed by the CFZ/CNG Claus and CNG Claus processes. The large energy requirements for regeneration make chemical solvent processing prohibitive. The cost of Selexol physical solvent processing of the LaBarge gas is significantly greater than the CNG/CNG Claus and CNG Claus processes.

Damon, D.A. [CNG Research Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Siwajek, L.A. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Klint, B.W. [BOVAR Inc., AB (Canada). Western Research

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2013-2015 Name Affiliation Phone E-mail Sector June 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2013-2015 Name Affiliation Phone E-mail Sector June 7 meeting Cocks Friedman, Randy NW Natural Gas (503) 721-2475 randy.friedman@nwnatural.com Distribution Finklea Edward NW-8553 bdickens@ci.tacoma.wa.us Electric Utility Defenbach, Byron Intermountain Gas (208) 377-6080 bdefen

74

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information Prior to developing the API Compendium of GHG Emissions Methodologies for the Oil and Gas Industry (PDF 14.6 MB), API reviewed a wide range of government estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from the oil and gas industry as well as existing and widely used methodologies for estimating emissions from our industry's operations. This review made it quite clear that while existing data and methods may be adequate for national-level estimates of greenhouse gas emissions, they were inadequate for developing reliable facility- and company-specific estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas operations. Download Acrobat Reader The Compendium is used by industry to assess its greenhouse gas emissions. Working with a number of other international associations as well as

76

Low Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal and Recovery CNG Claus Sulfur Recovery Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased use of natural gas (methane) in the domestic energy market will force the development of large non-producing gas reserves now considered to be low quality. Large reserves of low quality natural gas (LQNG) contaminated with hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N) are available but not suitable for treatment using current conventional gas treating methods due to economic and environmental constraints. A group of three technologies have been integrated to allow for processing of these LQNG reserves; the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFZ) process for hydrocarbon / acid gas separation; the Triple Point Crystallizer (TPC) process for H{sub 2}S / C0{sub 2} separation and the CNG Claus process for recovery of elemental sulfur from H{sub 2}S. The combined CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus group of processes is one program aimed at developing an alternative gas treating technology which is both economically and environmentally suitable for developing these low quality natural gas reserves. The CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus process is capable of treating low quality natural gas containing >10% C0{sub 2} and measurable levels of H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} to pipeline specifications. The integrated CFZ / CNG Claus Process or the stand-alone CNG Claus Process has a number of attractive features for treating LQNG. The processes are capable of treating raw gas with a variety of trace contaminant components. The processes can also accommodate large changes in raw gas composition and flow rates. The combined processes are capable of achieving virtually undetectable levels of H{sub 2}S and significantly less than 2% CO in the product methane. The separation processes operate at pressure and deliver a high pressure (ca. 100 psia) acid gas (H{sub 2}S) stream for processing in the CNG Claus unit. This allows for substantial reductions in plant vessel size as compared to conventional Claus / Tail gas treating technologies. A close integration of the components of the CNG Claus process also allow for use of the methane/H{sub 2}S separation unit as a Claus tail gas treating unit by recycling the CNG Claus tail gas stream. This allows for virtually 100 percent sulfur recovery efficiency (virtually zero SO{sub 2} emissions) by recycling the sulfur laden tail gas to extinction. The use of the tail gas recycle scheme also deemphasizes the conventional requirement in Claus units to have high unit conversion efficiency and thereby make the operation much less affected by process upsets and feed gas composition changes. The development of these technologies has been ongoing for many years and both the CFZ and the TPC processes have been demonstrated at large pilot plant scales. On the other hand, prior to this project, the CNG Claus process had not been proven at any scale. Therefore, the primary objective of this portion of the program was to design, build and operate a pilot scale CNG Claus unit and demonstrate the required fundamental reaction chemistry and also demonstrate the viability of a reasonably sized working unit.

Klint, V.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

links provide a listing of recent publications and software by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy and the National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO): Key Natural Gas and...

78

Community Resilience: Workshops on Private Sector and Property Owner Requirements for Recovery and Restoration from a Diasaster  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a proejct sponsored by DTRA to 1) Assess the readiness of private-sector businesses, building owners, and service providers to restore property and recover operations in the aftermath of a wide-area dispersal of anthrax; and 2) Understand what private property owners and businesses "want and need" from federal, state, and local government to support recovery and restoration from such an incident.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

easy to operate, and produce high quality heat that can be used to generate steam for combined heat and power and combined-cycle applications. About 75% of all gas...

80

Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity  

SciTech Connect

In November 2012, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) released a new report, 'Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity.' The study provides a new methodological approach to estimate natural gas related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tracks trends in regulatory and voluntary industry practices, and explores various electricity futures. The Executive Summary provides key findings, insights, data, and figures from this major study.

Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Climate VISION: PrivateSector Initiatives: Oil and Gas  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements Answering the Challenge: A U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Industry Initiative on Climate Change Through its leading trade association, the American Petroleum Institute, the U.S oil and natural gas industry is implementing an initiative to address climate change. API's Climate Challenge Programs feature three components: The API Climate Action Challenge focuses on strategies for reducing emissions. Under the Climate Action Challenge, companies are taking action to reduce, sequester, offset, or avoid their greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, under the Challenge, API-member refining companies are working to improve their energy efficiency by 10% by 2012 and are on track to meeting this goal. The API Climate R&D Challenge involves support for enhanced research and

82

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations American Petroleum Institute The oil and natural gas industry provides the fuel for American life, warming our homes, powering our businesses and giving us the mobility to enjoy this great land. As the primary trade association of that industry, API represents more than 400 members involved in all aspects of the oil and natural gas industry. Our association draws on the experience and expertise of our members and staff to support a strong and viable oil and natural gas industry. International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association The International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association (IPIECA) is comprised of petroleum companies and associations from around the world. Founded in 1974 following the establishment of the United

83

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Results Results The following are summary descriptions of actions taken to date by the American Petroleum Institute (API) and its members, as related to the Climate VISION program and GHG emissions intensity reduction, in general. For more complete information, please visit API's website (www.api.org) and view Climate Challenge:A Progress Report and, for the most recent examples, please see Companies Address Climate Change. (Also please browse API member company websites for additional information on company climate change initiatives.) API Climate Greenhouse Gas Estimation & Reporting Challenge API has developed and is distributing accurate greenhouse gas emissions estimating tools via its Compendium of GHG Emissions Methodologies for the Oil and Gas Industry (PDF 14.6 MB). The Compendium implements more robust

84

Apparatus and method for fast recovery and charge of insulation gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An insulation gas recovery and charge apparatus is provided comprising a pump, a connect, an inflatable collection device and at least one valve.

Jordan, Kevin

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

85

Recovery of CO/sub 2/ from flue gas  

SciTech Connect

Within the Permian Basin geographic region, there are a variety of sources for CO/sub 2/ other than naturally occurring deposits. These sources can provide sufficient quantities of CO/sub 2/ for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. The cost associated with pipelining CO/sub 2/ produced from natural sources into the Permian Basin is reported to be $1.50/MSCF or less. Therefore, flue gas sources result in higher CO/sub 2/ costs than natural deposits. However, these costs are within the pricing parameters for the normal CO/sub 2/ market place. The demand for flue gas CO/sub 2/ for EOR is seen to depend largely on the success of CO/sub 2/ floods and the relative price that can be applied to CO/sub 2/ based on the price of oil and the increases in domestic oil production and gas liquids that CO/sub 2/ can provide. Under current conditions, CO/sub 2/ has a value of ca $2.00/MSCF for EOR use.

Hyde, E.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Other Resources Other Resources Pew Center on Global Climate Change Pew Center brings together major organizations with critical scientific, economic, and technological expertise focused on global climate change and educates the public on associated risks, challenges, and solutions. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) The MIT joint program on the science and policy of global change provides research, independent policy analysis, and public education in global environmental change. IEA Greenhouse Gas Programme The IEA greenhouse gas R&D program (IEA GHG) aims to identify and evaluate fossil fuel-based GHG reduction technologies, disseminate results, and identify target technologies for appropriate and practical R&D. Nature Conservancy The Nature Conservancy sponsors projects that protect ecosystems and

87

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: GHG Inventory  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols GHG Inventory Protocols Petroleum Industry Guidelines for Reporting Greenhouse Gas Emissions (PDF 2.0 MB) Download Acrobat Reader IPIECA, as part of a joint industry task force with the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (OGP), has developed, on behalf of the petroleum industry, a voluntary industry-endorsed approach for measuring and reporting GHG emissions. The petroleum industry has recognized the need for GHG accounting and reporting guidance that is focused specifically on the industry. Current approaches vary among government reporting programs. Companies also differ in how they voluntarily report their emissions data. This variability in approaches has resulted in a lack of comparability of reported GHG

88

Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector October 19, 2011 - 1:10pm Addthis An insulation worker installs argon-filled panels behind the radiators in the LEED Gold-rated New York Power Authority building in White Plains. The unique construction of the gas-filled panels developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California are as effective barriers to heat as its pink fibrous counterparts with less material in less space. | Photo courtesy of FiFoil, Inc. An insulation worker installs argon-filled panels behind the radiators in the LEED Gold-rated New York Power Authority building in White Plains. The unique construction of the gas-filled panels developed at the Lawrence

89

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset of the wider dialogue on natural gas: 1. What are the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity?; 2. What are the existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and how are they changing in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns?; 3. How are natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices?; and 4. How might demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years?

Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Table 16. Natural gas delivered to consumers by sector, 2008-2012, and by state and sector, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 16. Natural gas delivered to consumers by sector, 2008-2012, and by state and sector, 2012 2008 Total 4,892,277 65,073,996 3,152,529 5,444,335 6,670,182 225,044 2009 Total 4,778,907 65,329,582 3,118,592 5,322,332 6,167,371 207,624 2010 Total 4,782,412 65,542,345 3,102,593 5,301,576 6,826,192 192,730 2011 Total R 4,713,777 R 65,940,522 R 3,155,319 R 5,319,817 R 6,994,120 R 189,301 2012 Total 4,148,970 66,624,457 2,895,358 5,355,613 7,223,835 189,330 Alabama 27,582 767,412 21,574 67,234 171,730 3,045 Alaska 21,380 122,983 19,898 13,134 6,357 3 Arizona 34,974 1,157,688 31,530 56,532 22,657 379 Arkansas 26,191 549,959 41,435 68,765 81,399 988 California 477,931 10,681,916 253,148 442,708 735,787 37,685 Colorado 115,306 1,659,808

92

Table 16. Natural gas delivered to consumers by sector, 2007-2011, and by state and sector, 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Table 16. Natural gas delivered to consumers by sector, 2007-2011, and by state and sector, 2011 2007 Total 4,722,358 64,964,769 3,012,904 5,308,785 6,654,716 198,289 2008 Total 4,892,277 65,073,996 3,152,529 5,444,335 6,670,182 225,044 2009 Total 4,778,907 65,329,582 3,118,592 5,322,332 6,167,371 207,624 2010 Total R 4,782,412 R 65,542,345 R 3,102,593 R 5,301,576 R 6,826,192 R 192,730 2011 Total 4,713,695 65,938,523 3,153,605 5,319,405 6,904,843 189,097 Alabama 36,556 772,248 25,136 67,657 153,067 2,976 Alaska 20,262 121,736 16,652 13,024 6,769 5 Arizona 38,592 1,146,286 32,633 56,547 21,724 371 Arkansas 33,737 551,795 39,986 67,815 85,175 1,131 California 512,565 10,625,190 246,141 440,990 706,350 37,575 Colorado 130,116 1,645,716

93

Optimal absorption pressure for CO/sub 2/ recovery from flue gas calculated  

SciTech Connect

This paper calculates the cost of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). It diagrams a carbon dioxide recovery plant and presents tables with costs of carbon dioxide recovery at various absorption pressures, and cost in various EOR project. It shows that the utility cost is a dominant factor and that a gas compressor does not reduce the equipment cost effectively at low pressure and concludes that 70 psig is the optimal operating pressure.

Fang, C.S.; Fan, S.K.

1982-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

SciTech Connect

Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 136, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural gas consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 138.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

96

AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 137, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural Gas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 140.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

97

Bulk Energy Storage: Assessment of Green House Gas Impacts to the Electric Power Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities are interested in understanding the role and impacts electric energy storage systems can have on reducing the electric sector's green house gas (GHG) emissions. This research project was undertaken to better understand and quantify GHG impacts of electric storage systems. The project specifically focuses on bulk energy storage systems such as compressed air energy storage (CAES).

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

98

Issues in Energy Economics Led by Emerging Linkages between the Natural Gas and Power Sectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel prices in 2006 continued at record levels, with uranium continuing upward unabated and coal, SO{sub 2} emission allowances, and natural gas all softening. This softening did not continue for natural gas, however, whose prices rose, fell and rose again, first following weather influences and, by the second quarter of 2007, continuing at high levels without any support from fundamentals. This article reviews these trends and describes the remarkable increases in fuel expenses for power generation. By the end of 2005, natural gas claimed 55% of annual power sector fuel expenses, even though it was used for only 19% of electric generation. Although natural gas is enormously important to the power sector, the sector also is an important driver of the natural gas market-growing to over 28% of the market even as total use has declined. The article proceeds to discuss globalization, natural gas price risk, and technology developments. Forces of globalization are poised to affect the energy markets in new ways-new in not being only about oil. Of particular interest in the growth of intermodal traffic and its a little-understood impacts on rail traffic patterns and transportation costs, and expected rapidly expanding LNG imports toward the end of the decade. Two aspects of natural gas price risk are discussed: how understanding the use of gas in the power sector helps define price ceilings and floors for natural gas, and how the recent increase in the natural gas production after years of record drilling could alter the supply-demand balance for the better. The article cautions, however, that escalation in natural gas finding and development costs is countering the more positive developments that emerged during 2006. Regarding technology, the exploitation of unconventional natural gas was one highlight. So too was the queuing up of coal-fired power plants for the post-2010 period, a phenomenon that has come under great pressure with many consequences including increased pressures in the natural gas market. The most significant illustration of these forces was the early 2007 suspension of development plans by a large power company, well before the Supreme Court's ruling on CO{sub 2} as a tailpipe pollutant and President Bush's call for global goals on CO{sub 2} emissions.

Platt, Jeremy B. [AAPG EMD Energy Economics and Technology (United States)], E-mail: jplatt@epri.com

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Analysis of Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options within a Multi-sector Economic Framework  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

National-scale analysis of greenhouse gas mitigation options is generally carried out using top-down economic models with moderate energy detail but very limited detail in agriculture and forestry. However, a complete analysis of greenhouse gas mitigation options requires an improved representation of agriculture within the top-down economic models used for analysis of climate policy. Greenhouse gas mitigation options within the agricultural sector include changes in afforestation of agricultural lands, crop and livestock management practices, harvesting of biomass crops for fuel, and the sequestration of carbon in agricultural soils. Analysis of such options is usually carried out in a bottom-up model such as the Agricultural Sector Model (ASM). We report on activities to combine the bottom-up agricultural detail from ASM with the top-down economic and energy structure used at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), which has been used extensively for analysis of alternative carbon mitigation strategies.

Sands, Ronald D.; Mccarl, Bruce A.; Gillig, Dhazn; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Gale, J.; Kaya, Y.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio.

102

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio. An added benefit of the project, which was managed by the National Energy

103

SPONSORED PROJECTS 1. Pending: "Feasibility Studies and Training to Support Landfill Gas Recovery in Ghana"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPONSORED PROJECTS 1. Pending: "Feasibility Studies and Training to Support Landfill Gas Recovery: PI. 4. "An Improved Model to Predict Gas Generation from Landfills based on Waste Composition-2015, Role: Co-PI. 3. "Field Measurement of Emissions from Natural Gas Drilling, Production, and Distribution

Texas at Arlington, University of

104

Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.jisea.org Technical Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan

106

Feasibility of methane-gas recovery at the St. John's Landfill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All facets reviewed in assessing the feasibility of a commercial landfill gas recovery system at the St. Johns Landfill in Portland, Oregon are discussed. Included are: landfill operational history, step-by-step descriptions of the field testing (and all results therein), landfill gas production/recovery predictions, results of the preliminary market research, cost matrices for primary utilization modes, and conclusions and recommendations based on analysis of the data gathered. Tables and figures are used to illustrate various aspects of the report.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Climate VISION: PrivateSector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways The oil and gas industry is a very diverse and complex sector of the energy economy. It ranges from exploration to production, processing, transportation, and distribution. All of these segments are elements of the natural gas industry and the oil industry but are different for oil than for natural gas. An example of a technology pathway for the oil refining industry is the Petroleum Refining Vision and Roadmap, which was developed through a joint effort of government and industry. Other technology roadmaps of relevance to Climate VISION participants either are being developed or will be developed in the future. The oil refining example is provided initially. Others will be added as they become available. Petroleum refining is one of nine energy-intensive industries that is

109

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field, Colombia. Experimental and simulation studies were conducted to achieve these objectives. The experimental study consisted of injecting reconstituted gas into a cell containing sand and "live" San Francisco oil. Experimental runs were made with injection of (i) the two field gases and their 50-50 mixture, (ii) the two field gases enriched with propane, and (iii) WAG with the two field gases enriched with propane. Produced oil volume, density, and viscosity; and produced gas volume and composition were measured and analyzed. A 1D 7-component compositional simulation model of the laboratory injection cell and its contents was developed. After a satisfactory history-match of the results of a WAG run, the prediction runs were made using the gas that gave the highest oil recovery in the experiments, (5:100 mass ratio of propane:Balcon gas). Oil production results from simulation were obtained for a range of WAG cycles and gas injection rate. The main results of the study may be summarized as follows. For all cases studied, the lowest oil recovery is obtained with injection of San Francisco gas, (60% of original oil-in-place OOIP), and the highest oil recovery (84% OOIP) is obtained with a WAG 7.5-7.5 (cycle of 7.5 minutes water injection followed by 7.5 minutes of gas injection at 872 ml/min). This approximately corresponds to WAG 20-20 in the field (20 days water injection followed by 20 days gas injection at 6.8 MMSCF/D). Results clearly indicate increase in oil recovery with volume of the gas injected. Lastly, of the three injection schemes studied, WAG injection with propane-enriched gas gives the highest oil recovery. This study is based on the one-dimensional displacement of oil. The three-dimensional aspects and other reservoir complexities that adversely affect oil recovery in reality have not been considered. A 3D reservoir simulation study is therefore recommended together with an economic evaluation of the cases before any decision can be made to implement any of the gas or WAG injection schemes.

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Understanding natural and induced gas migration through landfill cover materials: the basis for improved landfill gas recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vertical pressure and concentration gradients in landfill cover materials are being examined at the Mallard North Landfill in Dupage County, IL. The goal of this project is to understand venting of landfill gas and intrusion of atmospheric gases into the landfill in response to changing meteorological conditions (particularly barometric pressure and precipitation) and pumping rates at recovery wells. Nests of probes for directly measuring soil gas pressures have been installed in areas of fractured and unfractured silty clay till cover materials. The probes are at three depths: shallow (0.6 m), intermediate (1.2 m), and deep (in the top of the refuse). Preliminary results from fall 1985 suggest that soil gas pressures respond quickly to changes in barometric pressure but that concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen respond more slowly to changing soil moisture conditions. An important near-surface process that limits the total amount of methane available to a gas recovery system is the activity of methanotrophs (methane-oxidizing bacteria) in oxygenated cover materials. The results of this project will be used to quantify landfill mass balance relations, improve existing predictive models for landfill gas recovery systems, and improve landfill cover design for sites where gas recovery is anticipated.

Bogner, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: methane from coal seams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from the recovery of gas from coalbeds are identified and examined. The technology of methane recovery is described and economic and legal barriers to production are discussed. (ACR)

Ethridge, L.J.; Cowan, C.E.; Riedel, E.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Numerical Modeling of Gas Recovery from Methane Hydrate Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACTClass 1 hydrate deposits are characterized by a hydrate bearing layer underlain by a two phase, free-gas and water, zone. A Class 1 hydrate reservoir (more)

Silpngarmlert, Suntichai

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Smelting Exhaust Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a cost efficient capture of more valuable heat (higher exergy), heat exchangers should operate on the exhaust gases upstream of the gas treatment plants.

114

CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir-A Numerical Simulation Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir- A Numerical Simulation for storage and enhanced gas recovery may be organic-rich shales, which CO2 is preferentially adsorbed comprehensive simulation studies to better understand CO2 injection process in shale gas reservoir. This paper

Mohaghegh, Shahab

115

Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Executive Summary - Natural Gas Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity Jeffrey Logan, Garvin Heath, and Jordan Macknick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Elizabeth Paranhos and William Boyd University of Colorado Law School Ken Carlson Colorado State University Technical Report NREL/TP-6A50-57702 January 2013 The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of Colorado-Boulder, the Colorado School of Mines, the Colorado State University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Stanford University. JISEA ® and all JISEA-based marks are trademarks or registered trademarks of the Alliance for

116

Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas and the Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity Jeffrey Logan, Garvin Heath, and Jordan Macknick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Elizabeth Paranhos and William Boyd University of Colorado Law School Ken Carlson Colorado State University Technical Report NREL/TP-6A50-55538 November 2012 The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of Colorado-Boulder, the Colorado School of Mines, the Colorado State University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Stanford University. JISEA ® and all JISEA-based marks are trademarks or registered trademarks of the Alliance for

117

Effect of shale-water recharge on brine and gas recovery from geopressured reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of shale-water recharge has often been discussed and preliminary assessments of its significance in the recovery of geopressured fluids have been given previously. The present study uses the Pleasant Bayou Reservoir data as a base case and varies the shale formation properties to investigate their impact on brine and gas recovery. The parametric calculations, based on semi-analytic solutions and finite-difference techniques, show that for vertical shale permeabilities which are at least of the order of 10/sup -5/ md, shale recharge will constitute an important reservoir drive mechanism and will result in much larger fluid recovery than that possible in the absence of shale dewatering.

Riney, T.D.; Garg, S.K.; Wallace, R.H. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Energy Recovery By Direct Contact Gas-Liquid Heat Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy from hot gas discharge streams can be recovered by transfer directly to a coolant liquid in one of several available gas-liquid contacting devices. The design of the device is central to the theme of this paper, and experimental work has verified that the analogy between heat transfer and mass transfer can be used for design purposes. This enables the large amount of available mass transfer data for spray, packed and tray columns to be used for heat transfer calculations. Additional information is provided on flow arrangements for integrating direct contact exchangers into systems for recovering the energy transferred to the liquid.

Fair, J. R.; Bravo, J. L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Roadmap for Development of Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructructure and Analysis of Vehicular Natural Gas Consumption by Niche Sector  

SciTech Connect

Vehicular natural gas consumption is on the rise, totaling nearly 200 million GGEs in 2005, despite declines in total NGV inventory in recent years. This may be attributed to greater deployment of higher fuel use medium- and heavy-duty NGVs as compared to the low fuel use of the natural gas-powered LDVs that exited the market through attrition, many of which were bi-fuel. Natural gas station counts are down to about 1100 from their peak of about 1300. Many of the stations that closed were under-utilized or not used at all while most new stations were developed with greater attention to critical business fundamentals such as site selection, projected customer counts, peak and off-peak fueling capacity needs and total station throughput. Essentially, the nation's NGV fueling infrastructure has been--and will continue--going through a 'market correction'. While current economic fundamentals have shortened payback and improved life-cycle savings for investment in NGVs and fueling infrastructure, a combination of grants and other financial incentives will still be needed to overcome general fleet market inertia to maintain status quo. Also imperative to the market's adoption of NGVs and other alternative fueled vehicle and fueling technologies is a clear statement of long-term federal government commitment to diversifying our nation's transportation fuel use portfolio and, more specifically, the role of natural gas in that policy. Based on the current NGV market there, and the continued promulgation of clean air and transportation policies, the Western Region is--and will continue to be--the dominant region for vehicular natural gas use and growth. In other regions, especially the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic states and Texas, increased awareness and attention to air quality and energy security concerns by the public and - more important, elected officials--are spurring policies and programs that facilitate deployment of NGVs and fueling infrastructure. Because of their high per-vehicle fuel use, central fueling and sensitivity to fuel costs, fleets will continue to be the primary target for NGV deployment and station development efforts. The transit sector is projected to continue to account for the greatest vehicular natural gas use and for new volume growth. New tax incentives and improved life-cycle economics also create opportunities to deploy additional vehicles and install related vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure in the refuse, airport and short-haul sectors. Focusing on fleets generates the highest vehicular natural gas throughout but it doesn't necessarily facilitate public fueling infrastructure because, generally, fleet operators prefer not to allow public access due to liability concerns and revenue and tax administrative burdens. While there are ways to overcome this reluctance, including ''outside the fence'' retail dispensers and/or co-location of public and ''anchor'' fleet dispensing capability at a mutually convenient existing or new retail location, each has challenges that complicate an already complex business transaction. Partnering with independent retail fuel station companies, especially operators of large ''truck stops'' on the major interstates, to include natural gas at their facilities may build public fueling infrastructure and demand enough to entice the major oil companies to once again engage. Garnering national mass media coverage of success in California and Utah where vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure is more established will help pave the way for similar consumer market growth and inclusion of public accessibility at stations in other regions. There isn't one ''right'' business model for growing the nation's NGV inventory and fueling infrastructure. Different types of station development and ownership-operation strategies will continue to be warranted for different customers in different markets. Factors affecting NGV deployment and station development include: regional air quality compliance status and the state and/or local political climate regarding mandates and/or in

Stephen C. Yborra

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible multiphase mechanisms at work, namely, Darcy-type displacement until gas breakthrough, gravity drainage after breakthrough and film-drainage in gas-invaded zones throughout the duration of the process. The partially-scaled physical model was used in a series of experiments to study the effects of wettability, gas-oil miscibility, secondary versus tertiary mode gas injection, and the presence of fractures on GAGD oil recovery. In addition to yielding recoveries of up to 80% IOIP, even in the immiscible gas injection mode, the partially-scaled physical model confirmed the positive influence of fractures and oil-wet characteristics in enhancing oil recoveries over those measured in the homogeneous (unfractured) water-wet models. An interesting observation was that a single logarithmic relationship between the oil recovery and the gravity number was obeyed by the physical model, the high-pressure corefloods and the field data.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

Recovery Act: ArcelorMittal USA Blast Furnace Gas Flare Capture  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to ArcelorMittal USA, Inc. (ArcelorMittal) for a project to construct and operate a blast furnace gas recovery boiler and supporting infrastructure at ArcelorMittals Indiana Harbor Steel Mill in East Chicago, Indiana. Blast furnace gas (BFG) is a by-product of blast furnaces that is generated when iron ore is reduced with coke to create metallic iron. BFG has a very low heating value, about 1/10th the heating value of natural gas. BFG is commonly used as a boiler fuel; however, before installation of the gas recovery boiler, ArcelorMittal flared 22 percent of the blast furnace gas produced at the No. 7 Blast Furnace at Indiana Harbor. The project uses the previously flared BFG to power a new high efficiency boiler which produces 350,000 pounds of steam per hour. The steam produced is used to drive existing turbines to generate electricity and for other requirements at the facility. The goals of the project included job creation and preservation, reduced energy consumption, reduced energy costs, environmental improvement, and sustainability.

Seaman, John

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in research on methane recovery from coalbeds, eastern gas shales, western gas sands, and geopressured aquifers. In the methane from coalbeds project, data on information evaluation and management, resource and site assessment and characterization, model development, instrumentation, basic research, and production technology development are reported. In the methane from eastern gas shales project, data on resource characterization and inventory, extraction technology, and technology testing and verification are presented. In the western gas sands project, data on resource assessments, field tests and demonstrations and project management are reported. In the methane from geopressured aquifers project, data on resource assessment, supporting research, field tests and demonstrations, and technology transfer are reported.

Manilla, R.D. (ed.)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Evaluation of the Implementation of Contained Recovery of Oily Waste (CROW(TM)) Enhanced Recovery at a Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the implementation of an enhanced tar recovery remediation system at a former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) site. The project included investigations, treatability and testing, cost analysis, system design, construction, and operations.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

Table 6.8 Natural Gas Prices by Sector, 1967-2011 (Dollars per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Commercial sector, including commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 The percentage of the sector's consumption in Table ...

126

Recovery of purified helium or hydrogen from gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the removal of helium or hydrogen from gaseous mixtures also containing contaminants. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatomspheric pressure to preferentially absorb the contaminants in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed gas enriched in hydrogen or helium is withdrawn from the absorption zone as product. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in contaminants is withdrawn separately from the absorption zone. (10 claims)

Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

1974-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

A Management Tool for Analyzing CHP Natural Gas Liquids Recovery System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a management tool for analyzing combined heat and power (CHP) natural gas liquids (NGL) recovery systems. The methodology is developed around the central ideas of product recovery, possible recovery levels, and the flexibility of the process. These ideas led to the design of the CHP-NGL recovery system and the development of the equipment sizing and economic analysis methods. Requirements for sizing refrigeration units, heat exchangers, and pumps are discussed and demonstrated. From the data sheets it is possible to gather costs associated with the project and demonstrate the economic feasibility of the system. The amount of NGL recovered, heating value, payback period, cash flow, net present value of money, and the internal rate of return are calculated and demonstrated to be favorable to this project.

Olsen, C.; Kozman, T. A.; Lee, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Increase Natural Gas Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency http://en.openei.org/community/group/increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas.How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature?gas-energy-efficiency" target="_blank">read more natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat

129

Eco-Efficiency in Practice: Aligning Business and Environmental Interests in the Upstream Oil and Gas Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1991, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) introduced Eco- Efficiency as a management strategy to link financial and environmental performance to create more value with less ecological impact. Based on this strategy, CETAC-WEST (Canadian Environmental Technology Advancement Corporation - West), in mid-2000, introduced a practical approach to eco-efficiency to Western Canada's upstream oil and gas sector. The CETAC-WEST Eco-Efficiency Program, focused primarily on sour gas processing facilities, has developed methods and programs to identify opportunities for energy conservation and GHG reductions. The program outlined in this paper consists of four interrelated phases that are used to identify and track efficiency opportunities as well as promote the use of energy efficient methodologies and technologies. If, as program results suggest, 15% to 20% of the gas that is now consumed at by plant operations can be saved through efficiencies, it would save $500 to $700 million worth of gas for sale on the market. Although this small Pilot Program in the gas processing sector has surfaced major opportunities, there are significantly greater opportunities in other sectors with high GHG emissions intensity, such as sweet gas processing, conventional oil, heavy oil and oil sands. Capturing these opportunities will require a carefully considered strategy. This strategy should include, in addition to commitments for expanding the scope of the current Program, sustained leadership by industry champions and by governments - all aimed at changing the operating mode and improving the culture in the oil and gas industry.

Lukacs, J.; Munroe, V.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

131

Carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery: Identifying candidate sites for pilot study  

SciTech Connect

Depleted natural gas reservoirs are promising targets for carbon dioxide sequestration. Although depleted, these reservoirs are not devoid of methane, and carbon dioxide injection may allow enhanced production of methane by reservoir repressurization or pressure maintenance. Based on the favorable results of numerous simulation studies, we propose a field test of the Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR) process. The objective of the field test is to evaluate the feasibility of CSEGR in terms of reservoir processes such as injectivity, repressurization, flow and transport of carbon dioxide, and enhanced production of methane. The main criteria for the field site include small reservoir volume and high permeability so that increases in pressure and enhanced recovery will occur over a reasonably short time period. The Rio Vista Gas Field in the delta of California's Central Valley offers potential as a test site, although we are currently looking broadly for other potential sites of opportunity.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Benson, S.M.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Compression stripping of flue gas with energy recovery  

SciTech Connect

A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SO.sub.X and NO.sub.X and CO.sub.2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O' Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Compression Stripping of Flue Gas with Energy Recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SOX and NOX and CO2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO2, SO2, and H2O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

Ochs, Thomas L.; O' Connor, William K.

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Gas injection techniques for condensate recovery and remediation of liquid banking in gas-condensate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In gas-condensate reservoirs, gas productivity declines due to the increasing accumulation of liquids in the near wellbore region as the bottom-hole pressure declines below the (more)

Hwang, Jongsoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Procurement Specification for Horizontal Gas Path Heat Recovery Steam Generator: Avoiding Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), particularly those equipped with F-class gas turbines that are also subjected to periods of frequent cyclic operation, have experienced premature pressure part failures because of excessive thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) damage. The very competitive power generation marketplace has resulted in lowest installed cost often taking precedence over medium- and long-term durability and operating costs.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

136

Rotating diffuser for pressure recovery in a steam cooling circuit of a gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

The buckets of a gas turbine are steam-cooled via a bore tube assembly having concentric supply and spent cooling steam return passages rotating with the rotor. A diffuser is provided in the return passage to reduce the pressure drop. In a combined cycle system, the spent return cooling steam with reduced pressure drop is combined with reheat steam from a heat recovery steam generator for flow to the intermediate pressure turbine. The exhaust steam from the high pressure turbine of the combined cycle unit supplies cooling steam to the supply conduit of the gas turbine.

Eldrid, Sacheverel Q. (Saratoga Springs, NY); Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); DeStefano, Thomas Daniel (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Tight Western Sands  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study to identify and evaluate potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Tight Western Sands are reported. A brief discussion of economic and technical constraints to development of this resource is also presented to place the environmental and safety issues in perspective. A description of the resource base, recovery techniques, and possible environmental effects associated with tight gas sands is presented.

Riedel, E.F.; Cowan, C.E.; McLaughlin, T.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs by displacing oil downwards within the oil reservoir and into an oil recovery apparatus is disclosed. The process is referred to as "gas-assisted gravity drainage" and comprises the steps of placing one or more horizontal producer wells near the bottom of a payzone (i.e., rock in which oil and gas are found in exploitable quantities) of a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir and injecting a fluid displacer (e.g., CO.sub.2) through one or more vertical wells or horizontal wells. Pre-existing vertical wells may be used to inject the fluid displacer into the reservoir. As the fluid displacer is injected into the top portion of the reservoir, it forms a gas zone, which displaces oil and water downward towards the horizontal producer well(s).

Rao, Dandina N. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Table 6.5 Natural Gas Consumption by Sector, 1949-2011 (Billion ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data for compressed natural gas and liquefied natural gas in gasoline-equivalent gallons were converted to cubic feet by multiplying by the motor gasoline conversion

140
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141
142

Repowering reheat units with gas turbines: Final report. [Adding gas turbines and heat recovery to present units  

SciTech Connect

Although conventional repowering on nonreheat units replaces existing boilers with gas turbines and heat recovery steam generators, options investigated by Virginia Power use gas turbine waste heat to supplement, rather than replace, the output of existing steam generators. Virginia Power's experience in considering feedwater heater repowering (FHR) and hot windbox repowering (HWR) as repowering options is described here. Studying five plants identified as potential repowering candidates, investigators first evaluated FHR, which uses a gas turbine generator set equipped with an economizer to heat boiler feedwater. This reduces the steam turbine extraction flow and increases the steam turbine capacity. HWR, the second method investigated, routes the hot, relatively oxygen-rich exhaust flow from a gas turbine into the boiler windbox, eliminating the need for an air preheater. A boiler stack gas cooler then heats feedwater, again increasing turbine capacity by reducing extraction steam flow requirements for feedwater heating. FHR provided the lowest installed cost, especially at Mount Storm unit 3, a coal-fired minemouth plant. Use of a gas turbine to heat feedwater at this plant resulted in a $523/kW (1985) installed cost and 124-MWe unit capacity increase at a design incremental heat rate of 8600 Btu/kWh. FHR at Mount Storm units 1, 2, and 3 cost less overall than installation and operation of a new combined cycle. Although the findings and conclusions in this series of repowering reports are largely unique to the individual plants, units, and applications studied, other utilities performing repowering studies can draw on the types of consideration entertained, alternatives examined, and factors and rationale leading to rejection or acceptance of a given repowering approach. 12 figs., 12 tabs.

Rives, J.D.; Catina, J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

Feasibility study of landfill gas recovery at seven landfill sites, Adams County/Commerce City, Colorado. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of a major landfill gas recovery study conducted in Adams County, Colorado. The study was performed during the period from August 1979 through September 1980. The study was broad in scope, involving a technical, economic, and institutional feasibility analysis of recovering landfill-generated methane gas from seven sanitary landfills in southwestern Adams County. The study included: field extraction testing at the seven sistes; detailed legislative research and activity; a market survey, including preliminary negotiations; and preliminary design and cost estimates for gas recovery systems at all seven sites.

Not Available

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Advancing strategic environmental assessment in the offshore oil and gas sector: Lessons from Norway, Canada, and the United Kingdom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) for offshore oil and gas planning and development is utilized in select international jurisdictions, but the sector has received limited attention in the SEA literature. While the potential benefits of and rationale for SEA are well argued, there have been few empirical studies of SEA processes for the offshore sector. Hence, little is known about the efficacy of SEA offshore, in particular its influence on planning and development decisions. This paper examines SEA practice and influence in three international offshore systems: Norway, Atlantic Canada and the United Kingdom, with the intent to identify the challenges, lessons and opportunities for advancing SEA in offshore planning and impact assessment. Results demonstrate that SEA can help inform and improve the efficacy and efficiency of project-based assessment in the offshore sector, however weak coordination between higher and lower tiers limit SEA's ability to influence planning and development decisions in a broad regional environmental and socioeconomic context. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA can inform and improve the efficacy and efficiency of project EA offshore Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scope and deliverables of SEA offshore often differ from stakeholder expectations Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerable variability in influence of SEA output beyond licensing decisions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sector-based SEA offshore is often too restrictive to generate expected benefits.

Fidler, Courtney, E-mail: crfidler@gmail.com [Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A5 (Canada); Noble, Bram, E-mail: b.noble@usask.ca [Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A5 (Canada)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Natural gas use in the electric power sector is growing - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, ... the Nation's fleet of natural gas combined-cycle power plants is contributing significantly more to baseload electricity needs.

148

Industry sector analysis - oil, gas, transmission profile (Romania) 1994. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is derived from a telegraphic report dated 25 March 1994, prepared at the American Embassy - Bucharest. It discusses oil and gas transmission facilities in Romania.

Not Available

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

149

Membrane technologies for hydrogen and carbon monoxide recovery from residual gas streams. Tecnologas de membranas para la recuperacin de hidrgeno y monxido de carbono de gases residuales.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This PhD thesis work is aimed to the separation and recovery of valuable gases from industrial residual gas streams by means of membrane technology. In (more)

David, Oana Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Effects of Macroscopic Heterogeneities of Pore Structure and Wettability on Residual Oil Recovery Using the Gravity-Assisted Inert Gas Injection (GAIGI) Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To recover oil remaining in petroleum reservoirs after waterflooding, the gravitationally stable mode of gas injection is recognized as a promising tertiary oil recovery process. (more)

Parsaei, Rafat

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Development of the utilization of combustible gas produced in existing sanitary landfills: effects of corrosion at the Mountain View, CA Landfill Gas-Recovery Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of equipment has occurred at the Mountain View, California Landfill Gas Recovery Plant. Corrosion is most severe on compressor valve seats and cages, tubes in the first and second stages of the interstage gas cooler, and first and second stage piping and liquid separators. Corrosion occurs because the raw landfill gas contains water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. Some corrosion may also result from trace concentrations of organic acids present in the landfill gas. Corrosion of the third stage compressor, cooler, and piping does not occur because the gas is dehydrated immediately prior to the third stage. Controlling corrosion is necessary to maintain the mechanical integrity of the plant and to keep the cost of the gas competitive with natural gas. Attempts to reduce corrosion rates by injecting a chemical inhibitor have proved only partially successful. Recommendations for dealing with corrosion include earlier dehydration of the gas, selection of special alloys in critical locations, chemical inhibition, and regular plant inspections.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Understanding Sectoral Labor Market Dynamics: An Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examines the response of employment and wages in the US oil and gas ...eld services industry to changes the dynamic response of wages and employment in the U.S. Oil and Gas Field Services (OGFS) industry to changes in the price of crude petroleum using quarterly data from 1972 to 2002. The oil industry provides an important

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

155

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases. IFT measurements were carried out in a standard ternary liquid system of benzene, ethanol and water using drop shape analysis and capillary rise techniques. The experimental results indicate strong correlation among the three thermodynamic properties solubility, miscibility and IFT. The miscibility determined from IFT measurements for this ternary liquid system is in good agreement with phase diagram and solubility data, which clearly indicates the sound conceptual basis of VIT technique to determine fluid-fluid miscibility. Model fluid systems have been identified for VIT experimentation at elevated pressures and temperatures. Section III comprises of the experimental study aimed at evaluating the multiphase displacement characteristics of the various gas injection EOR process performances using Berea sandstone cores. During this reporting period, extensive literature review was completed to: (1) study the gravity drainage concepts, (2) identify the various factors influencing gravity stable gas injection processes, (3) identify various multiphase mechanisms and fluid dynamics operative during the GAGD process, and (4) identify important dimensionless groups governing the GAGD process performance. Furthermore, the dimensional analysis of the GAGD process, using Buckingham-Pi theorem to isolate the various dimensionless groups, as well as experimental design based on these dimensionless quantities have been completed in this reporting period. On the experimental front, recommendations from previous WAG and CGI have been used to modify the experimental protocol. This report also includes results from scaled preliminary GAGD displacements as well as the details of the planned GAGD corefloods for the next quarter. The technology transfer activities have mainly consisted of preparing technical papers, progress reports and discussions with industry personnel for possible GAGD field tests.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

158

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed mechanistic Parachor models. In the decane-CO{sub 2} binary system, Parachor model was found to be sufficient for interfacial tension calculations. The predicted miscibility from the Parachor model deviated only by about 2.5% from the measured VIT miscibility. However, in multicomponent live decane-CO{sub 2} system, the performance of the Parachor model was poor, while good match of interfacial tension predictions has been obtained experimentally using the proposed mechanistic Parachor model. The predicted miscibility from the mechanistic Parachor model accurately matched with the measured VIT miscibility in live decane-CO2 system, which indicates the suitability of this model to predict miscibility in complex multicomponent hydrocarbon systems. In the previous reports to the DOE (15323R07, Oct 2004; 15323R08, Jan 2005; 15323R09, Apr 2005; 15323R10, July 2005 and 154323, Oct 2005), the 1-D experimental results from dimensionally scaled GAGD and WAG corefloods were reported for Section III. Additionally, since Section I reports the experimental results from 2-D physical model experiments; this section attempts to extend this 2-D GAGD study to 3-D (4-phase) flow through porous media and evaluate the performance of these processes using reservoir simulation. Section IV includes the technology transfer efforts undertaken during the quarter. This research work resulted in one international paper presentation in Tulsa, OK; one journal publication; three pending abstracts for SCA 2006 Annual Conference and an invitation to present at the Independents Day session at the IOR Symposium 2006.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

This is the first Annual Technical Progress Report being submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy on the work performed under the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15323. This report follows two other progress reports submitted to U.S. DOE during the first year of the project: The first in April 2003 for the project period from October 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003, and the second in July 2003 for the period April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. Although the present Annual Report covers the first year of the project from October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003, its contents reflect mainly the work performed in the last quarter (July-September, 2003) since the work performed during the first three quarters has been reported in detail in the two earlier reports. The main objective of the project is to develop a new gas-injection enhanced oil recovery process to recover the oil trapped in reservoirs subsequent to primary and/or secondary recovery operations. The project is divided into three main tasks. Task 1 involves the design and development of a scaled physical model. Task 2 consists of further development of the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 involves the determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Each technical progress report, including this one, reports on the progress made in each of these tasks during the reporting period. Section I covers the scaled physical model study. A survey of literature in related areas has been conducted. Test apparatus has been under construction throughout the reporting period. A bead-pack visual model, liquid injection system, and an image analysis system have been completed and used for preliminary experiments. Experimental runs with decane and paraffin oil have been conducted in the bead pack model. The results indicate the need for modifications in the apparatus, which are currently underway. A bundle of capillary tube model has been considered and formulated aiming to reveal the interplay of the viscous, interfacial and gravity forces and to predict the gravity drainage performance. Scaling criteria for the scaled physical model design have been proposed based on an inspectional analysis. In Section II, equation of state (EOS) calculations were extended to study the effect of different tuning parameters on MMP for two reservoir crude oils of Rainbow Keg River and Terra Nova. This study indicates that tuning of EOS may not always be advisable for miscibility determination. Comparison of IFT measurements for benzene in water, ethanol mixtures with the solubility data from the literature showed that a strong mutual relationship between these two thermodynamic properties exists. These preliminary experiments indicate applicability of the new vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique to determine miscibility of ternary liquid systems. The VIT experimental apparatus is under construction with considerations of expanded capacity of using equilibrated fluids and a new provision for low IFT measurement in gas-oil systems. In Section III, recommendations in the previous progress reports have been investigated in this reporting period. WAG coreflood experiments suggest the use of ''Hybrid''-WAG type floods for improved CO{sub 2} utilization factors and recoveries. The effect of saturating the injection water with CO{sub 2} for core-floods has been investigated further in this quarter. Miscible WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine showed higher recoveries (89.2% ROIP) compared to miscible WAG floods using normal brine (72.5%). Higher tertiary recovery factors (TRF) were also observed for WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine due to improved mobility ratio and availability of CO{sub 2}. Continued experimentation for evaluation of both, ''Hybrid''-WAG and gravity stable type displacements, in Berea sandstone cores using synthetic as well as real reservoir fluids are planned for the next quarter.

Dandina N. Rao

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

This is the first Annual Technical Progress Report being submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy on the work performed under the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15323. This report follows two other progress reports submitted to U.S. DOE during the first year of the project: The first in April 2003 for the project period from October 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003, and the second in July 2003 for the period April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. Although the present Annual Report covers the first year of the project from October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003, its contents reflect mainly the work performed in the last quarter (July-September, 2003) since the work performed during the first three quarters has been reported in detail in the two earlier reports. The main objective of the project is to develop a new gas-injection enhanced oil recovery process to recover the oil trapped in reservoirs subsequent to primary and/or secondary recovery operations. The project is divided into three main tasks. Task 1 involves the design and development of a scaled physical model. Task 2 consists of further development of the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 involves the determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Each technical progress report, including this one, reports on the progress made in each of these tasks during the reporting period. Section I covers the scaled physical model study. A survey of literature in related areas has been conducted. Test apparatus has been under construction throughout the reporting period. A bead-pack visual model, liquid injection system, and an image analysis system have been completed and used for preliminary experiments. Experimental runs with decane and paraffin oil have been conducted in the bead pack model. The results indicate the need for modifications in the apparatus, which are currently underway. A bundle of capillary tube model has been considered and formulated aiming to reveal the interplay of the viscous, interfacial and gravity forces and to predict the gravity drainage performance. Scaling criteria for the scaled physical model design have been proposed based on an inspectional analysis. In Section II, equation of state (EOS) calculations were extended to study the effect of different tuning parameters on MMP for two reservoir crude oils of Rainbow Keg River and Terra Nova. This study indicates that tuning of EOS may not always be advisable for miscibility determination. Comparison of IFT measurements for benzene in water, ethanol mixtures with the solubility data from the literature showed that a strong mutual relationship between these two thermodynamic properties exists. These preliminary experiments indicate applicability of the new vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique to determine miscibility of ternary liquid systems. The VIT experimental apparatus is under construction with considerations of expanded capacity of using equilibrated fluids and a new provision for low IFT measurement in gas-oil systems. In Section III, recommendations in the previous progress reports have been investigated in this reporting period. WAG coreflood experiments suggest the use of ''Hybrid''-WAG type floods for improved CO{sub 2} utilization factors and recoveries. The effect of saturating the injection water with CO{sub 2} for core-floods has been investigated further in this quarter. Miscible WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine showed higher recoveries (89.2% ROIP) compared to miscible WAG floods using normal brine (72.5%). Higher tertiary recovery factors (TRF) were also observed for WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine due to improved mobility ratio and availability of CO{sub 2}. Continued experimentation for evaluation of both, ''Hybrid''-WAG and gravity stable type displacements, in Berea sandstone cores using synthetic as well as real reservoir fluids are planned for the next quarter.

Dandina N. Rao

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide with Enhanced Gas Recovery-Case Study Altmark, North German Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1987 Ribbeck, H. , Natural Gas Storage Project at Peckensen,besides underground natural gas storage [Sedlacek, 2002],natural gas reservoirs are an obvious target for CO 2 storage

Rebscher, Dorothee; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide with Enhanced Gas Recovery-Case Study Altmark, North German Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production history of the natural gas ?elds in the3: The production history of the natural gas ?elds of the

Rebscher, Dorothee; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide with Enhanced Gas Recovery-Case Study Altmark, North German Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1987 Ribbeck, H. , Natural Gas Storage Project at Peckensen,besides underground natural gas storage [Sedlacek, 2002],

Rebscher, Dorothee; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources & Links  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Federal/State Programs Federal/State Programs DOE/Office of Fossil Energy Programs As America's need for energy grows, DOE is meeting the challenge by developing clean fuel initiatives to make the most of traditional fossil fuels and investing in cutting edge research to identify new energy sources like hydrogen fuels and fusion technologies. Fossil fuels - coal, oil, and natural gas - currently provide more than 85% of all the energy consumed in the United States, nearly two-thirds of our electricity, and virtually all of our transportation fuels. Moreover, it is likely that the Nation's reliance on fossil fuels to power an expanding economy will actually increase over at least the next two decades even with aggressive development and deployment of new renewable and nuclear

165

Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery: Task 2. Topical report, September 30, 1992--August 29, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to present conceptual designs developed to treat a large portion of proven domestic natural gas reserves which are low quality. The conceptual designs separate hydrogen sulfide and large amounts of carbon dioxide (>20%) from methane, convert hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur, produce a substantial portion of the carbon dioxide as EOR or food grade CO{sub 2}, and vent residual CO{sub 2} virtually free of contaminating sulfur containing compounds. A secondary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to review existing gas treatment technology and identify existing commercial technologies currently used to treat large volumes of low quality natural gas with high acid content. Section II of this report defines low quality gas and describes the motivation for seeking technology to develop low quality gas reserves. The target low quality gas to be treated with the proposed technology is identified, and barriers to the production of this gas are reviewed. Section III provides a description of the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFG)-CNG technologies, their features, and perceived advantages. The three conceptual process designs prepared under Task 2 are presented in Section IV along with the design basis and process economics. Section V presents an overview of existing gas treatment technologies, organized into acid gas removal technology and sulfur recovery technology.

Cook, W.J.; Neyman, M.; Brown, W. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Klint, B.W.; Kuehn, L.; O`Connell, J.; Paskall, H.; Dale, P. [Bovar, Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A coupled flow and geomechanics model for enhanced oil and gas recovery in shale formations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Economic production from shale formations has been achieved because of advances in horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Nonetheless, hydrocarbon recovery from these reservoirs is (more)

Fakcharoenphol, Perapon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Repowering Fossil Steam Plants with Gas Turbines and Heat Recovery Steam Generators: Design Considerations, Economics, and Lessons L earned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes repowering fossil steam plants using gas turbines (GTs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) in combined-cycle mode. Design considerations and guidance, comparative economics, and lessons learned in the development of such projects are included. Various other methods of fossil plant repowering with GTs are also briefly discussed. The detailed results and comparisons that are provided relate specifically to a generic GT/HRSG repowering. Design parameters, limitations, schedulin...

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

168

Improved Recovery from Gulf of Mexico Reservoirs, Volume 4, Comparison of Methane, Nitrogen and Flue Gas for Attic Oil. February 14, 1995 - October 13, 1996. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas injection for attic oil recovery was modeled in vertical sandpacks to compare the process performance characteristics of three gases, namely methane, nitrogen and flue gas. All of the gases tested recovered the same amount of oil over two cycles of gas injection. Nitrogen and flue gas recovered oil more rapidly than methane because a large portion of the methane slug dissolved in the oil phase and less free gas was available for oil displacement. The total gas utilization for two cycles of gas injection was somewhat better for nitrogen as compared to methane and flue gas. The lower nitrogen utilization was ascribed to the lower compressibility of nitrogen.

Wolcott, Joanne; Shayegi, Sara

1997-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

169

Simulation of fracture fluid cleanup and its effect on long-term recovery in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the coming decades, the world will require additional supplies of natural gas to meet the demand for energy. Tight gas reservoirs can be defined as reservoirs where the formation permeability is so low (flowback procedures, production strategy, and reservoir conditions. Residual polymer in the fracture can reduce the effective fracture permeability and porosity, reduce the effective fracture half-length, and limit the well productivity. Our ability to mathematically model the fundamental physical processes governing fluid recovery in hydraulic fractures in the past has been limited. In this research, fracture fluid damage mechanisms have been investigated, and mathematical models and computer codes have been developed to better characterize the cleanup process. The codes have been linked to a 3D, 3-phase simulator to model and quantify the fracture fluid cleanup process and its effect on long-term gas production performances. Then, a comprehensive systematic simulation study has been carried out by varying formation permeability, reservoir pressure, fracture length, fracture conductivity, yield stress, and pressure drawdown. On the basis of simulation results and analyses, new ways to improve fracture fluid cleanup have been provided. This new progress help engineers better understand fracture fluid cleanup, improve fracture treatment design, and increase gas recovery from tight sand reservoirs, which can be extremely important as more tight gas reservoirs are developed around the world.

Wang, Yilin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce energy use. Natural Gas Supply System: Two majorenergy used by the natural gas supply system. These include

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Workforce Training for the Electric Power Sector: Awards | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Workforce Training for the Electric Power Sector: Awards List of Workforce Training Awards for the Electric Power Sector under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act...

173

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial sectors (Vermeeren, 2008). Steel industry ? TheDutch steel industry implemented 82 energy-saving projectsfoodstuffs, steel, and mining industries are the most

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Multiphase Mechanisms and Fluid Dynamics in Gas Injection Enhanced Oil Recovery Processes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Currently, the Water-Alternating-Gas (WAG) process is the most widely practiced horizontal mode gas injection process in the industry. Although this process is conceptually sound, it (more)

Kulkarni, Madhav M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

X-ray analysis can improve recovery of oil and natural gas |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and gas industries are undergoing a revolution that has opened up previously inaccessible resources trapped in shale and tight play formations. Oil and GasFact SheetJanuary 2013...

176

Novel selective surface flow (SSF{sup TM}) membranes for the recovery of hydrogren from waste gas streams. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The waste streams are off-gas streams from various chemical/refinery operations. In Phase I, the architecture of the membrane and the separation device were defined and demonstrated. The system consists of a shell-and-tube separator in which the gas to be separated is fed to the tube side, the product is collected as high pressure effluent and the permeate constitutes the waste/fuel stream. Each tube, which has the membrane coated on the interior, does the separation. A multi- tube separator device containing 1 ft{sup 2} membrane area was built and tested. The engineering data were used for designing a process for hydrogen recovery from a fluid catalytic cracker off-gas stream. First-pass economics showed that overall cost for hydrogen production is reduced by 35% vs on-purpose production of hydrogen by steam- methane reforming. The hydrogen recovery process using the SSF membrane results in at least 15% energy reduction and significant decrease in CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions.

Anand, M. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Energy recovery during expansion of compressed gas using power plant low-quality heat sources  

SciTech Connect

A method of recovering energy from a cool compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid is disclosed which includes incrementally expanding the compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid through a plurality of expansion engines and heating the gas, vapor, compressed liquid, or supercritical fluid entering at least one of the expansion engines with a low quality heat source. Expansion engines such as turbines and multiple expansions with heating are disclosed.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O' Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: A Program Studying Multi-sector Opportunities and Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recognition of the major transitions occurring within the U.S. energy economy, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) and Stanford University's Precourt Institute for Energy (PIE) engaged energy system stakeholders from government, industry, academia, and the environmental community in a discussion about the priority issues for a program of rigorous research relating to natural gas. Held December 10-11, 2012 on the Golden, CO campus of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the workshop provided invited experts opportunity to describe the state of current knowledge in defined topic areas, and to suggest analytic priorities for that topic area. Following discussion, all stakeholders then contributed potential research questions for each topic, and then determined priorities through an interactive voting process. This record of proceedings focuses on the outcomes of the discussion.

Gossett, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide with Enhanced Gas Recovery-Case Study Altmark, North German Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Reservoirs for Carbon Sequestration and Enhanced Gasand S. T. Kandji, Review Carbon sequestration in tropicalfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone

Rebscher, Dorothee; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Deep Sea Hybrid Power Systems for Deep Sea Oil & Gas Recovery ...  

... thereby eliminating the need for pipeline construction and transport altogether. Such tankers could rely on natural-gas powered fuel cells, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Devonian shale  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to identify and examine potential public health and safety issues and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Devonian age shale. This document will serve as background data and information for planners within the government to assist in development of our new energy technologies in a timely and environmentally sound manner. This report describes the resource and the DOE eastern gas shales project in Section 2. Section 3 describes the new and developing recovery technologies associated with Devonian shale. An assessment of the environment, health and safety impacts associated with a typical fields is presented in Section 4. The typical field for this assessment occupies ten square miles and is developed on a 40-acre spacing (that is, there is a well in each 40-acre grid). This field thus has a total of 160 wells. Finally, Section 5 presents the conclusions and recommendations. A reference list is provided to give a greater plant. Based on the estimated plant cost and the various cases of operating income, an economic analysis was performed employing a profitability index criterion of discounted cash flow to determine an interest rate of return on the plant investment.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Landfill methane recovery. Part II: gas characterization. Final report, December 1981-December 1982  

SciTech Connect

This study addresses field sampling, analytical testing, and data generation for the characterization of both raw and processed landfill gas. Standardized protocols were developed for the sampling and analysis of the landfill gas for trace constituents and are presented as Appendices A-C. A nationwide survey was conducted in which gas samples were collected at nine landfill sites and tested for trace volatile organic compounds (VOC), trace volatile mercury, and human pathogenic viruses and bacteria. Surface-gas flux measurements at the landfill surface were also made. Repetitive sampling and analysis for each of the nice sites porvided the opportunity to evaluate agreement (or variations) within a laboratory and between two analytical laboratories. Sampling and analytical protocols used by both laboratories were identical, however, the analytical hardware and interpretive computer hardware and software were different.

Lytwynyshyn, G.R.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Flynn, N.W.; Wingender, R.; Olivieri, V.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Expro Engineering Sponsorship Programme Expro International Group is an upstream oil and gas sector service company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and process flow from high-value oil and gas wells, from exploration and appraisal through to mature fieldThe Expro Engineering Sponsorship Programme Expro International Group is an upstream oil and gas for the development and delivery of innovative technologies to meet the needs of the oil and gas industry globally

Painter, Kevin

185

Evaluation of fracture treatment type on the recovery of gas from the cotton valley formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every tight gas well needs to be stimulated with a hydraulic fracture treatment to produce natural gas at economic flow rates and recover a volume of gas that provides an acceptable return on investment. Over the past few decades, many different types of fracture fluids, propping agents and treatment sizes have been tried in the Cotton Valley formation. The treatment design engineer has to choose the optimum fluid, optimum proppant, optimum treatment size and make sure the optimum treatment is mixed and pumped in the field. These optimum values also depend on drilling costs, fracturing costs and other economic parameters; such as gas prices, operating costs and taxes. Using information from the petroleum literature, numerical and analytical simulators, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides a detailed economic evaluation of the Cotton Valley wells drilled in the Elm Grove field operated by Matador Resources to determine not only the optimum treatment type, but also the optimum treatment volume as a function of drilling costs, completion costs, operating costs and gas prices. This work also provides an evaluation of well performance as a function of the fracture treatment type by reviewing production data from the Carthage and Oak Hill Cotton Valley fields in Texas and the Elm Grove field in Louisiana.

Yalavarthi, Ramakrishna

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

El-Fadel, Mutasem, E-mail: mfadel@aub.edu.lb [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Environmental assessment of the use of radionuclides as tracers in the enhanced recovery of oil and gas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of the use of radioisotopes as interwell tracers in field flooding for the enhanced recovery of oil and natural gas was performed. A typical operation using radioisotopes for interwell tracing was analyzed from the standpoint of three stages of operation: aboveground, subsurface, and recovery and disposal. Doses to workers who handle radioactive tracers and to members of the public were estimated for normal and accidental exposure scenarios. On the basis of estimates of the total quantity of tracer radionuclides injected in a year, the annual number of projects, the average number of injections per project, and assumed values of accident frequency, the collective dose equivalent is estimated to be 1.1 man-rem/y to workers and 15 man-rem/y to members of the public. The national radiological impact of the use of radioisotopes as interwell tracers in EOR projects is estimated to be a total collective dose equivalent of <16 man-rem/y. Accidential exposures are estimated to contribute relatively little to the total. 47 references, 8 figures, 43 tables.

Ng, Y.C.; Cederwall, R.T.; Anspaugh, L.R.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005648  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edward Levy Edward Levy Principal Investigator Director, Lehigh University Energy Research Center RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas usinG condensinG Heat excHanGeRs PRomis/PRoject no.: de-nt0005648 Background As the United States' population grows and demand for electricity and water increases, power plants located in some parts of the country will find it increasingly difficult to obtain the large quantities of water needed to maintain operations. Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. Many coal-fired power plants operate with stack temperatures in the 300 °F range to minimize fouling and corrosion problems due to sulfuric acid condensation and to

189

Fouling reduction characteristics of a no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger for flue gas heat recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional flue gas heat recovery systems, the fouling by fly ashes and the related problems such as corrosion and cleaning are known to be major drawbacks. To overcome these problems, a single-riser no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger is devised and studied. Fouling and cleaning tests are performed for a uniquely designed fluidized bed-type heat exchanger to demonstrate the effect of particles on the fouling reduction and heat transfer enhancement. The tested heat exchanger model (1 m high and 54 mm internal diameter) is a gas-to-water type and composed of a main vertical tube and four auxiliary tubes through which particles circulate and transfer heat. Through the present study, the fouling on the heat transfer surface could successfully be simulated by controlling air-to-fuel ratios rather than introducing particles through an external feeder, which produced soft deposit layers with 1 to 1.5 mm thickness on the inside pipe wall. Flue gas temperature at the inlet of heat exchanger was maintained at 450{sup o}C at the gas volume rate of 0.738 to 0.768 CMM (0.0123 to 0.0128 m{sup 3}/sec). From the analyses of the measured data, heat transfer performances of the heat exchanger before and after fouling and with and without particles were evaluated. Results showed that soft deposits were easily removed by introducing glass bead particles, and also heat transfer performance increased two times by the particle circulation. In addition, it was found that this type of heat exchanger had high potential to recover heat of waste gases from furnaces, boilers, and incinerators effectively and to reduce fouling related problems.

Jun, Y.D.; Lee, K.B.; Islam, S.Z.; Ko, S.B. [Kongju National University, Kong Ju (Republic of Korea). Dept. for Mechanical Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

191

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications A Reminder for Sector 7 PIs and Users: Please report your new publications to the Sector Manager and the CAT Director. The APS requires PIs to submit new publications to its Publication Database, a link which can be found on the Publication section of the APS web site. Publication information for work done at 7ID Proper acknowledgement sentences to include in papers. Sector 7 Call for APS User Activity Reports. APS User Activity Reports by MHATT-CATers. Recent articles Recent theses Sector 7 Reports Sector 7 Recent research highlights (New) Design documents in ICMS on Sector 7 construction and operation Sector 7 related ICMS documents Library Resources available on the WWW The ANL Library system ANL electronic journal list AIM Find it! Citation Ranking by ISI (see Journal citation report)

192

Natural Gas Politics in the Southern Cone : A comparative study of goal attainment in the gas sector in Argentina, Bolivia and Brazil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Southern Cone region consists of the six southernmost countries in South America. Three of these countries, Argentina, Bolivia and Brazil have great natural gas (more)

Aamodt, Solveig

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect

This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of produced water per year. Internationally, three barrels of water are produced for each barrel of oil. Production in the United States is more mature; the US average is about 7 barrels of water per barrel of oil. Closer to home, in Texas the Permian Basin produces more than 9 barrels of water per barrel of oil and represents more than 400 million gallons of water per day processed and re-injected.

David B. Burnett

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

194

A. G. A. six-month gas demand forecast July-December, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of the total gas demand for 1984 (including pipeline fuel) range from 18,226 to 19,557 trillion (TBtu). The second half of the year shows a slower recovery rate as economic recovery moderates. The forecast show both actual and projected demand by month, and compares it with 1983 demand and by market sector. 6 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

196

A $70/tCO2 greenhouse gas mitigation backstop for Chinas industrial and electric power sectors: insights from a comprehensive CCS cost curve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As one of the world's fastest growing economies with abundant coal reserves, China's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have doubled in the last decade and are expected to continue growing for the foreseeable future. While the Central Government has been promoting development and growth of cleaner and more efficient energy systems, efforts to reduce carbon emissions from the heavily coal-based economy may require continued and increased development and deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies. This paper presents the first detailed, national-scale assessment of CCS potential across the diverse geographic, geologic, and industrial landscape of China, through the lens of an integrated CCS cost curve. It summarizes the development of a cost curve representing the full chain of components necessary for the capture and geologic storage of CO2 from China's power generation and industrial sectors. Individual component cost estimates are described, along with the optimized source-sink matching of over 1,600 large stationary CO2 sources and 2300 gigatons of CO2 storage capacity within 90 major deep geologic onshore sedimentary sub-basins, to develop a cost curve incorporating CO2 capture, compression, transport, and storage. Results suggest that CCS can provide an important greenhouse gas mitigation option for most regions and industrial sectors in China, able to store more than 80% of emissions from these large CO2 sources (2900 million tons of CO2 annually) at costs less than $70/tCO2 for perhaps a century or more.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Li, Xiaochun; Wei, Ning

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

197

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sector 7 : Time Resolved Research Group Sector 7 is operated by the Time Resolved Research Group, which is part of the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. Our research focus is the study of Ultrafast fs-laser excitation of matter, using x-ray scattering and spectroscopy techniques. The sector developped two hard x-ray beamlines (7ID and 7BM) focused on time-resolved science. The 7BM beamline has been dedicated for time-resolved radiography of fuel sprays. Sector 7 Links: What's New Beamlines Overview User information: Getting Beamtime Current Research Programs Links to our partners, and collaborators (New) Publications Contact information Operational data (w/ current 7ID schedule) ES&H information (ESAF, EOR, TMS training, User Training)

198

Metro Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Facility Metro Methane Recovery Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Polk County, Iowa Coordinates 41.6278423°, -93.5003454° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6278423,"lon":-93.5003454,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

199

Puente Hills Energy Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Puente Hills Energy Recovery Biomass Facility Puente Hills Energy Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Puente Hills Energy Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Puente Hills Energy Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

200

Riveside Resource Recovery LLC Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Riveside Resource Recovery LLC Biomass Facility Riveside Resource Recovery LLC Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Riveside Resource Recovery LLC Biomass Facility Facility Riveside Resource Recovery LLC Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Will County, Illinois Coordinates 41.5054724°, -88.0900762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5054724,"lon":-88.0900762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sector X  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X X If there is an emergency at ETTP requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at: Oak Ridge High School 127 Providence Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Take most direct route to northbound Bethel Valley Road toward Oak Ridge. Turn left onto Illinois Avenue (Highway 62). Turn right onto Oak Ridge Turnpike and turn left to Oak Ridge High School. If there is an emergency at ORNL requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at: Karns High School 2710 Byington Solway Road Knoxville, TN 37931 Take most direct route to northbound Bethel Valley Road toward Knoxville. Then take a left at Highway 62 (Oak Ridge Highway) eastbound to Knoxville. Take a right onto State Route 131 (Byington Beaver Ridge) to Karns High School. If there is an emergency at Y-12 requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at:

202

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Link to Sector 7 Users and Collaborators Link to Sector 7 Users and Collaborators This is an incomplete list of Partners from Universities and National Labs who use the facilities at Sector 7. If you wish to add a link to your institutional page, do no hesitate to contact Eric Dufresne at the APS. The APS XSD Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics group Center for Molecular Movies at Copenhagen University Roy Clarke Group at the University of Michigan Rob Crowell Group at BNL Chris Elles's group at Kansas University Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Fuel Injection and Spray Research Group Paul Evans's group web page at the University of Wisconsin Alexei Grigoriev's group at Univ. of Tulsa Eric Landahl's web page at DePaul University The SLAC Pulse Institute Ultrafast Materials Science group (D. Reis and A. Lindenberg)

203

CO2 SELECTIVE CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECOVERY OF CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high temperature membrane reactor (MR) has been developed to enhance the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction efficiency with concomitant CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This improved WGS-MR with CO{sub 2} recovery capability is ideally suitable for integration into the Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power generation system. Two different CO{sub 2}-affinity materials were selected in this study. The Mg-Al-CO{sub 3}-layered double hydroxide (LDH) was investigated as an adsorbent or a membrane for CO{sub 2} separation. The adsorption isotherm and intraparticle diffusivity for the LDH-based adsorbent were experimentally determined, and suitable for low temperature shift (LTS) of WGS. The LDH-based membranes were synthesized using our commercial ceramic membranes as substrate. These experimental membranes were characterized comprehensively in terms of their morphology, and CO{sub 2} permeance and selectivity to demonstrate the technical feasibility. In parallel, an alternative material-base membrane, carbonaceous membrane developed by us, was characterized, which also demonstrated enhanced CO{sub 2} selectivity at the LTS-WGS condition. With optimization on membrane defect reduction, these two types of membrane could be used commercially as CO{sub 2}-affinity membranes for the proposed application. Based upon the unique CO{sub 2} affinity of the LDHs at the LTS/WGS environment, we developed an innovative membrane reactor, Hybrid Adsorption and Membrane Reactor (HAMR), to achieve {approx}100% CO conversion, produce a high purity hydrogen product and deliver a concentrated CO{sub 2} stream for disposal. A mathematical model was developed to simulate this unique one -step process. Finally a benchtop reactor was employed to generate experimental data, which were consistent with the prediction from the HAMR mathematical model. In summary, the project objective, enhancing WGS efficiency for hydrogen production with concomitant CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration, has been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated via the developed one-step reactor, HAMR. Future development on reactor scale up and field testing is recommended.

Paul K.T. Liu

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: News : News Sector 7 calendar of events. APS News APS Monthly meeting slides What's new at the APS Sector 7? 2013 news 2012 news 2011 news 2010 news 2009 news 2008 news 2007 news 2006 news 2005 news 2004 news 2003 news 2002 news 2001 news 2013 News from APS Sector 7 May 2013: Ruben Reininger et al. recently published an article on the optical design of the SPX Imaging and Microscopy beamline (SPXIM). The details can be found on the RSI web site here. A new web page is now available to guide 7-BM users. See the official 7-BM web page for more details. 2012 News from APS Sector 7 August 2012: Jin Wang gave a talk on August 29, 2012 entitled "The APS 7-BM is Open for Business, Officially!" at the August APS Monthly Operation Meeting. On August 1, Alan Kastengren joined the X-ray Science Division to operate the 7-BM beamline. Alan has been involved in the construction

205

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 23, 2012 August 23, 2012 New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector Taking a moment to break-down key findings from the latest Clean Energy Jobs Roundup. August 13, 2012 INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America August 3, 2012 A worker suppresses dust during the final demolition stages of the historic DP West site, located at Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Technical Area 21. The demolition was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and is part of $212 million in ARRA funds the Lab received for environmental remediation. | Photo courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Photo of the Week: August 3, 2012 Check out our favorite energy-related photos! August 2, 2012 With new pipes and controls, the natural gas kilns Highland Craftsmen uses to produce poplar bark shingles will operate about 40 percent more efficiently, saving the company $5,000 a year in energy costs. | Photo courtesy of Highland Craftsmen.

206

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

207

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

each of the consumption sectors, excluding the industrial sector, according to BENTEK Energy Services, LLC. Moderating temperatures likely contributed to lower natural gas...

208

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. , 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energy

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Symposium on enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The Second Joint Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery was held in Tulsa, Oklahoma on April 5 to 8, 1981. Forty-four technical papers were presented which covered all phases of enhanced oil recovery. Field tests, laboratory investigations, and mathematical analyses of tertiary recovery methods such as microemulsion flooding, carbon dioxide injection, in-situ combustion, steam injection, and gas injection are presented.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Programs Research Programs Sector 7's research program exploits the brilliance of the APS undulator radiation to perform material research studies with high spatial and temporal resolution. Microbeam studies are made using x-ray beam sizes on the submicron-scale, and time-resolved diffraction measurements are carried out with picosecond resolution. Sector 7's undulator line has experimental enclosures dedicated to both time-resolved and microbeam research. In one of these enclosures (7ID-D), a femtosecond laser facility is set up for ultrafast diffraction and spectroscopy studies in a pump-probe geometry. The 7ID-B hutch is a white beam capable station used for time-resolved phase-contrast imaging and beamline optics development. A third enclosure (7ID-C) is instrumented for high-resolution diffraction studies with a Huber 6-circle diffractometer. The instrument is ideal for thin-film and interface studies, including the recently developed Coherent Bragg Rod Analysis (COBRA) technique. The fs-laser has recently been delivered to 7ID-C so time-resolved laser pump-x-ray probe can be performed in 7ID-C since March 2007. An x-ray streak camera is also being commissioned in 7ID-C. 7ID-C is equipped for microdiffraction studies with a small Huber 4-cicle diffractometer used with zone-plate optics.

212

Nanjing Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Nanjing Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co. Ltd Place Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 210024 Sector Biomass Product Chinese biomass project developer. The company developed a landfill gas plant in Nanjing, China. Coordinates 32.0485°, 118.778969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.0485,"lon":118.778969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

213

Energy Recovery Associates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Associates Associates Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Recovery Associates Place Avon, Connecticut Zip 06001 Sector Biofuels Product Landfill Gas, Digester Gas, mixed methane and Greenhouse gases recovery and utilization equipment and projects. Year founded 1986 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 860-673-5659 Website http://www.Energy-Recovery-Ass Coordinates 41.7918396°, -72.8633635° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7918396,"lon":-72.8633635,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

214

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

215

ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Information & Getting Beamtime User Information & Getting Beamtime There are three ways to request beamtime to perform an experiment on APS-7ID. One can request beam time as an APS General User, as an APS Partner User, or one can contact a staff member of Sector 7 to work collaboratively with them using a small amount of staff time to gather preliminary data. 80% of the available beamtime on 7ID is given to General and Partner Users, while 20% is reserved for staff use. Beam time is allocated and announced by email shortly before the start of an experimental run. In October 2002, beamline 7ID welcomed its first APS General Users (GU). To gain access to 7ID, General or Partner Users are required to submit a proposal to the APS GU Website by the specified deadline. Sucessful proposals will be scheduled for the next cycle following the proposal deadline. There are three proposal cycles per year with deadlines about two months before the start of a run. The deadlines and General User forms are available on the web through the APS General User Web site. Specific instructions for new General Users are available on the site. These instructions can be helpful also for new APS Users in general.

217

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview and History Overview and History Sector 7 consists of two APS beamlines: 7-ID: an insertion device beamline based on an APS Type-A Undulator 7-BM: a bend magnet beam line for time-resolved radiography (currently being commissioned) Overview of 7-ID 7-ID comprises four large experimental enclosures designated A, B, C, and D. In 2004, a laser enclosure was also added (7ID-E). Enclosure 7-ID-A is the first optics enclosure and houses a polished Be window, an empty x-ray filter unit, a pair of white beam slits, a water-cooled double crystal diamond monochromator (Kohzu HLD4), and a P4 mode shutter. The beamline vertical offset is 35 mm. Enclosure 7-ID-B is a white-, or monochromatic-beam experimental enclosure. It is equipped with two precision motorized table for alignment and positioning of experimental equipment. This station is used for white-beam imaging or microdiffraction experiments.

218

Impact of Sorption Isotherms on the Simulation of CO2-Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage Process in Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Marcellus Shale Amirmasoud Kalantari-Dahaghi, SPE, West Virginia University, Shahab D. Mohaghegh, SPE Continuous, low-permeability, fractured, organic-rich gas shale units are widespread and are possible of how much carbon dioxide or methane can be stored in shale at a given pressure. In this paper, a shale

Mohaghegh, Shahab

219

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 2% of total natural gas usage in the residential sector.ignition systems, which will decrease gas usage andincrease electricity usage for gas ranges. Figure 11.4. Cost

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

service sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

service sector service sector Dataset Summary Description The energy consumption data consists of five spreadsheets: "overall data tables" plus energy consumption data for each of the following sectors: transport, domestic, industrial and service. Each of the five spreadsheets contains a page of commentary and interpretation. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released July 31st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption coal Coke domestic Electricity Electricity Consumption energy data Industrial Natural Gas Petroleum service sector transportation UK Data application/zip icon Five Excel spreadsheets with UK Energy Consumption data (zip, 2.6 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment The data in ECUK are classified as National Statistics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

222

Sector 30 - useful links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Useful Links Sector 30 Sector Orientation Form HERIX experiment header for lab book MERIX experiment header for lab book Printing from your laptop at the beamline Other IXS sectors...

223

2012 SG Peer Review - Recovery Act: NSTAR Automated Mater Reading Based Dynamic Pricing - Douglas Horton, NSTAR Electric & Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peer Peer Review Meeting Peer Review Meeting AMR Based Dynamic Pricing y g Doug Horton NSTAR Electric & Gas Co. 6/8/2012 AMR Based Dynamic Pricing Objective Provide two-way communication of electricity cost & consumption data utilizing the customers existing meter & Internet. Goal to achieve 5% reduction in peak and Goal to achieve 5% reduction in peak and average load. Life-cycle Funding ($K) Total Budget Total DOE Funding to Technical Scope Use customer's existing AMR meter and broadband Internet to achieve two way Total Budget Total DOE Funding Funding to Date $4,900k $2,362k $1,623k broadband Internet to achieve two way communication and "AMI" functionality Cutting-edge solution to integrate: * Existing meters E i ti I t t December 2008 * Existing Internet * Existing billing & CIS

224

Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams  

SciTech Connect

Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Electricity Supply Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Supply Sector Part 1 of 6 Supporting Documents Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary

226

Elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

CO2 SELECTIVE CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR WATER-GAS SHIFT REACTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECOVERY OF CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two process schemes have been investigated by us for the use of hydrotalcites we prepared as CO{sub 2} adsorbents to enhance water gas shift (WGS) reaction: Case I involves the adsorption enhanced WGS packed bed reactor and Case II involves the adsorption enhanced WGS membrane reactor. Both cases will achieve the same objective as the hydrotalcite membrane reactor: i.e., improving the WGS reactor efficiency via the concomitant removal of CO{sub 2} for sequestration. In this report a detailed investigation of the design characteristics and performance of Case II, termed the Hybrid Adsorbent-Membrane Reactor (HAMR), is presented. The HAMR system includes a packed-bed catalytic membrane reactor (hydrogen selective) coupling the WGS reaction (in a porous hydrogen selective membrane) with CO{sub 2} removal with an adsorbent in the permeate side. The reactor characteristics have been investigated for a range of permeance and selectivity relevant to the aforementioned application. The HAMR system shows enhanced CO conversion, hydrogen yield, and product purity, and provides good promise for reducing the hostile operating conditions of conventional WGS reactors, and for meeting the CO{sub 2} sequestration objective. In the next quarterly report we will present the simulation result for Case I as well as the progress on hydrotalcite membrane synthesis.

Paul K. T. Liu

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

228

Interaction of Fracture Fluid With Formation Rock and Proppant on Fracture Fluid Clean-up and Long-term Gas Recovery in Marcellus Shale Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs has become an integral part of the North American gas supply. The economic viability of many unconventional gas developments (more)

Yue, Wenting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Combined Heat & Power Technology Overview and Federal Sector Deployment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview and Overview and Federal Sector Deployment Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2013 - May 22-23 San Francisco, CA Hosted by: Pacific Gas and Electric Company Bob Slattery Oak Ridge National Laboratory CHP is an integrated energy system that:  is located at or near a facility  generates electrical and/or mechanical power  recovers waste heat for ◦ heating ◦ cooling ◦ dehumidification  can utilize a variety of technologies and fuels  is also referred to as cogeneration The on-site simultaneous generation of two forms of energy (heat and electricity) from a single fuel/energy source Defining Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Steam Electricity Fuel Prime Mover & Generator Heat Recovery Steam Boiler Conventional CHP

230

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26, 2010 26, 2010 200,000 Homes Weatherized Under the Recovery Act -- Video from Cathy Zoi Vice President Biden announced that 200,000 homes have been Weatherized under the Recovery Act. Hear what Cathy Zoi, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, has to say on Weatherization. August 26, 2010 200,000 homes weatherized under the Recovery Act August 25, 2010 The Recovery Act: Cutting Costs and Upping Capacity Secretary Chu joined Vice President Joe Biden at the White House to help unveil a new report on how investments made through the Recovery Act have been impacting innovation. While the report analyzed several major sectors, its most striking findings centered on energy. August 25, 2010 Eco Technologies, Inc., hired eleven workers to install these solar panels at the Hillsborough County judicial center. | Photo courtesy of Hillsborough County

231

Greenhouse gas reduction by recovery and utilization of landfill methane and CO{sub 2} technical and market feasibility study, Boului Landfill, Bucharest, Romania. Final report, September 30, 1997--September 19, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The project is a landfill gas to energy project rated at about 4 megawatts (electric) at startup, increasing to 8 megawatts over time. The project site is Boului Landfill, near Bucharest, Romania. The project improves regional air quality, reduces emission of greenhouse gases, controls and utilizes landfill methane, and supplies electric power to the local grid. The technical and economic feasibility of pre-treating Boului landfill gas with Acrion`s new landfill gas cleanup technology prior to combustion for power production us attractive. Acrion`s gas treatment provides several benefits to the currently structured electric generation project: (1) increase energy density of landfill gas from about 500 Btu/ft{sup 3} to about 750 Btu/ft{sup 3}; (2) remove contaminants from landfill gas to prolong engine life and reduce maintenance;; (3) recover carbon dioxide from landfill gas for Romanian markets; and (4) reduce emission of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide. Greenhouse gas emissions reduction attributable to successful implementation of the landfill gas to electric project, with commercial liquid CO{sub 2} recovery, is estimated to be 53 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent of its 15 year life.

Cook, W.J.; Brown, W.R.; Siwajek, L. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Sanders, W.I. [Power Management Corp., Bellevue, WA (United States); Botgros, I. [Petrodesign, SA, Bucharest (Romania)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Use expander cycles for LPG recovery  

SciTech Connect

Expander-type cycles are competitive with other gas recovery processes even when applied to relatively rich gas feeds for a high recovery of only propane plus. These cycles are the most economical to use when (1) ''free pressure drop'' is available between feed and residue gas pressure; (2) product requires demethanization only; (3) feed is very lean and propane plus heavier components are required; (4) a small, unattended, prefabricated unit for LPG recovery is needed; (5) an offshore LPG facility is required to be built on a platform where space and weight allowance is at a premium; (6) a facility is initially built for propane recovery, but is planned for future conversion to ethane recovery; and (7) relatively low-pressure gas feeds (which are usually quite rich) must be processed for a high recovery of ethane. A flow chart for an oil absorption plant is presented.

Valdes, A.R.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in the ENERGY STAR Commercial, Industrial and Residential Sectors. An Example of How the Refinery Industry is Capitalizing on ENERGY STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past 10 years ENERGY STAR has developed a track record as a certification mark to hang buildings performance hat on. By implementing upgrade strategies and pursuing operations and maintenance issues simultaneously, ENERGY STAR has led the nation and many states to pursue greenhouse gas reduction initiatives using energy efficiency as a model program. In developing these partnerships with industry, states and local government, what has occurred is a variety of program approaches that works to accomplish strategically a reduction in emissions. Through its development, ENERGY STAR has become an integral player with many Green Buildings Program to help them carry the energy efficiency banner to higher levels of cooperation. What is occurring today is that more and more local programs are looking to green buildings as an approach to reducing problems they face in air pollution, water pollution, solid waste, needed infrastructure and better of resources needs and the growth of expensive utility infrastructures. EPA - Region 6's ENERGY STAR and Green Building Program assistance has led to some unique solutions and the beginning workups for the integrated expansion of effort to support State Implementation Plans in new innovative voluntary approaches to transform certain markets, similarly to those of energy efficient products. This presentation will be an overview of activity that is being spearheaded in Texas in the DFW and Houston metro areas in ENERGY STAR and Green Buildings. The voluntary programs impacts are reducing energy consumption, creating markets for renewables, reducing air polluting chemicals and reducing greenhouse gas emissions using verifiable approaches.

Patrick, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at theAidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling ofmineral-water-gas Reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reactive-transport model for 14C was developed to test its applicability to the Aidlin geothermal system. Using TOUGHREACT, we developed a 1-D grid to evaluate the effects of water injection and subsequent water-rock-gas interaction on the compositions of the produced fluids. A dual-permeability model of the fracture-matrix system was used to describe reaction-transport processes in which the permeability of the fractures is many orders of magnitude higher than that of the rock matrix. The geochemical system included the principal minerals (K-feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, silica polymorphs) of the metagraywackes that comprise the geothermal reservoir rocks. Initial simulation results predict that the gas-phase CO2 in the reservoir will become more enriched in 14C as air-equilibrated injectate water (with a modern carbon signature) is incorporated into the system, and that these changes will precede accompanying decreases in reservoir temperature. The effects of injection on 14C in the rock matrix will be lessened somewhat because of the dissolution of matrix calcite with ''dead'' carbon.

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arkansas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced battery manufacturing and renewable energy. Through these investments, Arkansas's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arkansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

236

ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Alaska has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, coal, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Alaska are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and electric grid improvements to geothermal power. Through these investments, Alaska's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Alaska to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

237

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arkansas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced battery manufacturing and renewable energy. Through these investments, Arkansas's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arkansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

238

Carbon Dioxide as Cushion Gas for Natural Gas Storage  

Carbon dioxide injection during carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery can be carried out to produce the methane while

239

Enhanced oil recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

All energy resources available from a geopressured geothermal reservoir are used for the production of pipeline quality gas using a high pressure separator/heat exchanger and a membrane separator, and recovering waste gas from both the membrane separator and a low pressure separator in tandem with the high pressure separator for use in enhanced oil recovery, or in powering a gas engine and turbine set. Liquid hydrocarbons are skimmed off the top of geothermal brine in the low pressure separator. High pressure brine from the geothermal well is used to drive a turbine/generator set before recovering waste gas in the first separator. Another turbine/generator set is provided in a supercritical binary power plant that uses propane as a working fluid in a closed cycle, and uses exhaust heat from the combustion engine and geothermal energy of the brine in the separator/heat exchanger to heat the propane.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Capital requirements for energy sector: capital market access. The shift to successful efforts accounting: preliminary review of probable effects on oil and gas industry participants  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an initial assessment of the effects that the adoption of uniform successful efforts accounting might have on access to capital markets and investment behavior in the oil and gas industry. It also proposes a plan of interviews and analysis which would permit informed revision and expansion of that initial assessment. Section II presents a discussion of the origins and current status of the controversy between advocates of successful efforts and full cost accounting. An important underpinning of the argument in favor of uniform successful efforts accounting is the premise that all industry participants are fundamentally comparable and, thus, should be subject to uniform accounting treatment. Section III questions this premise by examining the various classes of industry participants. Section IV presents data on the roles of those classes of industry participants, paying particular attention to the importance of the independents in the exploration phase of the business. Section V discusses the effects which a shift to uniform successful efforts accounting might have on the various industry participants. A discussion of our initial conclusions are presented in Section VI. Section VII reviews a plan of interviews and analysis which would permit a more informed evaluation of policy options. Finally, Section VIII presents a series of policy alternatives.

Bennett, V.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Research programs on enhanced recovery are briefly described. Major areas include: chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery processes, resource assessment technology, geoscience technology, microbial technology, and environmental technology.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

Sector 1 welcome  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to Sector 1 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) located at Argonne Welcome to Sector 1 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The Sector 1 beamlines are operated by the Materials Physics & Engineering Group (MPE) of the APS X-ray Science Division (XSD). Sector 1 consists of the 1-ID and 1-BM beamlines, and 80% of the available beamtime is accessible to outside users through the General User program. The main programs pursued at Sector 1 are described below. 1-ID is dedicated to providing and using brilliant, high-energy x-ray beams (50-150 keV) for the following activities: Coupled high-energy small- and wide-angle scattering (HE-SAXS/WAXS) High-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM) Sector 1 General Layout Stress/strain/texture studies Pair-distribution function (PDF) measurements

244

Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Recovery Act Buy American Requirements for Information Needed from Financial Assistance Applicants/Recipients for Waiver Requests Based on Unreasonable Cost or Nonavailability Applicants for and recipients of financial assistance funded by the Recovery Act must comply with the requirement that all of the iron, steel, and manufactured goods used for a project for the construction, alteration, maintenance, or repair of a public building or public work be produced in the United States, unless the head of the agency makes a waiver, or determination of inapplicability of the Buy American Recovery Act provisions, based on one of the authorized exceptions. The authorized exceptions are unreasonable cost, nonavailability, and in furtherance of the public interest. This

245

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 17, 2010 March 17, 2010 Solar panels at Terry Sandstrom's home in Wheatland, Wyo. | Photo courtesy of Terry Sandstrom Solar and Wind Powering Wyoming Home Terry Sandstrom never thought he would run his house entirely on renewable energy, but when faced with a $100,000 price tag to get connected to the grid, he had to look at alternative options. March 17, 2010 DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in Clean Energy, Environmental Management Sectors WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy today released a new report highlighting the benefits of the Recovery Act to small businesses throughout the clean, renewable energy industry and environmental management sector. The report found that as of early March 2010, small businesses have been selected to receive nearly $5.4 billion in funding

246

Propane Demand by Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We will be watching the agricultural sector, since the Agriculture Economic Research Service has predicted a record corn crop this year. ...

247

Natural Gas Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for ... Tables 1 and 2 ...

248

Petroleum recovery materials and process  

SciTech Connect

A petroleum recovery process uses micellar solutions made from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). During the process, microemulsions utilizing LPG in the external phase are injected through at least one injection well into the oil-bearing formations. The microemulsions are driven toward at least one recovery well and crude petroleum is recovered through the recovery well. The LPG in the micellar system may be propane or butane. Corrosion inhibitors can be used in sour fields, and bactericides can be used where necessary. The microemulsions used contain up to about 10-20% water and about 8% surfactant. (4 claims)

Gogarty, W.B.; Olson, R.W.

1967-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Natural gas: major issues still unresolved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to statistics gathered from the US Department of Energy, the American Gas Association, and the Process Gas Consumers Group, total US gas consumption and production declined in 1983 for the fourth consecutive year, although increases of 3.4% and 6.6%, respectively, are expected for 1984. This turnaround is contingent on the effects of a strong economic recovery and normal winter weather overriding those of higher gas prices. In today's competitive market, gas demand will be closely tied to the gas pricing issue. A.G.A projects a moderation in both wellhead and consumer prices from 1983 to 1992. Regarding price deregulation, A.G.A. recommends a limited approach designed to moderate consumer gas prices while the PGC Group approves of total deregulation via a three-step process. Controversy over gas purchase contracts is also considerable among all sectors of the gas industry; meaningful action by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in this area would be of substantial benefit to all gas consumers.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships ISER's partnerships with the private sector are a strength which has enabled the division to respond to the needs of the sector and the nation. The division's domestic capabilities have been greatly enhanced by the relationships that have been created over years of collaborations with companies from all parts the sector, including electricity, oil, and natural gas. Specific mission areas, such as risk and system analysis, modeling and visualization across subsectors, and incident response would not be possible without the participation of the private sector. The relationships ISER maintains with energy sector owners and operators and public associations representing energy subsectors, including the American

251

Practitioner Perspectives Matter: Public Policy and Private Investment in the U.S. Electric Power Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric power plants, the volatility of natural gas marketsnatural gas overtook coal as the fuel of choice for new power plants,natural gas per kilowatthour generated), among investments in the electric power sector, coal-fired power plants

Barradale, Merrill Jones

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT California has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in California are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to solar and wind, geothermal and biofuels, carbon capture and storage, and environmental cleanup. Through these investments, California's businesses, universities, national labs, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning California to play an important role in the new energy economy

253

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT California has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in California are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to solar and wind, geothermal and biofuels, carbon capture and storage, and environmental cleanup. Through these investments, California's businesses, universities, national labs, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning California to play an important role in the new energy economy

254

Developing a Regional Recovery Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements The electric power sector participates in the Climate VISION program through the Electric Power Industry Climate Initiative (EPICI) and its Power Partners program, which is being developed in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The memberships of the seven organizations that comprise EPICI represent 100% of the power generators in the United States. Through individual commitments and collective actions, the power sector will strive to make meaningful contributions to the President's greenhouse gas intensity goal. EPICI members also support efforts to increase technology research, development and deployment that will help the power sector, and other sectors, achieve the President's goal. The seven organizations comprising EPICI are the American Public Power

256

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Inventory  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols GHG Inventory Protocols EPA/IAI PFC Measurement Protocol (PDF 243 KB) Download Acrobat Reader EPA and the International Aluminium Institute have collaborated with the global primary aluminium industry to develop a standard facility-specific PFC emissions measurement protocol. Use of the protocol will help ensure the consistency and accuracy of measurements. International Aluminum Institute's Aluminum Sector Greenhouse Gas Protocol (PDF 161 KB) Download Acrobat Reader The International Aluminum Institute (IAI) Aluminum Sector Addendum to the WBCSD/WRI Greenhouse Gas Protocol enhances and expands for the aluminum sector the World Business Council for Sustainable Development/World Resources Institute greenhouse gas corporate accounting and reporting protocol.

257

Recent Natural Gas Market Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

sectors U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Volumes and prices for pipeline and LNG imports and exports Underground Natural Gas Storage - Stocks of working and base gas...

258

Public Sector Energy Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capitol dome Capitol dome Public Sector Energy Efficiency Research on sustainable federal operations supports the implementation of sustainable policies and practices in the public sector. This work serves as a bridge between the technology development of Department of Energy's National Laboratories and the operational needs of public sector. Research activities involve many aspects of integrating sustainability into buildings and government practices, including technical assistance for sustainable building design, operations, and maintenance; project financing for sustainable facilities; institutional change in support of sustainability policy goals; and procurement of sustainable products. All of those activities are supported by our work on program and project evaluation, which analyzes overall program effectiveness while ensuring

259

Climate change adaptation in the U.S. electric utility sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility sector has been a focus of policy efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but even if these efforts are successful, the sector will need to adapt to the impacts of climate change. These are likely ...

Higbee, Melissa (Melissa Aura)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The role of natural gas as a vehicle transportation fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis analyzes pathways to directly use natural gas, as compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG), in the transportation sector. The thesis (more)

Murphy, Paul Jarod

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Natural Gas Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas International Energy Outlook 2009 Figure 33. World Natural Gas Consumption, 1980-2030 Figure 34. Natural Gas Consumption in North America by Country and Sector, 2006 and...

262

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Facility Winnebago County Landfill Gas Sector Biomass...

263

Sector 6 Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MM-Group Home MM-Group Home MMG Advisory Committees Beamlines 4-ID-C Soft Spectroscopy 4-ID-D Hard Spectroscopy 6-ID-B,C Mag. Scattering 6-ID-D HighE Scattering 29-ID IEX - ARPES,RSXS Getting Beamtime Sector Orientation Sector 4 Orientation Sector 6 Orientation Publications (4-ID) Publications (6-ID) Contact Us APS Ring Status Current APS Schedule Highlights of research on Sector 6 Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds March 12, 2013 Researchers have used beamlines 6-ID-B at the APS and XmAS at the ESRF to probe the structure of the rare-earth magnetic material europium titanate. In a magnetic field, the optical properties of this system change quite dramatically, presenting hope of a strong magneto-electric material for potential use in new memory, processing, and sensor devices.

264

sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sector sector Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

265

Buildings Sector Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A joint NREL, ORNL, and PNNL team conducted market analysis to help inform DOE/EERE's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program planning and management decisions. This chapter presents the results of the market analysis for the Buildings sector.

Hostick, Donna J.; Nicholls, Andrew K.; McDonald, Sean C.; Hollomon, Jonathan B.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Buildings Sector Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A joint NREL, ORNL, and PNNL team conducted market analysis to help inform DOE/EERE's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program planning and management decisions. This chapter presents the results of the market analysis for the Buildings sector.

Hostick, Donna J.; Nicholls, Andrew K.; McDonald, Sean C.; Hollomon, Jonathan B.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

268

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

269

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Progress Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

PROGRESS REPORT PROGRESS REPORT Progress Report NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: Megan Barnett, (202) 586-4940 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Friday, February 8, 2008 DOE Releases Climate VISION Progress Report 2007 Outlines Industry Progress in Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Intensity through Climate VISION Partnership WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released the Climate VISION Progress Report 2007, which reports on the actions taken by energy-intensive industries to improve greenhouse gas emissions intensity of their operations from 2002 to 2006. The report indicates that the power and energy-intensive industrial sectors improved their combined emissions intensity by 9.4 percent over this four year period, and in 2006, actual greenhouse gas emissions for these sectors fell a combined 1.4 percent.

270

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestme...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Convert CargoMAX Vehicles to Run on Compressed Natural Gas CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08092010 Location(s): Okarche, Oklahoma Office(s):...

271

Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Recovery Newsletters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

newsletters Office of Environmental newsletters Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en 2011 ARRA Newsletters http://energy.gov/em/downloads/2011-arra-newsletters 2011 ARRA Newsletters

273

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene ...  

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene purge gas United States Patent. Patent Number: 6,576,043: Issued: June 10, 2003: Official Filing:

274

Illinois Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Memo Illinois has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on...

275

NETL: Hydrogen & Clean Fuels - Abstract : Gas Adsorption on Single...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas Resources...

276

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas...

277

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

each of the consumption sectors, excluding the industrial sector, according to BENTEK Energy Services, LLC. Moderating temperatures likely contributed to lower natural gas...

278

District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent) District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution...

279

Natural Gas Supply SBIR Program  

SciTech Connect

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was created in 1982 by Public Law 97-219 and reauthorized in 1992 until the year 2000 by Public Law 102-564. The purposes of the new law are to (1) expand and improve the SBIR program, 2) emphasize the program`s goal of increasing private sector commercialization of technology developed through Federal R&D, (3) increase small business participation in Federal R&D, and (4) improve the Federal Government`s dissemination of information concerning the SBIR program. DOE`s SBIR pro-ram has two features that are unique. In the 1995 DOE SBIR solicitation, the DOE Fossil Energy topics were: environmental technology for natural gas, oil, and coal; advanced recovery of oil; natural gas supply; natural gas utilization; advanced coal-based power systems; and advanced fossil fuels research. The subtopics for this solicitation`s Natural Gas Supply topic are (1) drilling, completion, and stimulation; (2) low-permeability Formations; (3) delivery and storage; and (4) natural gas upgrading.

Shoemaker, H.D.; Gwilliam, W.J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Change in Consumer Electricity Bills Net Impact of RPS onon Natural Gas and Electricity Bills (2003-2020, 7% realelectricity sector should consider the potentially beneficial cross-sector impact of that diversification on natural gas prices and bills.

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Industrial and electric power sectors lead U.S. growth in natural gas consumption figure data U.S. total natural gas consumption grows from 24.4 trillion cubic feet in 2011 to 29.5 trillion cubic feet in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case. Natural gas use increases in all the end-use sectors except residential (Figure 85), where consumption declines as a result of improvements in appliance efficiency and falling demand for space heating, attributable in part to population shifts to warmer regions of the country. Despite falling early in the projection period from a spike in 2012, which resulted from very low natural gas prices relative to coal, consumption of natural gas for power generation increases by an average of 0.8 percent per year, with more natural gas used for electricity production as relatively

282

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Industrial and electric power sectors lead U.S. growth in natural gas consumption figure data U.S. total natural gas consumption grows from 24.4 trillion cubic feet in 2011 to 29.5 trillion cubic feet in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case. Natural gas use increases in all the end-use sectors except residential (Figure 85), where consumption declines as a result of improvements in appliance efficiency and falling demand for space heating, attributable in part to population shifts to warmer regions of the country. Despite falling early in the projection period from a spike in 2012, which resulted from very low natural gas prices relative to coal, consumption of natural gas for power generation increases by an average of 0.8 percent per year, with more natural gas used for electricity production as relatively

283

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW operates in the energy efficiency field- one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen and WOWClean provide more energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. WOWGen - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat WOWClean - Multi Pollutant emission control system. Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel and converts it to useful output. The remaining 65% is discharged into the environment as waste heat at temperatures ranging from 300F to 1,200F. This waste heat can be captured using the WOWGen technology and turned into electricity. This efficiency is up to twice the rate of competing technologies. Compelling economics and current environmental policy are stimulating industry interest. WOWGen power plants can generate between 1 - 25 MW of electricity. Project payback is between two to five years with IRR of 15% 30%. Nearly anywhere industrial waste heat is present, the WOW products can be applied. Beneficial applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas (pipeline compression stations, processing plants). Sources such as stack flue gases, steam, diesel exhaust, hot oil or combinations of sources can be used to generate power. WOWGen can also be used with stand alone power plants burning fossil fuels or using renewable energy sources such as solar and biomass.

Romero, M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Oil & Gas Research | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture and Storage Oil & Gas Methane Hydrate LNG Offshore Drilling Enhanced Oil Recovery Shale Gas Section 999 Report to Congress DOE issues the 2013 annual plan for the...

285

EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Agriculture Sector the Agriculture Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Partner Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica, Kenya, Mexico, Vietnam Central America, Eastern Africa, Central America, South-Eastern Asia References Land Use Assessment Toolkit - Agriculture Resources[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include strengthening implementation of

286

Louisville Private Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Private Sector Attendees Private Sector Attendees ENERGY STAR Kick-off Meeting December 2007 5/3rd Bank Al J Schneider Company (The Galt House East) Baptist Hospital East Brown - Forman Building Owner and Managers Association (BOMA) Louisville CB Richard Ellis Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Louisville Cushman Wakefield General Electric Company Golden Foods Greater Louisville Chapter of International Facility Management Association (IFMA) Hines Humana, Inc Institute of Real Estate Management (IREM) Kentucky Chapter Jewish Hospital & St Mary's Healthcare Kentucky Chapter, Certified Commercial Investment Managers (CCIM) Kentucky Governor's Office of Energy Policy Kentucky Society of Health Care Engineers Kindred Health Care Louisville Air Pollution Control Board

287

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Heat Recovery Boilers for Process Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat recovery boilers are widely used in process plants for recovering energy from various waste gas streams, either from the consideration of process or of economy. Sulfuric, as well as nitric, acid plant heat recovery boilers are examples of the use of heat recovery due primarily to process considerations. On the other hand, cost and payback are main considerations in the case of gas turbine and incineration plants, where large quantities of gases are exhausted at temperatures varying from 800F to 1800F. This gas, when recovered, can result in a large energy savings and steam production. This paper attempts to outline some of the engineering considerations in the design of heat recovery boilers for turbine exhaust applications (combined cycle, cogeneration mode), incineration plants (solid waste, fume) and chemical plants (reformer, sulfuric acid, nitric acid).

Ganapathy, V.; Rentz, J.; Flanagan, D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Reforms in Africa Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Reforms in Africa Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa Sector: Energy Topics: Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.uneca.org/eca_programmes/nrid/pubs/powersectorreport.pdf UN Region: Eastern Africa References: Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Reforms in Africa[1] Overview "This study assesses the socio-economic and environmental impacts of power

291

Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roadmap Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector -  - Foreword T his document, the Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector, outlines a coherent plan for improing cyber security in the energy sector. It is the result of an unprecedented collaboration between the energy sector and goernment to identify concrete steps to secure control systems used in the electricity, oil, and natural gas sectors oer the next ten years. The Roadmap proides a strategic framework for guiding industry and goernment efforts based on a clear ision supported by goals and time-based milestones. It addresses the energy sector's most urgent challenges as well as longer-term needs and practices. A distinctie feature of this collaboratie effort is the actie inolement and leadership of energy asset

292

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the private sector that focus on improving the production performance of domestic natural gas and oil stripper wells. Performer: The Pennsylvania State University (Energy...

293

Natural Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Gas Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 86. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 13. Natural Gas Supply, Disposition, and Prices Table 14. Oil and Gas Supply Table 21. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - New England Table 22. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic Table 23. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 24. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 25. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 26. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central Table 27. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South

294

ARM - Recovery Act Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ActRecovery Act Instruments ActRecovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Logo Subscribe FAQs Recovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Fact Sheet March 2010 Poster (PDF, 10MB) External Resources Recovery Act - Federal Recovery Act - DOE Recovery Act - ANL Recovery Act - BNL Recovery Act - LANL Recovery Act - PNNL Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Recovery Act Instruments These pages provide a breakdown of the new instruments planned for installation among the permanent and mobile ARM sites. In addition, several instruments will be purchased for use throughout the facility and deployed as needed. These are considered "facility spares" and are included in the table below. View All | Hide All ARM Aerial Facility Instrument Title Instrument Mentor Measurement Group Measurements

295

Recovery Act Open House  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act Open House North Wind Environmental was one of three local small businesses that received Recovery Funding for projects at DOE's Idaho Site. Members of the community...

296

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions related to the the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 5, 2010 CX-001438: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Project CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 04/05/2010 Location(s): Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 5, 2010 CX-001437: Categorical Exclusion Determination Market Title: Clean Energy Grant Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 04/05/2010 Location(s): Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

297

Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to Accelerate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Private Sector Partnership to Private Sector Partnership to Accelerate Renewable Energy Projects Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to Accelerate Renewable Energy Projects October 7, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington DC --- U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the Department of Energy (DOE) will provide up to $750 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to help accelerate the development of conventional renewable energy generation projects. This funding will cover the cost of loan guarantees which could support as much as $4 to 8 billion in lending to eligible projects, and the Department will invite private sector participation to accelerate the financing of these renewable energy projects. To this end, the Department announced the creation of its new Financial

298

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases 5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases Reference Resource Average Range Low Oil and Gas Resource High Oil and Gas Resource Shale gas, tight gas, and tight oil Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) Shale gas (billion cubic feet per well) 1.04 0.01-11.32 50% lower 100% higher Tight gas (billion cubic feet per well) 0.5 0.01-11.02 50% lower 100% higher Tight oil (thousand barrels per well) 135 1-778 50% lower 100% higher Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- (522) 1,044 Crude oil (billion barrels) -- -- (29) 58 Well spacing (acres) 100 20-406 No change 20-40 Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- No change 3,601

299

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases 5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases Reference Resource Average Range Low Oil and Gas Resource High Oil and Gas Resource Shale gas, tight gas, and tight oil Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) Shale gas (billion cubic feet per well) 1.04 0.01-11.32 50% lower 100% higher Tight gas (billion cubic feet per well) 0.5 0.01-11.02 50% lower 100% higher Tight oil (thousand barrels per well) 135 1-778 50% lower 100% higher Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- (522) 1,044 Crude oil (billion barrels) -- -- (29) 58 Well spacing (acres) 100 20-406 No change 20-40 Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- No change 3,601

300

Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISERs partnerships with the private sector are a strength which has enabled the division to respond to the needs of the sector and the nation. The divisions domestic capabilities have been...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the India Iron and Steel ISF Coke- Making a. b. c. d.and Stamp Charging). Maximum Recovery of Coke OvenGas Using Coke Oven Gas for achieving higher blast

Sathaye, Jayant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

List of Heat recovery Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

recovery Incentives recovery Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 174 Heat recovery Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 174) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Ohio - Commercial Custom Project Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Boilers Central Air conditioners Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Furnaces Heat pumps Heat recovery Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Processing and Manufacturing Equipment Refrigerators Yes AEP Ohio - Commercial Self Direct Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government

303

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah??s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah??s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ?? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer??s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah??s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah??s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

306

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly highlights of activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry are presented. Feature articles for this issue are: Natural Gas Overview for Winter 1983-1984 by Karen A. Kelley; and an Analysis of Natural Gas Sales by John H. Herbert. (PSB)

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Uncovering the Microbial Diversity of the Alberta Oil Sands through Metagenomics: A Stepping Stone for Enhanced Oil Recovery and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is directed at more traditional enhanced recovery projects such as waterflood or gas cycling projects and does

Voordouw, Gerrit

308

Heavy Flavor & Dark Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider some contributions to rare processes in $B$ meson decays from a Dark Sector containing 2 light unstable scalars, with large couplings to each other and small mixings with Standard Model Higgs scalars. We show that existing constraints allow for an exotic contribution to high multiplicity final states with a branching fraction as large as $\\mathcal{O}(10^{-4})$, and that exotic particles could appear as narrow resonances or long lived particles which are mainly found in high multiplicity final states from $B$ decays.

Nelson, Ann E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Fuel choice and aggregate energy demand in the commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a fuel choice and aggregate-demand model of energy use in the commercial sector of the United States. The model structure is dynamic with short-run fuel-price responses estimated to be close to those of the residential sector. Of the three fuels analyzed, electricity consumption exhibits a greater response to its own price than either natural gas or fuel oil. In addition, electricity price increases have the largest effect on end-use energy conservation in the commercial sector. An improved commercial energy-use data base is developed which removes the residential portion of electricity and natural gas use that traditional energy-consumption data sources assign to the commercial sector. In addition, household and commercial petroleum use is differentiated on a state-by-state basis.

Cohn, S.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Real natural gas reservoir data Vs. natural gas reservoir models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas reservoir per se model is an exceedingly simple model of a natural gas reservoir designed to develop the physical relationship between ultimate recovery and rate(s) of withdrawal for production regulation policy assessment. To be responsive, ...

Ellis A. Monash; John Lohrenz

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Ministry of Environment for Government of Nepal Sector Climate Focus Area Agriculture, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Low emission development planning Website http://cdkn.org/2011/11/call-f Country Nepal Southern Asia References Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment[1] CDKN is providing support to the GoN through a number of projects to design and deliver climate compatible development (CCD) plans and policies. To

312

Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Ministry of Environment for Government of Nepal Sector Climate Focus Area Agriculture, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Low emission development planning Website http://cdkn.org/2011/11/call-f Country Nepal Southern Asia References Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment[1] CDKN is providing support to the GoN through a number of projects to design and deliver climate compatible development (CCD) plans and policies. To

313

U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability Report U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability Report U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability Report As part of the Administration's efforts to support national climate change adaptation planning through the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force and Strategic Sustainability Planning process -- and to advance the Energy Department's goal of promoting energy security -- the Department released the U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability to Climate Change and Extreme Weather report. The report examines current and potential future impacts of climate change trends on the U.S. energy sector, including: Coastal energy infrastructure is at risk from sea level rise, increasing storm intensity and higher storm surge and flooding. Oil and gas production -- including refining, hydraulic fracturing

314

Taiwan: An energy sector study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study on the economy of Taiwan, with special reference to the energy sector, revealed the following: Taiwan's rapid export-driven economic growth in the 1970s and 1980s has earned them the rank of ''Newly Industrialized Countries.'' Coal reserves measure less than 1 billion tons, and annual output has declined to below 2 million tons per year. Marginal amounts of crude are produced. Natural gas resources have been exploited both on- and offshore, through production amounts to little more than 1 billion cubic meters per year. Domestic hydrocarbon production is forecast to decline. Taiwan prssesses an estimated 5300 mW of exploitable hydropower capacity, of which 2564 mW had been installed by 1986. Taiwan has undertaken a massive program of nuclear power construction in response to the rapid rise in oil prices during the 1970s. Energy demand has risen an average of 9.0 percent per year since 1954, while real GNP has grown 8.6 percent per year. Sine 1980, oil has provided a lower share of total energy demand. Oil demand for transport has continued to grow rapidly. Declining production of domestic natural gas has led Taiwan to initiate LNG imports from Indonesia beginning in 1990. Coal has regained some of its earlier importance in Taiwan's energy structure. With declining domestic production, imports now provide nearly 90 percent of total coal demand. Taiwan is basically self-sufficient in refining capacity. Energy demand is expected to grow 5.4 percent per year through the yeat 2000. With declining output of domestic resources, energy dependency on imports will rise from its current 90 percent level. Government policy recognizes this external dependency and has directed it efforts at diversification of suppliers. 18 refs., 11 figs., 40 tabs.

Johnson, T.; Fridley, D.; Kang, Wu

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project were to test and evaluate technologies that would result in improved characterization of fractured natural-gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. The Bureau of Economic Geology (Bureau) worked jointly with industry partner Atlas Resources, Inc. to design, execute, and evaluate several experimental tests toward this end. The experimental tests were of two types: (1) tests leading to a low-cost methodology whereby small-scale microfractures observed in matrix grains of sidewall cores can be used to deduce critical properties of large-scale fractures that control natural-gas production and (2) tests that verify methods whereby robust seismic shear (S) waves can be generated to detect and map fractured reservoir facies. The grain-scale microfracture approach to characterizing rock facies was developed in an ongoing Bureau research program that started before this Appalachian Basin study began. However, the method had not been tested in a wide variety of fracture systems, and the tectonic setting of rocks in the Appalachian Basin composed an ideal laboratory for perfecting the methodology. As a result of this Appalachian study, a low-cost commercial procedure now exists that will allow Appalachian operators to use scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of thin sections extracted from oriented sidewall cores to infer the spatial orientation, relative geologic timing, and population density of large-scale fracture systems in reservoir sandstones. These attributes are difficult to assess using conventional techniques. In the Henderson Dome area, large quartz-lined regional fractures having N20E strikes, and a subsidiary set of fractures having N70W strikes, are prevalent. An innovative method was also developed for obtaining the stratigraphic and geographic tops of sidewall cores. With currently deployed sidewall coring devices, no markings from which top orientation can be obtained are made on the sidewall core itself during drilling. The method developed in this study involves analysis of the surface morphology of the broken end of the core as a top indicator. Together with information on the working of the tool (rotation direction), fracture-surface features, such as arrest lines and plume structures, not only give a top direction for the cores but also indicate the direction of fracture propagation in the tough, fine-grained Cataract/Medina sandstones. The study determined that microresistivity logs or other image logs can be used to obtain accurate sidewall core azimuths and to determine the precise depths of the sidewall cores. Two seismic S-wave technologies were developed in this study. The first was a special explosive package that, when detonated in a conventional seismic shot hole, produces more robust S-waves than do standard seismic explosives. The importance of this source development is that it allows S-wave seismic data to be generated across all of the Appalachian Basin. Previously, Appalachian operators have not been able to use S-wave seismic technology to detect fractured reservoirs because the industry-standard S-wave energy source, the horizontal vibrator, is not a practical source option in the heavy timber cover that extends across most of the basin. The second S-wave seismic technology that was investigated was used to verify that standard P-wave seismic sources can create robust downgoing S-waves by P-to-S mode conversion in the shallow stratigraphic layering in the Appalachian Basin. This verification was done by recording and analyzing a 3-component vertical seismic profile (VSP) in the Atlas Montgomery No. 4 well at Henderson Dome, Mercer County, Pennsylvania. The VSP data confirmed that robust S-waves are generated by P-to-S mode conversion at the basinwide Onondaga stratigraphic level. Appalachian operators can thus use converted-mode seismic technology to create S-wave images of fractured and unfractured rock systems throughout the basin.

BOB A. HARDAGE; ELOISE DOHERTY; STEPHEN E. LAUBACH; TUCKER F. HENTZ

1998-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

316

Pacific Gas and Electric Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific Gas and Electric Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Pacific Gas and Electric Company Address PO Box 770000 Place San Francisco Zip 94177 Sector Marine and...

317

Gas Natural Corporacion Eolica SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Natural Corporacion Eolica SL Jump to: navigation, search Name Gas Natural Corporacion Eolica SL Place Barcelona, Spain Zip 8002 Sector Wind energy Product Barcelona...

318

Natural Gas Annual 2008 - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average price of natural gas delivered to consumers by state and sector, 2012 (dollars ... and Form EIA?910, Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey. ...

319

Biomass Gas Electric LLC BG E | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Gas Electric LLC BG E Jump to: navigation, search Name Biomass Gas & Electric LLC (BG&E) Place Norcross, Georgia Zip 30092 Sector Biomass Product Project developer...

320

Consumption of Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of natural gas for electricity generation in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements American Chemistry Council (ACC), representing 85% of the chemical industry production in the U.S., has agreed American Chemistry Council Logo to an overall greenhouse gas intensity reduction target of 18% by 2012 from 1990 levels. ACC will measure progress based on data collected directly from its members. ACC also pledges to support the search for new products and pursue innovations that help other industries and sectors achieve the President's goal. Activities include increased production efficiencies, promoting coal gasification technology, increasing bio-based processes, and, most importantly, developing efficiency-enabling products for use in other sectors, such as appliance transportation and construction. The following documents are available for download as Adobe PDF documents.

322

Sector 6 Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 APS Pubs. Database Sector 6 Publications Publications 2013:(45) "Classical and quantum phase transitions revealed using transport and x-ray measurements," Arnab Banerjee, Ph.D.-Thesis, University of Chicago, 2013. "Charge transfer and multiple density waves in the rare earth tellurides," A. Banerjee, Yejun Feng, D.M. Silevitch, Jiyang Wang, J.C. Lang, H.-H. Kuo, I.R. Fisher, T.F. Rosenbaum, Phys. Rev. B 87, 155131 (2013). "Controlling Size-Induced Phase Transformations Using Chemically Designed Nanolaminates," Matt Beekman, Sabrina Disch, Sergei Rouvimov, Deepa Kasinathan, Klaus Koepernik, Helge Rosner, Paul Zschack, Wolfgang S. Neumann, David C. Johnson, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52, 13211 (2013).

323

Sector 1 - Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Software APS Software Scientists and researchers at the APS develop custom scientific software to help with acquisition and analysis of beamline data. Several packages are available for a variety of platforms and uses. Data Acquisition Motion control and data collection at the 1-BM and 1-ID beamlines are primarily executed using EPICS software. We also utilize SPEC, running through EPICS, for many experiments. Data Analysis Some of the programs used at Sector 1 to analyse 1-d and/or 2-d data sets are described: Fit2d, for viewing and analysing 2-dimensional data Igor, for analysis of small-angle scattering data Matlab, for strain/texture analysis and image analysis. GSAS/EXPGUI, for structural refinement of diffraction data. A comprehensive list of Powder Diffraction Software and Resources can be

324

Louisville Private Sector Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thursday, December 13, 2007 Thursday, December 13, 2007 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Agenda * Welcome and introductions from the Mayor (9:00-9:15) o The Mayor's energy and climate protection goals for Louisville o Request for private sector input for the upcoming public-private partnership to promote increased energy efficiency in buildings throughout the Louisville community o Highlights from the December 12 meeting of the ENERGY STAR Challenge implementation group o Introduction to Metro's Green Initiative and goals for today's session * Getting started with ENERGY STAR (9:15-10:00) o Introduction to the program and overview of ENERGY STAR resources o Kentucky and regional ENERGY STAR Partners and labeled buildings o Simple steps for energy savings o The benefits of energy savings

325

Energy Sector Market Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Electric Power Sector Hydroelectric Power (a) ............... 0.670 0.785 0.653 0.561 0.633 0.775 0.631 0.566 0.659 0.776 0.625 0.572 2.668 2.605 2.633 Wood Biomass (b) ........................ 0.048 0.043 0.052 0.046 0.045 0.039 0.051 0.052 0.055 0.049 0.060 0.054 0.190 0.187 0.218 Waste Biomass (c) ....................... 0.063 0.064 0.066 0.069 0.061 0.063 0.063 0.064 0.062 0.065 0.068 0.065 0.262 0.250 0.261 Wind ............................................. 0.376 0.361 0.253 0.377 0.428 0.461 0.315 0.400 0.417 0.461 0.340 0.424 1.368 1.604 1.641 Geothermal ................................. 0.036 0.037 0.038 0.039 0.041 0.041 0.041 0.042 0.041 0.040 0.041 0.042 0.149 0.164 0.165 Solar ............................................. 0.007 0.022 0.021 0.014 0.013 0.022 0.026 0.016 0.021 0.048 0.048 0.025 0.064

327

Figure 9.4 Natural Gas Prices (Dollarsa per Thousand Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 9.4 Natural Gas Prices (Dollarsa per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wellhead and Citygate, 19492012 Consuming Sectors, 19672012 Consuming Sectors, Monthly

328

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.wte.org/ Cost: Free The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. Overview The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. The website includes information on waste-to-energy basics

329

Program Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector Albania Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies EC LEDS Albania Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies EC LEDS United States Agency for International Development USAID United States Environmental Protection Agency United States Department of Energy United States Department of Agriculture United States Department of State Albania Southern Asia Low emission development planning LEDS Energy Land Climate Algeria Clean Technology Fund CTF Algeria Clean Technology Fund CTF African Development Bank Asian Development Bank European Bank for Reconstruction and Development EBRD Inter American Development Bank IDB World Bank Algeria South Eastern Asia Background analysis Finance Implementation

330

Oil and Natural Gas Program Commericialized Technologies and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL AND NATURAL GAS PROGRAM National Energy Technology Laboratory 2 Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Enhanced Oil Recovery NETL has advanced the science of enhanced...

331

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural...

332

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural...

333

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to provide lean injection gas for reservoir energy, to provide fuel for potential viscous oil thermal recovery, or to supplement future export gas. The associated fresh water...

334

Sector 9 | Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sitemap A Amptek Detector B Beam Transport (BM) Beam Transport (ID) Beamlines Beamline Alignment (BM) Beamline Alignment (ID) Beamline Equipment (BM) Beamline Equipment (ID) Beryllium Window (ID) Bicron Szintillation Detector BM B-Table BM Beamline BM First Optics Enclosure (FOE) 9-BM A BM User Manual Bruker CCD C Cable / Patch Panel Layout (BM) Cable / Patch Panel Layout (ID) Common Tasks Computers & Software Contact Info Control Panels (BM) Control Panels (ID) Cryo Pump Cryostats Current Amplifier D Differential Pump (BM) Differential Pump (ID) E EPS and PSS Systems (BM) EPS and PSS Systems (ID) EXAFS F Flag Locations (BM) G Gas Distribution (BM) Gas Distribution (ID) Gate Valves Getting Beamtime H High Voltage (HV) Power Supply Home Page Horizontal Focusing Mirror (ID) Hutches (BM)

335

Sector 9 | Operations and Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sector 9 Operations and Schedule Contents: 9-ID User Manual 9-BM User Manual Common Tasks Computers and Software Troubleshooting Web Cameras...

336

Simplify heat recovery steam generator evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are widely used in process and power plants, refineries and in several cogeneration/combined cycle systems. They are usually designed for a set of gas and steam conditions but often operate under different parameters due to plant constraints, steam demand, different ambient conditions (which affect the gas flow and exhaust gas temperature in a gas turbine plant), etc. As a result, the gas and steam temperature profiles in the HRSG, steam production and the steam temperature differ from the design conditions, affecting the entire plant performance and economics. Also, consultants and process engineers who are involved in evaluating the performance of the steam system as a whole, often would like to simulate the performance of an HRSG under different gas flows, inlet gas temperature and analysis, steam pressure and feed water temperature to optimize the entire steam system and select proper auxiliaries such as steam turbines, condensers, deaerators, etc.

Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (US))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imaging techniques · Unconventional oil and gas recovery · Gas hydrates · Nano-sensors Cross recovery Unconventional resources Renewable fuels Carbon dioxide Public policy Environmental/health #12;The and commercializing OxProp a "controlled buoyancy proppant" that is expected to materially enhance oil and gas

338

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 15, 2012 May 15, 2012 Workers install the final LED streetlight for DC's EECBG-funded energy efficient lighting upgrade. | Energy Department photo, credit Chris Galm. Brighter Lights, Safer Streets Thanks to support from an Energy Department Recovery Act grant, Washington, DC streets are becoming brighter. May 1, 2012 A student gets hands-on experience in the electric sector during an internship and mentoring program with Northeast Utilities, through ARRA workforce development funding. | Photo courtesy of Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. Building Tomorrow's Smart Grid Workforce Today Many community colleges, universities, utilities and manufacturers across America are taking smart, pragmatic steps to train the next generation of workers needed to modernize the nation's electric grid.

339

Coal sector profile  

SciTech Connect

Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

340

DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in Clean Energy, Environmental Management Sectors DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in Clean Energy, Environmental Management Sectors March 17, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy today released a new report highlighting the benefits of the Recovery Act to small businesses throughout the clean, renewable energy industry and environmental management sector. The report found that as of early March 2010, small businesses have been selected to receive nearly $5.4 billion in funding across a number of Recovery Act and related programs, including loans, loan guarantees, grants, contracts and tax incentives, in partnership with the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in Clean Energy, Environmental Management Sectors DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in Clean Energy, Environmental Management Sectors March 17, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy today released a new report highlighting the benefits of the Recovery Act to small businesses throughout the clean, renewable energy industry and environmental management sector. The report found that as of early March 2010, small businesses have been selected to receive nearly $5.4 billion in funding across a number of Recovery Act and related programs, including loans, loan guarantees, grants, contracts and tax incentives, in partnership with the

342

Mass and Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building (air to air heat exchanger). In my papers I use (water to air heat exchanger) as a heat recovery and I use the water as a mass recovery. The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines.

Hindawai, S. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

344

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

345

Battleground Energy Recovery Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and ? Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

Daniel Bullock

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the core recovery, gas and water are produced.Gas produced will displace some water, reducing the density

Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

South Africa Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in South Africa Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing Countries and the Development of Methods and Instruments for Identifying Reduction Potential and Implementing NAMAs Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa-Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing Countries and the Development of Methods and Instruments for Identifying Reduction Potential and Implementing NAMAs Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.giz.de/en/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country South Africa Southern Africa

348

India Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing India Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing Countries and the Development of Methods and Instruments for Identifying Reduction Potential and Implementing NAMAs Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing Countries and the Development of Methods and Instruments for Identifying Reduction Potential and Implementing NAMAs Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.giz.de/en/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country India Southern Asia References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1]

349

Mexico Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing Mexico Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing Countries and the Development of Methods and Instruments for Identifying Reduction Potential and Implementing NAMAs Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing Countries and the Development of Methods and Instruments for Identifying Reduction Potential and Implementing NAMAs Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.giz.de/en/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Mexico Central America References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1]

350

Thailand Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Thailand Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing Countries and the Development of Methods and Instruments for Identifying Reduction Potential and Implementing NAMAs Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing Countries and the Development of Methods and Instruments for Identifying Reduction Potential and Implementing NAMAs Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.giz.de/en/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1]

351

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions related to the the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 19, 2011 CX-005047: Categorical Exclusion Determination Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/19/2011 Location(s): Chicago, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 19, 2011 CX-005039: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/19/2011

352

Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange. 4 figs.

Brown, W.R.; Cassano, A.A.; Dunbobbin, B.R.; Rao, P.; Erickson, D.C.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

353

Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange.

Brown, William R. (Zionsville, PA); Cassano, Anthony A. (Allentown, PA); Dunbobbin, Brian R. (Allentown, PA); Rao, Pradip (Allentown, PA); Erickson, Donald C. (Annapolis, MD)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM GAS MIXTURE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating uranium from a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and other gases is described that comprises bringing the mixture into contact with anhydrous calcium sulfate to preferentially absorb the uranium hexafluoride on the sulfate. The calcium sulfate is then leached with a selective solvent for the adsorbed uranium. (AEC)

Jury, S.H.

1964-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Utility Sector Leaders Make Firm Commitment to Energy Efficiency |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Sector Leaders Make Firm Commitment to Energy Efficiency Utility Sector Leaders Make Firm Commitment to Energy Efficiency Utility Sector Leaders Make Firm Commitment to Energy Efficiency July 31, 2006 - 9:30am Addthis (San Francisco, Calif. - July 31, 2006) More than 80 energy, environmental and other organizations announced commitments and public statements in support of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE), released today, which provides energy consumers and providers information on policies and techniques to save money as well as protect the environment. By adopting the plan's recommendations on low-cost, under-used energy efficiency, Americans could save hundreds of billions of dollars on their gas and electric utility bills, cut greenhouse gas emissions, and lower the costs for energy and pollution controls.

356

sector Renewable Energy Non renewable Energy Biomass Buildings Commercial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

user interface valueType text user interface valueType text sector valueType text abstract valueType text website valueType text openei tool keyword valueType text openei tool uri valueType text items label Calculator user interface Spreadsheet Website sector Renewable Energy Non renewable Energy Biomass Buildings Commercial Buildings Residential Economic Development Gateway Geothermal Greenhouse Gas Multi model Integration Multi sector Impact Evaluation Gateway Solar Wind energy website https www gov uk pathways analysis openei tool keyword calculator greenhouse gas emissions GHG low carbon energy planning energy data emissions data openei tool uri http calculator tool decc gov uk pathways primary energy chart uri http en openei org w index php title Calculator type Tools label AGI

357

Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sector sector NSTB November 2008 Hank Kenchington - Program Manager Office of Electricity of Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector * 2,000,000 Miles of Oil Pipelines * 1,300,000 Miles of Gas Pipelines * 2,000 Petroleum Terminals * ~1,000,000 Wells * Extensive Ports, Refineries, Transportation, and LNG Facilities * 160,000 Miles of Electrical Transmission lines * ~17,000 Generators; 985,000 Megawatts (net summer capacity) * Over 3,100 Electric Utilities, with 131 million customers Refinery Locations, Crude and Product Pipelines Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil & Gas LNG Import Facilities (Reactivation underway) Legend Interstate Pipelines Intrastate and Other Pipelines

358

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stripper Well Consortium Stripper Well Consortium DE-FC26-00NT41025 Goal: The goal is to enhance the ability of the domestic production industry to keep stripper wells producing at economic production rates in an environmentally safe manner, maximizing the recovery of domestic hydrocarbon resources. Objective: The objective is to develop and manage an industry-driven consortium that provides a cost-efficient vehicle for developing, transferring, and deploying new technologies into the private sector that focus on improving the production performance of domestic natural gas and oil stripper wells. Performer: The Pennsylvania State University (Energy Institute) - Project management Accomplishments: Established a consortium governing structure, constitution and bylaws, Established areas of research focus (reservoir remediation and characterization, well bore cleanup, and surface systems optimization) and rules for proposal submission and selection, and

359

A Review of Coal Mine Methane Recovery for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of methane from coal mines might be a cost-effective offset method for some utilities looking for ways to reduce or offset their greenhouse gas emissions. This report provides an evaluation of potential recovery amounts and costs for U.S. mines along with a discussion of technical and legal issues.

1997-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

360

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 89 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Kansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, biomass and wind power.The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Kansas are supporting abroad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to geothermal and carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, Kansas' businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Kansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Kansas Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications Slide 1 District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo

362

Recovery Act Funds at Work | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Center » Recovery Act » Recovery Act Funds at Work Information Center » Recovery Act » Recovery Act Funds at Work Recovery Act Funds at Work Funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) are being put to work to improve safety, reliability, and service in systems across the country. Idaho Power Company is accelerating development of renewable energy integration, improving access to clean power resources, and overhauling their customer information and communications systems. Oklahoma Gas and Electric has completed the 2-year pilot of a time-based rate program to reduce peak demand, which resulted in an average bill reduction of $150/customer over the summer periods. Powder River Energy Corporation is meeting the challenges of terrain and weather by building a microwave communications network to ensure higher

363

A Study of the Composition of Carryover Particles in Kraft Recovery Boilers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carryover particles are partially/completely burned black liquor particles entrained in the flue gas in kraft recovery boilers. Understanding how carryover particles form and deposit on (more)

Khalaj-Zadeh, Asghar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Pace of Recovery Act Spending | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pace of Recovery Act Spending Pace of Recovery Act Spending The Pace of Recovery Act Spending August 20, 2010 - 2:49pm Addthis Matt Rogers Matt Rogers McKinsey & Company Sometimes the media is quick to criticize the pace of Recovery Act spending in the energy sector. Here's a key fact that is often overlooked: more than 90 percent of the Department of Energy's $32 billion in Recovery Act funds has been allocated to clean energy projects around the country, creating tens of thousands of direct jobs and even more along the supply chain - doing everything from installing wind turbines and solar panels, to manufacturing electric car batteries, to making homes more energy-efficient. Focusing on the amount that has been "paid out" or "reimbursed" misses the impact that these funds have had in creating jobs from the

365

Brazil's Emerging Sectoral Framework for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation and the Potential to Deliver Greenhou se Gas Emissions Reductions from Avoided Deforestation in the Amazon's Xingu River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical deforestation and forest degradation contribute approximately 17% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to the atmosphere. Because of the comparatively large role of these emissions globally, the issue of how to address them has become prominent in international negotiations to develop a post-2012 global climate treaty under the auspices of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). A mechanism designed to compensate developing nations that succeed in reducing emissio...

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

366

Natural Gas Production Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, ... for elemental sulfur and carbon dioxide can be used for enhanced oil recovery. Inert gases such as

367

industrial sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

industrial sector industrial sector Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

368

Tenth oil recovery conference  

SciTech Connect

The Tertiary Oil Recovery Project is sponsored by the State of Kansas to introduce Kansas producers to the economic potential of enhanced recovery methods for Kansas fields. Specific objectives include estimation of the state-wide tertiary oil resource, identification and evaluation of the most applicable processes, dissemination of technical information to producers, occasional collaboration on recovery projects, laboratory studies on Kansas applicable processes, and training of students and operators in tertiary oil recovery methods. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Sleeper, R. (ed.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Cyanidation Recovery Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat Treatment of Black Dross for the Production of a Value Added Material ... Leaching Studies for Metals Recovery from Waste Printed Wiring Boards (PWBs).

370

Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector - 2006 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- 2006 - 2006 Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector - 2006 This document, the Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector, outlines a coherent plan for improving cyber security in the energy sector. It is the result of an unprecedented collaboration between the energy sector and government to identify concrete steps to secure control systems used in the electricity, oil, and natural gas sectors over the next ten years. The Roadmap provides a strategic framework for guiding industry and government efforts based on a clear vision supported by goals and time-based milestones. It addresses the energy sector's most urgent challenges as well as longer-term needs and practices. Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector More Documents & Publications

371

Gas Market Transition: Impacts of Power Generation on Gas Pricing Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power sector is beginning to influence the natural gas market, affecting both total natural gas demand and aspects of natural gas price behavior. This report offers a single source that quantifies these influences. With the addition of new gas-fired generating capacity, the use of gas generation in the power sector has grown steadily. However, this progression was arrested after 2002 when the brunt of overbuilding was felt, and gas use in the power sector migrated to ever more efficient units. While ...

2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

372

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from April 1 through June 30, 2002, for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' We investigate a broad spectrum of topics related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. Significant results were obtained in the areas of multiphase flow and rock properties, hot-fluid injection, improved primary heavy oil recovery, and reservoir definition. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. Briefly, experiments were conducted to image at the pore level matrix-to-fracture production of oil from a fractured porous medium. This project is ongoing. A simulation studied was completed in the area of recovery processes during steam injection into fractured porous media. We continued to study experimentally heavy-oil production mechanisms from relatively low permeability rocks under conditions of high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased oil recovery rate and decreased residual oil saturation. Also in the area of imaging production processes in laboratory-scale cores, we use CT to study the process of gas-phase formation during solution gas drive in viscous oils. Results from recent experiments are reported here. Finally, a project was completed that uses the producing water-oil ratio to define reservoir heterogeneity and integrate production history into a reservoir model using streamline properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Payments Soar Past $4.3 Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2011 12, 2011 The EM Recovery Act Program has helped many small businesses in the recent recession. Some of these small business owners have told me they were on the brink of shutting down or facing significant layoffs before the Recovery Act. Now, they can use the experience and training they obtained in the Recovery Act cleanup to com- pete in sectors of the economy where they weren't previously qualified. Acting EM Recovery Act Program Director Thomas Johnson, Jr. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Payments Soar Past $4.3 Billion More than $4.3 BILLION in Recovery Act payments are accelerating environmental cleanup Small Business Contract Achievements EM has awarded about $2 billion - or one third of the $6 billion from the Recovery Act - to small businesses. The EM Recovery Act Program

374

Energy Sector Jobs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sector Jobs Energy Sector Jobs New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector: Taking a moment to break-down key findings from the latest Clean Energy Jobs...

375

The role of natural gas as a vehicle transportation fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes pathways to directly use natural gas, as compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG), in the transportation sector. The thesis focuses on identifying opportunities to reduce market ...

Murphy, Paul Jarod

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Status of enhanced oil recovery technology  

SciTech Connect

The various enhanced oil recovery processes are discussed and classified into the following categories: (1) polymer waterflooding; (2) steam processes; (3) miscible gas (CO/sub 2/) processes; (4) surfactant flooding; and (5) in-situ combustion. Polymer flooding alone is of limited applicability and production from polymer projects is unlikely to become highly significant. Steam processes are now economic for favorable prospects, and recovery levels range from 5 to 35%. Miscible gas processes are particularly applicable to those reservoirs with favorable geology located near sources of CO/sub 2/, and production could become significant in the next five years, but not sooner due to the time necessary to develop CO/sub 2/ sources and construct distribution systems. Recovery levels for the miscible gas processes are in the 5 to 15% range. Most surfactant processes are still in the research stage, and will not yield significant production for at least ten years. Ten to fifteen % of the original oil-in-place can be recovered through these processes. In Situ combustion processes are currently economic in some cases, but the ultimate potential is presently very limited unless significant technical breakthroughs are made in the future. It is estimated that the ultimate potential for present enhanced oil recovery processes in the conterminous United States is up to 20 billion barrels of petroleum.

Mattax, C.C.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with emphasis; (6) detailed study of CH4-CO2 exchange as a unique alternative to recover CH4 gas while sequestering CO2; (7) the relevance of fines in otherwise clean sand sediments on gas recovery and related phenomena such as fines migration and clogging, vuggy structure formation, and gas-driven fracture formation during gas production by depressurization.

J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Recovery Act State Summaries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act State Summaries Recovery Act State Summaries Recovery Act State Summaries Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo American Samoa Recovery Act State Memo Arizona Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo California Recovery Act State Memo Colorado Recovery Act State Memo Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo Delaware Recovery Act State Memo District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo Florida Recovery Act State Memo Georgia Recovery Act State Memo Guam Recovery Act State Memo Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo Idaho Recovery Act State Memo Illinois Recovery Act State Memo Indiana Recovery Act State Memo Iowa Recovery Act State Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Maine Recovery Act State Memo

379

1 New Technologies, Industry Developments and Emission Trends in Key Sectors: The Energy Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Australias total primary energy consumption grew by 3.6 per cent per annum between 1993/94 and 1997/98, while primary energy use in the electricity sector rose by more than 5 per cent per year over the same period. Since 1993/94, brown coal has strongly expanded its share in the fuel mix of the interconnected electricity markets of Victoria, New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory, and South Australia. It has become the primary fuel source for electricity generation, substituting for hydro, natural gas and hard coal. At the national level, this has meant that the long-term trend towards greater use of natural gas has stalled in favour of coal, especially brown coal. Since Victorias brown coal plants have relatively low thermal efficiencies, this substitution has also had the effect of reducing the average thermal efficiency in the power market to the levels of the late 1980s (IEA, 2001b). It should be noted that the economic objective of reducing the price of power which has driven the first stage of reform in the electricity industry in Australia has perversely encouraged the aggregate use of energy in the economy. This, in turn, has added to the growth of greenhouse gas emissions, reinforcing the trend associated with the change in the fuel mix for electricity generation. This paper addresses non-transport energy-related activities including conventional and renewable forms of energy supply, cross-cutting technologies employed in the energy sector and, more briefly, energy use by the business and household sectors.

Ainsley Jolley

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Gas utilization technologies  

SciTech Connect

One of the constant challenges facing the research community is the identification of technology needs 5 to 15 years from now. A look back into history indicates that the forces driving natural gas research have changed from decade to decade. In the 1970s research was driven by concerns for adequate supply; in the 1980s research was aimed at creating new markets for natural gas. What then are the driving forces for the 1990s? Recent reports from the natural gas industry have helped define a new direction driven primarily by market demand for natural gas. A study prepared by the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America Foundation entitled ``Survey of Natural Research, Development, and Demonstration RD&D Priorities`` indicated that in the 1990s the highest research priority should be for natural gas utilization and that technology development efforts should not only address efficiency and cost, but environmental and regulatory issues as well. This study and others, such as the report by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.) entitled ``Strategic Vision for Natural Gas Through the Year 2000,`` clearly identify the market sectors driving today`s technology development needs. The biggest driver is the power generation market followed by the industrial, transportation, appliance, and gas cooling markets. This is best illustrated by the GRI 1994 Baseline Projection on market growth in various sectors between the year 1992 and 2010. This paper highlights some of the recent technology developments in each one of these sectors.

Biljetina, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Attribution of climate forcing to economic sectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Attribution of climate forcing to economic sectors Title Attribution of climate forcing to economic sectors Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Unger,...

382

Energy Efficiency Report: Chapter 3: Residential Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. The Residential Sector Introduction. More than 90 million single-family, multifamily, and mobile home households encompass the residential sector.

383

U.S. Propane Demand Sectors (1996)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The residential and commercial sector and the chemical sector are the largest end users of propane in the U.S., accounting for 34% and 41% ...

384

Building Energy Retrofit Research: Multifamily Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Retrofit Research: Multifamily Sector Title Building Energy Retrofit Research: Multifamily Sector Publication Type Report Year of Publication 1985 Authors Diamond,...

385

Recovery Act Recipient Reporting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipients Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipients November 19, 2009 1 Outline of Presentation * OMB Reporting Requirements * Jobs Guidance * FR.gov 2 Section 1512 of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act Outlines Recipient Reporting Requirements "Recipient reports required by Section 1512 of the Recovery Act will answer important questions, such as: ▪ Who is receiving Recovery Act dollars and in what amounts? ▪ What projects or activities are being funded with Recovery Act dollars? ▪ What is the completion status of such projects or activities and what impact have they had on job creation and retention?" "When published on www.Recovery.gov, these reports will provide the public with an unprecedented level of transparency into how Federal dollars are being spent and will help drive accountability for the timely,

386

Summary - Caustic Recovery Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Caustic Recovery Technology Caustic Recovery Technology ETR Report Date: July 2007 ETR-7 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Caustic Recovery Technology Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (EM-21) has been developing caustic recovery technology for application to the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to reduce the amount of Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrified. Recycle of sodium hydroxide with an efficient caustic recovery process could reduce the amount of waste glass produced by greater than 30%. The Ceramatec Sodium (Na), Super fast Ionic CONductors (NaSICON) membrane has shown promise for directly producing 50% caustic with high sodium selectivity. The external review

387

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 52 quarter ending September 30, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress review on enhanced oil recovery covers: Chemical Flooding /emdash/ Supporting Research; Gas Displacement /emdash/ Supporting Research; Thermal Recovery /emdash/ Supporting Research; Resource Assessment Technology; Geoscience Technology; Environmental Technology; Microbial Technology.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress Review No. 39, quarter ending June 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 41, quarter ending December 31, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress Review No. 42, quarter ending March 31, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 51 quarter ending June 30, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Progress review on enhanced oil recovery covers: Chemical Flooding /emdash/ Field Projects; Chemical Flooding /emdash/ Supporting Research; Gas Displacement /emdash/ Supporting Research; Thermal Recovery /emdash/ Supporting Research; Resource Assessment Technology; Geoscience; Environmental Technology; Microbial Technology.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Sector 1 Frequently Asked Questions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sector 1 - General Information Sector 1 - General Information Sector 1 Safety Plan (pdf) Useful X-Ray Related Numbers Si a0 = 5.4308 Angstrom CeO2 a0=5.411 Angstrom Cd-109 gamma = 88.036 keV X-ray energy/wavelength conversion constant = 12.39842 Angstrom/keV Useful 1-ID Operations Information Always set the undulator by closing from large to small gap. Always scan the Kohzu monochromator from high to low energy. A Cd-109 source that can be used to calibrate detectors can be obtained by contacting Ali. It has Ag flourescent lines and a 88.036 keV gamma line. Tim Mooney's telephone number is 2-5417. Frequently Asked Questions The following questions come up often when using the Sector 1 beamlines. If you have a question (and maybe answer) that would be of general interest to Sector 1 users, please give it to Jon or Greg for inclusion in this list.

393

Danish Energy Authority Poland -Electricity and gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Danish Energy Authority Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU Funds Electricity sector analyses December 2004 #12;Danish Energy Authority Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU Funds Electricity sector

394

A T U Section 3. Natural Gas A G A S  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Section 3. Natural Gas Natural gas prices are developed for the residential, commercial, indus-trial, transportation, and electric power sectors.

395

Natural gas consumption has two peaks each year - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption of natural gas is seasonal, with consumption patterns among end-use sectors highly driven by weather. Total natural gas consumption peaks during the ...

396

Utah Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utah Recovery Act State Memo Utah Recovery Act State Memo Utah Recovery Act State Memo Utah has substantial natural resources, including oil, coal, natural gas, wind, geothermal, and solar power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Utah are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and geothermal, alternative fuel vehicles, and the clean-up of legacy uranium processing sites. Through these investments, Utah's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Utah to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Utah Recovery Act State Memo

397

Texas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Recovery Act State Memo Texas Recovery Act State Memo Texas Recovery Act State Memo Texas has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, biomass, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Texas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from carbon capture and storage to energy efficiency, the smart grid, solar, geothermal, and biomass projects. Through these investments, Texas's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Texas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Texas Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

398

Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arkansas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced battery manufacturing and renewable energy. Through these investments, Arkansas's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arkansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

399

Alaska Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, coal, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Alaska are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and electric grid improvements to geothermal power. Through these investments, Alaska's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Alaska to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Alaska Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

400

Virginia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virginia Recovery Act State Memo Virginia Recovery Act State Memo Virginia Recovery Act State Memo Virginia has substantial natural resources, including coal and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Virginia are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to alternative fuel vehicles and the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News. Through these investments, Virginia's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Virginia to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Virginia Recovery Act State Memo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana has substantial natural resources, including abundant oil, gas, coal, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Louisiana are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and smart grid to solar and geothermal, advanced battery manufacturing and biofuels. Through these investments, Louisiana's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Louisiana to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo

402

Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming has substantial natural resources including coal, natural gas, oil, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Wyoming are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, Wyoming's businesses, the University of Wyoming, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Wyoming to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Recovery_Act_Memo_Wyoming.pdf More Documents & Publications Slide 1

403

Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, gas, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Kentucky are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and alternative fuels and vehicles. Through these investments, Kentucky's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Kentucky to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

404

Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Oklahoma are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and geothermal. Through these investments, Oklahoma's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Ohio to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

405

Alaska Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, coal, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Alaska are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and electric grid improvements to geothermal power. Through these investments, Alaska's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Alaska to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Alaska Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

406

Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, gas, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Kentucky are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and alternative fuels and vehicles. Through these investments, Kentucky's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Kentucky to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

407

Alabama Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama has substantial natural resources, including gas, coal, biomass, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Alabama are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the electric grid to renewable energy and carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, Alabama's businesses, universities, nonprofits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Alabama to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Alabama Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

408

Montana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Montana are supporting abroad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and geothermal. Through these investments, Montana's businesses, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Montana to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Montana Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

409

Montana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Montana are supporting abroad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and geothermal. Through these investments, Montana's businesses, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Montana to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Montana Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

410

Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Oklahoma are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and geothermal. Through these investments, Oklahoma's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Ohio to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

411

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 43  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Table 16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers by Sector, 2006-2010, and by State and Sector, 2010 2006 Total ... 4,368,466 64,166,280 2,832,030 5,273,379 R...

412

Sustainable Energy Future in China's Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article investigates the potentials of energy-saving and mitigation of green-house gas (GHG) emission offered by implementation of building energy efficiency policies in China. An overview of existing literature regarding long-term energy demand and CO2 emission forecast scenarios is presented, it is found that the building sector will account for about one third of energy demand in China by 2020 and would have significant environmental implications in terms of GHG and other pollutant gases emission. Energy consumption in buildings could be reduced by 100-300 million tons of oil equivalent (mtoe) in 2030 compared to the business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, which means that 600-700 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions could be saved by implementing appropriate energy policies within an adapted institutional framework. The main energy saving potentials in buildings can be achieved by improving building's thermal performance and district heating system.

Li, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Mexico-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Mexico-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Partner Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Mexico Central America References Land Use Assessment Toolkit - Agriculture Resources[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include strengthening implementation of climate change policies, development of climate change policies, and

414

Recent hydrocarbon developments in Latin America: Key issues in the downstream oil sector  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following: (1) An overview of major issues in the downstream oil sector, including oil demand and product export availability, the changing product consumption pattern, and refineries being due for major investment; (2) Recent upstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela; (3) Recent downstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Cuba, and Venezuela; (4) Pipelines in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico; and (5) Regional energy balance. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Wu, K.; Pezeshki, S.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recovery (EOR) and natural gas storage. Keywords: geologicalactivities such as natural gas storage, EOR, and deepstorage, such as natural gas storage and CO 2 -enhanced oil

Jordan, Preston D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Disturbance and Recovery of Salt Marsh Arthropod Communities following BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Gulf of Mexico is a hub of oil and gas exploration activities that historically have impacted and impede recovery of the system. There are over 3,000 active oil & gas production platforms in U.S. OuterDisturbance and Recovery of Salt Marsh Arthropod Communities following BP Deepwater Horizon Oil

Pennings, Steven C.

417

Enhanced recovery update  

SciTech Connect

Three key projects featuring enhanced operations in California are described. In the Kern River oil field, steaming at a pilot project is testing the hot plate heavy oil recovery method. In Buena Vista oil field, steam will be injected in a test project to determine the commercial feasibility of using steam for the enhanced recovery of light crude oil. Also, in the McKittrick oil field, 2 processes are being considered for a commercial heavy oil mining venture. Steam continues to be the most important element in the recovery of hard-to-produce oil. Other steam-using projects are highlighted.

Rintoul, B.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Property:RecoveryFunding | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RecoveryFunding RecoveryFunding Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RecoveryFunding" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 5,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 1,544,004 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 4,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 11,444,180 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 1,330,825 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 18,700,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 20,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 200,000,000 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 88,821,251 +

419

Feed Resource Recovery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Resource Recovery Feed Resource Recovery Jump to: navigation, search Name Feed Resource Recovery Place Wellesley, Massachusetts Product Start-up planning to convert waste to fertilizer and biomethane gas. Coordinates 42.29776°, -71.289744° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.29776,"lon":-71.289744,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

420

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Here is one compliance agreement for EMs American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program on accelerated milestones for the Recovery Act program.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Owner Itaska Location Brawley, California Coordinates 32.9786566°, -115.530267° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.9786566,"lon":-115.530267,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

422

Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hampden County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.1172314°, -72.6624209° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1172314,"lon":-72.6624209,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

423

Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597°, -82.3017728° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.9903597,"lon":-82.3017728,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

424

Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Facility Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

425

Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Facility Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Miami-Dade County, Florida Coordinates 25.7889689°, -80.2264393° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.7889689,"lon":-80.2264393,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

426

Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Southeast Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

427

Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Montgomery County Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Montgomery County, Maryland Coordinates 39.1547426°, -77.2405153° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1547426,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

428

Recovery News Flashes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news-flashes Office of Environmental news-flashes Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP http://energy.gov/em/downloads/tru-success-srs-recovery-act-prepares-complete-shipment-more-5000-cubic-meters-nuclear recovery-act-prepares-complete-shipment-more-5000-cubic-meters-nuclear" class="title-link">"TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP

429

Natural gas monthly, November 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground state data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

430

Natural gas monthly, April 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

NONE

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

431

Natural gas monthly, June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

Natural gas monthly, July 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Natural gas monthly: December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Natural gas monthly, June 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Natural gas monthly: September 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Regional GHG Emissions Stat s Greenhouse Gas and the Regional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6/5/2013 1 Regional GHG Emissions Stat s Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Symposium.6% Coal 42% Hydro, 68.0% 10 #12;6/5/2013 6 Overall GHG Emissions: PNW vs. US Total US Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Economic Sector (2011) Total PNW* Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Economic Sector (2010

437

Heat Recovery from Coal Gasifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with heat recovery from pressurized entrained and fixed bed coal gasifiers for steam generation. High temperature waste heat, from slagging entrained flow coal gasifier, can be recovered effectively in a series of radiant and convection waste heat boilers. Medium level waste heat leaving fixed bed type gasifiers can be recovered more economically by convection type boilers or shell and tube heat exchangers. An economic analysis for the steam generation and process heat exchanger is presented. Steam generated from the waste heat boiler is used to drive steam turbines for power generation or air compressors for the oxygen plant. Low level heat recovered by process heat exchangers is used to heat product gas or support the energy requirement of the gasification plant. The mechanical design for pressure vessel shell and boiler tubes is discussed. The design considers metallurgical requirements associated with hydrogen rich, high temperature, and high pressure atmosphere.

Wen, H.; Lou, S. C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper discusses the applications of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation. Consultants, plant engineers and plant developers can evaluate the steam side performance of HRSGs and arrive at the optimum system which matches the needs of the process plant, cogeneration or combined cycle plant. There is no need to design the HRSG per se and hence simulation is a valuable tool for anyone interested in evaluating the HRSG performance even before it is designed. It can also save a lot of time for specification writers as they need not guess how the steam side performance will vary with different gas/steam parameters. A few examples are given to show how simulation methods can be applied to real life problems.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Procurement Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), particularly those equipped with advanced gas turbines that are subjected to periods of frequent cyclic operation, have experienced premature pressure part failures resulting from excessive thermal mechanical fatigue damage. The very competitive power generation marketplace has resulted in the lowest installed cost often taking precedence over medium- and long-term durability and operating costs. The procurement of engineer, procure, and construct ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

440

Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i.e. , more efficient power generation and gas recovery,building materials, and power generation. ^ This sectionheat and pressure for power generationpreviously considered

Zhiping, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Plant Renovation Fuel-Gas Recovery District.Heating Honeycomb Briquettes Coal Processing Raw Material Conservation (b) Technology Updating Waste Heat &

Zhiping, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Low Temperature Heat Recovery for Boiler Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low temperature corrosion proof heat exchangers designed to reduce boiler flue gas temperatures to 150F or lower are now being commercially operated on gas, oil and coal fired boilers. These heat exchangers, when applied to boiler flue gas, are commonly called condensing economizers. It has traditionally been common practice in the boiler industry to not reduce flue gas temperatures below the 300F to 400F range. This barrier has now been broken by the development and application of corrosion proof heat exchanger technology. This opens up a vast reservior of untapped recoverable energy that can be recovered and reused as an energy source. The successful recovery of this heat and the optimum use of it are the fundemental goals of the technology presented in this paper. This Recovered Low Level Heat Is Normally Used To Heat Cold Make-up Water Or Combustion Air.

Shook, J. R.; Luttenberger, D. B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Electric Power Forest Products Iron and Steel Lime Magnesium Minerals Mining Oil and Gas Semiconductors Progress Report Aluminum Automobile Manufacturers Business...

445

Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping cogeneration systems, over two-thirds of the energy is in the exhaust gases leaving the gas turbine. In bottoming cycles, where steam and/or electrical power are generated from heating process exhaust streams, the heat recovery design is of primary concern. John Zink Company, since 1929, has specialized in the development, design, and fabrication of energy efficient equipment for the industrial and commercial markets. The paper outlines the design, installation and performance of recently supplied gas turbine cogeneration heat recovery systems. It also describes; several bottoming cycle thermal system designs applied to incinerators, process heaters, refinery secondary reformers and FCC units. Overall parameters and general trends in the design and application of cogeneration thermal systems are presented. New equipment and system designs to reduce pollution and increase overall system efficiency are also reviewed.

Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 47, Quarter ending June 1986  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery; resource assessment; environmental technology; and microbial technology. (AT)

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Analysis of fuel shares in the industrial sector  

SciTech Connect

These studies describe how fuel shares have changed over time; determine what factors are important in promoting fuel share changes; and project fuel shares to the year 1995 in the industrial sector. A general characterization of changes in fuel shares of four fuel types - coal, natural gas, oil and electricity - for the industrial sector is as follows. Coal as a major fuel source declined rapidly from 1958 to the early 1970s, with oil and natural gas substituting for coal. Coal's share of total fuels stabilized after the oil price shock of 1972-1973, and increased after the 1979 price shock. In the period since 1973, most industries and the industrial sector as a whole appear to freely substitute natural gas for oil, and vice versa. Throughout the period 1958-1981, the share of electricity as a fuel increased. These observations are derived from analyzing the fuel share patterns of more than 20 industries over the 24-year period 1958 to 1981.

Roop, J.M.; Belzer, D.B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

FLARING SOLAR HALE SECTOR BOUNDARIES  

SciTech Connect

The sector structure that organizes the magnetic field of the solar wind into large-scale domains has a clear pattern in the photospheric magnetic field as well. The rotation rate, 27-28.5 days, implies an effectively rigid rotation originating deeper in the solar interior than the sunspots. The photospheric magnetic field is known to be concentrated near that portion (the Hale boundary) in each solar hemisphere, where the change in magnetic sector polarity matches that between the leading and following sunspot polarities in active regions in the respective hemispheres. We report here that flares and microflares also concentrate at the Hale boundaries, implying that flux emergence and the creation of free magnetic energy in the corona also have a direct cause in the deep interior.

Svalgaard, L. [HEPL, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94304 (United States); Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S., E-mail: leif@leif.org [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

Impact of Higher Natural Gas Prices on Local Distribution ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

sectors of the natural gas market between 1999 and 2006, ... rate structure and revenue collection are appropriate for each customer service category.

450

Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool Summary Name: Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy AgencyCompany Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Energy, Land...

451

Natural Gas Year-in-Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Highlights. Continued growth in production, relatively low prices, and expanded electric power sector use characterized U.S. natural gas markets in 2011.

452

Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) - December 2012 With Data for October...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual 2011. These revisions primarily apply to statistics on production, underground storage, consumption, and prices by sector. Many 2012 monthly data series have been...

453

District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per...

454

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive Incentive Type State Rebate Program Applicable Sector Agricultural, Commercial, Industrial, Institutional,...

455

Guidelines on Optimizing Heat Recovery Steam Generator Drains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe thermal-mechanical fatigue damage to the superheaters (SHs), reheaters (RHs), and steam piping of horizontal-gas-path heat recovery steam generators due primarily to ineffective drainage of the condensate that is generated in superheaters and reheaters at every startup continues to be a significant industry problem that results in avoidable deterioration of unit reliability and significant unnecessary maintenance costs. This report will assist operators in guiding heat recovery steam generator (HR...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

456

North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota has substantial natural resources, including coal, natural gas, oil, wind, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in North Dakota are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to clean coal, wind, and carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, North Dakota's businesses, the University of North Dakota, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning North Dakota to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future.

457

New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in New Mexico are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and solar, geothermal and hydro, biofuels and nuclear, as well as a major commitment to cleaning up the Cold War- legacy nuclear sites in the state. Through these investments, New Mexico's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning New

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North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota has substantial natural resources, including coal, natural gas, oil, wind, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in North Dakota are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to clean coal, wind, and carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, North Dakota's businesses, the University of North Dakota, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning North Dakota to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future.

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New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mexico Recovery Act State Memo Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in New Mexico are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and solar, geothermal and hydro, biofuels and nuclear, as well as a major commitment to cleaning up the Cold War- legacy nuclear sites in the state. Through these investments, New Mexico's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning New

460

California Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Recovery Act State Memo California Recovery Act State Memo California Recovery Act State Memo C