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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Alameda County, California Coordinates 37.6016892°, -121.7195459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6016892,"lon":-121.7195459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CSL Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Broward County, Florida Coordinates 26.190096°, -80.365865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.190096,"lon":-80.365865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Lake Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CID Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Anderson County, Tennessee Coordinates 36.0809574°, -84.2278796° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0809574,"lon":-84.2278796,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility BJ Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Gwinnett County, Georgia Coordinates 33.9190653°, -84.0167423° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9190653,"lon":-84.0167423,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Du Page County, Illinois Coordinates 41.8243831°, -88.0900762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8243831,"lon":-88.0900762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location St. Joseph County, Indiana Coordinates 41.6228085°, -86.3376761° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6228085,"lon":-86.3376761,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility DFW Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Denton County, Texas Coordinates 33.1418611°, -97.179026° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.1418611,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers biomass-firedboilers.pd...

14

Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act...

15

Puente Hills Energy Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Puente Hills Energy Recovery Biomass Facility Puente Hills Energy Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Puente Hills Energy Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Puente Hills Energy Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

Riveside Resource Recovery LLC Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Riveside Resource Recovery LLC Biomass Facility Riveside Resource Recovery LLC Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Riveside Resource Recovery LLC Biomass Facility Facility Riveside Resource Recovery LLC Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Will County, Illinois Coordinates 41.5054724°, -88.0900762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5054724,"lon":-88.0900762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

17

Metro Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Facility Metro Methane Recovery Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Polk County, Iowa Coordinates 41.6278423°, -93.5003454° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6278423,"lon":-93.5003454,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity Announcements Special Notice Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity Announcements Special...

19

Landfill gas recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas recovery ... However, by referring to landfills as dumps, the article creates a misimpression. ... The answers revolve around the relative emissions from composting facilities and landfills and the degree to which either finished compost or landfill gas is used beneficially. ...

Morton A. Barlaz

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

20

ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers Reducing Superheater Corrosion to Enable Maximum Energy Effi ciency This project will develop...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

RCWMD Badlands Landfill Gas Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RCWMD Badlands Landfill Gas Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name RCWMD Badlands Landfill Gas Project Biomass Facility Facility RCWMD Badlands Landfill Gas...

22

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Facility Winnebago County Landfill Gas Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Winnebago County, Wisconsin Coordinates...

23

Biomass Gas Electric LLC BG E | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BG E Jump to: navigation, search Name: Biomass Gas & Electric LLC (BG&E) Place: Norcross, Georgia Zip: 30092 Sector: Biomass Product: Project developer specialising in biomass...

24

Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Facility Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Facility Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Miami-Dade County, Florida Coordinates 25.7889689°, -80.2264393° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.7889689,"lon":-80.2264393,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Southeast Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Southeast Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

27

Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Imperial Valley Resource Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Owner Itaska Location Brawley, California Coordinates 32.9786566°, -115.530267° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.9786566,"lon":-115.530267,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Pioneer Valley Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hampden County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.1172314°, -72.6624209° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1172314,"lon":-72.6624209,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

29

Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Hillsborough County Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597°, -82.3017728° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.9903597,"lon":-82.3017728,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

30

Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Montgomery County Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Montgomery County Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Montgomery County, Maryland Coordinates 39.1547426°, -77.2405153° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1547426,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Systems and procedures for integrated recovery of forest biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whether recovery of forest biomass will become a common procedure depends on how acceptable biomass is for fuel and fiber, what the demand is for it, how stable is its supply, and how economic it is when it comes to energy. Manufacturers appear interested in continuing to develop machines and systems that recover biomass resulting from silvicultural treatments, final harvests, and site preparation. (Refs. 9).

Walbridge, T.A.; Stuart, W.B.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for...

33

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

34

Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provided more than $36 billion to the Department of Energy (DOE) to accelerate work on existing projects, undertake new and transformative research, and deploy clean energy technologies across the nation. Of this funding, $1029 million is supporting innovative work to advance biomass research, development, demonstration, and deployment.

35

Penobscot Energy Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Penobscot Energy Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Penobscot Energy Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Penobscot County, Maine Coordinates 45.3230777°, -68.5806727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.3230777,"lon":-68.5806727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Enhancing landfill gas recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The landfilling of municipal solid waste (MSW) may cause potential environmental impacts like global warming (GW), soil contaminations, and groundwater pollution. The degradation of MSW in anaerobic circumstances generates methane emissions, and can hence contribute the GW. As the GW is nowadays considered as one of the most serious environmental threats, the mitigation of methane emissions should obviously be aimed at on every landfill site where methane generation occurs. In this study, the treatment and utilization options for the generated LFG at case landfills which are located next to each other are examined. The yearly GHG emission balances are estimated for three different gas management scenarios. The first scenario is the combined heat and power (CHP) production with a gas engine. The second scenario is the combination of heat generation for the asphalt production process in the summer and district heat production by a water boiler in the winter. The third scenario is the LFG upgrading to biomethane. The estimation results illustrate that the LFG collection efficiency affects strongly on the magnitudes of GHG emissions. According to the results, the CHP production gives the highest GHG emission savings and is hence recommended as a gas utilization option for case landfills. Furthermore, aspects related to the case landfills' extraction are discussed.

Antti Niskanen; Hanna Vrri; Jouni Havukainen; Ville Uusitalo; Mika Horttanainen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

38

SEMASS Resource Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » SEMASS Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name SEMASS Resource Recovery Biomass Facility Facility SEMASS Resource Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Plymouth County, Massachusetts Coordinates 41.9120406°, -70.7168469° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9120406,"lon":-70.7168469,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

39

Biomass and Natural Gas to Liquid Transportation Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-D: Natural Gas & Biomass to Liquids Josephine Elia, Graduate Student, Princeton University

40

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Bergen County, New Jersey Coordinates 40.9262762°, -74.07701° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9262762,"lon":-74.07701,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Palos Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Palos Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Facility Palos Verdes Gas to Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Facility Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.7924343°, -72.8042797° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7924343,"lon":-72.8042797,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

Thermochemical Gasification of Biomass: Fuel Conversion, Hot Gas Cleanup and Gas Turbine Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air-blown fluidized bed biomass gasification integrated with a gas- and steam turbine combined cycle (BIGCC) is a potentially attractive way to convert biomass into electricity and heat with a high efficiency.

J. Andries; W. de Jong; P. D. J. Hoppesteyn

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Making Biofuel Renewable: Sustainable Phosphorus Recovery from Microbial Biomass McKay Gifford and Paul Westerhoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making Biofuel Renewable: Sustainable Phosphorus Recovery from Microbial Biomass McKay Gifford, BioresourceTechnology, 102(2), 1697-1703. Biomass Composition Biofuel Processing Anion Exchange Microwave depletion indicate that future energy must come from biofuel. Biodiesel from photosynthetic microorganisms

Hall, Sharon J.

47

Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Project Biomass Facility Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Albany County, New York Coordinates 42.5756797°, -73.9359821° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5756797,"lon":-73.9359821,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

48

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

49

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Natural Gas Rate and Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

50

Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Facility Gas Utilization Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location San Diego County, California Coordinates 33.0933809°, -116.6081653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0933809,"lon":-116.6081653,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

51

Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Gas Technology Institute  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Gas Technology Institute will conduct research and development on hydropyrolysis and hydroconversion processes to make gasoline and diesel.

52

CO2 abatement by co-firing of natural gas and biomass-derived gas in a gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, a possible way for partial CO2 emissions reduction from gas turbine exhausts by co-firing with biomass is investigated. The basic principle is the recirculation of a fraction of the exhausts (still rich in oxygen) to a gasifier, in order to produce syngas to mix with natural gas fuel. As biomass is a CO2 neutral fuel, the fraction of replaced natural gas is a measure of CO2 removal potential of the powerplant. The investigated solution considers the conversion of solid fuel to a gaseous fuel into an atmospheric gasifier, which is blown with a recirculated fraction of hot gas turbine exhausts, typically still rich in air. In this way, the heat content of the exhausts may be exploited to partially sustain the gasification section. The produced syngas, after the tar removal into the high temperature cracker, is thus sent to the cooling section, consisting of three main components: (I) gas turbine recuperator, (II) heat recovery steam generator and (III) condensing heat exchanger to cool down the syngas close to the environmental temperature before the subsequent recompression and mixing with natural gas fuel into the combustion chamber. The water stream produced within the condensing heat exchanger upstream the syngas compression is vaporised and sent back to the gasifier. If very limited modification to the existing gas turbine has to be applied in order to keep the additional costs limited, only a relatively reduced fraction of the low calorific value syngas may be mixed with natural gas. The analysis at different levels of co-firing has shown that no appreciable redesign has to be applied to the target GE5 machine up to 2530% (heat rate based) renewable fraction. With an accurate heat recovery from the cooling/cleaning system of the syngas, the same levels of efficiency of the original machine have been achieved, in spite of the relatively large power consumption of the syngas recompression. Very interesting results have been obtained within the 1030% range of biomass co-firing, with CO2 removal levels between 30% and 50% with reference to the values of the base GE5 gas turbine powerplant. The economic analysis has shown that, in spite of the high investment required for the syngas fuel production chain (gasifier, coolers, cleaners and fuel compressor), approximately at the same level of gas turbine itself, there is an interesting attractiveness due to the possibility of selling high-value green certificates and CO2 allowances, which reduce the payback time to 24 years. The uncertainty on the calculated economic parameters are greatly influenced by the uncertainty on actual biomass availability and yearly working time of powerplant, whereas off design operation, which affects mainly the uncertainty of compressor and turbine efficiency, is mainly reflected on the uncertainty of electric power output and efficiency.

Daniele Fiaschi; Riccardo Carta

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Residual biomass recovery from fully-mechanized delayed thinnings on Spanish Pinus spp. plantations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In Spain, five million hectares of conifer plantations require thinning. As only a small part produces pulpwood, they are a major potential biomass resource. A time-study is performed on the recovery of logging residues in a Pinus plantation on gentle terrain in order to analyze the main factors affecting the productivity and cost of biomass and pulpwood harvesting. The first factor is the branches and tops piling method, either using the forest harvester head to bunch them along the strip road sides (method S) while processing the timber, or leaving them on the strip road centre (method C) and using a 175 HP bulldozer with a raking implement to pile them up afterwards. The second factor is the top diameter separating pulpwood and biomass, 8 or 10cm. Mechanized felling-processing productivity is greater for the method C and the smaller diameter. Hauling biomass off with forwarder is also significantly more productive when piled by bulldozer. Productivity equations were fitted for pulpwood and biomass forwarding. The direct cost of biomass recovery ranged from 29.7 to 31.5 per green tonne (H=51%). The roundwood and biomass effective yields per hectare were measured. This allowed evaluating the cost balance for roundwood/roundwood plus biomass harvesting, based on the net income per hectare. Under the 2013 Spanish market conditions, recovery of residual biomass is economically preferable to harvesting only roundwood in the studied stands. The greater net income balance corresponds to the piling method using the bulldozer (C) and the larger top diameter (10cm).

E. Tolosana; R. Laina; Y. Ambrosio; M. Martn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Effects of fracturing fluid recovery upon well performance and ultimate recovery of hydraulically fractured gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis IAN MARIE BERTHELOT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS by JAN MARIE BERTIIELOT Appmved...

Berthelot, Jan Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies January 22, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis...

56

Micro Gas Turbine Operation with Biomass Producer Gas and Mixtures of Biomass Producer Gas and Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Instead of gas engines, micro or mini gas turbines may be used. ... Power output delivered to the grid, engine speed, turbine temperature, and fuel gas valve position are read from the micro gas turbine operating console and recorded manually. ... Financial support from the Renewable Energy (DEN) program of the Dutch Energy Agency SenterNovem is gratefully acknowledged. ...

Luc P. L. M. Rabou; Jan M. Grift; Ritze E. Conradie; Sven Fransen

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

57

NETL: Natural Gas Resources, Enhanced Oil Recovery, Deepwater Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Projects and Natural Gas Projects Index of Research Project Summaries Use the links provided below to access detailed DOE/NETL project information, including project reports, contacts, and pertinent publications. Search Natural Gas and Oil Projects Current Projects Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas Environmental Other Natural Gas Resources Ehanced Oil Recovery CO2 EOR Environmental Other EOR & Oil Resources Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture Safety & Environmental Other Deepwater Technology Methane Hydrates DOE/NETL Projects Completed Projects Completed Natural Gas Resources Completed Enhanced Oil Recovery Completed Deepwater Technology Completed E&P Technologies Completed Environmental Solutions Completed Methane Hydrates Completed Transmission & Distribution

58

SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Symposium on Energy from Biomass and Wastes, August 14,Gasification of Biomass," Department of Energy Contract No.of Biomass Gasification," Department of Energy Contract No.

Figueroa, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography: Application in the Study of Biomass Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analytical chemistry technique of pyrolysis/gas chromatography has been applied to the study of biomass pyrolysis. Very small samples of biomass feedstocks were pyrolyzed in a controlled, reproducible manner....

John C. Franklin; James L. Kuester

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas. How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature? Links: The technology of Condensing Flue Gas Heat Recovery natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Landfill Gas Formation, Recovery and Emission in The Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfills are one of the main sources of methane in The Netherlands. Methane emissions from landfills are estimated to be about 180580 ... at a total of 7601730 ktonnes. Landfill gas recovery and utilization is...

Hans Oonk

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Recovery of oil from fractured reservoirs by gas displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNE BE RG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNEBERG Approved as, to style and content by: . ( y (Chairman of Cornrnittee) (Head of Depar nt) / (Membe r) (Member) M b...

Unneberg, Arild

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

Co-conversion of Biomass, Shale-natural gas, and process-derived CO2 into Fuels and Chemicals  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-D: Natural Gas & Biomass to Liquids Suresh Babu, Senior Program Manager, Biomass Program Development, Brookhaven National Laboratory

64

SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pressure on the Steam Gasification of Biomass," Departmentof Energy, Catalytic Steam Gasification of Biomass, 11 AprilII. DISCUSSION III. GASIFICATION/LIQUEFACTION DESIGN BASIS

Figueroa, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Exhaust Gas Energy Recovery Technology Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exhaust waste heat recovery systems have the potential to significantly improve vehicle fuel economy for conventional and hybrid electric powertrains spanning passenger to heavy truck applications. This chapter discusses thermodynamic considerations and three classes of energy recovery technologies which are under development for vehicle applications. More specifically, this chapter describes the state-of-the-art in exhaust WHR as well as challenges and opportunities for thermodynamic power cycles, thermoelectric devices, and turbo-compounding systems.

Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Development of biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program to develop biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines was started at Aerospace Research Corporation in 1980. The research culminated in construction and installation of a power generation system using an Allison T-56 gas turbine at Red Boiling Springs, Tennessee. The system has been successfully operated with delivery of power to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Emissions from the system meet or exceed EPA requirements. No erosion of the turbine has been detected in over 760 hours of operation, 106 of which were on line generating power for the TVA. It was necessary to limit the turbine inlet temperature to 1450{degrees}F to control the rate of ash deposition on the turbine blades and stators and facilitate periodic cleaning of these components. Results of tests by researchers at Battelle Memorial Institute -- Columbus Division, give promise that deposits on the turbine blades, which must be periodically removed with milled walnut hulls, can be eliminated with addition of lime to the fuel. Operational problems, which are centered primarily around the feed system and engine configuration, have been adequately identified and can be corrected in an upgraded design. The system is now ready for development of a commercial version. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provided support only for the evaluation of wood as an alternative fuel for gas turbines. However, the system appears to have high potential for integration into a hybrid system for the production of ethanol from sorghum or sugar cane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

Hamrick, J T [Aerospace Research Corp., Roanoke, VA (USA)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Recovery of Sugars from Ionic Liquid Biomass Liquor by Solvent Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. M. Holmes Biomass Science and Conversion Technologyof the conversion of biomass into monosaccharides. However,enhance the conversion of IL-treated biomass polysaccharides

Brennan, Timothy C.; Datta, Supratim; Blanch, Harvey W.; Simmons, Blake A.; Holmes, Bradley M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass from feed hopper Feed distributor cone with ultrasonic level indication P~~~ ~at Pyrolysis

Figueroa, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Mississippi Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Memo Mississippi has substantial natural resources, including biomass, oil, coal, and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

71

Synthesis Gas Generation by Chemical-Looping Reforming of Biomass with Natural Copper Ore as Oxygen Carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical-looping reforming (CLR) of biomass is a ... However, at the cost of synthesis gas combustion for heat, the gas lower heating value...

Lei Guo; Haibo Zhao; Chuguang Zheng

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Management Tool for Analyzing CHP Natural Gas Liquids Recovery System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research is to develop a management tool for analyzing combined heat and power (CHP) natural gas liquids (NGL) recovery systems. The methodology is developed around the central ideas of product recovery, possible recovery...

Olsen, C.; Kozman, T. A.; Lee, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17 until the Riser Insertion Tube was disconnected...

74

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17 until the Riser Insertion Tube was disconnected...

75

Biomass gasification using a horizontal entrained-flow gasifier and catalytic processing of the product gas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A novel study on biomass-air gasification using a horizontal entrained-flow gasifier and catalytic processing of the product gas has been conducted. The study was designed (more)

Legonda, Isack Amos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. This report describes testing using the laboratory apparatus but operated at the pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas, which contains far more contaminants than can be simulated in the laboratory. The results are very encouraging, with stable and efficient operation being obtained for a prolonged period of time.

Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

CO2 mass transfer and conversion to biomass in a horizontal gasliquid photobioreactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study deals with CO2 mass transfers and biomass conversion in an industrial horizontal tubular photobioreactor. An analytical approach is used to determine an expression modeling the influence of CO2 mass transfers on the overall biomass conversion efficiency for a given culture broth, heat and light conditions. Fluid mechanics and mass transfer are predicted with a classical two-phase flow approach (Taitel and Dukler, 1976) combined with a dissolution correlation developed and tested in the laboratory (Valiorgue et al., 2011). The influence of the stripping gas, removing the excess of oxygen in the liquid, on the conversion to biomass efficiency is shown to be not negligible. The expression is used to evaluate how the photobioreactor's design and process parameters can be tuned in order to improve biomass conversion efficiency. The biomass conversion efficiency evolution with the photobioreactor's length was found to behave asymptotically and it was explained by the relative orders of magnitude of gas dissolution and gas stripping. It has been shown that the gas flow rate for stripping and therefore the oxygen removal will be limited when further increasing the industrial photobioreactor's length for a given objective of CO2 conversion to biomass efficiency.

P. Valiorgue; H. Ben Hadid; M. El Hajem; L. Rimbaud; A. Muller-Feuga; J.Y. Champagne

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Increased olefins production via recovery of refinery gas hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the process of catalytically cracking heavy petroleum fractions to make gasoline and light fuel oil, by-product waste gases are also generated. The waste gases, normally used as fuel, are themselves rich sources of ethylene, propylene and other light hydrocarbons which can be recovered inexpensively via a cryogenic dephlegmator process. This gas separation technique is exploited in a system, in operation since spring of 1987, which reclaims C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from a refinery gas. The reclamation process bolsters production in a nearby ethylene plant. Causing no disruption of ethylene plant operations, the cryogenic hydrocarbon recovery system functions smoothly with existing systems. The dephlegmation unit operation melds distillation and heat transfer processes in a single easily-controlled step which boosts the hydrocarbon purity and recovery above the levels profitably achievable with conventional cryogenic separation techniques. Very attractive operating economics follow from high purity, high recovery, and high energy efficiency. This paper discusses process concepts, economic benefits, plant operation, and early performance results.

Bernhard, D.P.; Rowles, H.C.; Moss, J.A.; Pickering, J.L. Jr.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Structure and Parameters Optimization of Organic Rankine Cycle System for Natural Gas Compressor Exhaust Gas Energy Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the paper, the structure and working principle of free piston based organic rankine cycle (ORC) exhaust gas energy recovery system...

Yongqiang Han; Zhongchang Liu; Yun Xu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Incremental natural gas resources through infield reserve growth/secondary natural gas recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Infield Reserve Growth/Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project is to develop, test, and verify technologies and methodologies with near- to midterm potential for maximizing the recovery of natural gasfrom conventional reservoirs in known fields. Additional technical and technology transfer objectives of the SGR project include: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities in reservoirs of conventional permeability cause reservoir compartmentalization and, hence, incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas gulf coast basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications to find secondary gas. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields. To transfer project results to a wide array of natural gas producers, not just as field case studies, but as conceptual models of how heterogeneities determine natural gas flow units and how to recognize the geologic and engineering clues that operators can use in a cost-effective manner to identify incremental, or secondary, gas.

Finley, R.J.; Levey, R.A.; Hardage, B.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Unconventional gas recovery program. Semi-annual report for the period ending September 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the third semi-annual report describing the technical progress of the US DOE projects directed at gas recovery from unconventional sources. Currently the program includes Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project, Eastern Gas Shales Project, Western Gas Sands Project, and Geopressured Aquifers Project.

Manilla, R.D. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Effect of Gas Diffusion on Mobility of Foam for Enhanced Oil Recovery Lars E. Nonnekes1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Gas Diffusion on Mobility of Foam for Enhanced Oil Recovery Lars E. Nonnekes1 Foam can improve the sweep efficiency of gas injected into oil reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery University William Richard Rossen Email: W.R.Rossen@tudelft.nl Abstract Transport of gas across

Cox, Simon

83

Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention discloses a novel method of operating a gasifier for production of fuel gas from carbonaceous fuels. The process disclosed enables operating in an entrained mode using inlet gas velocities of less than 7 feet per second, feedstock throughputs exceeding 4000 lbs/ft.sup.2 -hr, and pressures below 100 psia.

Feldmann, Herman F. (Worthington, OH); Paisley, Mark A. (Upper Arlington, OH)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Apparatus and method for fast recovery and charge of insulation gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An insulation gas recovery and charge apparatus is provided comprising a pump, a connect, an inflatable collection device and at least one valve.

Jordan, Kevin

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

85

CO2-limitation-inducible Green Recovery of fatty acids from cyanobacterial biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...energy-intensive biomass processes such as concentration...or ethyl esters (biodiesel), and alkanes. However...needed for a productive process. We believe...biomass and metabolites: Process options and economics . Biotechnol...Rittmann BE ( 2011 ) Evaluation of methods to extract...

Xinyao Liu; Sarah Fallon; Jie Sheng; Roy Curtiss III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The effects of production rates and some reservoir parameters on recovery in a strong water drive gas reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the effect of gas production rate and rock and fluid properties on the recovery of gas from strong water drive gas reservoirs will permit gas production optimization and should result in conservation of natural and financial resources. Hence... saturations, gas production rate is not a dominant factor affecting the ultimate gas recovery. Almost all the gas is recovered whether producing the field at 0. 1 or 10 times GRR. In predicting the gas recovery in a strong water drive reser- voir...

Soemarso, Christophorus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

Biomass Gasification:? Produced Gas Upgrading by In-Bed Use of Dolomite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When some calcined dolomite (OCaOMg) is used in the bed of a biomass gasifier of fluidized bed type the raw gas produced is cleaner than when only silica sand is used in it as fluidizing medium. In-bed dolomite changes the product distribution at the ...

Ana Olivares; Mara P. Aznar; Miguel A. Caballero; Javier Gil; Eva Francs; Jos Corella

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report describes the objectives, technical approach, results and conclusions for a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept is a configuration of CrystaTech, Inc.'s CrystaSulf{reg_sign} process which utilizes a direct oxidation catalyst upstream of the absorber tower to oxidize a portion of the inlet hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and elemental sulfur. This hybrid configuration of CrystaSulf has been named CrystaSulf-DO and represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day and more. This hybrid process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both onshore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf is a nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes H{sub 2}S from gas streams and converts it to elemental sulfur. In CrystaSulf, H{sub 2}S in the inlet gas is reacted with SO{sub 2} to make elemental sulfur according to the liquid phase Claus reaction: 2H{sub 2}S + SO{sub 2} {yields} 2H{sub 2}O + 3S. The SO{sub 2} for the reaction can be supplied from external sources by purchasing liquid SO{sub 2} and injecting it into the CrystaSulf solution, or produced internally by converting a portion of the inlet gas H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} or by burning a portion of the sulfur produced to make SO{sub 2}. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, the needed SO{sub 2} is produced by placing a bed of direct oxidation catalyst in the inlet gas stream to oxidize a portion of the inlet H{sub 2}S. Oxidation catalysts may also produce some elemental sulfur under these conditions, which can be removed and recovered prior to the CrystaSulf absorber. The CrystaSulf-DO process can utilize direct oxidation catalyst from many sources. Numerous direct oxidation catalysts are available from many suppliers worldwide. They have been used for H{sub 2}S oxidation to sulfur and/or SO{sub 2} for decades. It was believed at the outset of the project that TDA Research, Inc., a subcontractor, could develop a direct oxidation catalyst that would offer advantages over other commercially available catalysts for this CrystaSulf-DO process application. This project involved the development of several of TDA's candidate proprietary direct oxidation catalysts through laboratory bench-scale testing. These catalysts were shown to be effective for conversion of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} and to elemental sulfur under certain operating conditions. One of these catalysts was subsequently tested on a commercial gas stream in a bench-scale reactor at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas with good results. However, commercial developments have precluded the use of TDA catalysts in the CrystaSulf-DO process. Nonetheless, this project has advanced direct oxidation catalyst technology for H{sub 2}S control in energy industries and led to several viable paths to commercialization. TDA is commercializing the use of its direct oxidation catalyst technology in conjunction with the SulfaTreat{reg_sign} solid scavenger for natural gas applications and in conjunction with ConocoPhillips and DOE for gasification applications using ConocoPhillips gasification technology. CrystaTech is commercializing its CrystaSulf-DO process in conjunction with Gas Technology Institute for natural gas applications (using direct oxidation catalysts from other commercial sources) and in conjunction with ChevronTexaco and DOE for gasification applications using ChevronTexaco's gasification technology.

Dennis Dalrymple

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Enhancing Shale Gas Recovery by High-Temperature Supercritical CO2 Flooding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine a new technology for shale gas recovery: high-temperature supercritical carbon dioxide flooding ... of supercritical carbon dioxide, the characteristics of shale gas reservoirs, the adsorption/desorpti...

Feiying Ma; Yongqing Wang; Lin Wang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Petrochemicals from oil, natural gas, coal and biomass: Production costs in 20302050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane, coal and biomass are being considered as alternatives to crude oil for the production of basic petrochemicals, such as light olefins. This paper is a study on the production costs of 24 process routes utilizing these primary energy sources. A wide range of projected energy prices in 20302050 found in the open literature is used. The basis for comparison is the production cost per t of high value chemicals (HVCs or light olefin-value equivalent). A Monte Carlo method was used to estimate the ranking of production costs of all 24 routes with 10,000 trials of varying energy prices and CO2 emissions costs (assumed to be within $0100/tCO2; the total CO2 emissions, or cradle-to-grave CO2 emissions, were considered). High energy prices in the first three quarter of 2008 were tested separately. The main findings are: Production costs: while the production costs of crude oil- and natural gas-based routes are within $500900/tHVCs, those of coal- and biomass-based routes are mostly within $400800/tHVCs. Production costs of coal- and biomass-based routes are in general quite similar while in some cases the difference is significant. Among the top seven most expensive routes, six are oil- and gas-based routes. Among the top seven least expensive routes, six are coal and biomass routes. CO2 emissions costs: the effect of CO2 emissions costs was found to be strong on the coal-based routes and also quite significant on the biomass-based routes. However, the effect on oil- and gas-based routes is found to be small or relatively moderate. Energy prices in 2008: most of the coal-based routes and biomass-based routes (particularly sugar cane) still have much lower production costs than the oil- and gas-based routes (even if international freight costs are included). To ensure the reduction of CO2 emissions in the long-term, we suggest that policies for the petrochemicals industry focus on stimulating the use of biomass as well as carbon capture and storage features for coal-based routes.

Tao Ren; Bert Danils; Martin K. Patel; Kornelis Blok

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

92

CO2-limitation-inducible Green Recovery of fatty acids from cyanobacterial biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...other microbial bioreactors such as algae, E. coli, and yeast...fatty acyl methyl, or ethyl esters (biodiesel), and alkanes...Green Recovery is introduced into algae. Fig. S1. One fluorescence microscopy...

Xinyao Liu; Sarah Fallon; Jie Sheng; Roy Curtiss III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery from a spark-ignition (SI) engine, from a prototyping of a practical supervi- sion and control system for a pilot Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

94

In-line continuous sizing of biomass particles in gas-solid two-phase flow at a biomass-fired power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas-solid two-phase flows are widely seen in many industrial processes. A good exampleis the pneumatically conveyed pulverised fuel flow in the power generation industry. As a significant renewable fuel source biomass has been widely adopted in electrical power generation. The particle size distribution of pneumatically conveyed biomass correlates closely with combustion efficiency and pollutant emissions and should therefore be monitored on anin-line continuous basis. In this paper an integrated instrumentation system using both a piezoelectric sensorand anelectrostatic sensor arrayis proposed to measure the size distribution and flow velocity of biomass particles. A prototype system was tested on a 250mm bore pipe at a biomass-fired power plantand its performance has been evaluated under industrial conditions.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio.

96

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio. An added benefit of the project, which was managed by the National Energy

97

Calcined Dolomite, Magnesite, and Calcite for Cleaning Hot Gas from a Fluidized Bed Biomass Gasifier with Steam:? Life and Usefulness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calcined Dolomite, Magnesite, and Calcite for Cleaning Hot Gas from a Fluidized Bed Biomass Gasifier with Steam:? Life and Usefulness ... About the temperature effect, at low (800 C) and medium (840 C) temperatures, the calcite is soon deactivated. ...

Jess Delgado; Mara P. Aznar; Jos Corella

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

98

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory, J.from smoldering combustion of biomass measured by Open-Pathof levoglucosan in biomass combustion aerosol by high-

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Thermal characterization and pyrolysis kinetics of tropical biomass feedstocks for energy recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper aims to analyse energy related properties, thermal degradation behaviour and devolatilization kinetics of five Cameroonian biomasses namely, Palm Kernel Shells (PKS), Mesocarp Fibres (PMF), Coffee Husk (CH), Corn Cob (CC) and Peanut Shell (PNS). The thermal degradation was performed using thermogravimetric analysis (TG). Different behaviours related to the presence of chemical constituents such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin were obtained. Comparison of the thermal characterization shows that PMF is the most interesting feedstock with the highest heating values and reactivity due to higher volatile content. Decomposition of TG data was analysed by applying diffusion and chemical reaction kinetic models. Obtained results show that biomass pyrolysis is represented by two successive steps. The devolatilization stage characterized by high weight loss rate is well described by diffusion reaction models. In contrast, the char formation stage characterized by low weight loss rate is well described by third order chemical reaction models.

M. Jeguirim; J. Bikai; Y. Elmay; L. Limousy; E. Njeugna

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Exergy analysis of biomass-to-synthetic natural gas (SNG) process via indirect gasification of various biomass feedstock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an exergy analysis of SNG production via indirect gasification of various biomass feedstock, including virgin (woody) biomass as well as waste biomass (municipal solid waste and sludge). In indirect gasification heat needed for endothermic gasification reactions is produced by burning char in a separate combustion section of the gasifier and subsequently the heat is transferred to the gasification section. The advantages of indirect gasification are no syngas dilution with nitrogen and no external heat source required. The production process involves several process units, including biomass gasification, syngas cooler, cleaning and compression, methanation reactors and SNG conditioning. The process is simulated with a computer model using the flow-sheeting program Aspen Plus. The exergy analysis is performed for various operating conditions such as gasifier pressure, methanation pressure and temperature. The largest internal exergy losses occur in the gasifier followed by methanation and SNG conditioning. It is shown that exergetic efficiency of biomass-to-SNG process for woody biomass is higher than that for waste biomass. The exergetic efficiency for all biomass feedstock increases with gasification pressure, whereas the effects of methanation pressure and temperature are opposite for treated wood and waste biomass.

Caecilia R. Vitasari; Martin Jurascik; Krzysztof J. Ptasinski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Promising technology for recovery and use of liquefied natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Use of liquefied natural gas is proposed as an alternative to motor fuel. Technology for recovering liquid natural gas based on the principle of internal gas cooling in a turbo-expander, and the equipment require...

E. B. Fedorova; V. V. Fedorov; A. D. Shakhov

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Combined Flue Gas Heat Recovery and Pollution Control Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the field of heat recovery now make it possible to recover a portion of the wasted heat and improve the working conditions of the air purification equipment. Proper design and selection of heat recovery and pollution control equipment as a combination...

Zbikowski, T.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

Arnold, Marion Denson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Bioenergy recovery from landfill gas: A case study in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas (LFG) utilization which means a synergy...3/h and the methane concentration was above 90%. The process and optimization of the pilot-scale test were also reported in the paper. The product gas was of...

Wei Wang; Yuxiang Luo; Zhou Deng

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory, J.J. R. , and Veres, P. : Biomass burning in Siberia andOpen burning of agricultural biomass: Physical and chemical

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Experimentalnumerical design of a biomass bubbling fluidized bed gasifier for paper sludge energy recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the application of a comprehensive approach to the design of small scale sustainable distributed generation systems with special focus on energy recovery from paper production process sludge. The methodology integrates a detailed fluid-dynamic analysis tool with preliminary experimental analysis on a laboratory scale to guide the design of a prototype bubbling fluidized bed gasifier in the 85kW power range fitting with small and medium size paper production industries. Preliminary tests show stable operation even for this rather small power scale, and deviation from chemical equilibrium concentration in agreement with literature available data. Energy content in the sludge may be recovered along with a significant reduction of residual volume and mass. The concept may then be used to increase the overall sustainability of paper production.

S. Cordiner; G. De Simone; V. Mulone

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arkansas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced battery manufacturing and renewable energy. Through these investments, Arkansas's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arkansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

110

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arkansas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced battery manufacturing and renewable energy. Through these investments, Arkansas's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arkansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

111

The effect on recovery of the injection of alternating slugs of gas and water at pressures above the bubble point  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Recovery vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Gas Slug. 13 4, Refined Oil Recovery vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Water Slug. 14 5. The Effect of Slug Length on Recovery of Refined Oil. 15 6. Recovery of East... Texas Crude Oil vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Gas Slug. ig 7. Recovery of East Texas Crude Oil vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Water Slug. 19 8. The Effect of Slug Length on Recovery of East Texas Crude Oil. 20...

Givens, James Wilson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Chemicals from Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Added Chemicals from Biomass. Volume I: Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas (www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/pdfs/35523.pdf) . 6. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical...

David R. Dodds; Richard A. Gross

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

Development of hot corrosion resistant coatings for gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emission reductions are being sought worldwide to mitigate climate change. These need to proceed in parallel with optimisation of thermal efficiency in energy conversion systems on economic grounds to achieve overall sustainability. The use of renewable energy is one strategy being adopted to achieve these needs; with one route being the burning of biomass and waste derived fuels in the gas turbines of highly efficient, integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electricity generating units. A major factor to be taken into account with gas turbines using such fuels, compared with natural gas, is the potentially higher rates of hot corrosion caused by molten trace species which can be deposited on hot gas path components. This paper describes the development of hot corrosion protective coatings for such applications. Diffusion coatings were the basis for coating development, which consisted of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) trials, using aluminising and single step silicon-aluminising processes to develop new coating structures on two nickel-based superalloys, one conventionally cast and one single crystal (IN738LC and CMSX-4). These coatings were characterised using SEM/EDX analysis and their performance evaluated in oxidation and hot corrosion screening tests. A variant of the single step silicon-aluminide coating was identified as having sufficient oxidation/hot corrosion resistance and microstructural stability to form the basis for future coating optimisation.

A. Bradshaw; N.J. Simms; J.R. Nicholls

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible multiphase mechanisms at work, namely, Darcy-type displacement until gas breakthrough, gravity drainage after breakthrough and film-drainage in gas-invaded zones throughout the duration of the process. The partially-scaled physical model was used in a series of experiments to study the effects of wettability, gas-oil miscibility, secondary versus tertiary mode gas injection, and the presence of fractures on GAGD oil recovery. In addition to yielding recoveries of up to 80% IOIP, even in the immiscible gas injection mode, the partially-scaled physical model confirmed the positive influence of fractures and oil-wet characteristics in enhancing oil recoveries over those measured in the homogeneous (unfractured) water-wet models. An interesting observation was that a single logarithmic relationship between the oil recovery and the gravity number was obeyed by the physical model, the high-pressure corefloods and the field data.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

Recovery Act: ArcelorMittal USA Blast Furnace Gas Flare Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to ArcelorMittal USA, Inc. (ArcelorMittal) for a project to construct and operate a blast furnace gas recovery boiler and supporting infrastructure at ArcelorMittals Indiana Harbor Steel Mill in East Chicago, Indiana. Blast furnace gas (BFG) is a by-product of blast furnaces that is generated when iron ore is reduced with coke to create metallic iron. BFG has a very low heating value, about 1/10th the heating value of natural gas. BFG is commonly used as a boiler fuel; however, before installation of the gas recovery boiler, ArcelorMittal flared 22 percent of the blast furnace gas produced at the No. 7 Blast Furnace at Indiana Harbor. The project uses the previously flared BFG to power a new high efficiency boiler which produces 350,000 pounds of steam per hour. The steam produced is used to drive existing turbines to generate electricity and for other requirements at the facility. The goals of the project included job creation and preservation, reduced energy consumption, reduced energy costs, environmental improvement, and sustainability.

Seaman, John

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Secondary natural gas recovery -- infield reserve growth joint venture: Applications in midcontinent sandstones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Infield Reserve Growth/Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project is to develop, test, and verify technologies and methodologies with near- to midterm potential for maximizing the recovery of natural gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Additional technical and technology transfer objectives of the SGR project include: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities in reservoirs of conventional permeability cause reservoir compartmentalization and, hence, incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from deltaic and valley-fill sandstones of the Midcontinent as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications to find secondary gas; to demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields; and to transfer project results to a wide array of natural gas producers, not just as field case studies, but as conceptual models of how heterogeneities determine natural gas flow units and how to recognize the geologic and engineering clues that operators can use in a cost-effective manner to identify incremental, or secondary, gas.

Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Modeling effects of diffusion and gravity drainage on oil recovery in naturally fractured reservoirs under gas injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas injection in naturally fractured reservoirs maintains the reservoir pressure, and increases oil recovery primarily by gravity drainage and to a lesser extent by mass transfer between the flowing gas in the fracture and the porous matrix...

Jamili, Ahmad

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

120

Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant fraction of U.S. natural gas reserves are subquality due to the presence of acid gases and nitrogen; 13% of existing reserves (19 trillion cubic feed) may be contaminated with hydrogen sulfide. For natural gas to be useful as fuel and feedstock, this hydrogen sulfide has to be removed to the pipeline specification of 4 ppm. The technology used to achieve these specifications has been amine, or similar chemical or physical solvent, absorption. Although mature and widely used in the gas industry, absorption processes are capital and energy-intensive and require constant supervision for proper operation. This makes these processes unsuitable for treating gas at low throughput, in remote locations, or with a high concentration of acid gases. The U.S. Department of Energy, recognizes that exploitation of smaller, more sub-quality resources will be necessary to meet demand as the large gas fields in the U.S. are depleted. In response to this need, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has developed membranes and a membrane process for removing hydrogen sulfide from natural gas. During this project, high-performance polymeric thin-film composite membranes were brought from the research stage to field testing. The membranes have hydrogen sulfide/methane selectivities in the range 35 to 60, depending on the feed conditions, and have been scaled up to commercial-scale production. A large number of spiral-wound modules were manufactured, tested and optimized during this project, which culminated in a field test at a Shell facility in East Texas. The short field test showed that membrane module performance on an actual natural gas stream was close to that observed in the laboratory tests with cleaner streams. An extensive technical and economic analysis was performed to determine the best applications for the membrane process. Two areas were identified: the low-flow-rate, high-hydrogen-sulfide-content region and the high-flow-rate, high-hydrogen-sulfide-content region. In both regions the MTR membrane process will be combined with another process to provide the necessary hydrogen sulfide removal from the natural gas. In the first region the membrane process will be combined with the SulfaTreat fixed-bed absorption process, and in the second region the membrane process will be combined with a conventional absorption process. Economic analyses indicate that these hybrid processes provide 20-40% cost savings over stand-alone absorption technologies.

K. Amo; R.W. Baker; V.D. Helm; T. Hofmann; K.A. Lokhandwala; I. Pinnau; M.B. Ringer; T.T. Su; L. Toy; J.G. Wijmans

1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Investigation of Effects of Coal and Biomass Contaminants on the Performance of Water-Gas-Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects of Coal Effects of Coal and Biomass Contaminants on the Performance of Water-Gas-Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Background Coal-Biomass-to-Liquids (CBTL) processes gasify coal, biomass, and mixtures of coal/ biomass to produce synthesis gas (syngas) that can be converted to liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Positive benefits of these processes include the use of feedstocks from domestic sources and lower greenhouse gas production than can be achieved from using conventional petroleum-based fuels. However, syngas generated by coal and biomass co-gasification contains a myriad of trace contaminants that may poison the water- gas-shift (WGS) and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts used in the gas-to-liquid processes. While the effect of coal contaminants on FT processes is well studied, more research

122

Densified Biomass Can Cost-Effectively Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Address Energy Security in Thermal Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Total switchgrass production costs at the farm gate were $79.31/Mg (see SI for production cost detail). ... Replacing natural gas with biomass produces high, positive abatement costs and is not deemed to be a viable alternative. ... Zhang, Y.; McKechnie, J.; Cormier, D.; Lyng, R.; Mabee, W.; Ogino, A.; MacLean, H. L.Life cycle emissions and cost of producing electricity from coal, natural gas, and wood pellets in Ontario, Canada Environ. ...

Thomas O. Wilson; Frederick M. McNeal; Sabrina Spatari; David G. Abler; Paul R. Adler

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

123

This work was supported by the USDepartment of Energy, UnconventionalGas Recovery Research Program.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;This work was supported by the USDepartment of Energy, UnconventionalGas Recovery Research the world's first Hot Dry Rock geothermalenergyextractionsystemat FentonHill,New Mexico. The system-specifiedtools should be capableof operatingfor sustained periodsin hot wells; have automaticgain controland

124

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pyrolysis of wood: Applications to thermochemical processing of newsprint and biomass.of pyrolysis of cellulose, is a well-established biomasspyrolysis products (such as levoglucosan). In contrast, laboratory combustion of biomass

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Secondary natural gas recovery in mature fluvial sandstone reservoirs, Frio Formation, Agua Dulce Field, South Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach that integrates detailed geologic, engineering, and petrophysical analyses combined with improved well-log analytical techniques can be used by independent oil and gas companies of successful infield exploration in mature Gulf Coast fields that larger companies may consider uneconomic. In a secondary gas recovery project conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and funded by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, a potential incremental natural gas resource of 7.7 bcf, of which 4.0 bcf may be technically recoverable, was identified in a 490-ac lease in Agua Dulce field. Five wells in this lease had previously produced 13.7 bcf from Frio reservoirs at depths of 4600-6200 ft. The pay zones occur in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones offset by faults associated with the Vicksburg fault zone. The compartments may each contain up to 1.0 bcf of gas resources with estimates based on previous completions and the recent infield drilling experience of Pintas Creek Oil Company. Uncontacted gas resources occur in thin (typically less than 10 ft) bypassed zones that can be identified through a computed log evaluation that integrates open-hole logs, wireline pressure tests, fluid samples, and cores. At Agua Dulce field, such analysis identified at 4-ft bypassed zone uphole from previously produced reservoirs. This reservoir contained original reservoir pressure and flowed at rates exceeding 1 mmcf/d. The expected ultimate recovery is 0.4 bcf. Methodologies developed in the evaluation of Agua Dulce field can be successfully applied to other mature gas fields in the south Texas Gulf Coast. For example, Stratton and McFaddin are two fields in which the secondary gas recovery project has demonstrated the existence of thin, potentially bypassed zones that can yield significant incremental gas resources, extending the economic life of these fields.

Ambrose, W.A.; Levey, R.A. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Vidal, J.M. (ResTech, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Sippel, M.A. (Research and Engineering Consultants, Inc., Englewood, CA (United States)); Ballard, J.R. (Envirocorp Services and Technology, Houston, TX (United States)); Coover, D.M. Jr. (Pintas Creek Oil Company, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)); Bloxsom, W.E. (Coastal Texas Oil and Gas, Houston, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Increase Natural Gas Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency http://en.openei.org/community/group/increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas.How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature?gas-energy-efficiency" target="_blank">read more natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat

127

Improvement in oil recovery using cosolvents with CO{sub 2} gas floods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of investigations to improve oil recovery using cosolvents in CO{sub 2} gas floods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the application and selection of cosolvents as additives to gas displacement processes. A cosolvent used as a miscible additive changed the properties of the supercritical gas phase. Addition of a cosolvent resulted in increased viscosity and density of the gas mixture, and enhanced extraction of oil compounds into the CO{sub 2} rich phase. Gas phase properties were measured in an equilibrium cell with a capillary viscometer and a high pressure densitometer. A number of requirements must be considered in the application of a cosolvent. Cosolvent miscibility with CO{sub 2}, brine solubility, cosolvent volatility and relative quantity of the cosolvent partitioning into the oil phase were factors that must be considered for the successful application of cosolvents. Coreflood experiments were conducted with selected cosolvents to measure oil recovery efficiency. The results indicate lower molecular weight additives, such as propane, are the most effective cosolvents to increase oil recovery.

Raible, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Improvement in oil recovery using cosolvents with CO sub 2 gas floods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of investigations to improve oil recovery using cosolvents in CO{sub 2} gas floods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the application and selection of cosolvents as additives to gas displacement processes. A cosolvent used as a miscible additive changed the properties of the supercritical gas phase. Addition of a cosolvent resulted in increased viscosity and density of the gas mixture, and enhanced extraction of oil compounds into the CO{sub 2} rich phase. Gas phase properties were measured in an equilibrium cell with a capillary viscometer and a high pressure densitometer. A number of requirements must be considered in the application of a cosolvent. Cosolvent miscibility with CO{sub 2}, brine solubility, cosolvent volatility and relative quantity of the cosolvent partitioning into the oil phase were factors that must be considered for the successful application of cosolvents. Coreflood experiments were conducted with selected cosolvents to measure oil recovery efficiency. The results indicate lower molecular weight additives, such as propane, are the most effective cosolvents to increase oil recovery.

Raible, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

130

Meteorological parameters as an important factor on the energy recovery of landfill gas in landfills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of meteorological factors on the composition and the energy recovery of the landfill gas (LFG) were evaluated in this study. Landfill gas data consisting of methane carbon dioxide and oxygen content as well as LFG temperature were collected from April 2009 to March 2010 along with meteorological data. The data set were first used to visualize the similarity by using self-organizing maps and to calculate correlation factors. Then the data was used with ANN to further analyze the impacts of meteorological factors. In both analysis it is seen that the most important meteorological parameter effective on LFG energy content is soil temperatures. Furthermore ANN was found to be successful in explaining variations of methane content and temperature of LFG with correlation coefficients of 0.706 and 0.984 respectively. ANN was proved itself to be a useful tool for estimating energy recovery of the landfill gas.

?brahim Uyanik; Bestamin zkaya; Selami Demir; Mehmet akmakci

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Santa Clara Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Santa Clara Biomass Facility Facility Santa Clara Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Santa Clara County,...

132

Hutchins LFG Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hutchins LFG Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hutchins LFG Biomass Facility Facility Hutchins LFG Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dallas County,...

133

Compression Stripping of Flue Gas with Energy Recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SOX and NOX and CO2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO2, SO2, and H2O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

Ochs, Thomas L.; O'Connor, William K.

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Compression stripping of flue gas with energy recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SO.sub.X and NO.sub.X and CO.sub.2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Electromotive Force for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Using Biomass Produced Gas as Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electromotive force (e.m.f.) of solid oxide fuel cells using biomass produced gas (BPG) as the fuels is calculated at 700-1 200 K using an in-house computer program based on thermodynamic equilibrium analysis. Tour program also predicts the concentration of oxygen in the fuel chamber as well as the concentration of equilibrium species such as H2 CO CO2 and CH4. Compared with using hydrogen as a fuel the e.m.f. for cells using BPG as the fuels is relative low and strongly influenced by carbon deposition. To remove carbon deposition the optimum amount of H2O to add is determined at various operating temperatures. Further the e.m.f. for cells based on yttria stabilized zirconia and doped ceria as electrolytes are compared. The study reveals that when using BPG as fuel the depression of e.m.f. for a SOFC using doped ceria as electrolyte is relatively small when compared with that using Yttria stabilized zirconia.

Wei Zhu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY and continuously between the earth's biomass and atmosphere. From a greenhouse gas perspective, forest treatments

137

Solar Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Synthesis Gas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00335  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CRADA is established to facilitate the development of solar thermal technology to efficiently and economically convert biomass into useful products (synthesis gas and derivatives) that can replace fossil fuels. NREL's High Flux Solar Furnace will be utilized to validate system modeling, evaluate candidate reactor materials, conduct on-sun testing of the process, and assist in the development of solar process control system. This work is part of a DOE-USDA 3-year, $1M grant.

Netter, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Carbon dioxide recovery from an integrated coal gasifier, combined cycle plant using membrane separation and a CO2 gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A scheme is described for electricity production based on coal gasification with recovery of carbon dioxide. In this scheme, coal is gasified into a coal gas, consisting mainly of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A ...

Chris Hendriks

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 16 (2013) 129144 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Comparative lifecycle inventory (LCI) of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods inventory (LCI) to compare the lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emis- sions of enhanced oil recovery (EOR oil recovery CCS Biomass IGCC NGCC Carbon credits a b s t r a c t This study uses a process lifecycle

Jaramillo, Paulina

140

Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs by displacing oil downwards within the oil reservoir and into an oil recovery apparatus is disclosed. The process is referred to as "gas-assisted gravity drainage" and comprises the steps of placing one or more horizontal producer wells near the bottom of a payzone (i.e., rock in which oil and gas are found in exploitable quantities) of a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir and injecting a fluid displacer (e.g., CO.sub.2) through one or more vertical wells or horizontal wells. Pre-existing vertical wells may be used to inject the fluid displacer into the reservoir. As the fluid displacer is injected into the top portion of the reservoir, it forms a gas zone, which displaces oil and water downward towards the horizontal producer well(s).

Rao, Dandina N. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Catalytic Reforming of Biomass Raw Fuel Gas to Syngas for FT Liquid Fuels Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of biomass to obtain a syngas provides a competitive means for clean FT (Fischer-Tropsch) liquid fuels from renewable resources. The feasibility of the process depends on the upgrading of raw ...

Tiejun Wang; Chenguang Wang; Qi Zhang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Pressurised Combustion of Biomass-Derived, Low Calorific Value, Fuel Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During a 3 year (1996 1998) project, partly funded by the EU as part of their JOULE 3 programme, experimental and theoretical research will be done on the pressurised combustion of biomass-derived, LCV, fuel ga...

J. Andries; P. D. J. Hoppesteyn

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The best use of biomass? Greenhouse gas lifecycle analysis of predicted pyrolysis biochar systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to pessimistic scenarios are used for system operation. Slow pyrolysis is compared to fast pyrolysis and biomass co-firing for GHG abatement and electricity production, using various scenarios for availability of indigenous Scottish feedstocks....

Hammond, James A R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Impact of the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide on Gas Oil Hydrotreatment: Investigation on Liquids from Biomass Cotreatment with Petroleum Cuts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide on Gas Oil Hydrotreatment: Investigation on Liquids from Biomass Cotreatment with Petroleum Cuts ... A potential way of utilizing these bioliquids as fuels could be the direct hydrotreatment(6) or the cohydrotreatment with petroleum fractions,(7) such as atmospheric gas oils, to achieve the technical and environmental fuel standards, especially in terms of sulfur content. ...

Ana Pinheiro; Nathalie Dupassieux; Damien Hudebine; Christophe Geantet

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

Mixed refrigerants proven efficient in natural-gas-liquids recovery process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lower processing temperatures for higher recoveries of natural gas liquids (NGL) leads to increasingly complex and expensive refrigeration techniques. This paper describes the mixed component refrigeration technique and that it has been proven as a viable alternative to the turboexpander plant. Mixed component refrigeration systems have been primarily used in applications such as LNG terminals and peak-shaving plants, where overall compression horse-power requirements are of primary concern due to operating cost. Recently, development of high pressure, brazed aluminum plate/fin exchangers and increasing compression costs have made economic potential of the mixed refrigerant alternative apparent. If the residue gas must be compressed to the same pressure as the plant inlet using the turbo-expander design, the mixed refrigerant system will require approximately 15% less horsepower for the same liquids production.

Mac Kenzie, D.H.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

147

Establishment phase greenhouse gas emissions in short rotation woody biomass plantations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-rotation woody bio- energy crops (SRWC), specifically hybrid-poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.), being to short-rotation woody biomass crops (SRWC) for bioenergy in the Northern U.S. Lake States. GHG debts in time since last cultivation: 5 vs. 42 years. To address the short-term effects of plantation

Turner, Monica G.

148

Texas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Texas Recovery Act State Memo Texas Recovery Act State Memo Texas Recovery Act State Memo Texas has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, biomass, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Texas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from carbon capture and storage to energy efficiency, the smart grid, solar, geothermal, and biomass projects. Through these investments, Texas's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Texas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Texas Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

149

Guadalupe Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Guadalupe Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility Guadalupe Power Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

150

Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Des Plaines Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

151

Hot corrosion tests on corrosion resistant coatings developed for gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper reports on results of hot corrosion tests carried out on siliconaluminide coatings developed for hot components of gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases. The corrosion tests of the siliconaluminide coatings, applied to superalloys IN738LC and CMSX-4, each consisted of five 100h periods; at 700C for the type II tests and at 900C for the type I tests. Deposits of Cd+ alkali and Pb+ alkali were applied before each exposure. These deposits had been previously identified as being trace species produced from gasification of biomass containing fuels which after combustion had the potential to initiate hot corrosion in a gas turbine. Additionally, gases were supplied to the furnace to simulate the atmosphere anticipated post-combustion of these biomass derived fuel gases. Results of the type I hot corrosion tests showed that these novel coatings remained in the incubation stage for at least 300h, after which some of the coating entered propagation. Mass change results for the first 100h confirmed this early incubation stage. For the type II hot corrosion tests, differences occurred in oxidation and sulphidation rates between the two substrates; the incubation stages for CMSX-4 samples continued for all but the Cd+ alkali high salt flux samples, whereas, for IN738LC, all samples exhibited consistent incubation rates. Following both the type I and type II corrosion tests, assessments using BSE/EDX results and XRD analysis confirmed that there has to be remnant coating, sufficient to grow a protective scale. In this study, the novel siliconaluminide coating development was based on coating technology originally evolved for gas turbines burning natural gas and fossil fuel oils. So in this paper comparisons of performance have been made with three commercially available coatings; a CoCrAlY overlay, a platinum-aluminide diffusion, and triple layer nickelaluminide/siliconaluminide-diffusion coatings. These comparisons showed that the novel single-step siliconaluminide coatings provide equal or superior type II hot corrosion resistance to the best of the commercial coatings.

A. Bradshaw; N.J. Simms; J.R. Nicholls

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Toward a less natural gas dependent energy mix in Spain: Crowding-out effects of shifting to biomass power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper estimates the impact of a hypothetical change in Spain's energy mix on a number of productive sectors. The change would be brought about by substituting power generation from natural gas with generation from biomass. The total amount of electricity supplied has been calculated to remain constant so that a crowding-out effect would be derived from the displacement of one technology with another. An inputoutput (IO) framework has been used to estimate the overall economic impact on 26 productive sectors included on Spain's 2007 IO Table. Based on the available literature, the consideration of net impact improves the analysis. The results show that the overall net impact across all productive sectors of this change in the energy mix would be positive and equal to about 0.5% for the period. Higher impacts were measured for the Electricity power and Electricity Supply sector (15.4%) followed by the Agriculture, Hunting, Forestry sector (7.1%). Only the Gas generation and Gas supply sector showed a negative impact (2.5%), which is consistent with the reduced use of natural gas. The overall calculated total impact for Spain's productive sector was equal to 8074.95 million at the 2007-equivalent value.

Mara J. Colinet; Jos M. Cansino; Jos M. Gonzlez-Limn; Manuel Ordez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Toward Novel Hybrid Biomass, Coal, and Natural Gas Processes for Satisfying Current Transportation Fuel Demands, 1: Process Alternatives, Gasification Modeling, Process Simulation, and Economic Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toward Novel Hybrid Biomass, Coal, and Natural Gas Processes for Satisfying Current Transportation Fuel Demands, 1: Process Alternatives, Gasification Modeling, Process Simulation, and Economic Analysis ... This paper, which is the first part of a series of papers, introduces a hybrid coal, biomass, and natural gas to liquids (CBGTL) process that can produce transportation fuels in ratios consistent with current U.S. transportation fuel demands. ... Steady-state process simulation results based on Aspen Plus are presented for the seven process alternatives with a detailed economic analysis performed using the Aspen Process Economic Analyzer and unit cost functions obtained from literature. ...

Richard C. Baliban; Josephine A. Elia; Christodoulos A. Floudas

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

Diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils with and without landfill gas recovery systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Aerobic CH4 oxidation plays an important role in mitigating CH4 release from landfills to the atmosphere. Therefore, in this study, oxidation activity and community of methanotrophs were investigated in a subtropical landfill. Among the three sites investigated, the highest CH4 concentration was detected in the landfill cover soil of the site (A) without a landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, although the refuse in the site had been deposited for a longer time (?1415 years) compared to the other two sites (?611 years) where a LFG recovery system was applied. In April and September, the higher CH4 flux was detected in site A with 72.4 and 51.7gm?2d?1, respectively, compared to the other sites. The abundance of methanotrophs assessed by quantification of pmoA varied with location and season. A linear relationship was observed between the abundance of methanotrophs and CH4 concentrations in the landfill cover soils (R=0.827, P<0.001). The key factors influencing the methanotrophic diversity in the landfill cover soils were pH, the water content and the CH4 concentration in the soil, of which pH was the most important factor. Type I methanotrophs, including Methylococcus, Methylosarcina, Methylomicrobium and Methylobacter, and type II methanotrophs (Methylocystis) were all detected in the landfill cover soils, with Methylocystis and Methylosarcina being the dominant genera. Methylocystis was abundant in the slightly acidic landfill cover soil, especially in September, and represented more than 89% of the total terminal-restriction fragment abundance. These findings indicated that the LFG recovery system, as well as physical and chemical parameters, affected the diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils.

Yao Su; Xuan Zhang; Fang-Fang Xia; Qi-Qi Zhang; Jiao-Yan Kong; Jing Wang; Ruo He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases. IFT measurements were carried out in a standard ternary liquid system of benzene, ethanol and water using drop shape analysis and capillary rise techniques. The experimental results indicate strong correlation among the three thermodynamic properties solubility, miscibility and IFT. The miscibility determined from IFT measurements for this ternary liquid system is in good agreement with phase diagram and solubility data, which clearly indicates the sound conceptual basis of VIT technique to determine fluid-fluid miscibility. Model fluid systems have been identified for VIT experimentation at elevated pressures and temperatures. Section III comprises of the experimental study aimed at evaluating the multiphase displacement characteristics of the various gas injection EOR process performances using Berea sandstone cores. During this reporting period, extensive literature review was completed to: (1) study the gravity drainage concepts, (2) identify the various factors influencing gravity stable gas injection processes, (3) identify various multiphase mechanisms and fluid dynamics operative during the GAGD process, and (4) identify important dimensionless groups governing the GAGD process performance. Furthermore, the dimensional analysis of the GAGD process, using Buckingham-Pi theorem to isolate the various dimensionless groups, as well as experimental design based on these dimensionless quantities have been completed in this reporting period. On the experimental front, recommendations from previous WAG and CGI have been used to modify the experimental protocol. This report also includes results from scaled preliminary GAGD displacements as well as the details of the planned GAGD corefloods for the next quarter. The technology transfer activities have mainly consisted of preparing technical papers, progress reports and discussions with industry personnel for possible GAGD field tests.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The best use of biomass? Greenhouse gas lifecycle analysis of predicted pyrolysis biochar systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Life cycle analysis is carried out for 11 predicted configurations of pyrolysis biochar systems to determine greenhouse gas balance, using an original spreadsheet model. System (more)

Hammond, James A R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed mechanistic Parachor models. In the decane-CO{sub 2} binary system, Parachor model was found to be sufficient for interfacial tension calculations. The predicted miscibility from the Parachor model deviated only by about 2.5% from the measured VIT miscibility. However, in multicomponent live decane-CO{sub 2} system, the performance of the Parachor model was poor, while good match of interfacial tension predictions has been obtained experimentally using the proposed mechanistic Parachor model. The predicted miscibility from the mechanistic Parachor model accurately matched with the measured VIT miscibility in live decane-CO2 system, which indicates the suitability of this model to predict miscibility in complex multicomponent hydrocarbon systems. In the previous reports to the DOE (15323R07, Oct 2004; 15323R08, Jan 2005; 15323R09, Apr 2005; 15323R10, July 2005 and 154323, Oct 2005), the 1-D experimental results from dimensionally scaled GAGD and WAG corefloods were reported for Section III. Additionally, since Section I reports the experimental results from 2-D physical model experiments; this section attempts to extend this 2-D GAGD study to 3-D (4-phase) flow through porous media and evaluate the performance of these processes using reservoir simulation. Section IV includes the technology transfer efforts undertaken during the quarter. This research work resulted in one international paper presentation in Tulsa, OK; one journal publication; three pending abstracts for SCA 2006 Annual Conference and an invitation to present at the Independents Day session at the IOR Symposium 2006.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Gasification of biomass in water/gas-stabilized plasma for syngas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The experimental reactor PLASGAS for plasma pyrolysis and vitrification equipped with the hybrid gas-water stabilized torch was used in the experiments. The plasma torch is characterized by low density, high t...

M. Hrabovsky; M. Konrad; V. Kopecky; M. Hlina; T. Kavka

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of progress achieved in the program of thermochemical conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Instrumentation and tar measurement systems for a downdraft biomass gasifier.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass gasification is a promising route utilizing biomass materials to produce fuels and chemicals. Gas product from the gasification process is so called synthesis gas (more)

Hu, Ming

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to augment the National Reservoir Database (TORIS database) and to increase our understanding of geologic heterogeneities that affect the recoveries of oil and gas from carbonate reservoirs in the State of Alabama and to identify those resources that are producible at moderate cost. These objectives will be achieved through detailed geological, engineering, and geostatistical characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon reservoirs in selected productive fields in the State of Alabama. The results of these studies will be used to develop and test mathematical models for prediction of the effects of reservoir heterogeneities in hydrocarbon production. Work to date has focused on the completion of Subtasks 1, 2, and 3. Subtask 1 included the survey and tabulation of available reservoir engineering and geological data relevant to the Smackover reservoir in southwestern Alabama. Subtask 2 comprises the geological and engineering characterization of Smackover reservoir lithofacies. This has been accomplished through detailed examination and analysis of geophysical well logs, core material, well cuttings, and well-test data from wells penetrating Smackover reservoirs in southwestern Alabama. From these data, reservoir heterogeneities, such as lateral and vertical changes in lithology, porosity, permeability, and diagenetic overprint, have been recognized and used to produce maps, cross sections, graphs, and other graphic representations to aid in interpretation of the geologic parameters that affect these reservoirs. Subtask 3 includes the geologic modeling of reservoir heterogeneities for Smackover reservoirs. This research has been based primarily on the evaluation of key geologic and engineering data from selected Smackover fields. 1 fig.

Mancini, E.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Kansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, biomass and wind power.The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Kansas are supporting abroad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to geothermal and carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, Kansas' businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Kansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Kansas Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications Slide 1 District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo

165

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power plant. and pyrolysis of biomass by heating underpyrolysis oils) Producer gas Synthesis gas (syngas) Substitute natural gas (SNG) Hydrogen Biochemical Biosolids Physiochemical Densified biomass

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Vertical composition gradient effects on original hydrocarbon in place volumes and liquid recovery for volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Place Volumes and Liquid Recovery for Volatile Oil and Gas Condensate Reservoirs. (December 2000) Juan Manual Jaramillo Arias, B. S. , Universidad de America; B. S. , Universidad Nacional de Colombia Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Maria A. Barrufet... Reservoir Performance 2. 2 Equation of State Review. . 2. 3 Peng Robinson Equation of State (PR EOS). 2. 4 Vapor Liquid Equilibria. . 2. 5 Volume Translation. 2. 6 Pseudoization or Lumping. 2. 7 Heavy Fraction Characterization. . 2. 8 Compositional...

Jaramillo Arias, Juan Manuel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy and exergy analyses of an externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) cycle integrated with biomass gasifier for distributed power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass based decentralized power generation using externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) can be a technically feasible option. In this work, thermal performance and sizing of such plants have been analyzed at different cycle pressure ratio (rp=2?8), turbine inlet temperature (TIT=10501350K) and the heat exchanger cold end temperature difference (CETD=200300K). It is found that the thermal efficiency of the EFGT plant reaches a maximum at an optimum pressure ratio depending upon the TIT and heat exchanger CETD. For a particular pressure ratio, thermal efficiency increases either with the increase in TIT or with the decrease in heat exchanger CETD. The specific air flow, associated with the size of the plant equipment, decreases with the increase in pressure ratio. This decrease is rapid at the lower end of the pressure ratio (rp<4) but levels-off at higher rp values. An increase in the TIT reduces the specific air flow, while a change in the heat exchanger CETD has no influence on it. Based on this comparison, the performance of a 100kW EFGT plant has been analyzed for three sets of operating parameters and a trade-off in the operating condition is reached.

Amitava Datta; Ranjan Ganguly; Luna Sarkar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO2 Sequestration … Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

* NREL/TP-510-32575 * NREL/TP-510-32575 Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO 2 Sequestration - Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics Pamela L. Spath Margaret K. Mann National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 January 2004 * NREL/TP-510-32575 Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO 2 Sequestration - Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics Pamela L. Spath Margaret K. Mann Prepared under Task No. BB04.4010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393

170

Determining the maximal capacity of a combined-cycle plant operating with afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect gained from afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler used as part of a PGU-450T combined-cycle plant is considered. The results obtained from ... electric and therma...

V. M. Borovkov; N. M. Osmanova

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Assessment of Fuel-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Fischer?Tropsch Diesel from Coal and Cellulosic Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessment of Fuel-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Fischer?Tropsch Diesel from Coal and Cellulosic Biomass ... There are two general designs for FTD production:(7, 30) recycling (RC) design and once-through (OT) design, as illustrated in Figure 2. ... Wang, M. Q.GREET 1.0 Transportation Fuel Cycles Model: Methodology and Use, Argonne National Laboratory: Argonne, IL, ANL/ESD-33. ...

Xiaomin Xie; Michael Wang; Jeongwoo Han

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

172

Biomass Gasification with Steam in Fluidized Bed:? Effectiveness of CaO, MgO, and CaO?MgO for Hot Raw Gas Cleaning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The upgrading of the raw hot gas from a bubbling fluidized bed biomass gasifier is studied using cheap calcined minerals or rocks downstream from the gasifier. ... Gasification with steam (with or without O2 added) is another process which produces a medium heating (10?16 MJ/m3n) value gas with a 30?60 vol % H2 content. ... The effect of the particle diameter has been studied at 794 9 C (T2) with sizes between 1.0 and 4.0 mm (dp,mean = 1.30?3.25 mm). ...

Jess Delgado; Mara P. Aznar; Jos Corella

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

173

Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana has substantial natural resources, including abundant oil, gas, coal, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Louisiana are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and smart grid to solar and geothermal, advanced battery manufacturing and biofuels. Through these investments, Louisiana's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Louisiana to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo

174

Alabama Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama has substantial natural resources, including gas, coal, biomass, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Alabama are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the electric grid to renewable energy and carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, Alabama's businesses, universities, nonprofits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Alabama to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Alabama Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

175

Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arkansas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced battery manufacturing and renewable energy. Through these investments, Arkansas's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arkansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

176

New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150 200 C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50 60 C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural gas boilers for applications with process fluid return temperatures higher than or close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas.

Qu, Ming [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Yin, Hongxi [Southeast University, Nanjing, China

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Effect of sweep gas composition on ionization chamber response in the BEATRIX-II tritium recovery experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BEATRIX-II irradiation experiment was an in situ tritium recovery experiment to evaluate the tritium release characteristics of fusion ceramic breeder materials and to characterize their stability under fast neutron irradiation to extended burnups. This is an International Energy Agency (IEA) sponsored experiment which is being carried out in the Materials Open Test Assembly of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The participants are Japan, Canada and the US The in situ tritium recovery experiment consisted of two individual in-reactor experimental assemblies (Phase I and Phase II) that were irradiated for 300 and 200 EFPD, respectively. Each experimental phase included two specimens: a thin annular specimen capable of temperature changes and a larger temperature-gradient specimen. In Phase I both specimens were Li{sub 2}O while for Phase II the temperature-change specimen consisted of Li{sub 2}O and the temperature-gradient specimen was a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} spherebed. Real-time measurements of the tritium release from the specimens during changing conditions (neutronics, temperature and sweep gas composition) were made using ion chambers. In order to correctly interpret the response of the ionization chambers it is necessary to understand the effect of changing sweep gas composition on the operation of the chambers. The purpose of this paper is to describe activities carried out to determine the effect of hydrogen additions to a helium sweep gas on the operation of these ionization chambers.

Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Baker, D.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effect of sweep gas composition on ionization chamber response in the BEATRIX-II tritium recovery experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BEATRIX-II irradiation experiment was an in situ tritium recovery experiment to evaluate the tritium release characteristics of fusion ceramic breeder materials and to characterize their stability under fast neutron irradiation to extended burnups. This is an International Energy Agency (IEA) sponsored experiment which is being carried out in the Materials Open Test Assembly of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The participants are Japan, Canada and the US The in situ tritium recovery experiment consisted of two individual in-reactor experimental assemblies (Phase I and Phase II) that were irradiated for 300 and 200 EFPD, respectively. Each experimental phase included two specimens: a thin annular specimen capable of temperature changes and a larger temperature-gradient specimen. In Phase I both specimens were Li[sub 2]O while for Phase II the temperature-change specimen consisted of Li[sub 2]O and the temperature-gradient specimen was a Li[sub 2]ZrO[sub 3] spherebed. Real-time measurements of the tritium release from the specimens during changing conditions (neutronics, temperature and sweep gas composition) were made using ion chambers. In order to correctly interpret the response of the ionization chambers it is necessary to understand the effect of changing sweep gas composition on the operation of the chambers. The purpose of this paper is to describe activities carried out to determine the effect of hydrogen additions to a helium sweep gas on the operation of these ionization chambers.

Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Baker, D.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Recovery of gas from hydrate deposits using conventional production technology. [Salt-frac technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane hydrate gas could be a sizeable energy resource if methods can be devised to produce this gas economically. This paper examines two methods of producing gas from hydrate deposits by the injection of hot water or steam, and also examines the feasibility of hydraulic fracturing and pressure reduction as a hydrate gas production technique. A hydraulic fracturing technique suitable for hydrate reservoirs is also described.

McGuire, P.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Beckett System Recovery and Utilization of Low Grade Waste Heat From Flue Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. During low demand periods, the unit is gas-fired and produces 150 psi steam at high efficiency. In the fall, the heat exchanger is converted to accept flue gas from the large original water tube boilers. The flue gas heats water, which preheats make...

Henderson, W. R.; DeBiase, J. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Evaluation of fracture treatment type on the recovery of gas from the cotton valley formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Every tight gas well needs to be stimulated with a hydraulic fracture treatment to produce natural gas at economic flow rates and recover a volume of gas that provides an acceptable return on investment. Over the past few decades, many different...

Yalavarthi, Ramakrishna

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Integrated Biomass Gasification - Gas Turbine - Fuel Cell Systems for Small-Scale, Distributed Generation of Electricity and Heat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A system design for application on commercial scale based on present day technology will be considered. At Delft University of Technology, a biomass gasifier has been set up...th process development unit, will be...

B. J. P. Buhre; J. Andries

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators Agency/Company /Organization: California Biomass Collaborative Partner: Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of California Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: biomass.ucdavis.edu/calculator.html Locality: California Cost: Free Provides energy cost and financial assessment tools for biomass power, bio gas, biomass combined heat and power, and landfill gas. Overview The California Biomass Collaborative provides energy cost and financial

184

Newby Island I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island I Biomass Facility Facility Newby Island I Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Santa Clara County, California Coordinates 37.2938907, -121.7195459...

185

Newby Island II Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island II Biomass Facility Facility Newby Island II Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Santa Clara County, California Coordinates 37.2938907, -121.7195459...

186

Survey and Down-Selection of Acid Gas Removal Systems for the Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Ethanol with a Detailed Analysis of an MDEA System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first section (Task 1) of this report by Nexant includes a survey and screening of various acid gas removal processes in order to evaluate their capability to meet the specific design requirements for thermochemical ethanol synthesis in NREL's thermochemical ethanol design report (Phillips et al. 2007, NREL/TP-510-41168). MDEA and selexol were short-listed as the most promising acid-gas removal agents based on work described in Task 1. The second report section (Task 2) describes a detailed design of an MDEA (methyl diethanol amine) based acid gas removal system for removing CO2 and H2S from biomass-derived syngas. Only MDEA was chosen for detailed study because of the available resources.

Nexant, Inc., San Francisco, California

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Biomass | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy » Energy » Biomass Biomass Learn how the Energy Department is working to sustainably transform the nation's abundant renewable resources into biomass energy. Featured Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel A behind-the-scenes video of how oil from algae is extracted and refined to create clean, renewable transportation fuel. Oregon Hospital Heats Up with a Biomass Boiler Using money from the Recovery Act, Blue Mountain Hospital replaced one of its 1950s crude oil boilers with a wood-pellet boiler -- saving the hospital about $100,000 a year in heating costs. | Photo courtesy of the Oregon Department of Energy. Highlighting how a rural Oregon hospital was able to cut its heating bills while stimulating the local economy. Ceres: Making Biofuels Bigger and Better A Ceres researcher evaluates the performance of biofuel crops. | Photo courtesy of Ceres, Inc.

188

Energy recovery during expansion of compressed gas using power plant low-quality heat sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of recovering energy from a cool compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid is disclosed which includes incrementally expanding the compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid through a plurality of expansion engines and heating the gas, vapor, compressed liquid, or supercritical fluid entering at least one of the expansion engines with a low quality heat source. Expansion engines such as turbines and multiple expansions with heating are disclosed.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Heat waste recovery system from exhaust gas of diesel engine to a reciprocal steam engine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research project was about the combined organic Rankine cycle which extracted energy from the exhaust gas of a diesel engine. There was a study (more)

Duong, Tai Anh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Nanjing Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Nanjing Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co. Ltd Place Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 210024 Sector Biomass Product Chinese biomass project developer. The company developed a landfill gas plant in Nanjing, China. Coordinates 32.0485°, 118.778969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.0485,"lon":118.778969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

192

Gas treatment and by-products recovery of Thailand`s first coke plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke is needed in the blast furnace as the main fuel and chemical reactant and the main product of a coke plant. The second main product of the coke plant is coke oven gas. During treatment of the coke oven gas some coal chemicals like tar, ammonia, sulphur and benzole can be recovered as by-products. Since the market prices for these by-products are rather low and often erratic it does not in most cases justify the investment to recover these products. This is the reason why modern gas treatment plants only remove those impurities from the crude gas which must be removed for technical and environmental reasons. The cleaned gas, however, is a very valuable product as it replaces natural gas in steel work furnaces and can be used by other consumers. The surplus can be combusted in the boiler of a power plant. A good example for an optimal plant layout is the new coke oven facility of Thai Special Steel Industry (TSSI) in Rayong. The paper describes the TSSI`s coke oven gas treatment plant.

Diemer, P.E.; Seyfferth, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Biomass as Renewable Source of Energy , Possible Conversion Routes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass, a renewable source of energy, has been used since the beginning of ... natural gas, wood and other forms of biomass were the most important sources of energy available to humans. Today, biomass accounts ...

Prof. Martin Kaltschmitt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Biomass as Renewable Source of Energy , Possible Conversion Routes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass, a renewable source of energy, has been used since the beginning of ... natural gas, wood and other forms of biomass were the most important sources of energy available to humans. Today, biomass accounts ...

Prof. Martin Kaltschmitt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Proposing a novel combined cycle for optimal exergy recovery of liquefied natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effective utilization of the cryogenic exergy associated with liquefied natural gas (LNG) vaporization is important. In this paper, a novel combined power cycle is proposed which utilizes LNG in different ......

M. R. Salimpour; M. A. Zahedi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Increasing liquid hydrocarbon recovery from natural gas: Evaluation of the vortex-tube device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vortex-tube device provides a useful addition to the range of equipment available to the gas industry. It has been shown that the use of vortex-tube equipment permits improved separation in comparison with a Joule-Thomson system, without entering into the cost and complexity of a true isentropic system such as a turbo-expander unit. The comparative advantage of the vortex tube depends upon the inlet conditions of the gas and the pressure drop that is available. An optimum pressure drop of 25--35% of the inlet gas pressure has been confirmed in practice. Although not yet tested on operating plant, it is expected that a loss of performance of vortex-tube units will occur for inlet liquid-to-gas ratios of greater than 20%. Units with up to 5% liquid at the inlet have been successfully operated showing that a single phase gas at the unit inlet is not essential. It is expected that future application of vortex tube units will be concentrated where performance improvements over Joule-Thomson units, at low capital cost, are required.

Hajdik, B. [CBS Engineering, Houston, TX (United States); Steinle, J. [BEB Erdoel and Erdgas GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Lorey, M. [Filtan Analgenbau GmbH, Langenselbold (Germany); Thomas, K. [Falk and Thomas Engineering GmbH, Wettenberg (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Biomass Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In its simplest terms, biomass is all the plant matter found on our planet. Biomass is produced directly by photosynthesis, the fundamental engine of life on earth. Plant photosynthesis uses energy from the su...

Stephen R. Decker; John Sheehan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Biomass Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accounting for all of the factors that go into energy demand (population, vehicle miles traveled per ... capita, vehicle efficiency) and land required for energy production (biomass land yields, biomass conversion

Stephen R. Decker; John Sheehan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

El-Fadel, Mutasem, E-mail: mfadel@aub.edu.lb [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Recovery of Wasted Mechanical Energy from the Reduction of Natural Gas Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract At the present time in Romania, the transition from the natural gas transportation system to the distribution system is done only thru the use of pressure reducing stations. Here the pressure drop is usually done by using throttle valves or pressure reducing valves, where the gas energy is spent without doing any work. In this article we propose the use of turbo-expanders in the pressure reducing stations, where the natural gas pressure from the transportation grid is high and needs to drop to lower levels to enter the distribution grids, in this way part of the energy consumed in the compression stations are recovered. The plans are made at this time for a pilot project at the pressure reducing station in the city of Onesti, Bacau County.

Iancu Andrei; Tudorache Valentin; Tarean Cristina; Toma Niculae

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment Maximizing electrical efficiency Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill Maximizing equipment uptime Minimizing water consumption Minimizing post-combustion emissions The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWhs of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH4 flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.1880.014, 0.2240.012 and 0.2370.008lCH4/m2hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24l/m2hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.060.89l/m2hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.422.46l/m2hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L0) values in the range of 19.8102.6m3/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

Mutasem El-Fadel; Layale Abi-Esber; Samer Salhab

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005648  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Edward Levy Edward Levy Principal Investigator Director, Lehigh University Energy Research Center RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas usinG condensinG Heat excHanGeRs PRomis/PRoject no.: de-nt0005648 Background As the United States' population grows and demand for electricity and water increases, power plants located in some parts of the country will find it increasingly difficult to obtain the large quantities of water needed to maintain operations. Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. Many coal-fired power plants operate with stack temperatures in the 300 °F range to minimize fouling and corrosion problems due to sulfuric acid condensation and to

204

Study of integrated metal hydrides heat pump and cascade utilization of liquefied natural gas cold energy recovery system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The traditional cold energy utilization of the liquefied natural gas system needs a higher temperature heat source to improve exergy efficiency, which barricades the application of the common low quality thermal energy. The adoption of a metal hydride heat pump system powered by low quality energy could provide the necessary high temperature heat and reduce the overall energy consumption. Thus, an LNG cold energy recovery system integrating metal hydride heat pump was proposed, and the exergy analysis method was applied to study the case. The performance of the proposed integration system was evaluated. Moreover, some key factors were also theoretically investigated about their influences on the system performance. According to the results of the analysis, some optimization directions of the integrated system were also pointed out.

Xiangyu Meng; Feifei Bai; Fusheng Yang; Zewei Bao; Zaoxiao Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Biomass pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

206

Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

208

CLC of biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Developments on Developments on Chemical Looping Combustion of Biomass Laihong Shen Jiahua Wu Jun Xiao Rui Xiao Southeast University Nanjing, China 2 th U.S. - China Symposium on CO 2 Emissions Control Science & Technology Hangzhou, China May 28-30, 2008 Overview  Introduction  Technical approach  Experiments on chemical looping combustion of biomass  Conclusions Climate change is a result of burning too much coal, oil and gas.... We need to capture CO 2 in any way ! Introduction CCS is the world's best chance to have a major & immediate impact on CO 2 emission reduction Introduction Introduction  Biomass is renewable energy with zero CO 2 emission  A way to capture CO 2 from biomass ?  If so, a quick way to reduce CO 2 content in the atmosphere Normal combustion

209

Producer Gas Composition and NOx Emissions from a Pilot-Scale Biomass Gasification and Combustion System Using Feedstock with Controlled Nitrogen Content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2) Additionally, the biomass prices are generally high, as the biomass feedstocks are seasonal and there is lack of a large feed storage capability to control the price. ... Five different biomass feedstocks with varying nitrogen contents were tested. ... Five different biomass feedstocks were used in this study. ...

Sharan Sethuraman; Cuong Van Huynh; Song-Charng Kong

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

210

Flue-gas sulfur-recovery plant for a multifuel boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1991, a Finnish fluting mill brought on stream a flue-gas desulfurization plant with an SO{sub 2} reduction capacity of 99%. The desulfurization plant enabled the mill to discontinue the use of its sulfur burner for SO{sub 2} production. The required makeup sulfur is now obtained in the form of sulfuric acid used by the acetic acid plant, which operates in conjunction with the evaporating plant. The mill`s sulfur consumption has decreased by about 6,000 tons/year (13.2 million lb/year) because of sulfur recycling.

Miettunen, J. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland); Aitlahti, S. [Savon Sellu Oy, Kuopio (Finland)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Effect of Magnesite as Bed Material in a 100 kWth Steam?Oxygen Blown Circulating Fluidized-Bed Biomass Gasifier on Gas Composition and Tar Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Those issues, depending upon the type of the gasifier, are related to (1) scale of operation and availability of biomass, (2) size distribution of raw biomass, (3) operability of the gasifier with fuels containing large amounts of ash, especially if the fraction of alkali, chlorine, and sulfur is high,(2) (4) the formation of condensable higher hydrocarbons (tar), and (5) cleaning and upgrading of the gas for dedicated downstream application. ... The main characteristics of the rig are (i) reactor height, 5.5 m; (ii) riser inner diameter, 83 mm; downcomer inner diameter, 54 mm; material, stainless-steel AISI310, DIN 1.4845; (iii) fluidization medium electrical preheater (6 kW; Tmax = 400 C; Tnom = 360 C; Watlow, St. Louis, MO); (iv) electrical heating of the whole rig (22 kW; Tmax = 1200 C; Tnom = 850 C) using modular ceramic fiber heaters (ZMC Zamac, Poland); (v) high-temperature ceramic tissue candle filter unit (BWF, Germany) operating at 450 C and a high-temperature Si?SiC ceramic candle filter (Pall-Schumacher, Germany) operating at 800 C; (vi) feeding system with a maximum feed rate of ca. ... 200 and 470 ?m, while magnesite particle sizes are spread throughout the analysis domain; the fraction of fines in magnesite is significantly larger than in sand. ...

M. Siedlecki; R. Nieuwstraten; E. Simeone; W. de Jong; A. H. M. Verkooijen

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Biomass Combustion for Electricity Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Subject of this article is therefore the description of the state-of-the-art technologies, environmental impacts including greenhouse gas emission balances, as well as financial aspects of using biomass for elect...

Andreas Wiese Dr.-Ing.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Biomass Combustion for Electricity Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Subject of this article is therefore the description of the state-of-the-art technologies, environmental impacts including greenhouse gas emission balances, as well as financial aspects of using biomass for elect...

Andreas Wiese Dr.-Ing.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solvent Systems Catalystic Biomass Liquefaction Investigatereactor Product collection Biomass liquefaction process12-13, 1980 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Energie-Cits 2001 BIOMASS -WOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energie-Cités 2001 BIOMASS - WOOD Gasification / Cogeneration ARMAGH United Kingdom Gasification is transferring the combustible matters in organic waste or biomass into gas and pure char by burning the fuel via it allows biomass in small-scaled engines and co-generation units ­ which with conventional technologies

216

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

217

Top Value Added Chemicals From Biomass: I. Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies twelve building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions. The twelve building blocks can be subsequently converted to a number of high-value bio-based chemicals or materials. Building block chemicals, as considered for this analysis, are molecules with multiple functional groups that possess the potential to be transformed into new families of useful molecules. The twelve sugar-based building blocks are 1,4-diacids (succinic, fumaric and malic), 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, 3-hydroxy propionic acid, aspartic acid, glucaric acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, glycerol, sorbitol, and xylitol/arabinitol. In addition to building blocks, the report outlines the central technical barriers that are preventing the widespread use of biomass for products and chemicals.

Werpy, Todd A.; Holladay, John E.; White, James F.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

AGCO Biomass Solutions: Biomass 2014 Presentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Plenary IV: Advances in Bioenergy FeedstocksFrom Field to Fuel AGCO Biomass Solutions: Biomass 2014 Presentation Glenn Farris, Marketing Manager Biomass, AGCO Corporation

219

Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, ?-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Analysis and optimization of cascade Rankine cycle for liquefied natural gas cold energy recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study proposes a new concept called the cascade Rankine cycle, which recovers LNG (liquefied natural gas) cold energy for power generation, optimizes the cycle by investigating the effects of key parameters on its performance, and compares its thermal efficiency, exergy efficiency and economic evaluation to those of the conventional alternatives. The cascade Rankine cycle consists of multiple stages of the organic Rankine cycle in a layered structure in which the first stage encompasses the second one that, in turn, encompasses the next. Due to its layered configuration, optimization of the cycle is straightforward and involves sequentially optimizing the individual stages. Optimization of the subsequent stages, however, required process simulation considering the equipment efficiency and the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid. Process simulation indicated that the indicators such as net power output, thermal efficiency, and exergy efficiency generally increase as the number of stages increases. These indicators were, however, significantly affected by the thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The proposed cycles demonstrated significantly better performance in these indicators than the conventional cycles. The three-stage cascade Rankine cycle with propane as the working fluid exhibited the highest net power output, thermal efficiency and exergy efficiency within the set.

In-Hwan Choi; Sangick Lee; Yutaek Seo; Daejun Chang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Investigating and Using Biomass Gases  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

Students will be introduced to biomass gasification and will generate their own biomass gases. Students generate these everyday on their own and find it quite amusing, but this time theyll do it by heating wood pellets or wood splints in a test tube. They will collect the resulting gases and use the gas to roast a marshmallow. Students will also evaluate which biomass fuel is the best according to their own criteria or by examining the volume of gas produced by each type of fuel.

222

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

224

Biomass Domestic Cooking Gasifier Stove for Use in Rural Areas of Developing Countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental Biomass Domestic Gasifier Cooking Stove (BDGCS) system is described here. A gasifier produces gas from biomass wastes such as...

Gao Xiansheng

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Biomass Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Biomass is an energy resource derived from organic matter, which includes wood, agricultural waste, and other living-cell material that can be burned to produce heat energy. It also includes algae,...

226

Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

Power Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) - 2,870,000 x 0.8 6 W - 3414 = 70 kw (or 900 hp). When recovering power from an expanding gas, consideration should be given to the final gas temperature. This tem;:>f'rature can be estimated by the formula: T 2 Final temperature, oR. Other... with the requirements make generation fqr more useful. Presently a recovery level of around 500 kw (or 657 hp) appears to be the minimum level which will support an in stallation. In order to achieve reasonable effi ciency, quality equipment with good control...

Murray, F.

228

The Effect of Acid Additives on Carbonate Rock Wettability and Spent Acid Recovery in Low Permeability Gas Carbonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spent acid retention in the near-wellbore region causes reduction of relative permeability to gas and eventually curtailed gas production. In low-permeability gas carbonate reservoirs, capillary forces are the key parameters that affect the trapping...

Saneifar, Mehrnoosh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

229

Collocation method for the modeling of membrane gas permeation systems A. Feichtingera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) or hydrogen recovery from biomass gasification gases (Mayer et al., 2010; Makaruk et al., 2012). CorrespondingCollocation method for the modeling of membrane gas permeation systems A. Feichtingera , A simulation, collocation method, error estimate, grid adaptation, multicomponent separation 1. Introduction

Weinmüller, Ewa B.

230

Assessment of fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for Fischer-Tropsch diesel from coal and cellulosic biomass.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study expands and uses the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model to assess the effects of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology and cellulosic biomass and coal cofeeding in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) plants on energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of FT diesel (FTD). To demonstrate the influence of the coproduct credit methods on FTD life-cycle analysis (LCA) results, two allocation methods based on the energy value and the market revenue of different products and a hybrid method are employed. With the energy-based allocation method, fossil energy use of FTD is less than that of petroleum diesel, and GHG emissions of FTD could be close to zero or even less than zero with CCS when forest residue accounts for 55% or more of the total dry mass input to FTD plants. Without CCS, GHG emissions are reduced to a level equivalent to that from petroleum diesel plants when forest residue accounts for 61% of the total dry mass input. Moreover, we show that coproduct method selection is crucial for LCA results of FTD when a large amount of coproducts is produced.

Xie, X.; Wang, M.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Driving on Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from gasoline engines in performance...increased fuel efficiency of diesel engines could yield...petroleum consumption if much of...from gas to diesel. The higher...of a diesel engine can be offset...incentives and fuel cost recoveries...

John Ohlrogge; Doug Allen; Bill Berguson; Dean DellaPenna; Yair Shachar-Hill; Sten Stymne

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

232

The role of gap phase processes in the biomass dynamics of tropical forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gap phase processes in the biomass dynamics of tropical forests...understood. Above-ground woody biomass in some tropical forest...greenhouse gas emissions from biomass burning, decomposition and soils forest in conversion, shifting cultivation and...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Impact of Sorption Isotherms on the Simulation of CO2-Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage Process in Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoirs, natural gas occurs as free gas in the intergranular and fracture porosity and is adsorbed on clay Continuous, low-permeability, fractured, organic-rich gas shale units are widespread and are possible geologic storage targets .The Marcellus could act as a storage reservoir for captured CO2. In this scenario

Mohaghegh, Shahab

234

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for transportation fuel Concept developed at RIS? and DTU Anne Belinda Thomsen (RIS?) Birgitte K. Ahring (DTU) #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass: Biogas #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Pre-treatment Step Biomass is macerated The biomass is cut in small

235

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. [Jurassic Smackover Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Appendix 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of ethanol from corn, sugarcane and cellulosic biomass for US use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Globally, bioethanol is the largest volume biofuel used in the transportation sector, with corn-based ethanol production occurring mostly in the US and sugarcane-based ethanol production occurring mostly in Brazil. Advances in technology and the resulting improved productivity in corn and sugarcane farming and ethanol conversion, together with biofuel policies, have contributed to the significant expansion of ethanol production in the past 20years. These improvements have increased the energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits of using bioethanol as opposed to using petroleum gasoline. This article presents results from our most recently updated simulations of energy use and GHG emissions that result from using bioethanol made from several feedstocks. The results were generated with the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model. In particular, based on a consistent and systematic model platform, we estimate life-cycle energy consumption and GHG emissions from using ethanol produced from five feedstocks: corn, sugarcane, corn stover, switchgrass and miscanthus.We quantitatively address the impacts of a few critical factors that affect life-cycle GHG emissions from bioethanol. Even when the highly debated land use change GHG emissions are included, changing from corn to sugarcane and then to cellulosic biomass helps to significantly increase the reductions in energy use and GHG emissions from using bioethanol. Relative to petroleum gasoline, ethanol from corn, sugarcane, corn stover, switchgrass and miscanthus can reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 1948%, 4062%, 90103%, 7797% and 101115%, respectively. Similar trends have been found with regard to fossil energy benefits for the five bioethanol pathways.

Michael Wang; Jeongwoo Han; Jennifer B Dunn; Hao Cai; Amgad Elgowainy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Biomass shock pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Science Activities in Biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Activities in Biomass Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, genetics, distillation, agriculture, chemicalcarbon cycles, climatology, plants and energy resources...

240

Taylor Biomass Energy LLC TBE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Energy LLC TBE Biomass Energy LLC TBE Jump to: navigation, search Name Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE) Place Montgomery, New York Zip 12549-9900 Sector Biomass Product Montgomery-based municipal-solid-waste (MSW) recovery and recycling firm providing biomass gasification units in addition to operating its own gasifier plants. References Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE) is a company located in Montgomery, New York . References ↑ "Taylor Biomass Energy, LLC (TBE)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Taylor_Biomass_Energy_LLC_TBE&oldid=352048" Categories:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Biomass Energy in a Carbon Constrained Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Energy in a Carbon Constrained Future Biomass Energy in a Carbon Constrained Future Speaker(s): William Morrow Date: September 3, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Eric Masanet Two areas of research will be presented: potential roles that domestically sourced biomass energy could play in achieving U.S. environmental and petroleum security goals, and possible pathways for achieving California's long-term greenhouse gas reduction goals. Biomass energy is viewed by many in the electricity and transportation fuel sectors as offering benefits such as greenhouse gas emissions reductions and petroleum fuel substitution. For this reason a large-scale biomass energy industry future is often anticipated although currently biomass energy provides only a small contribution to these sectors. Agriculture models, however,

242

Plasma Treatments and Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exploitation of forest resources for energy production includes various methods of biomass processing. Gasification is one of the ways to recover energy from biomass. Syngas produced from biomass can be used to power internal combustion engines or, after purification, to supply fuel cells. Recent studies have shown the potential to improve conventional biomass processing by coupling a plasma reactor to a pyrolysis cyclone reactor. The role of the plasma is twofold: it acts as a purification stage by reducing production of tars and aerosols, and simultaneously produces a rich hydrogen syngas. In a first part of the paper we present results obtained from plasma treatment of pyrolysis oils. The outlet gas composition is given for various types of oils obtained at different experimental conditions with a pyrolysis reactor. Given the complexity of the mixtures from processing of biomass, we present a study with methanol considered as a model molecule. This experimental method allows a first modeling approach based on a combustion kinetic model suitable to validate the coupling of plasma with conventional biomass process. The second part of the paper is summarizing results obtained through a plasma-pyrolysis reactor arrangement. The goal is to show the feasibility of this plasma-pyrolysis coupling and emphasize more fundamental studies to understand the role of the plasma in the biomass treatment processes.

J Luche; Q Falcoz; T Bastien; J P Leninger; K Arabi; O Aubry; A Khacef; J M Cormier; J Ld

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Effects of oil and gas well-drilling fluids on the biomass and community structure of microbiota that colonize sands in running seawater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Well-drilling fluid and a number of the known components (barite, clay, Aldacide, Surflo, and Dowicide, were tested for effects on the biomass and community structure of the microbiota that colonize marine san...

Glen A. Smith; Janet S. Nickels

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Biomass Gasification with Steam and Oxygen Mixtures at Pilot Scale and with Catalytic Gas Upgrading. Part I: Performance of the Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass gasification with steam + O2...mixtures is studied at small pilot plant (1020 kg/h) scale. The gasifier used is a turbulent fluidized bed of ... tested till date. Product distribution from the gasifier, ...

M. P. Aznar; J. Corella; J. Gil

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Generation of a Gaseous Fuel by Pyrolysis or Gasification of Biomass for Use as Reburn Gas in Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biofliels attract increasing interest in power plant technology as sources of carbon dioxide neutral fuels. Besides using solid pulverised biomass as an additional fuel in coal-fired boilers a further possibil...

C. Storm; H. Spliethoff; K. R. G. Hein

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Other Biomass | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Other Biomass Other Biomass Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

247

Recovery of hydrogen and other components from refinery gas stream by partial condensation using preliminary reflux condensation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for separating a hydrogen-containing refinery-type gas mixture into various fractions using reflux condensation, drying and partial condensation and phase separation.

Beddome, R.A.; Fenner, G.W.; Saunders, J.B.

1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

Spray process for the recovery of CO.sub.2 from a gas stream and a related apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for recovering carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a gas stream is disclosed. The method includes the step of reacting CO.sub.2 in the gas stream with fine droplets of a liquid absorbent, so as to form a solid material in which the CO.sub.2 is bound. The solid material is then transported to a desorption site, where it is heated, to release substantially pure CO.sub.2 gas. The CO.sub.2 gas can then be collected and used or transported in any desired way. A related apparatus for recovering carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a gas stream is also described herein.

Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Perry, Robert James; Wood, Benjamin Rue; Genovese, Sarah Elizabeth

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

249

Exergoeconomic analysis of a biomass post-firing combined-cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass can be converted thermo- and bio-chemically to solid, liquid and gaseous biofuels. In this paper, energy, exergy and exergoeconomic analyses are applied to a biomass integrated post-firing combined-cycle power plant. The energy and exergy efficiencies of the cycle are found to be maximized at specific compressor pressure ratio values, and that higher pressure ratios reduce the total unit product cost. Increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature and decreasing the compressor pressure ratio decreases the CO2 mole fraction exiting the power plant. The exergoeconomic factor for the biomass integrated post-firing combined-cycle power plant at the optimum energy/exergy efficiency is 0.39. This implies that the major cost rate of this power plant configuration is attributable to the exergy destruction cost rate. Increasing the compressor pressure ratio decreases the mass of air per mass of steam in the power plant, implying a reduction in the gas turbine plant size. Increasing both the compressor pressure ratio and the heat recovery steam generator inlet gas temperature increases the capital investment cost compared with the exergy destruction cost. However, increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature decreases this ratio.

Hassan Athari; Saeed Soltani; Seyed Mohammad Seyed Mahmoudi; Marc A. Rosen; Tatiana Morosuk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Byxbee Park Sanitary Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Facility Byxbee Park Sanitary Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Santa Clara County, California Coordinates 37.2938907, -121.7195459...

251

Integrating agricultural pest biocontrol into forecasts of energy biomass production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis Integrating agricultural pest biocontrol into forecasts of energy biomass production T pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, and soil erosion (Nash, 2007; Searchinger et al., 2008). On the other

Gratton, Claudio

252

Analyzing Biomass Conversion into Liquid Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variants of the FischerTropsch producer-gas conversion into liquid hydrocarbons are analyzed under the ... is attained in the reactions occurring in the biomass gasification. When the raw material is wood ... th...

V. D. Meshcheryakov; V. A. Kirillov

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Georgia has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Georgia are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and alternative fuels and vehicles. Through these investments, Georgia's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Georgia to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

254

GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Georgia has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Georgia are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and alternative fuels and vehicles. Through these investments, Georgia's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Georgia to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

255

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Projects Biomass Characterization Projects A photo of a magnified image on a computer screen. Many blue specks and lines in different sizes and shapes are visible on top of a white background. A microscopic image of biomass particles. Through biomass characterization projects, NREL researchers are exploring the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment and during processing. The characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a critical step in optimizing biomass conversion processes. Among NREL's biomass characterization projects are: Feedstock/Process Interface NREL is working to understand the effects of feedstock and feedstock pre-processing on the conversion process and vice versa. The objective of the task is to understand the characteristics of biomass feedstocks

256

Microbial Production of Energy Sources from Biomass [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Microbial Production of Energy Sources from Biomass [and Discussion] R. C. Righelato...product. However, the capital and energy costs of operating microbial conversions...recovery methods which consume little energy. Ethanol production is unlikely...

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Biomass Gasification with Air in an Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed. Effect of Six Operational Variables on the Quality of the Produced Raw Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variables analyzed are equivalence ratio (from 0.20 to 0.45), temperatures of the gasifier bed (750?850 C) and of its freeboard (500?600 C), H/C ratio in the feed, use of secondary air (10% of the overall) in the freeboard, and addition (2?5 wt %) of a calcined dolomite mixed with the biomass used as the feedstock. ... Biomass has a density 2?5 times lower than silica sand, used as the fluidizing medium in the bed. ... The particle size for the silica sand in the bed is important. ...

Ian Narvez; Alberto Oro; Maria P. Aznar; Jos Corella

1996-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

259

Biomass gasification project gets funding to solve black liquor safety and landfill problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on biomass gasifications. The main by-product in pulp making is black liquor from virgin fiber; the main by-product in paper recycling is fiber residue. Although the black liquor is recycled for chemical and energy recovery, safety problems plague the boilers currently used to do this. The fiber residue is usually transported to a landfill. The system being developed by MTCI will convert black liquor and fiber residue into a combustible gas, which can then be used for a wide variety of thermal or power generation applications.

Black, N.P.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-11 019 UC-61 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,Catalytic Liquefaction of Biomass,n M, Seth, R. Djafar, G.of California. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION QUARTERLY

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquid Fuels from Biomass: "Catalyst Screening and KineticUC-61 (l, RCO osn CDL or BIOMASS CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION ManuCATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS Manu Seth, Roger Djafar,

Seth, Manu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Simulation study on lignite-fired power system integrated with flue gas drying and waste heat recovery Performances under variable power loads coupled with off-design parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignite is a kind of low rank coal with high moisture content and low net heating value, which is mainly used for electric power generation. However, the thermal efficiency of power plants firing lignite directly is very low. Pre-drying is a proactive option, dehydrating raw lignite to raise its heating value, to improve the power plant thermal efficiency. A pre-dried lignite-fired power system integrated with boiler flue gas drying and waste heat recovery was proposed in this paper. The plant thermal efficiency could be improved by 1.51% at benchmark condition due to pre-drying and waste heat recovery. The main system performances under variable power loads were simulated and analyzed. Simulation results show that the improvement of plant thermal efficiency reduced to 1.36% at 50% full load. Moreover, the influences of drying system off-design parameters were simulated coupled with power loads. The variation tendencies of main system parameters were obtained. The influence of pre-drying degree (including moisture content of pre-dried lignite and raw lignite) on the plant thermal efficiency diminishes gradually with the decreasing power load. The dryer thermal efficiency and dryer exhaust temperature are also main factors and the influences on system parameters have been quantitatively analyzed.

Xiaoqu Han; Ming Liu; Jinshi Wang; Junjie Yan; Jiping Liu; Feng Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery - Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase I results of a C0{sub 2}-assisted oil recovery demonstration project in selected Cypress Sandstone reservoirs at Mattoon Field, Illinois are reported. The design and scope of this project included C0{sub 2} injectvity testing in the Pinnell and Sawyer units, well stimulaton treatments with C0{sub 2} in the Strong unit and infill well drilling, completion and oil production. The field activities were supported by extensive C0{sub 2}-oil-water coreflood experiments, CO{sub 2} oil-phase interaction experiments, and integrated geologic modeling and reservoir simulations. The progress of the project was made public through presentations at an industry meeting and a DOEs contractors` symposium, through quarterly reports and one-to-one consultations with interested operators. Phase II of this project was not implemented. It would have been a water-alternating-gas (WAG) project of longer duration.

Baroni, M. [American Oil Recovery, Inc., Decatur, IL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FROM BIOMASS, COAL, AN) ASSESSMENT NATURAL GAS 1 (2002),ASSESSMENT OF GREENiiousE GAS EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Steelmaker Matches Recovery Act Funds to Save Energy & Reduce...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

factsheet describing how ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor Energy Recovery & Reuse 504 Boiler was constructed and installed with DOE Recovery Act Funding. Blast Furnace Gas...

266

Biomass torrefaction and CO2 capture using mining wastes A new approach for reducing greenhouse gas emissions of co-firing plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for an efficient biomass/coal co-firing could thus be further enhanced by curbing the overall process CO2 emissions as well as using ionic-liquid-impregnated torrefac- tion to increase birch wood constituents' torrefaction saturation, and carbon monoxide and methane concen- trations on mining residues CO2 uptake was studied

Devernal, Anne

267

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tracy Biomass Biomass Facility Facility Tracy Biomass Sector Biomass Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

268

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Capabilities Biomass Characterization Capabilities A photo of a man wearing a white lab coat and looking into a large microscope. A researcher uses an Atomic Force Microscope to image enzymes used in biochemical conversion. Through biomass characterization, NREL develops, refines, and validates rapid and cost-effective methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment, as well as during bioconversion processing. Detailed and accurate characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a necessity for any biomass-to-biofuels conversion. Understanding how the individual biomass components and reaction products interact at each stage in the process is important for researchers. With a large inventory of standard biomass samples as reference materials,

269

Simulation of fracture fluid cleanup and its effect on long-term recovery in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies, such as large volume fracture treatments, are required before a reasonable profit can be made. Hydraulic fracturing is one of the best methods to stimulate a tight gas well. Most fracture treatments result in 3-6 fold increases in the productivity...

Wang, Yilin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Biomass Analytical Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diversity and performance, The chemical and physical properties of biomass and biomass feedstocks are characterized as they move through the supply chain to various conversion...

271

Sandia National Laboratories: Biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Assessing the Economic Potential of Advanced Biofuels On September 10, 2013, in Biofuels, Biomass, Energy, Facilities, JBEI, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable...

272

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sandia National Laboratories: Biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EnergyBiomass Biomass Sandia spearheads research into energy alternatives that will help the nation reduce its dependence on fossil fuels and to combat the effects of climate...

274

Sandia National Laboratories: Biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass "Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave the Way for Closed-Loop Biofuel Refineries On December 11, 2014, in Biofuels, Biomass, Capabilities,...

275

nat_gas_current_proj | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Enhanced Oil Recovery Deepwater Tech Methane Hydrate Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas | Environmental | Other Natural Gas Related...

276

A Low-cost, High-yield Process for the Direct Productin of High Energy Density Liquid Fuel from Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective and outcome of this project was the development and validation of a novel, low-cost, high-pressure fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process (H{sub 2}Bioil) using supplementary hydrogen (H{sub 2}) to produce liquid hydrocarbons from biomass. The research efforts under the various tasks of the project have culminated in the first experimental demonstration of the H2Bioil process, producing 100% deoxygenated >C4+ hydrocarbons containing 36-40% of the carbon in the feed of pyrolysis products from biomass. The demonstrated H{sub 2}Bioil process technology (i.e. reactor, catalyst, and downstream product recovery) is scalable to a commercial level and is estimated to be economically competitive for the cases when supplementary H{sub 2} is sourced from coal, natural gas, or nuclear. Additionally, energy systems modeling has revealed several process integration options based on the H{sub 2}Bioil process for energy and carbon efficient liquid fuel production. All project tasks and milestones were completed or exceeded. Novel, commercially-scalable, high-pressure reactors for both fast-hydropyrolysis and hydrodeoxygenation were constructed, completing Task A. These reactors were capable of operation under a wide-range of conditions; enabling process studies that lead to identification of optimum process conditions. Model compounds representing biomass pyrolysis products were studied, completing Task B. These studies were critical in identifying and developing HDO catalysts to target specific oxygen functional groups. These process and model compound catalyst studies enabled identification of catalysts that achieved 100% deoxygenation of the real biomass feedstock, sorghum, to form hydrocarbons in high yields as part of Task C. The work completed during this grant has identified and validated the novel and commercially scalable H2Bioil process for production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Studies on model compounds as well as real biomass feedstocks were utilized to identify optimized process conditions and selective HDO catalyst for high yield production of hydrocarbons from biomass. In addition to these experimental efforts, in Tasks D and E, we have developed a mathematical optimization framework to identify carbon and energy efficient biomass-to-liquid fuel process designs that integrate the use of different primary energy sources along with biomass (e.g. solar, coal or natural gas) for liquid fuel production. Using this tool, we have identified augmented biomass-to-liquid fuel configurations based on the fast-hydropyrolysis/HDO pathway, which was experimentally studied in this project. The computational approach used for screening alternative process configurations represents a unique contribution to the field of biomass processing for liquid fuel production.

Agrawal, Rakesh

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

277

Energy recovery from solid waste fuels using advanced gasification technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the mid-1980s, TPS Termiska Processer AB has been working on the development of an atmospheric-pressure gasification process. A major aim at the start of this work was the generation of fuel gas from indigenous fuels to Sweden (i.e. biomass). As the economic climate changed and awareness of the damage to the environment caused by the use of fossil fuels in power generation equipment increased, the aim of the development work at TPS was changed to applying the process to heat and power generation from feedstocks such as biomass and solid wastes. Compared with modern waste incineration with heat recovery, the gasification process will permit an increase in electricity output of up to 50%. The gasification process being developed is based on an atmospheric-pressure circulating fluidized bed gasifier coupled to a tar-cracking vessel. The gas produced from this process is then cooled and cleaned in conventional equipment. The energy-rich gas produced is clean enough to be fired in a gas boiler without requiring extensive flue gas cleaning, as is normally required in conventional waste incineration plants. Producing clean fuel gas in this manner, which facilitates the use of efficient gas-fired boilers, means that overall plant electrical efficiencies of close to 30% can be achieved. TPS has performed a considerable amount of pilot plant testing on waste fuels in their gasification/gas cleaning pilot plant in Sweden. Two gasifiers of TPS design have been in operation in Greve-in-Chianti, italy since 1992. This plant processes 200 tonnes of RDF (refuse-derived fuel) per day.

Morris, M.; Waldheim, L. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)] [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Biomass treatment method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating biomass was developed that uses an apparatus which moves a biomass and dilute aqueous ammonia mixture through reaction chambers without compaction. The apparatus moves the biomass using a non-compressing piston. The resulting treated biomass is saccharified to produce fermentable sugars.

Friend, Julie (Claymont, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III; Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Lyons, Robert C. (Arvada, CO)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

279

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier.

Unknown

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential Michael Schaetzel Undergraduate ? Environmental Studies ? University of Kansas L O C A T S I O N BIOMASS ENERGY POTENTIAL o According to DOE, Biomass has the potential to provide 14% of... the nations power o Currently 1% of national power supply o Carbon neutral? combustion of biomass is part of the natural carbon cycle o Improved crop residue management has potential to benefit environment, producers, and economy Biomass Btu...

Schaetzel, Michael

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass November 30, 2011 - 12:08pm Addthis ThermoChem Recovery International's process demonstration unit -- where wood waste and forest residue is converted into renewable fuel. | Courtesy of TRI. ThermoChem Recovery International's process demonstration unit -- where wood waste and forest residue is converted into renewable fuel. | Courtesy of TRI. Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy After a rigorous testing process, Energy Department project partners at ThermoChem Recovery International (TRI) have validated a process that converts wood waste and forest residue into clean, renewable fuel. Pilot validation is a key milestone for biofuels companies like TRI. With

282

Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

2012 SG Peer Review - Recovery Act: NSTAR Automated Mater Reading Based Dynamic Pricing - Douglas Horton, NSTAR Electric & Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Peer Peer Review Meeting Peer Review Meeting AMR Based Dynamic Pricing y g Doug Horton NSTAR Electric & Gas Co. 6/8/2012 AMR Based Dynamic Pricing Objective Provide two-way communication of electricity cost & consumption data utilizing the customers existing meter & Internet. Goal to achieve 5% reduction in peak and Goal to achieve 5% reduction in peak and average load. Life-cycle Funding ($K) Total Budget Total DOE Funding to Technical Scope Use customer's existing AMR meter and broadband Internet to achieve two way Total Budget Total DOE Funding Funding to Date $4,900k $2,362k $1,623k broadband Internet to achieve two way communication and "AMI" functionality Cutting-edge solution to integrate: * Existing meters E i ti I t t December 2008 * Existing Internet * Existing billing & CIS

284

NREL: Biomass Research - News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News News Below are news stories related to NREL biomass research. Subscribe to the RSS feed RSS . Learn about RSS. November 7, 2013 NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released iPhone users now have access to a free application that locates fueling stations offering alternative fuels, including electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, e85 Ethanol, propane and hydrogen. The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the new mobile application for DOE's Clean Cities program. Clean Cities supports local stakeholders across the country in an effort to cut petroleum use in transportation. August 21, 2013 Can "Drop-In" Biofuels Solve Integration Issues? Lab works to create biofuels indistinguishable from conventional

285

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to Design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications.

Unknown

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Interaction of Fracture Fluid With Formation Rock and Proppant on Fracture Fluid Clean-up and Long-term Gas Recovery in Marcellus Shale Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs has become an integral part of the North American gas supply. The economic viability of many unconventional gas developments (more)

Yue, Wenting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

288

Simulation study on the CO2-driven enhanced gas recovery with sequestration versus the re-fracturing treatment of horizontal wells in the U.S. unconventional shale reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It is proposed that very low permeability formations are possible candidates for CO2 sequestration. Further, experimental studies have shown that shale formations have huge affinity to adsorb CO2, the order of 5 to 1 compared to the methane. Therefore, potential sequestration of CO2 in shale formations leading to enhanced gas recovery (EGR) will be a promising while challenging target for the oil and gas industry. On the other side, hydraulic re-fracturing treatment of shale gas wells is currently gaining more attention due to the poor performance of shale gas reservoirs after a couple years of production. Hence, investigating and comparing the performance of CO2-EGR with the re-fracturing treatment is essential for the future economic viability of depleted shale gas reservoirs. This paper presents a systematic comparison of the effect of these two processes on improving gas production performance of unconventional reservoirs, which is not well understood and has not been studied thoroughly in the literature. In this paper, a shale gas field data has been evaluated and incorporated in our simulations for both CO2-EGR and re-fracturing treatment purposes. Numerical simulations are performed using local grid refinement (LGR) in order to accurately model the non-linear pressure drop. Also, a dual-porosity/dual-permeability model is incorporated in the reservoir simulation model. Further, the uncertainties associated with inter-related set of geologic and engineering parameters are evaluated and quantified for re-fracturing treatment through several simulation runs. This comprehensive sensitivity study helps in understanding the key reservoir and fracture properties that affect the production performance and enhanced gas recovery in shale gas reservoirs. The results showed that re-fracturing treatment outperforms CO2-EGR due to the pronounced effect on cumulative methane gas production. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis showed that the characteristics of reservoir matrix including permeability and porosity are the most influential parameters for re-fracturing treatment. The findings of this study recommend hydraulic re-fracturing of shale reservoirs at first for enhancing gas production followed by CO2 injection at a later time. This work provides field operators with more insight into maximizing gas recovery from unconventional shale gas reservoirs using re-fracturing stimulation, CO2 injection, or a combination of both methods.

Mohammad O. Eshkalak; Emad W. Al-Shalabi; Alireza Sanaei; Umut Aybar; Kamy Sepehrnoori

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Recovery Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) presents opportunities with potential for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Signed into law by President Obama on February 17,...

290

List of Biomass Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 757 Biomass Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-757) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Net Metering (Arizona) Net Metering Arizona Commercial Industrial Residential Nonprofit Schools Local Government State Government Fed. Government Agricultural Institutional Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Wind energy Biomass No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

291

Release of Fuel-Bound Nitrogen during Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of four biomass feedstocks (leucaena, sawdust, bagasse, and banagrass) with significantly different fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) content was investigated to determine the effects of operational parameters and nitrogen content of biomass on the partitioning of FBN among nitrogenous gas species. ... The present study attempts to clarify the effects of gasification conditions and fuel on the release and evolution of biomass FBN through parallel experiments utilizing four different biomass feedstocks having significantly different FBN contents. ... Four types of biomass feedstocks were used in the experimentsleucaena, sawdust, bagasse, and banagrass. ...

Jiachun Zhou; Stephen M. Masutani; Darren M. Ishimura; Scott Q. Turn; Charles M. Kinoshita

2000-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

Russell Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts Sector: Biomass Product: Russell Biomass, LLC is developing a 50MW biomass to energy project at the former Westfield Paper Company site in Russell, Massachusetts....

293

NREL: Biomass Research Home Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Research Photo of a technician completing a laboratory procedure Biomass Compositional Analysis Find laboratory analytical procedures for standard biomass analysis. Photo...

294

Sandia National Laboratories: Lignocellulosic Biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProgramLignocellulosic Biomass Lignocellulosic Biomass It is estimated that there is over 1 billion tons of non-food lignocellulosic biomass currently available on a sustainable...

295

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report, (unpublished, 1979). Biomass Project Progress 31.Operations, vol. 2 of Biomass Energy (Stanford: StanfordPhotosynthethic Pathway Biomass Energy Production," ~c:_! _

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operations, vol. 2 of Biomass Energy (Stanford: StanfordPhotosynthethic Pathway Biomass Energy Production," ~c:_! _LBL-11902 UC-61a BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...

298

Energie aus Biomasse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomasse ist Sonnenenergie, die mithilfe von Pflanzen ber den Prozess der Photosynthese in organische Materie umgewandelt wird und in dieser Form zur Deckung der Energienachfrage genutzt werden kann. Biomasse...

Martin Kaltschmitt; Wolfgang Streicher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Biomass One Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One Sector Biomass Owner Biomass One LP Location White City, Oregon Coordinates 42.4333333°, -122.8338889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4333333,"lon":-122.8338889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

300

Pretreated densified biomass products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A product comprising at least one densified biomass particulate of a given mass having no added binder and comprised of a plurality of lignin-coated plant biomass fibers is provided, wherein the at least one densified biomass particulate has an intrinsic density substantially equivalent to a binder-containing densified biomass particulate of the same given mass and h a substantially smooth, non-flakey outer surface. Methods for using and making the product are also described.

Dale, Bruce E; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Biobased Chemicals Without Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unlike most other companies using biology to make chemicals, LanzaTech does not rely on biomass feedstocks. ...

MELODY BOMGARDNER

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in North ­ This study is part of a larger project aimed at quantifying the biomass and biomass increment been developed to estimate the biomass and biomass increment of coarse, small and fine roots of trees

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

303

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jones and w.s. Fong, Biomass Conversion of Biomass to Fuels11902 UC-61a BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII RonaldLBL-11902 Biomass Energy Conversion in Hawaii Ronald 1.

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Star Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India Sector: Biomass Product: Plans to set up biomass projects in Rajasthan. References: Star Biomass1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Star Biomass...

305

AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding Guide 2010 The Forestry Commission and the Humber Rural Partnership (co-ordinated by East Riding of Yorkshire Council) have jointly produced a biomass funding guide fuel prices continue to rise, and the emerging biomass sector is well-placed to make a significant

306

Flash Carbonization of Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass feedstocks included woods (Leucaena and oak) and agricultural byproducts (macadamia nut shells and corncob). ... Biomass feedstocks employed in this study are listed in Table 1. ... 4 We presume that these differences represent the inherent variability of biomass feedstocks from one year, location, etc. to the next. ...

Michael Jerry Antal, Jr.; Kazuhiro Mochidzuki; Lloyd S. Paredes

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

307

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A project to develop a microbial heat recovery cell (MHRC) system prototype using wastewater effluent samples from candidate facilities to produce either electric power or hydrogen

308

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Configurations of the Mercury 50 Recuperated Gas-Turbine-Based Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Heat and Power (BIGCHP) Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, several original configurations of the cogeneration system based on different gasification technologies and Mercury 50 recuperated gas turbine are proposed and examined theoretically. ... (14) Another key problem of the successful commercialization of the technology is the commercial availability of reliable and efficient gas turbines (GTs) modified for syngas operation. ... In particular, the paper presents current development status and design challenges being addressed by Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. for large industrial engines (>200 MW) and by Solar Turbines for smaller engines (Turbine Systems (ATS) program. ...

Jacek Kalina

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

309

BNL | Biomass Burns  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

310

Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass: Biomass: Organic matter, including: agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes, and terrestrial and aquatic crops grown solely for energy purposes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Traditional and Thermal Use of Biomass Traditional use of biomass, particularly burning wood, is one of the oldest manners in which biomass has been utilized for energy. Traditional use of biomass is 14% of world energy usage which is on the same level as worldwide electricity usage. Most of this consumption comes from developing countries where traditional use of biomass accounts for 35% of primary energy usage [1] and greater than 75% of primary energy use is in the residential sector. The general trend in developing countries has been a

311

Colton Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Colton Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

312

Bavarian LFGTE Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bavarian LFGTE Biomass Facility Bavarian LFGTE Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bavarian LFGTE Biomass Facility Facility Bavarian LFGTE Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Boone County, Kentucky Coordinates 38.9940572°, -84.7315563° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9940572,"lon":-84.7315563,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

313

Bradley Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bradley Biomass Facility Bradley Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bradley Biomass Facility Facility Bradley Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

314

Grayson Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grayson Biomass Facility Grayson Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Grayson Biomass Facility Facility Grayson Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

315

Al Turi Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turi Biomass Facility Turi Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Al Turi Biomass Facility Facility Al Turi Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, New York Coordinates 41.3911653°, -74.3118212° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3911653,"lon":-74.3118212,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Chicopee Electric Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chicopee Electric Biomass Facility Chicopee Electric Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chicopee Electric Biomass Facility Facility Chicopee Electric Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hampden County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.1172314°, -72.6624209° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1172314,"lon":-72.6624209,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

317

California Street Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Street Biomass Facility Street Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Street Biomass Facility Facility California Street Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

318

Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Girvin Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Duval County, Florida Coordinates 30.3500511°, -81.6035062° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.3500511,"lon":-81.6035062,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

319

Berlin Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Berlin Biomass Facility Berlin Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Berlin Biomass Facility Facility Berlin Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Green Lake County, Wisconsin Coordinates 43.863117°, -89.0179332° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.863117,"lon":-89.0179332,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

320

San Marcos Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marcos Biomass Facility Marcos Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name San Marcos Biomass Facility Facility San Marcos Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Diego County, California Coordinates 33.0933809°, -116.6081653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0933809,"lon":-116.6081653,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Lyon Development Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lyon Development Biomass Facility Lyon Development Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lyon Development Biomass Facility Facility Lyon Development Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Oakland County, Michigan Coordinates 42.5921924°, -83.336188° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5921924,"lon":-83.336188,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

322

Acme Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Acme Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Acme Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Contra Costa County, California Coordinates 37.8534093°, -121.9017954° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8534093,"lon":-121.9017954,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

323

Brickyard Recycling Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recycling Biomass Facility Recycling Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brickyard Recycling Biomass Facility Facility Brickyard Recycling Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Vermilion County, Illinois Coordinates 40.122469°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.122469,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

324

BKK Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BKK Landfill Biomass Facility BKK Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name BKK Landfill Biomass Facility Facility BKK Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

325

Reliant Bluebonnet Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reliant Bluebonnet Biomass Facility Reliant Bluebonnet Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Reliant Bluebonnet Biomass Facility Facility Reliant Bluebonnet Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Harris County, Texas Coordinates 29.7751825°, -95.3102505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.7751825,"lon":-95.3102505,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

326

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Facility Harrisburg Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dauphin County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.2734277°, -76.7336521° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2734277,"lon":-76.7336521,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

327

Biodyne Beecher Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beecher Biomass Facility Beecher Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biodyne Beecher Biomass Facility Facility Biodyne Beecher Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Will County, Illinois Coordinates 41.5054724°, -88.0900762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5054724,"lon":-88.0900762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

328

Sunset Farms Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sunset Farms Biomass Facility Sunset Farms Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Sunset Farms Biomass Facility Facility Sunset Farms Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Travis County, Texas Coordinates 30.2097015°, -97.6982272° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.2097015,"lon":-97.6982272,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

329

Halifax Electric Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Biomass Facility Electric Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Halifax Electric Biomass Facility Facility Halifax Electric Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Plymouth County, Massachusetts Coordinates 41.9120406°, -70.7168469° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9120406,"lon":-70.7168469,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

330

Randolph Electric Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Randolph Electric Biomass Facility Randolph Electric Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Randolph Electric Biomass Facility Facility Randolph Electric Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Norfolk County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.17668°, -71.1448516° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.17668,"lon":-71.1448516,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Otay Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Otay Biomass Facility Otay Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Otay Biomass Facility Facility Otay Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Diego County, California Coordinates 33.0933809°, -116.6081653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0933809,"lon":-116.6081653,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

332

Tri Cities Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tri Cities Biomass Facility Tri Cities Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tri Cities Biomass Facility Facility Tri Cities Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Maricopa County, Arizona Coordinates 33.2917968°, -112.4291464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.2917968,"lon":-112.4291464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

333

Gude Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gude Biomass Facility Gude Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gude Biomass Facility Facility Gude Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Montgomery County, Maryland Coordinates 39.1547426°, -77.2405153° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1547426,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

334

Biodyne Lyons Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biodyne Lyons Biomass Facility Biodyne Lyons Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biodyne Lyons Biomass Facility Facility Biodyne Lyons Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

335

Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Westchester Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

336

Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Kiefer Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Sacramento County, California Coordinates 38.47467°, -121.3541631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.47467,"lon":-121.3541631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

337

Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Milliken Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

338

Reliant Conroe Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conroe Biomass Facility Conroe Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Reliant Conroe Biomass Facility Facility Reliant Conroe Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Montgomery County, Texas Coordinates 30.3213482°, -95.4777811° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.3213482,"lon":-95.4777811,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

339

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Facility Brookhaven Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

340

Biodyne Springfield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biodyne Springfield Biomass Facility Facility Biodyne Springfield Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Sangamon County, Illinois Coordinates 39.7337353°, -89.6251646° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7337353,"lon":-89.6251646,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ridgeview Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridgeview Biomass Facility Ridgeview Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ridgeview Biomass Facility Facility Ridgeview Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Manitowoc County, Wisconsin Coordinates 44.1438879°, -87.460397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.1438879,"lon":-87.460397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

Coffin Butte Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coffin Butte Biomass Facility Coffin Butte Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Coffin Butte Biomass Facility Facility Coffin Butte Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Benton County, Oregon Coordinates 44.6281686°, -123.3873877° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.6281686,"lon":-123.3873877,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

Barre Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barre Biomass Facility Barre Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Barre Biomass Facility Facility Barre Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Worcester County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.4096528°, -71.8571331° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4096528,"lon":-71.8571331,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

344

Arbor Hills Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hills Biomass Facility Hills Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Arbor Hills Biomass Facility Facility Arbor Hills Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Washtenaw County, Michigan Coordinates 42.3076493°, -83.8473015° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3076493,"lon":-83.8473015,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

345

Chapter 11 - Sulfur Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sulfur is present in many raw industrial gases and in natural gas in the form of hydrogen sulfide. Sulfur removal facilities are located at the majority of oil and gas processing facilities throughout the world. The sulfur recovery unit does not make a profit for the operator but it is an essential processing step to allow the overall facility to operate, as the discharge of sulfur compounds to the atmosphere is severely restricted by environmental regulations. Concentration levels of H2S vary significantly depending upon their source. H2S produced from absorption processes, such as amine treating of natural gas or refinery gas, can contain 5075% H2S by volume or higher. This chapter provides information about fundamentals of sulfur removal facilities in the natural gas industry.

Alireza Bahadori

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Issues Impacting Refractory Service Life in Biomass/Waste Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different carbon sources are used, or are being considered, as feedstock for gasifiers; including natural gas, coal, petroleum coke, and biomass. Biomass has been used with limited success because of issues such as ash impurity interactions with the refractory liner, which will be discussed in this paper.

Bennett, J.P.; Kwong, K.-S.; Powell, C.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Alaska has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, coal, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Alaska are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and electric grid improvements to geothermal power. Through these investments, Alaska's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Alaska to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

348

Strategy for the Application of Novel Characterization Methods for Biomass Fuels: Case Study of Straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Retschitzegger, S.; Brunner, T.; Obernberger, I. Assessment of online corrosion measurements in combination with fuel analysis, flue gas, aerosol and deposit measurements in a biomass CHP plant. ...

Ingwald Obernberger

2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

350

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

351

Coal/biomass gasifier lab tests are a success  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal/biomass gasifier lab tests are a success ... The process produces a medium-Btu gas from a mixture of coal, municipal solid waste, and dewatered sewage sludge. ...

1980-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification is a thermo-chemical process which transforms biomass into valuable synthesis gas. Integrated with a biorefinery it can address the facilitys residue handling challenges and input demands. A number of feedstock, technology, oxidizer...

Georgeson, Adam

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

353

Biothermal gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BIOTHERMGAS Process is described for conversion of biomass, organic residues, and peat to substitute natural gas (SNG). This new process, under development at IGT, combines biological and thermal processes for total conversion of a broad variety of organic feeds (regardless of water or nutrient content). The process employs thermal gasification for conversion of refractory digester residues. Ammonia and other inorganic nutrients are recycled from the thermal process effluent to the bioconversion unit. Biomethanation and catalytic methanation are presented as alternative processes for methanation of thermal conversion product gases. Waste heat from the thermal component is used to supply the digester heat requirements of the bioconversion component. The results of a preliminary systems analysis of three possible applications of this process are presented: (1) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with catalytic methanation; (2) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with biomethanation; and (3) 1000 ton/day municipal solid waste (MSW) sewage sludge plant with biomethanation. The results indicate that for these examples, performance is superior to that expected for biological or thermal processes used separately. The results of laboratory studies presented suggest that effective conversion of thermal product gases can be accomplished by biomethanation.

Chynoweth, D.P.; Srivastava, V.J.; Henry, M.P.; Tarman, P.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Wheelabrator Bridgeport Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheelabrator Bridgeport Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Bridgeport Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Bridgeport Sector Biomass Facility Type...

355

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewableenergyresourcesincludebiomass,solarthermalresources: wind, closed?loop biomass, open? loop biomass, geothermal energy, solar

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Downdraft gasification of biomass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objectives of this research were to investigate the parameters affecting the gasification process within downdraft gasifiers using biomass feedstocks. In addition to investigations with (more)

Milligan, Jimmy B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Biomass: Biogas Generator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BIOGAS GENERATOR Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemicalcarbon cycles, plants, energy resourcestransformations) Grade Level: Middle School (6-8) Small groups (3 to...

358

Biomass 2012 Agenda  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

reach of biomass and biofuel applications, helping to build capacity that will allow for bioenergy markets to develop and deepen in the international arena. Moderator: Natasha...

359

DOE 2014 Biomass Conference  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2014 Biomass Conference Jim Williams Senior Manager American Petroleum Institute July 29, 2014 DRAFT 72814 Let's Agree with the Chicken Developing & Implementing Fuels & Vehicle...

360

Biomass Resource Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with universities and industry partners to maintain a library of herbaceous and woody biomass samples. All analyses performed on these samples, including moisture content,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Biomass 2014 Attendee List  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bender Novozymes Bryna Berendzen DOE - Bioenergy Technologies Office Joshua Berg The Earth Partners Dilfia Bermudez Summerhill Biomass Systems Inc. Michael Bernstein BCS, Inc....

362

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectrometer analyzes vapors during the gasification and pyrolysis processes. NREL's biomass projects are designed to advance the production of liquid transportation fuels from...

363

Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To support research and development (R&D) planning efforts within the Thermochemical Conversion Program, the Bioenergy Technologies Office hosted the Biomass Indirect Liquefaction (IDL)...

364

Introduction to Biomass Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass was the major fuel in the world ... hundreds when coal then became dominant. The combustion of solid biofuels as a primary energy...

Jenny M. Jones; Amanda R. Lea-Langton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Biomass 2014 Draft Agenda | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass 2014 Draft Agenda Biomass 2014 Draft Agenda The following document is a draft agenda for the Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy conference. Biomass 2014 Draft...

366

Biomass 2011 Conference Agenda | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 Conference Agenda Biomass 2011 Conference Agenda Biomass 2011 Conference Agenda bio2011fullagenda.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass 2009 Conference Agenda Biomass 2010...

367

Biomass 2009 Conference Agenda | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

09 Conference Agenda Biomass 2009 Conference Agenda Biomass 2009 Conference Agenda bio2009fullagenda.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass 2010 Conference Agenda Biomass 2011...

368

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Breaking down biomass could help in converting biomass to fuels. March 26, 2012 Biomass Due to diminishing petroleum...

369

One Step Biomass Gas Reforming-Shift Separation Membrane Reactor - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Michael Roberts (Primary Contact), Razima Souleimanova Gas Technology Institute (GTI) 1700 South Mount prospect Rd, Des Plaines, IL 60018 Phone: (847) 768-0518 Email: roberts@gastechnology.org DOE Managers HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-07GO17001 Subcontractors: * National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA * Schott North America, Duryea, PA * ATI Wah Chang, Albany, OR Project Start Date: February 1, 2007 Project End Date: June 30, 2013

370

A large carbon sink in the woody biomass of Northern forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large carbon sink in the woody biomass of Northern forests R. B. Myneni* , J. Dong* , C. J fossil fuels and industrial activities. Some of the missing carbon is sequestered in vegetation biomass, industrialized nations can use certain forest biomass sinks to meet their green- house gas emissions reduction

Goldberg, Bennett

371

Emissions tradeoffs associated with cofiring forest biomass with coal: A case study in Colorado, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 July 2013 Keywords: Forest biomass Greenhouse gas emissions Air pollution Bioenergy Cofire a b mine and power plant. Model emissions tradeoffs of cofiring forest biomass with coal up to 20% by heat emissions sources: coal mining, power plant processes, forest biomass processes, boiler emissions

Fried, Jeremy S.

372

Biomass Gasification using Solar Thermal Energy M. Munzinger and K. Lovegrove  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.lovegrove@anu.edu.au Hydrogen from Biomass as an energy carrier has generated increasing interest in recent years in connection with the use of solar heat as energy source for the conversion reaction. Biomass gasification effective as high energy density transport fuels. Gas derived from solar thermal conversion of biomass

373

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recovery of energy from sludge-Comparison of the various2006. Wim Rulkens, Sewage sludge as a biomass resource forEpstein, E. , Sewage sludge and effluent use in agriculture,

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

NETL: Oil & Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Gas Publications KMD Contacts Project Summaries EPAct 2005 Arctic Energy Office Announcements Software Stripper Wells Efficient recovery of our nation's fossil fuel resources...

375

BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early with biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the boiler, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value, which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior.

Jay R. Gunderson; Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Biomass energy analysis for crop dehydration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994, an agricultural processing facility was constructed in southern New Mexico for spice and herb dehydration. Annual operational costs are dominated by energy costs, due primarily to the energy intensity of dehydration. A feasibility study was performed to determine whether the use of biomass resources as a feedstock for a cogeneration system would be an economical option. The project location allowed access to unusual biomass feedstocks including cotton gin trash, pecan shells and in-house residues. A resource assessment of the immediate project area determined that approximately 120,000 bone dry tons of biomass feedstocks are available annually. Technology characterization for the plant energy requirements indicated gasification systems offer fuel flexibility advantages over combustion systems although vendor support and commercial experience are limited. Regulatory siting considerations introduce a level of uncertainty because of a lack of a precedent in New Mexico for gasification technology and because vendors of commercial gasifiers have little experience operating such a facility nor gathering emission data. A public opinion survey indicated considerable support for renewable energy use and biomass energy utilization. However, the public opinion survey also revealed limited knowledge of biomass technologies and concerns regarding siting of a biomass facility within the geographic area. The economic analysis conducted for the study is based on equipment vendor quotations, and indicates there will be difficulty competing with current prices of natural gas.

Whittier, J.P.; Haase, S.G.; Quinn, M.W. [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

An investigation of the performance of a hybrid turboexpander-fuel cell system for power recovery at natural gas pressure reduction stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is transported in pipelines at high pressures. To distribute the gas locally at locations along the pipeline the pressure must be reduced before the gas enters the local distribution system. Most pressure reduction stations in North America use expansion valves for this purpose. The expansion process produces a temperature decrease which can cause problems so the gas must be preheated before entering the expansion valve. Usually this is done using a natural gas-fired boiler. To reduce the energy consumption the pressure drop can be achieved by passing the gas through a turboexpander which generates electrical power. With a turboexpander system the gas must also be preheated, a gas-fired boiler again used. A new approach which uses a hybrid turboexpander-fuel cell system has been considered here. In such a system, a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) utilizing natural gas is used to preheat the gas before it flows through the turboexpander and to provide low emission electrical power. The main objective of the present work was to investigate the factors affecting the performance of such a system. Data on natural gas usage in typical smaller Canadian city was used as an input to a simulation of a hybrid gas expansion station in the city.

Clifford Howard; Patrick Oosthuizen; Brant Peppley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Driving on Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for future liquid biofuels might be better directed...because of higher energy density and at...priority for future biofuel research. However...perhaps including algae or thermochemical...support research alternatives that look beyond...biomass yields and the energy density of biomass...

John Ohlrogge; Doug Allen; Bill Berguson; Dean DellaPenna; Yair Shachar-Hill; Sten Stymne

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

379

Biomass Research Program  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

INL's mission is to achieve DOE's vision of supplying high-quality raw biomass; preprocessing biomass into advanced bioenergy feedstocks; and delivering bioenergy commodities to biorefineries. You can learn more about research like this at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Kenney, Kevin; Wright, Christopher; Shelton-Davis, Colleen

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-Fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biomass Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis technique was developed to co-generate hydrogen and electricity directly from a fuel at a reduced cost of electricity. Solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs), which were comprised of 8YSZ electrolytes sandwiched between thick anode supports and thin cathodes, were constructed and experimentally evaluated at various operation conditions on lab-level button cells with 2 cm2 per-cell active areas as well as on bench-scale stacks with 30 cm2 and 100 cm2 per-cell active areas. To reduce the concentration overpotentials, pore former systems were developed and engineered to optimize the microstructure and morphology of the Ni+8YSZ-based anodes. Chemically stable cathode materials, which possess good electronic and ionic conductivity and exhibit good electrocatalytic properties in both oxidizing and reducing gas atmospheres, were developed and materials properties were investigated. In order to increase the specific hydrogen production rate and thereby reduce the system volume and capital cost for commercial applications, a hybrid system that integrates the technologies of the SOFEC and the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), was developed and successfully demonstrated at a 1kW scale, co-generating hydrogen and electricity directly from chemical fuels.

Tao, Greg, G.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Module Handbook Specialisation Biomass Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Module Handbook Specialisation Biomass Energy 2nd Semester for the Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009 University of Zaragoza Specialisation Provider: Biomass Energy #12;Specialisation Biomass Energy, University of Zaragoza Modul: Introduction and Basic Concepts

Damm, Werner

382

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY to treatment prescriptions and anticipated outputs of sawlogs and biomass fuel? How many individual operations biomass fuel removed. Typically in plantations. 50% No harvest treatment

383

biomass | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biomass biomass Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

384

Exploring the Optimum Role of Natural Gas in Biofuels Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-D: Natural Gas & Biomass to Liquids Vann Bush, Managing Director, Energy Conversion, Gas Technology Institute

385

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY Citation: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 2009. Biomass to Energy: Forest

386

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY study. The Biomass to Energy (B2E) Project is exploring the ecological and economic consequences

387

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY .................................................................................... 33 3.3 BIOMASS POWER PLANT OPERATION MODELS AND DATA

388

Developing better biomass feedstock | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Developing better biomass feedstock Developing better biomass feedstock Multi-omics unlocking the workings of plants Kim Hixson, an EMSL research scientist, is bioengineering...

389

NREL: Biomass Research - Video Text  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

common corn grain ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol is made from organic plant matter called biomass. The video shows different forms of biomass such as switchgrass, corn stalks, and...

390

Bioconversion of biomass to methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion of biomass to methane is described. The biomethane potentials of various biomass feedstocks from our laboratory and literature is summarized.

Hashimoto, A.G. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Biomass Energy Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of biomass energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply biomass within the Federal sector.

392

Waste Biomass-Extracted Surfactants for Heavy Oil Removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential synergism between biobased surfactants, produced from the alkaline extraction of waste biomass, and a synthetic surfactant was assessed. ... Since the principles of soil washing (critical Ca) were first developed for reservoir engineering, one expects that the ultralow (surfactant-enhanced oil recovery operations. ...

Matthew D. Baxter; Edgar Acosta; Enzo Montoneri; Silvia Tabasso

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

Recovery Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 Recovery Act Buy American Requirements for Information Needed from Financial Assistance Applicants/Recipients for Waiver Requests Based on Unreasonable Cost or Nonavailability Applicants for and recipients of financial assistance funded by the Recovery Act must comply with the requirement that all of the iron, steel, and manufactured goods used for a project for the construction, alteration, maintenance, or repair of a public building or public work be produced in the United States, unless the head of the agency makes a waiver, or determination of inapplicability of the Buy American Recovery Act provisions, based on one of the authorized exceptions. The authorized exceptions are unreasonable cost, nonavailability, and in furtherance of the public interest. This

394

A BIOMASS-BASED MODEL TO ESTIMATE THE PLAUSIBILITY OF EXOPLANET BIOSIGNATURE GASES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biosignature gas detection is one of the ultimate future goals for exoplanet atmosphere studies. We have created a framework for linking biosignature gas detectability to biomass estimates, including atmospheric photochemistry ...

Seager, Sara

395

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT California has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in California are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to solar and wind, geothermal and biofuels, carbon capture and storage, and environmental cleanup. Through these investments, California's businesses, universities, national labs, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning California to play an important role in the new energy economy

396

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT California has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in California are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to solar and wind, geothermal and biofuels, carbon capture and storage, and environmental cleanup. Through these investments, California's businesses, universities, national labs, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning California to play an important role in the new energy economy

397

East Bridgewater Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East Bridgewater Biomass Facility East Bridgewater Biomass Facility Facility East Bridgewater Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Plymouth County, Massachusetts Coordinates 41.9120406°, -70.7168469° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9120406,"lon":-70.7168469,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

398

Biodyne Peoria Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biodyne Peoria Biomass Facility Biodyne Peoria Biomass Facility Facility Biodyne Peoria Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Peoria County, Illinois Coordinates 40.7156396°, -89.7755338° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7156396,"lon":-89.7755338,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

399

OpenEI - biomass  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/827 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

License
Type of License: 

400

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Integration and Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Based Microcombined Heat and Power Systems and Other Renewable Systems Using Biomass Waste Derived Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2, 3) The microgeneration or self-generation concept for dwellings is associated with several advantages, such as (1) cutting emissions of greenhouse gases, (2) reducing the number of people living in fuel poverty, (3) reducing the demands on transmission systems and distribution systems, (4) reducing the need for those systems to be modified, (5) enhancing the availability of electricity and heat for consumers, and (6) encouraging consumer engagement with energy efficient technologies. ... The SOFC can utilize heat of oxidization of gaseous fuels, such as hydrogen, syngas, and natural gas, in the anode in the presence of an oxidant in the cathode, to produce electricity. ... The biomass gasification plant under consideration comprises gasifiers, gas cooling and clean up technologies, gas turbines, heat recovery steam generators (HRSG), etc. ...

Jhuma Sadhukhan; Yingru Zhao; Matthew Leach; Nigel P. Brandon; Nilay Shah

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

402

Managing Manure with Biogas Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as natural gas, propane, and fuel oil. Biogas can also be flared to control odor if energy recovery: a digester, a gas-handling system, a gas-use device, and a manure storage tank or pond to hold the treat- ed.g., storage tanks, storage ponds, lagoons). These benefits include odor control, improved air and water

Mukhtar, Saqib

403

Driving on Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Annual Supply ( USDA and DOE , Washington, DC , 2005 ); www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/pdfs/final_billionton_vision...hybridcars.com/. 12 Vehicle Technologies Program, DOE , www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/2008_fotw514...

John Ohlrogge; Doug Allen; Bill Berguson; Dean DellaPenna; Yair Shachar-Hill; Sten Stymne

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

Driving on Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Increasing supplies of biodiesel is one priority for future...research. However, production of biodiesel from temperate oilseed crops...systems, perhaps including algae or thermochemical conversion...biomass either for burning or for biodiesel production. Reducing leaf...

John Ohlrogge; Doug Allen; Bill Berguson; Dean DellaPenna; Yair Shachar-Hill; Sten Stymne

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

405

DOE 2014 Biomass Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1CFostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels DOE 2014 Biomass Conference Jim Williams, Senior Manager, American Petroleum Institute

406

Modern Biomass Conversion Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of key biomass conversion technologies currently deployed and technologies that may...2...capture and sequestration technology (CCS). In doing so, special at...

Andre Faaij

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

AGCO Biomass Solutions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to update any forward-looking statements except as required by law. Who is AGCO? AGCO Biomass - A History * Started approximately 5 years ago - First OEM to have a department...

408

Overview of Biomass Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main combustion systems for biomass fuels are presented and the respective requirements ... etc.) in industrial boilers or for co-combustion in power plants. For fuels with high ... moving grate firings are u...

T. Nussbaumer; J. E. Hustad

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12; #12;© Crown copyright 2007 ISBN: 978 0 7559 6506 9 Scottish% recyclable. #12;A BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12;#12;1 CONTENTS FOREWORD 3 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5 2. INTRODUCTION 9 3. WIDER CONTEXT 13 4. SCOTLAND'S ROLE IN THE UK BIOMASS STRATEGY 17 5. BIOMASS HEATING 23 6

410

Biomass 2014 Poster Session  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energys Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) invites students, researchers, public and private organizations, and members of the general public to submit poster abstracts for consideration for the annual Biomass Conference Poster Session. The Biomass 2014 conference theme focuses on topics that are advancing the growth of the bioeconomy, such as improvements in feedstock logistics; promising, innovative pathways for advanced biofuels; and market-enabling co-products.

411

Washington Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Washington Recovery Act State Memo Washington Recovery Act State Memo Washington Recovery Act State Memo Washington State has substantial natural resources, including biomass, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA)is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Washington are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind, biomass, and geothermal, as well as cleaning up the legacy of Cold War nuclear facilities at Hanford. Through these investments, Washington's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Washington to play an important role in the new energy economy of the

412

Biomass Power Association (BPA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Power Association (BPA) Biomass Power Association (BPA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Power Association (BPA) Agency/Company /Organization: Biomass Power Association Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.usabiomass.org Cost: Free References: Biomass Power Association[1] The website includes information on biomass power basics, renewable electricity standards, and updates on legislation affecting biomass power plants. Overview "The Biomass Power Association is the nation's leading organization working to expand and advance the use of clean, renewable biomass

413

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

414

Influence of steam injection through exhaust heat recovery on the design performance of solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine hybrid systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzed the influence of steam injection on the performance of hybrid systems combining a solid oxide fuel cell and a gas turbine. Two different ... the effects of injecting steam, generated by recovering

Sung Ku Park; Tong Seop Kim; Jeong L. Sohn

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Illinois Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Act State Memo Illinois has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

416

Optimization of the performance ofdown-draft biomass gasifier installedat National Engineering Research &Development (NERD) Centre ofSri Lanka.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Using biomass gasification to produce combustible gas is one of the promising sustainable energy optionsavailable for many countries. At present, a few small scale (more)

Gunarathne, Duleeka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Production of low BTU gas from biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and transported with little difficulty. It was decided to use a fluidized bed reactor for the gasification. Fluidized bed reactors offer many advantages when utilized as a medium for gasifi- cation of solid fuels. Some of them are excellent mixing... carbon and graphite. The results showed the equilibrium constant to be a function of temperature alone, independent of carbon source, particle size and other physical properties of the carbon. Brink (1976) studied the pyrolysis and gasifi- cation...

Lee, Yung N.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Starting Up Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter gives the reader a practical introduction into microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) including the microbial production of natural gas from oil. Decision makers who consider the use of one of the...

Michael Siegert; Jana Sitte; Alexander Galushko; Martin Krger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Transportation fuels from biomass via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable source of carbon, which could provide a means to reduce the greenhouse gas impact from fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Biomass is the only renewable source of liquid fuels, which could displace petroleum-derived products. Fast pyrolysis is a method of direct thermochemical conversion (non-bioconversion) of biomass to a liquid product. Although the direct conversion product, called bio-oil, is liquid; it is not compatible with the fuel handling systems currently used for transportation. Upgrading the product via catalytic processing with hydrogen gas, hydroprocessing, is a means that has been demonstrated in the laboratory. By this processing the bio-oil can be deoxygenated to hydrocarbons, which can be useful replacements of the hydrocarbon distillates in petroleum. While the fast pyrolysis of biomass is presently commercial, the upgrading of the liquid product by hydroprocessing remains in development, although it is moving out of the laboratory into scaled-up process demonstration systems.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

420

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Researchers at NREL use biomass process and sustainability analyses to understand the economic, technical, and global impacts of biomass conversion technologies. These analyses reveal the economic feasibility and environmental benefits of biomass technologies and are useful for government, regulators, and the private sector. NREL's Energy Analysis Office integrates and supports the energy analysis functions at NREL. Among NREL's projects in biomass process and sustainability analyses are: Life Cycle Assessment of Energy Independence and Security Act for Ethanol NREL is determining the life cycle environmental impacts of the ethanol portion of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA mandates

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Pressure swing adsorption with intermediate product recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pressure swing adsorption process is used to achieve intermediate product recovery by the introduction of a gas displacement step before, simultaneous with or subsequent to pressure equalization between beds of a multi-bed adsorption system. A cocurrent depressurization step is then employed to achieve intermediate product recovery. A portion of said intermediate product or of the more readily adsorbable component recovered from a bed advantageously being employed to provide displacement gas for another bed in the adsorption system.

Fuderer, A.

1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

422

Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo Hawaii has substantial natural resources, including solar, biomass , geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Hawaii are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind power and biofuels. Through these investments, Hawaii's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Hawaii to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Arizona Recovery Act State Memo

423

Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo Rhode Island has substantial natural resources, including wind and biomass. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Rhode Island are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from weatherization to smart grid workforce training. Through these investments, Rhode Island's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Rhode Island to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Guam Recovery Act State Memo

424

New Hampshire Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hampshire Recovery Act State Memo Hampshire Recovery Act State Memo New Hampshire Recovery Act State Memo New Hampshire has substantial natural resources, including wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in New Hampshire are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from weatherization and retrofits to the smart grid. Through these investments, New Hampshire's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning New Hampshire to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. New Hampshire Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Virginia Recovery Act State Memo

425

Maine Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maine Recovery Act State Memo Maine Recovery Act State Memo Maine Recovery Act State Memo Maine has substantial natural resources, including wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Maine are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to solar and wind. Through these investments, Maine's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Maine to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Maine Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications Slide 1 District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo

426

Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo Wisconsin has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA)is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Wisconsin are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to alternative fuel vehicles. Through these investments, Wisconsin's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Wisconsin to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications California Recovery Act State Memo

427

Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo Hawaii has substantial natural resources, including solar, biomass , geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Hawaii are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind power and biofuels. Through these investments, Hawaii's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Hawaii to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Arizona Recovery Act State Memo

428

Benchmarking Biomass Gasification Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals and Hydrogen Production Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Jared P. Ciferno John J. Marano June 2002 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to express their appreciation to all individuals who contributed to the successful completion of this project and the preparation of this report. This includes Dr. Phillip Goldberg of the U.S. DOE, Dr. Howard McIlvried of SAIC, and Ms. Pamela Spath of NREL who provided data used in the analysis and peer review. Financial support for this project was cost shared between the Gasification Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Biomass Power Program within the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

429

Biomass 2010 Conference Agenda | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

0 Conference Agenda Biomass 2010 Conference Agenda Biomass 2010 Conference Agenda bio2010fullagenda.pdf More Documents & Publications QTR Cornerstone Workshop Agenda 2014 Biomass...

430

Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saugus Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Saugus Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Saugus Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste...

431

Biomass 2012 Agenda | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2 Agenda Biomass 2012 Agenda Detailed agenda from the July 10-11, 2012, Biomass conference--Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities - Sustaining a Commitment...

432

Dinuba Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dinuba Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Dinuba Biomass Facility Facility Dinuba Sector Biomass Owner Community Recycling, Inc. Location Dinuba, California...

433

November 2011 Model documentation for biomass,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 November 2011 Model documentation for biomass, cellulosic biofuels, renewable of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;3 Contents Biomass.....................................................................................................................................................4 Variables in the biomass module

Noble, James S.

434

Mecca Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mecca Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mecca Biomass Facility Facility Mecca Sector Biomass Owner Colmac Energy Location Mecca, California Coordinates 33.571692,...

435

Hebei Jiantou Biomass Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jiantou Biomass Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hebei Jiantou Biomass Power Place: Jinzhou, Hebei Province, China Zip: 50000 Sector: Biomass Product: A company engages in...

436

NREL: International Activities - Biomass Resource Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Resource Assessment Map showing annual productivity of marginal lands in APEC economies. Biomass resource assessments quantify the existing or potential biomass material in...

437

Chowchilla Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chowchilla Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chowchilla Biomass Facility Facility Chowchilla Sector Biomass Owner London Economics Location Chowchilla, California...

438

Category:Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pages in category "Biomass" This category contains only the following page. B Biomass Scenario Model Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:Biomass&oldid3...

439

Haryana Biomass Power Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haryana Biomass Power Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Haryana Biomass Power Ltd. Place: Mumbai, Haryana, India Zip: 400025 Sector: Biomass Product: This is a JV consortium...

440

NREL: Biomass Research - David W. Templeton  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

W. Templeton Photo of David Templeton David Templeton is the senior biomass analyst on the Biomass Analysis team (Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory) within the National...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuels,LLC UCSDBiomasstoPower EconomicFeasibilityFigure1:WestBiofuelsBiomassGasificationtoPowerrates... 31 UCSDBiomasstoPower?Feasibility

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Mecca Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mecca Plant Biomass Facility Facility Mecca Plant Sector Biomass Location Riverside County, California Coordinates...

443

Florida Biomass Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name: Florida Biomass Energy Consortium Place: Florida Sector: Biomass Product: Association of biomass energy companies. References: Florida...

444

Opportunities for Farmers in Biomass Feedstock Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Opportunities for Farmers in Biomass Feedstock Production Richard Hess Biomass 2014, Feedstocks Plenary July 29, 2014 Getting into the Biomass Business Crop Residue Removal; Farm...

445

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Biomass Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basics and biomass organizations. Technology Basics The following resources explain the fundamentals of biomass energy technologies: Biomass Energy Basics: NREL publishes this...

446

Map of Biomass Facilities/Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Map of Biomass Facilities/Data Map of Biomass Facilities/Data < Map of Biomass Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Download a CSV file of the table below: CSV FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Place GeneratingCapacity NumberOfUnits CommercialOnlineDate HeatRate WindTurbineManufacturer FacilityStatus AES Mendota Biomass Facility Fresno County, California 25 MW25,000 kW 25,000,000 W 25,000,000,000 mW 0.025 GW 2.5e-5 TW 1989 17,873.6 APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Arizona 2.85 MW2,850 kW 2,850,000 W 2,850,000,000 mW 0.00285 GW 2.85e-6 TW 2006 8,911 Aberdeen Biomass Facility Sierra Pacific Industries Aberdeen, Washington 12 MW12,000 kW 12,000,000 W 12,000,000,000 mW 0.012 GW 1.2e-5 TW Acme Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Gas Contra Costa County, California 0.27 MW270 kW

447

Optimization of condensing gas drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- cal, undersaturated reservoir with gas being injected into the crest and oil being produced from the base of the structure. Fractional oil re- covery at gas breakthrough proved to be less sensitive to changes in oil withdrawal rates as the gas... injection pressure was increased. The validity of the model was established by accurately simulating several low pressure gas drives conducted in the laboratory. Oil recoveries at gas breakthrough using the model compared closely with those recoveries...

Lofton, Larry Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

448

APS Biomass I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

APS Biomass I Biomass Facility APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Facility APS Biomass I Sector Biomass Location Arizona Coordinates 34.0489281°, -111.0937311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0489281,"lon":-111.0937311,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

Minimally refined biomass fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Fixed Bed Biomass Gasifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report details work performed by Gazogen to develop a novel biomass gasifier for producimg electricity from commercially available hardwood chips. The research conducted by Gazogen under this grant was intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new means of producing electricity from wood chips and other biomass and carbonaceous fuels. The technical feasibility of the technology has been furthered as a result of the DOE grant, and work is expected to continue. The economic feasibility can only be shown when all operational problems have been overocme. The technology could eventually provide a means of producing electricity on a decentralized basis from sustainably cultivated plants or plant by-products.

Carl Bielenberg

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Selective olefin recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim report has been prepared as a followup to the January 1996 JDAG meeting. The report presents the results of various studies which evaluate the impact of process design changes on the overall SOR economics for cracked gas olefin recovery. The changes were made to either complete portions of the design that were missing or overlooked, or to improve and/or optimize the SOR process. A grass-roots propane-feed 350,000 MTA plant with a conventional recovery system was adopted as the study basis, and was compared with SOR systems of various sizes up to 350,000 MTA. This approach was taken to determine if SOR plants could be competitive with larger plants utilizing conventional recovery systems. Second phase KG expansion by 50,000-150,000 MTA ethylene was reexamined in view of the SOR process optimization. As was done in Stone & Webster`s December 1995 study, an SOR system was compared with an ARS expansion.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Recovery Newsletters  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

newsletters Office of Environmental newsletters Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en 2011 ARRA Newsletters http://energy.gov/em/downloads/2011-arra-newsletters 2011 ARRA Newsletters

453

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

454

EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA 7: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Place County, CA SUMMARY DOE is proposing to provide funding to Placer County, California to construct and operate a two-megawatt wood-to-energy biomass facility at the Eastern Regional Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and Landfill in unincorporated Placer County. The wood-to-energy biomass facility would use a gasification technology. The fuel supply for the proposed project would be solely woody biomass, derived from a variety of sources including hazardous fuels residuals, forest thinning and harvest residuals, and Wildland Urban Interface sourced waste materials from residential and commercial property defensible space clearing and property management activities

455

Biomass Feedstock National User Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1BIntegration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers Biomass Feedstock National User Facility Kevin L. Kenney, Director, Biomass Feedstock National User Facility, Idaho National Laboratory

456

Biomass in a petrochemical world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...refinery, mapping out the possible routes from biomass feedstocks to fuels and petrochemical-type products, drawing...biorefinery enables the conversion of a range of biomass feedstocks into fuels and chemical feedstocks [6]. As with...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has completed a project to examine fundamental issues that could limit the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC attempted to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience problematic fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive coal-biomass blends. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause increased clinkering or slagging at the grate due to higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start much earlier for biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates, various chlorides, and phosphates. These species in combination with different flue gas temperatures, because of changes in fuel heating value, can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project was to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project were: (1) Modification of an existing pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system. (2) Verification testing of the simulator. (3) Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash formation and potential fouling mechanisms and to optimize activities in the modified pilot-scale system. (4) Pilot-scale testing in the grate-fired system. The resulting data were used to elucidate ash-related problems during coal-biomass cofiring and offer a range of potential solutions.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Jay R. Gunderson; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early for biomass fuels compared to the design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides, in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project is to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project are: Modification of an existing EERC pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system; Verification testing of the simulator; Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash formation and potential fouling mechanisms and to optimize activities in the modified pilot-scale system; and Pilot-scale testing in the grate-fired system. The resulting data will be collected, analyzed, and reported to elucidate ash-related problems during biomass-coal cofiring and offer a range of potential solutions.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Biomass 2014 Attendee List | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass 2014 Attendee List Biomass 2014 Attendee List This document is the attendee list for Biomass 2014, held July 29-July 30 in Washington, D.C. biomass2014attendeelist.pdf...

460

Research and evaluation of biomass resources/conversion/utilization systems (market/experimental analysis for development of a data base for a fuels from biomass model). Quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1979-January 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biomass allocation model has been developed and is undergoing testing. Data bases for biomass feedstock and thermochemical products are complete. Simulated data on process efficiency and product costs are being used while more accurate data are being developed. Market analyses data are stored for the biomass allocation model. The modeling activity will assist in providing process efficiency information required for the allocation model. Process models for entrained bed and fixed bed gasifiers based on coal have been adapted to biomass. Fuel product manufacturing costs will be used as inputs for the data banks of the biomass allocations model. Conceptual economics have been generated for seven of the fourteen process configurations via a biomass economic computer program. The PDU studies are designed to demonstrate steady state thermochemical conversions of biomass to fuels in fluidized, moving and entrained bed reactor configurations. Pulse tests in a fluidized bed to determine the effect of particle size on reaction rates and product gas composition have been completed. Two hour shakedown tests using peanut hulls and wood as the biomass feedstock and the fluidized bed reactor mode have been carried out. A comparison was made of the gas composition using air and steam - O/sub 2/. Biomass thermal profiles and biomass composition information shall be provided. To date approximately 70 biomass types have been collected. Chemical characterization of this material has begun. Thermal gravimetric, pyrogaschromatographic and effluent gas analysis has begun on pelletized samples of these biomass species.

Ahn, Y.K.; Chen, Y.C.; Chen, H.T.; Helm, R.W.; Nelson, E.T.; Shields, K.J.; Stringer, R.P.; Bailie, R.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;5-2 #12;APPENDIX 5: BIOMASS TO ENERGY PROJECT:WILDLIFE HABITAT EVALUATION 1. Authors: Patricia Manley Ross management scenarios. We evaluated the potential effects of biomass removal scenarios on biological diversity

462

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY as a result of emerging biomass opportunities on private industrial and public multiple-use lands (tracked in the vegetation domain) and the quantity of biomass consumed by the wildfire (tracked

463

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;12-2 #12;Appendix 12: Biomass to Energy Project Team, Committee Members and Project Advisors Research Team. Nechodom's background is in biomass energy policy development and public policy research. Peter Stine

464

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY or recommendations of the study. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Domain Description The study area for the Biomass to Energy (B2 and environmental costs and benefits of using forest biomass to generate electrical power while changing fire

465

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy;#12;Executive Summary In Massachusetts, biomass energy has typically meant wood chips derived from the region's extensive forest cover. Yet nationally, biomass energy from dedicated energy crops and from crop residues

Schweik, Charles M.

466

13, 3226932289, 2013 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern Great Plains T (ACP). Please refer to the corresponding final paper in ACP if available. Biomass burning aerosol Geosciences Union. 32269 #12;ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern

Dong, Xiquan

467

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;10-2 #12;Appendix 10: Power Plant Analysis for Conversion of Forest Remediation Biomass to Renewable Fuels and Electricity 1. Report to the Biomass to Energy Project (B2E) Principal Authors: Dennis Schuetzle, TSS

468

Arnold Schwarzenegger BIOMASS TO ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor BIOMASS TO ENERGY: FOREST MANAGEMENT FOR WILDFIRE REDUCTION, ENERGY;6-2 #12;APPENDIX 6: Cumulative Watershed Effects Analysis for the Biomass to Energy Project 1. Principal the findings or recommendations of the study. Cumulative watershed effects (CWE) of the Biomass to Energy (B2E

469

7, 1733917366, 2007 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA wet season experiment C. H. Mari a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tracing biomass burning plumes from. Mari (marc@aero.obs-mip.fr) 17339 #12;ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

470

Application of a low pressure economizer for waste heat recovery from the exhaust flue gas in a 600MW power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of recovering the waste heat of the exhaust flue gas before entering a flue gas desulphurizer (FGD) in a 600MW power plant. This waste heat can be recovered by installing a low pressure economizer (LPE) to heat the condensed water which can save the steam extracted from the steam turbine for heating the condensed water and then extra work can be obtained. The energy and water savings and the reduction of CO2 emission resulted from the LPE installation are assessed for three cases in a 600MW coal-fired power plant with wet stack. Serpentine pipes with quadrate finned extensions are selected for the LPE heat exchanger which has an overall coefficient of heat transfer of 37W/m2K and the static pressure loss of 781Pa in the optimized case. Analysis results show that it is feasible to install \\{LPEs\\} in the exhaust flue gas system between the pressurizing fan and the FGD, which has little negative impacts on the unit. The benefits generated include saving of standard coal equivalent (SCE) at 24g/(kWh) and saving of water at 2535t/h under full load operation with corresponding reduction of CO2 emission.

Chaojun Wang; Boshu He; Shaoyang Sun; Ying Wu; Na Yan; Linbo Yan; Xiaohui Pei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Federal Biomass Activities | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Federal Biomass Activities Federal Biomass Activities Statutory and executive order requirements for Bioproducts and Biofuels federalbiomassactivities.pdf More Documents &...

472

Biomass Energy Technology Module | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics: Technology characterizations Website: web.worldbank.orgWBSITEEXTERNALTOPICSEXTENERGY2EXTRENENERGYTK0,, References: Biomass...

473

Enhanced liquid hydrocarbon recovery process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the recovery of liquid hydrocarbons from a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing formation. It comprises injecting natural gas into the formation via a well in fluid communication with the formation, the natural gas being at a temperature which is insufficient to significantly mobilize light density oil in the formation and at a pressure such that the natural gas is immiscible with the light density oil in the formation, the natural gas being injected in a volume sufficient to contact light density oil in the formation within a radius from the well of about 50 meters; shutting in the well for a period of time of about 1 to about 100 days which is sufficient to render the contacted light density oil mobile; and producing the light density oil which has been mobilized by solution of the natural gas from the well.

Haines, H.K.; Monger, T.G.; Kenyon, D.E.; Galvin, L.J.

1991-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

474

Ultra-high CO2 capture efficiency in CFB oxyfuel power plants by calcium looping process for CO2 recovery from purification units vent gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work presents a new option for the recovery of the CO2 losses from CO2 purification units in oxyfuel plants, by means of the Ca-looping process. The idea is to capture the CO2 in the vent stream from purification units by reaction with CaO sorbent in a carbonator reactor, where CaCO3 is formed. Sorbent is then regenerated in a calciner reactor by oxyfuel combustion of a fraction of the coal fed to the power plant. Since the Ca-looping process requires a continuous purge of exhaust sorbent and make-up of fresh limestone, the system is best coupled with a CFB boiler, where the exhausted Ca-rich sorbent can be used for in-furnace sulfur absorption. In this work, detailed mass and energy balances of the system proposed are reported, including a preliminary sizing of the reactors of the Ca-looping unit. A sensitivity analysis was also performed, by considering two types of coal as feed (mainly differing in sulfur content), two levels of non-condensable gases in the impure CO2 stream to be purified and different behaviors of the exhausted Ca-based sorbent injected in the CFB boiler, where it can experience different levels of recarbonation. Interesting results were obtained for this new system, which can capture about 90% of the CO2 vented from the purification unit in a reasonably compact reactors system, allowing an overall CO2 avoidance of the order of 99% with respect to conventional coal-fired steam plants without capture. As far as energy penalties are concerned, they were evaluated by the specific primary energy consumption for CO2 avoided index (SPECCA). Small differences with respect to reference oxyfuel plants without CO2 recovery were obtained, with either slightly better or slightly worse performances, depending on the sulfur content of the coal used. Penalties are associated to the export of CaO in the final exhausted sulfated sorbent from the CFB boiler, which increases when a higher sulfur coal is used. However, experimental analysis on the recarbonation level which can be attained by the CaL exhaust sorbent in the CFB boiler and further process optimization are needed to correctly account for these penalties and possibly minimize them.

Matteo C. Romano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests February 2012 #12;This Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests study was conducted by the Biomass Energy Resource Center Biomass Energy Resource Center Kamalesh Doshi Biomass Energy Resource Center Hillary Emick Biomass Energy

476

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economics of black liquor gasifier/gas turbine cogenerationblack liquor and biomass gasifier/gas turbine technology".entrained flow booster gasifier in New Bern, North Carolina;

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

The Use of Biomass for Power Generation in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, biomass has been man's principal source of energy, mainly used in the form of wood for cooking and heating. With the industrial revolution and the introduction of motorized transportation and electricity, fossil fuels became the dominant source of energy. Today, biomass is the largest domestic source of renewable energy providing over 3% of total U.S. energy consumption, and surpassing hydropower. Yet, recent increases in the price and volatility of fossil fuel supplies and the financial impacts from a number of financially distressed investments in natural gas combined cycle power plants have led to a renewed interest in electricity generation from biomass. The biomass-fueled generation market is a dynamic one that is forecast to show significant growth over the next two decades as environmental drivers are increasingly supported by commercial ones. The most significant change is likely to come from increases in energy prices, as decreasing supply and growing demand increase the costs of fossil fuel-generated electricity and improve the competitive position of biomass as a power source. The report provides an overview of the renewed U.S. market interest in biomass-fueled power generation and gives a concise look at what's driving interest in biomass-fueled generation, the challenges faced in implementing biomass-fueled generation projects, and the current and future state of biomass-fueled generation. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of biomass-fueled generation including its history, the current market environment, and its future prospects; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving renewed interest in biomass-fueled generation; an analysis of the challenges that are hindering the implementation of biomass-fueled generation projects; a description of the various feedstocks that can be used for biomass-fueled generation; an evaluation of the biomass supply chain; a description of biomass-fueled generation technologies; and, a review of the economic drivers of biomass-fueled generation project success.

none

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

NREL: Biomass Research - Thomas Foust  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thomas Foust Thomas Foust Photo of Thomas Foust Dr. Thomas Foust is an internationally recognized expert in the biomass field. His areas of expertise include feedstock production, biomass-to-fuels conversion technologies, and environmental and societal sustainability issues associated with biofuels. He has more than 20 years of research and research management experience, specializing in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. As National Bioenergy Center Director, Dr. Foust guides and directs NREL's research efforts to develop biomass conversion technologies via biochemical and thermochemical routes, as well as critical research areas addressing the sustainability of biofuels. This research focuses on developing the necessary science and technology for converting biomass to biofuels,

479

Gasification and co-gasification of biomass wastes: Effect of the biomass origin and the gasifier operating conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air gasification of different biomass fuels, including forestry (pinus pinaster pruning) and agricultural (grapevine and olive tree pruning) wastes as well as industry wastes (sawdust and marc of grape), has been carried out in a circulating flow gasifier in order to evaluate the potential of using these types of biomass in the same equipment, thus providing higher operation flexibility and minimizing the effect of seasonal fuel supply variations. The potential of using biomass as an additional supporting fuel in coal fuelled power plants has also been evaluated through tests involving mixtures of biomass and coalcoke, the coke being a typical waste of oil companies. The effect of the main gasifier operating conditions, such as the relative biomass/air ratio and the reaction temperature, has been analysed to establish the conditions allowing higher gasification efficiency, carbon conversion and/or fuel constituents (CO, H2 and CH4) concentration and production. Results of the work encourage the combined use of the different biomass fuels without significant modifications in the installation, although agricultural wastes (grapevine and olive pruning) could to lead to more efficient gasification processes. These latter wastes appear as interesting fuels to generate a producer gas to be used in internal combustion engines or gas turbines (high gasification efficiency and gas yield), while sawdust could be a very adequate fuel to produce a H2-rich gas (with interest for fuel cells) due to its highest reactivity. The influence of the reaction temperature on the gasification characteristics was not as significant as that of the biomass/air ratio, although the H2 concentration increased with increasing temperature.

Magn Lapuerta; Juan J. Hernndez; Amparo Pazo; Julio Lpez

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics, and Computational Fluid Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal-biomass Catalytic Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics, and Computational Fluid Dynamics Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports research and development efforts targeted to improve efficiency and reduce the negative environmental effects of the use of fossil fuels. One way to achieve these goals is to combine coal with biomass to create synthesis gas (syngas) for use in turbines and refineries to produce energy, fuels,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery biomass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Optimizing hydrocarbon recoveries in nitrogen rejection units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to address conceptual questions such as process selection and natural gas liquids plant integration, an understanding of the effects of several additional factors on nitrogen rejection unit design is important. These factors, which may influence optimum hydrocarbon recovery, installed compression, etc., include current and forecast values for natural gas and utilities, project life, plant size, feed gas composition and product specifications, feed pressure, and process variations. Prices, project life, and plant size are analyzed in detail and presented in terms of methane recoveries as a function of nitrogen content in the feed for both double and single column processes. Trends are qualitatively discussed for the remaining factors. 13 references.

Chesney, J.D.; Davis, R.A.; Hilton, M.F.; Vines, H.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Definition: Biomass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Biomass Organic matter, including: agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes, and terrestrial and aquatic crops grown solely for energy purposes.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Biomass is biological material derived from living, or recently living organisms. It most often refers to plants or plant-derived materials which are specifically called lignocellulosic biomass. As a renewable energy source, biomass can either be used directly via combustion to produce heat, or indirectly after converting it to various forms of biofuel. Conversion of biomass to biofuel can be achieved by different methods which are broadly classified into: thermal, chemical, and biochemical methods. Historically, humans have harnessed biomass-derived

483

Georgia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Georgia Recovery Act State Memo Georgia Recovery Act State Memo Georgia Recovery Act State Memo Georgia has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Georgia are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and alternative fuels and vehicles. Through these investments, Georgia's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Georgia to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Georgia Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

484

South Dakota Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

South Dakota Recovery Act State Memo South Dakota Recovery Act State Memo South Dakota Recovery Act State Memo South Dakota has substantial natural resources, including biomass, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in South Dakota are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency to smart grid and geothermal power. Through these investments, South Dakota's businesses, the University of South Dakota, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning South Dakota to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. South Dakota Recovery Act State Memo

485

New Jersey Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Jersey Recovery Act State Memo Jersey Recovery Act State Memo New Jersey Recovery Act State Memo New Jersey has substantial natural resources, including wind and biomass. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in New Jersey are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to alternative fuels and vehicles, as well as the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in Plainsboro. Through these investments, New Jersey's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning New Jersey to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. New Jersey Recovery Act State Memo

486

Georgia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Georgia Recovery Act State Memo Georgia Recovery Act State Memo Georgia Recovery Act State Memo Georgia has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Georgia are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and alternative fuels and vehicles. Through these investments, Georgia's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Georgia to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Georgia Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

487

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.wte.org/ Cost: Free The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. Overview The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. The website includes information on waste-to-energy basics

488

Oregon Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oregon Recovery Act State Memo Oregon Recovery Act State Memo Oregon Recovery Act State Memo Oregon has substantial natural resources, including wind, geothermal, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Oregon reflect a broad spectrum of opportunities, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced fuels, battery manufacturing, and geothermal and solar power. Through these investments, Oregon's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Oregon to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Oregon Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

489

EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Placer County, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is proposing to provide funding to Placer County, California to construct and operate a two-megawatt wood-to-energy biomass facility at the Eastern Regional Materials R