Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

2

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

High ratio recirculating gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

High ratio recirculating gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1989-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

5

Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine  

SciTech Connect

An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

Wu, Ko-Jen

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

6

Induced Flue Gas Recirculation Performance Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Induced Flue Gas Recirculation (IFGR) is a proven, low-cost method for controlling NOx emissions on gas-fired utility boilers. In 1997, IFGR technology for power generation applications was first demonstrated at Entergy's Willow Glen station, near Baton Rouge, LA. Following the success with IFGR at Willow Glen, four members of the Gas/Oil Fired Boiler Performance and Combustion NOx Control Target (No.55 in 2000) installed, or plan to install, IFGR on an additional 27 units. American Electric Power has im...

2000-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

7

Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2004 Authors Kristoffersen, Astrid H., Ashok J. Gadgil, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 9th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms - RoomVent 2004, Pagination pp 6 Date Published September 5-8, 2 Conference Location Coimbra, Portugal Abstract Tracer gas measurements are commonly used to estimate the fresh air exchange rate in a room or building. Published tracer decay methods account for fresh air supply, infiltration, and leaks in ductwork. However, the time delay associated with a ventilation system recirculating tracer back to the room also affects the decay rate. We present an analytical study of tracer gas decay in a well-mixed, mechanically-ventilated room with recirculation. The analysis shows that failing to account for delays can lead to under- or over-estimates of the fresh air supply, depending on whether the decay rate calculation includes the duct volume

9

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Lorenzetti, David M., Astrid H. Kristoffersen, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Indoor Air Pagination 7 Keywords recirculating ventilation, tracer decay rate Abstract Tracer gas measurements are used to estimate the flow rate of fresh air into a room or building. These methods commonly account for the decay of tracer gas concentration as the result of ventilation air supply and infiltration, using a well-mixed model of the space. Some researchers also have considered the effect of leakage in the ventilation ductwork. This paper considers the effect of recirculation through ventilation ducts on the calculated fresh air supply rate. Transport delay in the ducts can significantly alter the time evolution of tracer concentration, and hence alter the estimated air change rate.

10

Environmental performance of air staged combustor with flue gas recirculation to burn coal/biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental and thermal performance of a 1.07 m diameter, 440 kW atmospheric fluidized bed combustor operated at 700{degrees}C-920{degrees}C and burning coal was studied. Flue gas recirculation was incorporated to enhance the thermal performance and air staging was used to control emissions of SO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O. Studies focused on the effect of excess air, firing rate, and use of sorbent on system performance. The recirculation-staging mode with limestone had the highest thermal efficiency (0.67) using the firing equation. Emission data showed that flue gas recirculation (ratio of 0.7) significantly reduced NO{sub x} emissions; and that use of limestone sorbent at a Ca/S ratio of 3 reduced SO{sub 2} emissions by 64% to approximately 0.310 g/MJ.

Anuar, S.H.; Keener, H.M.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Integrated exhaust gas recirculation and charge cooling system  

SciTech Connect

An intake system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger configured to deliver compressed intake charge, comprising exhaust gas from the exhaust system and ambient air, through an intake charge conduit and to cylinders of the internal combustion engine. An intake charge cooler is in fluid communication with the intake charge conduit. A cooling system, independent of the cooling system for the internal combustion engine, is in fluid communication with the intake charge cooler through a cooling system conduit. A coolant pump delivers a low temperature cooling medium from the cooling system to and through the intake charge cooler for the transfer of heat from the compressed intake charge thereto. A low temperature cooler receives the heated cooling medium through the cooling system conduit for the transfer or heat therefrom.

Wu, Ko-Jen

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Influence of Flue Gas Recirculation on the Formation of NOx in the Process of Coal Grate-Fired  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the improvement of environmental protection requirements, the problems of NOx emission from industrial boiler become more and more notable. To explore a real effective method of low NOx combustion, the article discusses the influence of flue gas ... Keywords: flue gas recirculation, grate-fired, temperature, Nox

Li Xu; Jianmin Gao; Guangbo Zhao; Laifu Zhao; Zhifeng Zhao; Shaohua Wu

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the oxidative reactivity of diesel engine soot  

SciTech Connect

This paper expands the consideration of the factors affecting the nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of diesel soot to include the impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Past work showed that soot derived from oxygenated fuels such as biodiesel carries some surface oxygen functionality and thereby possesses higher reactivity than soot from conventional diesel fuel. In this work, results show that EGR exerts a strong influence on the physical properties of the soot which leads to enhanced oxidation rate. HRTEM images showed a dramatic difference between the burning modes of the soot generated under 0 and 20% EGR. The soot produced under 0% EGR strictly followed an external burning mode with no evidence of internal burning. In contrast, soot generated under 20% EGR exhibited dual burning modes: slow external burning and rapid internal burning. The results demonstrate clearly that highly reactive soot can be achieved by manipulating the physical properties of the soot via EGR. (author)

Al-Qurashi, Khalid; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 405 Academic Activities Bldg., University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Dynamic instabilities in spark-ignited combustion engines with high exhaust gas recirculation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We propose a cycle-resolved dynamic model for combustion instabilities in spark-ignition engines operating with high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). High EGR is important for increasing fuel efficiency and implementing advanced low-emission combustion modes such as homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI). We account for the complex combustion response to cycle-to-cycle feedback by utilizing a global probability distribution that describes the pre-spark state of in-cylinder fuel mixing. The proposed model does a good job of simulating combustion instabilities observed in both lean-fueling engine experiments and in experiments where nitrogen dilution is used to simulate some of the combustion inhibition of EGR. When used to simulate high internal EGR operation, the model exhibits a range of global bifurcations and chaos that appear to be very robust. We use the model to show that it should be possible to reduce high EGR combustion instabilities by switching from internal to external EGR. We also explain why it might be helpful to deliberately stratify the fuel in the pre-spark gas mixture. It might be possible to extend the simple approach used in this model to other chemical reaction systems with spatial inhomogeneity.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

SELECTIVE NOx RECIRCULATION FOR STATIONARY LEAN-BURN NATURAL GAS ENGINES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research program conducted at the West Virginia University Engine and Emissions Research Laboratory (EERL) is working towards the verification and optimization of an approach to remove nitric oxides from the exhaust gas of lean burn natural gas engines. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under contract number: DE-FC26-02NT41608. Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) involves three main steps. First, NOx is adsorbed from the exhaust stream, followed by periodic desorption from the aftertreatment medium. Finally the desorbed NOx is passed back into the intake air stream and fed into the engine, where a percentage of the NOx is decomposed. This reporting period focuses on the NOx decomposition capability in the combustion process. Although researchers have demonstrated NOx reduction with SNR in other contexts, the proposed program is needed to further understand the process as it applies to lean burn natural gas engines. SNR is in support of the Department of Energy goal of enabling future use of environmentally acceptable reciprocating natural gas engines through NOx reduction under 0.1 g/bhp-hr. The study of decomposition of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) during combustion in the cylinder was conducted on a 1993 Cummins L10G 240 hp lean burn natural gas engine. The engine was operated at different air/fuel ratios, and at a speed of 800 rpm to mimic a larger bore engine. A full scale dilution tunnel and analyzers capable of measuring NOx, CO{sub 2}, CO, HC concentrations were used to characterize the exhaust gas. Commercially available nitric oxide (NO) was used to mimic the NOx stream from the desorption process through a mass flow controller and an injection nozzle. The same quantity of NOx was injected into the intake and exhaust line of the engine for 20 seconds at various steady state engine operating points. NOx decomposition rates were obtained by averaging the peak values at each set point minus the baseline and finding the ratio between the injected NO amounts. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio, injected NO quantity and engine operating points affected the NOx decomposition rates of the natural gas engine. A highest NOx decomposition rate of 27% was measured from this engine. A separate exploratory tests conducted with a gasoline engine with a low air/fuel ratio yielded results that suggested, that high NOx decomposition rates may be possible if a normally lean burn engine were operated at conditions closer to stoichiometric, with high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for a brief period of time during the NOx decomposition phase and with a wider range of air/fuel ratios. Chemical kinetic model predictions using CHEMKIN were performed to relate the experimental data with the established rate and equilibrium models. NOx decomposition rates from 35% to 42% were estimated using the CHEMKIN software. This provided insight on how to maximize NOx decomposition rates for a large bore engine. In the future, the modeling will be used to examine the effect of higher NO{sub 2}/NO ratios that are associated with lower speed and larger bore lean burn operation.

Nigel Clark; Gregory Thompson; Richard Atkinson; Chamila Tissera; Matt Swartz; Emre Tatli; Ramprabhu Vellaisamy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Selective NOx Recirculation for Stationary Lean-Burn Natural Gas Engines  

SciTech Connect

Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) generated by internal combustion (IC) engines are implicated in adverse environmental and health effects. Even though lean-burn natural gas engines have traditionally emitted lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions compared to their diesel counterparts, natural gas engines are being further challenged to reduce NOx emissions to 0.1 g/bhp-hr. The Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) approach for NOx reduction involves cooling the engine exhaust gas and then adsorbing the NOx from the exhaust stream, followed by the periodic desorption of NOx. By sending the desorbed NOx back into the intake and through the engine, a percentage of the NOx can be decomposed during the combustion process. SNR technology has the support of the Department of Energy (DOE), under the Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) program to reduce NOx emissions to under 0.1 g/bhp-hr from stationary natural gas engines by 2010. The NO decomposition phenomenon was studied using two Cummins L10G natural gas fueled spark-ignited (SI) engines in three experimental campaigns. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio ({lambda}), injected NO quantity, added exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) percentage, and engine operating points affected NOx decomposition rates within the engine. Chemical kinetic model predictions using the software package CHEMKIN were performed to relate the experimental data with established rate and equilibrium models. The model was used to predict NO decomposition during lean-burn, stoichiometric burn, and slightly rich-burn cases with added EGR. NOx decomposition rates were estimated from the model to be from 35 to 42% for the lean-burn cases and from 50 to 70% for the rich-burn cases. The modeling results provided an insight as to how to maximize NOx decomposition rates for the experimental engine. Results from this experiment along with chemical kinetic modeling solutions prompted the investigation of rich-burn operating conditions, with added EGR to prevent preignition. It was observed that the relative air/fuel ratio, injected NO quantity, added EGR fraction, and engine operating points affected the NO decomposition rates. While operating under these modified conditions, the highest NO decomposition rate of 92% was observed. In-cylinder pressure data gathered during the experiments showed minimum deviation from peak pressure as a result of NO injections into the engine. A NOx adsorption system, from Sorbent Technologies, Inc., was integrated with the Cummins engine, comprised a NOx adsorbent chamber, heat exchanger, demister, and a hot air blower. Data were gathered to show the possibility of NOx adsorption from the engine exhaust, and desorption of NOx from the sorbent material. In order to quantify the NOx adsorption/desorption characteristics of the sorbent material, a benchtop adsorption system was constructed. The temperature of this apparatus was controlled while data were gathered on the characteristics of the sorbent material for development of a system model. A simplified linear driving force model was developed to predict NOx adsorption into the sorbent material as cooled exhaust passed over fresh sorbent material. A mass heat transfer analysis was conducted to analyze the possibility of using hot exhaust gas for the desorption process. It was found in the adsorption studies, and through literature review, that NO adsorption was poor when the carrier gas was nitrogen, but that NO in the presence of oxygen was adsorbed at levels exceeding 1% by mass of the sorbent. From the three experimental campaigns, chemical kinetic modeling analysis, and the scaled benchtop NOx adsorption system, an overall SNR system model was developed. An economic analysis was completed, and showed that the system was impractical in cost for small engines, but that economies of scale favored the technology.

Nigel N. Clark

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation  

SciTech Connect

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Selective NOx Recirculation for Stationary Lean-Burn Natural Gas Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) involves cooling the engine exhaust gas and then adsorbing the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from the exhaust stream, followed by the periodic desorption of NOx. By returning the desorbed, concentrated NOx into the engine intake and through the combustion chamber, a percentage of the NOx is decomposed during the combustion process. An initial study of NOx decomposition during lean-burn combustion was concluded in 2004 using a 1993 Cummins L10G 240hp natural gas engine. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio, injected NO (nitric oxide) quantity and engine operating points affected NOx decomposition rates of the engine. Chemical kinetic modeling results were also used to determine optimum NOx decomposition operating points and were published in the 2004 annual report. A NOx decomposition rate of 27% was measured from this engine under lean-burn conditions while the software model predicted between 35-42% NOx decomposition for similar conditions. A later technology 1998 Cummins L10G 280hp natural gas engine was procured with the assistance of Cummins Inc. to replace the previous engine used for 2005 experimental research. The new engine was equipped with an electronic fuel management system with closed-loop control that provided a more stable air/fuel ratio control and improved the repeatability of the tests. The engine was instrumented with an in-cylinder pressure measurement system and electronic controls, and was adapted to operate over a range of air/fuel ratios. The engine was connected to a newly commissioned 300hp alternating current (AC) motoring dynamometer. The second experimental campaign was performed to acquire both stoichiometric and slightly rich (0.97 lambda ratio) burn NOx decomposition rates. Effects of engine load and speed on decomposition were quantified, but Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) was not varied independently. Decomposition rates of up to 92% were demonstrated. Following recommendations at the 2004 ARES peer review meeting at Argonne National Laboratories, in-cylinder pressure was measured to calculate engine indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) changes due to NOx injections and EGR variations, and to observe conditions in the cylinder. The third experimental campaign gathered NOx decomposition data at 800, 1200 and 1800 rpm. EGR was added via an external loop, with EGR ranging from zero to the point of misfire. The air/fuel ratio was set at both stoichiometric and slightly rich conditions, and NOx decomposition rates were calculated for each set of runs. Modifications were made to the engine exhaust manifold to record individual exhaust temperatures. The three experimental campaigns have provided the data needed for a comprehensive model of NOx decomposition during the combustion process, and data have confirmed that there was no significant impact of injected NO on in-cylinder pressure. The NOx adsorption system provided by Sorbent Technologies Corp. (Twinsburg, OH), comprised a NOx adsorber, heat exchanger and a demister. These components were connected to the engine, and data were gathered to show both the adsorption of NOx from the engine, and desorption of NOx from the carbon-based sorbent material back into the engine intake, using a heated air stream. In order to quantify the NOx adsorption/desorption characteristics of the sorbent material, a bench top adsorption system was constructed and instrumented with thermocouples and the system output was fed into a NOx analyzer. The temperature of this apparatus was controlled while gathering data on the characteristics of the sorbent material. These data were required for development of a system model. Preliminary data were gathered in 2005, and will continue in early 2006. To assess the economic benefits of the proposed SNR technology the WVU research team has been joined in the last quarter by Dr Richard Turton (WVU-Chemical Engineering), who is modeling, sizing and costing the major components. The tasks will address modeling and preliminary design of the heat exchanger, demister and NOx sorbent chamber s

Nigel Clark; Gregory Thompson; Richard Atkinson; Richard Turton; Chamila Tissera; Emre Tatli; Andy Zimmerman

2005-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

19

Guidelines for Induced Flue Gas Recirculation: Volume 1: Reducing Air/Gas System Resistance and Enhancing Fan Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document guides users through a logical sequence, or "road map," of activities and decisions for optimizing solutions for fans, ducts, and related equipment in fossil plant combustion air and gas systems.

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

Utilizing a cycle simulation to examine the use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for a spark-ignition engine: including the second law of thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system has been widely used to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission, improve fuel economy and suppress knock by using the characteristics of charge dilution. However, previous studies have shown that as the EGR rate at a given engine operating condition increases, the combustion instability increases. The combustion instability increases cyclic variations resulting in the deterioration of engine performance and increasing hydrocarbon emissions. Therefore, the optimum EGR rate should be carefully determined in order to obtain the better engine performance and emissions. A thermodynamic cycle simulation of the four-stroke spark-ignition engine was used to determine the effects of EGR on engine performance, emission characteristics and second law parameters, considering combustion instability issues as EGR level increases. A parameter, called 'Fuel Fraction Burned,' was introduced as a function of the EGR percentage and used in the simulation to incorporate the combustion instability effects. A comprehensive parametric investigation was conducted to examine the effects of variations in EGR, load and speed for a 5.7 liter spark-ignition automotive engine. Variations in the thermal efficiencies, brake specific NOx emissions, average combustion temperature, mean exhaust temperature, maximum temperature and relative heat transfer as functions of exhaust gas recycle were determined for both cooled and adiabatic EGR configurations. Also effects of variations in the load and speed on thermal efficiencies, relative heat transfers and destruction of availability due to combustion were determined for 0% EGR and 20% EGR cases with both cooled and adiabatic configurations. For both EGR configurations, thermal efficiencies first increase, reach a maximum at about 16% EGR and then decrease as the EGR level increases. Thermal efficiencies are slightly higher for cooled EGR configuration than that for adiabatic configuration. Concentration of nitric oxide emissions decreases from about 2950 ppm to 200 ppm as EGR level increases from 0% to 20% for cooled EGR configuration. The cooled EGR configuration results in lower nitric oxide emissions relative to the adiabatic EGR configuration. Also second law parameters show the expected trends as functions of EGR. Brake thermal efficiency is higher for the 20% EGR case than that for the no EGR case over the range of load (0 to WOT) and speed (600 rpm to 6000 rpm). Predictions made from the simulation were compared with some of the available experimental results. Predicted thermal efficiencies showed a similar trend when compared to the available experimental data. Also, percentage of unused fuel availability increases as the EGR level increases, and it can be seen as one of the effects of deteriorating combustion quality as the EGR level increases.

Shyani, Rajeshkumar Ghanshyambhai

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

An experimental and numerical investigation on the influence of external gas recirculation on the HCCI autoignition process in an engine: Thermal, diluting, and chemical effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to contribute to the solution of controlling the autoignition in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine, parameters linked to external gas recirculation (EGR) seem to be of particular interest. Experiments performed with EGR present some difficulties in interpreting results using only the diluting and thermal aspect of EGR. Lately, the chemical aspect of EGR is taken more into consideration, because this aspect causes a complex interaction with the dilution and thermal aspects of EGR. This paper studies the influence of EGR on the autoignition process and particularly the chemical aspect of EGR. The diluents present in EGR are simulated by N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, with dilution factors going from 0 to 46 vol%. For the chemically active species that could be present in EGR, the species CO, NO, and CH{sub 2}O are used. The initial concentration in the inlet mixture of CO and NO is varied between 0 and 170 ppm, while that of CH{sub 2}O alters between 0 and 1400 ppm. For the investigation of the effect of the chemical species on the autoignition, a fixed dilution factor of 23 vol% and a fixed EGR temperature of 70 C are maintained. The inlet temperature is held at 70 C, the equivalence ratios between 0.29 and 0.41, and the compression ratio at 10.2. The fuels used for the autoignition are n-heptane and PRF40. It appeared that CO, in the investigated domain, did not influence the ignition delays, while NO had two different effects. At concentrations up until 45 ppm, NO advanced the ignition delays for the PRF40 and at higher concentrations, the ignition delayed. The influence of NO on the autoignition of n-heptane seemed to be insignificant, probably due to the higher burn rate of n-heptane. CH{sub 2}O seemed to delay the ignition. The results suggested that especially the formation of OH radicals or their consumption by the chemical additives determines how the reactivity of the autoignition changed. (author)

Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, FRT, Institut Jean Le Rond D'Alembert, 2, place de la Gare de Ceinture, 78210 St Cyr l'Ecole (France); Guibert, Philippe [UPMC Universite Paris 06, FRT, Institut Jean Le Rond D'Alembert, 2, place de la Gare de Ceinture, 78210 St Cyr l'Ecole (France)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Recirculation bubbler for glass melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas bubbler device provides enhanced recirculation of molten glass within a glass melter apparatus. The bubbler device includes a tube member disposed within a pool of molten glass contained in the melter. The tube member includes a lower opening through which the molten glass enters and upper slots disposed close to (above or below) the upper surface of the pool of molten glass and from which the glass exits. A gas (air) line is disposed within the tube member and extends longitudinally thereof. A gas bubble distribution device, which is located adjacent to the lower end of the tube member and is connected to the lower end of the gas line, releases gas through openings therein so as to produce gas bubbles of a desired size in the molten glass and in a distributed pattern across the tube member.

Guerrero, Hector (Evans, GA); Bickford, Dennis (Folly Beach, SC)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

23

Use of low temperature blowers for recirculation of hot gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for maintaining motors at low operating temperatures during recirculation of hot gases in fuel cell operations and chemical processes such as fluidized bed coal gasification. The apparatus includes a means for separating the hot process gas from the motor using a secondary lower temperature gas, thereby minimizing the temperature increase of the motor and associated accessories.

Maru, H.C.; Forooque, M.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

A Stratified Model of the Inertial Recirculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inertial gyre with characteristics very similar to the recirculation observed in eddy-resolving general circulation models is obtained with a simple, analytically tractable, two-layer model. The recirculating gyre is contained in a box of ...

Paola Cessi

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Xenon Recirculation-Purification with a Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-xenon based particle detectors have been dramatically growing in size during the last years, and are now exceeding the one-ton scale. The required high xenon purity is usually achieved by continuous recirculation of xenon gas through a high-temperature getter. This challenges the traditional way of cooling these large detectors, since in a thermally well insulated detector, most of the cooling power is spent to compensate losses from recirculation. The phase change during recondensing requires five times more cooling power than cooling the gas from ambient temperature to -100C (173 K). Thus, to reduce the cooling power requirements for large detectors, we propose to use the heat from the purified incoming gas to evaporate the outgoing xenon gas, by means of a heat exchanger. Generally, a heat exchanger would appear to be only of very limited use, since evaporation and liquefaction occur at zero temperature difference. However, the use of a recirculation pump reduces the pressure of the extracted liquid, forces it to evaporate, and thus cools it down. We show that this temperature difference can be used for an efficient heat exchange process. We investigate the use of a commercial parallel plate heat exchanger with a small liquid xenon detector. Although we expected to be limited by the available cooling power to flow rates of about 2 SLPM, rates in excess of 12 SLPM can easily be sustained, limited only by the pump speed and the impedance of the flow loop. The heat exchanger operates with an efficiency of (96.8 +/- 0.5)%. This opens the possibility for fast xenon gas recirculation in large-scale experiments, while minimizing thermal losses.

K. L. Giboni; E. Aprile; B. Choi; T. Haruyama; R. F. Lang; K. E. Lim; A. J. Melgarejo; G. Plante

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

26

Distribution plate for recirculating fluidized bed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A distribution plate for a recirculating fluidized bed has a centrally disposed opening and a plurality of apertures adjacent the periphery to eliminate dead spots within the bed.

Yang, Wen-ching (Export, PA); Vidt, Edward J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Keairns, Dale L. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combuston chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end of the combustor chamber and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture is described. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combustor chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture. 10 figs.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

29

Property:Recirculating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recirculating Recirculating Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Recirculating Property Type String Pages using the property "Recirculating" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + No + B Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Yes + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Yes + Carderock Large Cavitation Tunnel + Yes + Carderock Subsonic Wind Tunnel + Yes + Conte Large Flume + No + Conte Small Flume + No + D DeFrees Flume 1 + No + DeFrees Flume 2 + No + DeFrees Flume 3 + No +

30

Inertial Recirculation in a ?-Plane Corner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sub-basin scale recirculation can be driven by imposing low values of potential vorticity in the northwest corner of a ?-Plane box. Mesoscale eddies parametrized by lateral potential vorticity diffusion, carry this anomaly into the interior and ...

G. R. Ierley; W. R. Young

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Impact of nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation on gaseous releases from a landfill bioreactor cell  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the impact of nitrate injection on a full scale landfill bioreactor through the monitoring of gaseous releases and particularly N{sub 2}O emissions. During several weeks, we monitored gas concentrations in the landfill gas collection system as well as surface gas releases with a series of seven static chambers. These devices were directly connected to a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector and an electron capture detector (GC-FID/ECD) placed directly on the field. Measurements were performed before, during and after recirculation of raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate. Raw leachate recirculation did not have a significant effect on the biogas concentrations (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O) in the gas extraction network. However, nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation induced a marked increase of the N{sub 2}O concentrations in the gas collected from the recirculation trench (100-fold increase from 0.2 ppm to 23 ppm). In the common gas collection system however, this N{sub 2}O increase was no more detectable because of dilution by gas coming from other cells or ambient air intrusion. Surface releases through the temporary cover were characterized by a large spatial and temporal variability. One automated chamber gave limited standard errors over each experimental period for N{sub 2}O releases: 8.1 {+-} 0.16 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 384), 4.2 {+-} 0.14 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 132) and 1.9 {+-} 0.10 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 49), during, after raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation, respectively. No clear correlation between N{sub 2}O gaseous surface releases and recirculation events were evidenced. Estimated N{sub 2}O fluxes remained in the lower range of what is reported in the literature for landfill covers, even after nitrate injection.

Tallec, G.; Bureau, C. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France); Peu, P.; Benoist, J.C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Lemunier, M. [Suez-Environnement, CIRADE, 38 Av. Jean Jaures, 78440 Gargenville (France); Budka, A.; Presse, D. [SITA France, 132 Rue des 3 Fontanot, 92000 Nanterre Cedex (France); Bouchez, T. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France)], E-mail: theodore.bouchez@cemagref.fr

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

A Model of the Inertial Recirculation Driven by Potential Vorticity Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some essential features of a recirculating inertial gyre (the “recirculation”) can be analyzed with a very simple, analytically tractable model. In wind-driven eddy-resolving general circulation models the recirculation appears as a strong sub-...

Paola Cessi; Glenn Ierley; William Young

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Recirculating Molten Metal Supply System And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The melter furnace includes a heating chamber (16), a pump chamber (18), a degassing chamber (20), and a filter chamber (22). The pump chamber (18) is located adjacent the heating chamber (16) and houses a molten metal pump (30). The degassing chamber (20) is located adjacent and in fluid communication with the pump chamber (18), and houses a degassing mechanism (36). The filter chamber (22) is located adjacent and in fluid communication with the degassing chamber (20). The filter chamber (22) includes a molten metal filter (38). The melter furnace (12) is used to supply molten metal to an externally located holder furnace (14), which then recirculates molten metal back to the melter furnace (12).

Kinosz, Michael J. (Apollo, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

US10 Capable Prototype Volvo MG11 Natural Gas Engine Development: Final Report, December 16, 2003 - July 31, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report discusses a project to develop a low-emissions natural gas engine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and a three-way catalyst (TWC).

Tai, C.; Reppert, T.; Chiu, J.; Christensen, L.; Knoll, K.; Stewart, J.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Eddy-Driven Recirculations from a Localized Transient Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of time-mean recirculation gyres from the nonlinear rectification of an oscillatory, spatially localized vorticity forcing is examined analytically and numerically. Insights into the rectification mechanism are presented and the ...

Stephanie Waterman; Steven R. Jayne

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Heat recirculating cooler for fluid stream pollutant removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process by which heat is removed from a reactant fluid to reach the operating temperature of a known pollutant removal method and said heat is recirculated to raise the temperature of the product fluid. The process can be utilized whenever an intermediate step reaction requires a lower reaction temperature than the prior and next steps. The benefits of a heat-recirculating cooler include the ability to use known pollutant removal methods and increased thermal efficiency of the system.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

37

Control method for turbocharged diesel engines having exhaust gas recirculation  

SciTech Connect

A method of controlling the airflow into a compression ignition engine having an EGR and a VGT. The control strategy includes the steps of generating desired EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates as a function of the desired and measured compressor mass airflow values and exhaust manifold pressure values. The desired compressor mass airflow and exhaust manifold pressure values are generated as a function of the operator-requested fueling rate and engine speed. The EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates are then inverted to corresponding EGR and VGT actuator positions to achieve the desired compressor mass airflow rate and exhaust manifold pressure. The control strategy also includes a method of estimating the intake manifold pressure used in generating the EGR valve and VGT turbine positions.

Kolmanovsky, Ilya V. (Ypsilanti, MI); Jankovic, Mrdjan J (Birmingham, MI); Jankovic, Miroslava (Birmingham, MI)

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

An Experimental Investigation of a Flue Gas Recirculation System ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low Grade Waste Heat Driven Desalination and SO2 Scrubbing · Meeting the Materials Challenges to Enable Clean Coal Technologies · Photocatalytic Efficacy ...

39

Diesel emission reduction using internal exhaust gas recirculation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for controlling combustion in a direct-injection diesel engine includes monitoring a crankshaft rotational position of a cylinder of the engine, monitoring an engine load, determining an intake stroke within the cylinder based upon the crankshaft rotational position, and when the engine load is less than a threshold engine load, opening an exhaust valve for the cylinder during a portion of the intake stroke.

He, Xin (Denver, CO); Durrett, Russell P. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

Controlling engine exhaust gas recirculation and vacuum inverter  

SciTech Connect

Engine manifold vacuum is inverted by an in-line vacuum inverter which provides a power source for an egr valve actuator for providing desired egr flow in a predetermined range of engine power loading and egr flow is cut off outside the range. The invention utilizes a vacuum inverter employing a pair of spaced diaphragms for controlling an atmospheric air bleed valve to a vacuum chamber powered by manifold vacuum. The diaphragms are spring loaded so as to seek equilibrium positions as vacuum in the chamber varies force. The inverter produces a vacuum output signal which changes inversely with changes in engine manifold vacuum.

Bradshaw, C.E.; Uitvlugt, M.W.

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Study of NO{sub x} Reduction by Fuel Injection Recirculation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flue-gas recirculation (FGR) is a well-known method used to control oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub X}) in industrial burner applications. Recent small- and large-scale experiments in natural-gas fired boilers have shown that introducing the recirculated flue gases with the fuel results in a much greater reduction in NO{sub X}, per unit mass of gas recirculated, in comparison to introducing the flue gases with the combustion air. That fuel injection recirculation (FIR) is more effective than windbox FGR is quite remarkable. At present, however, there is no definitive understanding of why FIR is more effective than conventional FGR. The objective of the present investigation is to ascertain whether or not chemical and/or molecular transport effects alone can explain the differences in NO{sub X} reduction observed between FIR and FGR by studying laminar diffusion flames. The purpose of studying laminar flames is to isolate chemical effects from the effects of turbulent mixing and heat transfer, which are inherent in practical boilers. Numerical simulations of H{sub 2}-air and CH{sub 4}-air counterflow diffusion flames using full kinetics were performed and NO{sub X} emission indices calculated for various conditions. Studies were conducted in which a N{sub 2} diluent was added either on the fuel- or air-side of the flame for conditions of either fixed initial velocities or fixed fuel mass flux. Results from these simulation studies indicate that a major factor in diluent effectiveness is the differential effect on flame zone residence times associated with fuel-side verses air-side dilution. Simulations in which flow velocities were fixed as diluent was added either to the air or fuel stream showed lower NO{sub X} emissions for air-side dilution; however, if instead, fuel mass fluxes were fixed as diluent was added, which results in an increase in the velocity of the streams, fuel-side dilution was more effective. These results were independent of whether H{sub 2} or Ch{sub 4} was used as the fuel.

Feese, J.J.; Turns, S.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Automatic HVAC Air Recirculation Made Easy with Stepper Motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TND416/D Abstract: This paper highlights the system requirements and operating conditions of automatic air recirculation valves and reviews compatibility of existing actuator types with these requirements. When comparing the available technologies, it becomes clear that air recirculation flap actuators containing a bipolar stepper motor offer key advantages over actuators with other motor types. It is shown how specific bipolar stepper motor drive techniques can contribute to the overall system performance while the total system cost is minimized. The paper elaborates on availability and key features of motor driver integrated circuits that allow advanced control of these novel actuators. 1.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A study of NO{sub x} reduction by fuel injection recirculation. Topical report, January 1995--May 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flue-gas recirculation (FGR) is a well-known method used to control oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in industrial burner applications. Recent small- and large-scale experiments by Carnot (Tustin, CA) have shown that introducing the recirculated flue gases with the fuel results in a much greater reduction in NO{sub x}, per unit mass of gas recirculated, in comparison to introducing the flue gases with the combustion air. That fuel injection recirculation (FIR) is more effective than windbox FGR is quite remarkable. At present, however, there is no definitive understanding of why FIR is more effective than conventional FGR. One speculation is that introducing the diluent gases on the fuel side of the flame affects the prompt-NO mechanism causing the greater effectiveness. The objective of our research is to ascertain whether or not chemical and/or molecular transport effects alone can explain the differences in NO{sub x} reduction observed between FIR and FGR. This knowledge will aid in the rational application and optimization of FIR in a wide variety of industrial applications. A combined modeling and experimental program is in progress to achieve the research objectives. This report discusses computer modeling studies of counterflow diffusion flames employing detailed chemical kinetics for fuel (hydrogen or methane) combustion and NO{sub x} formation. These simulations allow the calculation of NO{sub x} emission indices for a wide range of conditions. Parametric studies were conducted in which the diluent was added either on the fuel or air side of the flame for a wide range of flow conditions. Preliminary results from these simulation studies indicate that a major factor in FIR effectiveness is the differential effect on flame zone residence times associated with fuel-side versus air-side dilution.

Turns, S.R.; Feese, J.J.; Frenklach, M.Y.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Demonstration of a Low-NOx Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle engine research project: A Caterpillar C-12 natural gas engine with Clean Air Power Dual-Fuel technology and exhaust gas recirculation demonstrated low NOx and PM emissions.

Not Available

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Ozone (o3) efficacy on reduction of phytophthora capsici in recirculated horticultural irrigation water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microorganisms that cause plant disease have been isolated in recirculated irrigation water and increase the risks of disease incidence in horticultural operations. Ozone is an effective oxidizer used to disinfect drinking water supplies and treat industrial wastewater. The objective of this research was to investigate using ozone gas as part of a strategy to reduce the incidence of Phytophthora deBary in recirculated irrigation water. An isolate of Phytophthora capsici Leonian was cultured to induce sporulation. Spore dilutions were placed in aliquots of reverse osmosis water and bubbled with ozone gas (O3) to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1. Ozonated samples were plated and observed for colony forming units. Increasing ozone concentrations reduced the number of colony forming units to 0 at 1.5 mg· L-1 03. Turbidity effects on efficacy on Phytophthora capsici were tested using bentonite clay at 0 to 2.0 nephelometric turbidity units and ozone concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg· L-1. Increasing bentonite did not affect the efficacy of increasing ozone concentrations on reducing colony formation to 0 at 1.5 mg·L-1 O3. Bioassays using Phytophthora capsici on Capsicum annuum L. seedlings confirmed apparent pathogenicity. Reverse osmosis water, containing a soluble fertilizer at 0 to 300 mg· L-1 N, was ozonated to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1 O3 and used to irrigate Chrysanthemum x morifolium T. de Romatuelle. Increasing ozone concentrations did not interact with increasing fertilizer levels to affect the final growth parameters. Chrysanthemum exposed to ozone gas concentrations of 0.5 to 1.5 mg·L-1 showed symptomatic ozone damage. Complete soluble fertilizer solutions with micronutrients were ozonated from 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1 O3 and analysed for nutrient content. Increasing ozone levels did not interact with fertilizers to affect macronutrients. Increasing ozone interacted with iron at a high fertilizer level. Ozone did not affect the efficacy of paclobutralzol in controlling growth in Viola x wittrockiana. Ozone was effective in controlling Phytophthora capsici in recirculated irrigation water with minimum impact on plant growth. Adjustments in fertility regiemes may be needed to counteract the oxidizing affect of ozone on micronutrients.

McDonald, Garry Vernon

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

47

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program Phase I: Clean Air Partners 0.5 g/hp-h NOx Engine Concept; Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by Clean Air Partners to develop 0.5 g/hp-h NOx natural gas engine exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technology for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program.

Wong, H. C.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies  

SciTech Connect

Confronted with contaminated land from the world wars and the postwar industrialization period, German researchers and practicing professionals have worked to develop processes for effective environmental restoration. This presentation documents efforts by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers to (1) identify collaborators and German technologies exhibiting near-term potential for clean-up of volatile organic contaminated soil and groundwater at Department of Energy sites, (2) critically assess performance, and (3) inform interested agencies. The project was limited to identification and preliminary evaluation and included engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. Two processes were identified: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well (PP/HW). Both technologies induce a recirculation flow field in the aquifer and enable simultaneous down hole treatment of the aquifer and vadose zone. University of Karlsruhe researchers have demonstrated the UVB/GZB technology in shallow aquifers with moderately high saturated thickness and hydraulic conductivities. The PP/HW technology offers potential for VOC treatment in sites with thin aquifers or heterogeneities. This paper describes identified German technologies and includes critical evaluations of well performance, associated treatment processes, operating variables, and aquifer-well interactions.

Webb, O.F.; Siegrist, R.L.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Environmental Science Div.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Process for separating, especially in multiple stages, acid components such as CO/sub 2/, HCN and specifically H/sub 2/S, from gases, especially from coke oven gases, by means of ammonia recirculation scrubbing  

SciTech Connect

A process of separating in multiple stages acid components in coke oven gas such as CO/sub 2/, HCN and particularly H/sub 2/S by ammonia scrubbing wherein the ammonia used in scrubbing is deacidified to remove the acid components and is recirculated to the scrubbing process at least in part as substantially pure liquid ammonia.

Bauer, H.K.; Otte, E.A.W.

1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

50

Brief paper: Output tracking of continuous bioreactors through recirculation and by-pass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose to regulate the output of an auto-catalytic bioprocess (a biological process associated with a growth of a micro-organism) by means of a recirculation loop and by-pass. We give conditions on the volume of the reactor and the ... Keywords: Continuous bioreactor, Nonlinear control design, Output regulation, Recirculation loop

Jérôme Harmand; Alain Rapaport; Frédéric Mazenc

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

On-Line Measurement and Tuning of Multi-Pass Recirculation Time in the CEBAF Linacs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Line Measurement and Tuning of Multi-Pass Recirculation Time in the CEBAF Linacs Michael, USA Abstract CEBAF is a CW, recirculating electron accelerator, us- ing on-crest RF acceleration the beam to drift off-crest with respect to the accelerating fields. Figure 1: Layout of CEBAF Accelerator

52

Circulo: Saving Energy with Just-In-Time Hot Water Recirculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The average home in the US flushes 1000's of gallons of water down the drain each year while standing at the fixture and waiting for hot water. Some households use a pump for hot water recirculation (HWR) to ensure that hot water is always immediately ... Keywords: Energy and Water Conservation, Hot Water Recirculation

Andrew Frye, Michel Goraczko, Jie Liu, Anindya Prodhan, Kamin Whitehouse

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Evaluation of numerical strategies for large eddy simulation of particulate two-phase recirculating flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting particle dispersion in recirculating two-phase flows is a key issue for reacting flows and a potential application of large eddy simulation (LES) methods. In this study, Euler/Euler and Euler/Lagrange LES approaches are compared in the bluff ... Keywords: Euler/Euler, Euler/Lagrange, LES, Particles, Two-phase recirculating flows

E. Riber; V. Moureau; M. García; T. Poinsot; O. Simonin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

"Self Cooled Recirculating Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Wall System"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Self Cooled Recirculating Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Wall System" Self Cooled Recirculating Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Wall System" Inventor ..--.. Richard P. Majeski Disclosed is a design for a fully axisymmetric, fast flowing liquid lithium plasma facing "wall" or surface which, in its present form, is intended for implementation in a tokamak. The design employs JxB forces to form a free-surface flow along a guide wall at the outer boundary of the plasma. The implementation of the disclosure design includes a system for recirculating the liquid metal within the volume of the toroidal field coils using inductive pumping, an approach wich allows independent energizing of the wall-forming and recirculating pumping systems, cooling of the recirculating liquid using fluid heat exchange with a molten salt,

55

Numerical investigation of recirculation in the UTSI MHD combustor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical studies were carried out to investigate the gross structure of flow in cylindrical combustors. The combustor configurations studied are variations of a working design used at the University of Tennessee Space Institute to burn pulverized coal at temperatures in excess of 3000K for generation of a plasma feeding a magnetohydrodynamic channel. The numerical studies were conducted for an isothermal fluid; the main objective of the calculations was to study the effect of the oxidant injection pattern on the gross structure of recirculating flows within the combustor. The calculations illustrate the basic features of the flow in combustors of this type and suggest implications for the injection of coal and oxidizer in this type of combustor.

Schulz, R.J.; Lee, J.J.; Giel, T.V. Jr.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

RECENT PROGRESS TOWARD A MUON RECIRCULATING LINEAR ACCELERATOR  

SciTech Connect

Both Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require very rapid acceleration due to the short lifetime of muons. After a capture and bunching section, a linac raises the energy to about 900 MeV, and is followed by one or more Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA), possibly followed by a Rapid Cycling Synchnotron (RCS) or Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring. A RLA reuses the expensive RF linac section for a number of passes at the price of having to deal with different energies within the same linac. Various techniques including pulsed focusing quadruopoles, beta frequency beating, and multipass arcs have been investigated via simulations to improve the performance and reduce the cost of such RLAs.

Slawomir Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Kevin Beard

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Computation of turbulent recirculating flows using a hybrid adaptive grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid adaptive gridding procedure is applied to the computation of two-dimensional turbulent, recirculating flows. The procedure combines both the local refinement method and the global moving grid method. The moving grid method is applied to obtain the initial adaptive solution. The local refinement method is then used on the large error regions flagged by using the weight function approach. The test cases are a backward facing step flow, a two-dimensional side jet flow, and an axisymmetric swirling flow. By comparing with the fine uniform grid solution, the numerical efficiencies ranging from 20 to 40 are obtained in the test problems. The most attractive feature of the procedure is its ease of application.

Lee, D.; Yeh, C.L. (National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. Terralog USA, in collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), are currently investigating advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. This two-year research project, funded by the US Department of Energy, includes combined efforts for: 1) Resource characterization; 2) Small and large scale laboratory investigations; 3) Numerical simulation at both the laboratory and field scale; and 4) Engineering feasibility studies and economic evaluations. The research project is currently in its early stages. This paper summarizes our technical approach and preliminary findings related to potential resources, small-scale laboratory simulation, and supporting numerical simulation efforts.

Mike Bruno; Russell L. Detwiler; Kang Lao; Vahid Serajian; Jean Elkhoury; Julia Diessl; Nicky White

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Efficiency of an AMTEC recirculating test cell, experiments and projections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) is an electrochemical device for the direct conversion of heat to electrical energy with efficiencies potentially near Carnot. The future usefulness of AMTEC for space power conversion depends on the efficiency of the devices. Systems studies have projected from 15% to 35% thermal to electric conversion efficiencies, and one experiment has demonstrated 19% efficiency for a short period of time. Recent experiments in a recirculating test cell (RTC) have demonstrated sustained conversion efficiencies as high as 10.2% early in cell life and 9.7% after maturity. Extensive thermal and electrochemical analysis of the cell during several experiments demonstrated that the efficiency could be improved in two ways. First, the electrode performance could be improved. The electrode for these tests operated at about one third the power density of state of the art electrodes. The low power density was caused by a combination of high series resistance and high mass flow resistance. Reducing these resistances could improve the efficiency to greater than 10%. Second, the cell thermal performance could be improved. Efficiencies greater than 14% could be realized through reducing the radiative thermal loss. Further improvements to the efficiency range predicted by systems studies can be accomplished through the development and use of an advanced condenser with improved reflectivity, close to that of a smooth sodium film, and the series connecting of individual cells to further reduce thermal losses.

Underwood, M.L.; O`Connor, D.; Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project described herein was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify processes and technologies developed in Germany that appeared to have near-term potential for enhancing the cleanup of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soil and groundwater at DOE sites. Members of the ORNL research team identified and evaluated selected German technologies developed at or in association with the University of Karlsruhe (UoK) for in situ treatment of VOC contaminated soils and groundwater. Project activities included contacts with researchers within three departments of the UoK (i.e., Applied Geology, Hydromechanics, and Soil and Foundation Engineering) during fall 1991 and subsequent visits to UoK and private industry collaborators during February 1992. Subsequent analyses consisted of engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. As a result of these project efforts, two processes were identified as having near-term potential for DOE: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well. This document was prepared to summarize the methods and results of the assessment activities completed during the initial year of the project. The project is still ongoing, so not all facets of the effort are completely described in this document. Recommendations for laboratory and field experiments are provided.

Siegrist, R.L.; Webb, O.F.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Wind-Driven Recirculations and Exchange in the Labrador and Irminger Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that recently observed cyclonic recirculation gyres in the Irminger and Labrador Seas may be forced by the strong cyclonic wind stress curl that develops each winter seaward of the east coast of Greenland. Idealized analytical ...

Michael A. Spall; Robert S. Pickart

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst: Final Report, 24 February 2004 -- 23 February 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the development of a E7G 12-liter, lean-burn natural gas engine--using stoichiometric combustion, cooled exhaust gas recirculation, and three-way catalyst technologies--for refuse haulers.

Reppert, T.; Chiu, J.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A Numerical Model for the Dynamic Simulation of a Recirculation Single-Effect Absorption Chiller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Numerical Model for the Dynamic Simulation of a Recirculation Single- Effect Absorption Chiller A dynamic model for the simulation of a new single-effect water/lithium bromide absorption chiller. Keywords: absorption; chiller; modelling; transient; water-lithium bromide; falling film hal-00713904

Recanati, Catherine

65

Suction-recirculation device for stabilizing particle flows within a solar powered solid particle receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A suction-recirculation device for stabilizing the flow of a curtain of blackened heat absorption particles falling inside of a solar receiver with an open aperture. The curtain of particles absorbs the concentrated heat from a solar mirror array reflected up to the receiver on a solar power tower. External winds entering the receiver at an oblique angle can destabilize the particle curtain and eject particles. A fan and ductwork is located behind the back wall of the receiver and sucks air out through an array of small holes in the back wall. Any entrained particles are separated out by a conventional cyclone device. Then, the air is recirculated back to the top of the receiver by injecting the recycled air through an array of small holes in the receiver's ceiling and upper aperture front wall. Since internal air is recirculated, heat losses are minimized and high receiver efficiency is maintained. Suction-recirculation velocities in the range of 1-5 m/s are sufficient to stabilize the particle curtain against external wind speeds in excess of 10 m/s.

Kolb, Gregory J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

Suction-recirculation device for stabilizing particle flows within a solar powered solid particle receiver  

SciTech Connect

A suction-recirculation device for stabilizing the flow of a curtain of blackened heat absorption particles falling inside of a solar receiver with an open aperture. The curtain of particles absorbs the concentrated heat from a solar mirror array reflected up to the receiver on a solar power tower. External winds entering the receiver at an oblique angle can destabilize the particle curtain and eject particles. A fan and ductwork is located behind the back wall of the receiver and sucks air out through an array of small holes in the back wall. Any entrained particles are separated out by a conventional cyclone device. Then, the air is recirculated back to the top of the receiver by injecting the recycled air through an array of small holes in the receiver's ceiling and upper aperture front wall. Since internal air is recirculated, heat losses are minimized and high receiver efficiency is maintained. Suction-recirculation velocities in the range of 1-5 m/s are sufficient to stabilize the particle curtain against external wind speeds in excess of 10 m/s.

Kolb, Gregory J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

67

Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Fouling in Diesel Applications: Fundamental Studies Deposit Properties and Microstructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the results of experimental efforts aimed at improving the understanding of the mechanisms and conditions at play in the fouling of EGR coolers. An experimental apparatus was constructed to utilize simplified surrogate heat exchanger tubes in lieu of full-size heat exchangers. The use of these surrogate tubes allowed removal of the tubes after exposure to engine exhaust for study of the deposit layer and its properties. The exhaust used for fouling the surrogate tubes was produced using a modern medium-duty diesel engine fueled with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and biodiesel blends. At long exposure times, no significant difference in the fouling rate was observed between fuel types and HC levels. Surface coatings for the tubes were also evaluated to determine their impact on deposit growth. No surface treatment or coating produced a reduction in the fouling rate or any evidence of deposit removal. In addition, microstructural analysis of the fouling layers was performed using optical and electron microscopy in order to better understand the deposition mechanism. The experimental results are consistent with thermophoretic deposition for deposit formation, and van der Waals attraction between the deposit surface and exhaust-borne particulate.

Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Styles, Dan [Ford Motor Company; Simko, Steve [Ford Motor Company

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effect of leachate recirculation on landfill gas production and leachate quality: A controlled laboratory study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a laboratory study conducted during 1992-1994 at Argonne National Laboratory. The study examined biogas production and leachate chemistry in parallel anaerobic assays run under either leachate recycle or leachate drainage regimes over a period of 400 days. A standardized synthetic refuse (paper, grass, food) was used in an experimental design which evaluated two elevated moisture contents and two added soils. All assays were conducted in vitro in 125 mL serum bottles. Four recycle/drainage events were completed during the 400 days of this experiment. Sufficient replicates (10 or 20) for each trial were included in the experimental design to permit destructive sampling of assay solids after each recycle/drainage event. Changes in the chemistry of solid, liquid, and gaseous phases were evaluated during the decomposition process. Analyses included major gases (CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}), selected chemical constituents of leachate (Cl-C5 carboxylic acids, total organic carbon, Kjeldahl nitrogen, total phosphorus, iron, zinc, and chloride), leachate pH and conductivity, and selected solids analysis (gravimetric moisture content, volatile solids, total carbon, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin).

Bogner, J.; Spokas, K.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

High gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal via upwardly directed recirculating fluidization  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to an improved device and method for the high gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, for the purpose of removing sulfur and ash from the coal whereby the product is a dry environmentally acceptable, low-sulfur fuel. The process involves upwardly directed recirculating air fluidization of selectively sized powdered coal in a separator having sections of increasing diameters in the direction of air flow, with magnetic field and flow rates chosen for optimum separations depending upon particulate size.

Eissenberg, David M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Yin-An (Opelika, AL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Design and Operating Guidelines Manual for Cooling-Water Treatment - Treatment of Recirculated Cooling Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This preliminary manual was developed to provide a systematic procedure for evaluating candidate strategies for the treatment of recirculated cooling water. It presents (1) a means of selecting optimal treatment methods and facilities on the basis of technical and economic considerations, and (2) guidelines for proper cooling-water system operation. Descriptions of, and user's manuals for, the cooling-system process and chemical equilibrium computer simulation models are included.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Response of the Inertial Recirculation to Intensified Stratification in a Two-Layer Quasigeostrophic Ocean Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous observation and model studies show that the upper-ocean stratification is enhanced under global warming (Capotondi et al.; Cravatte et al.; Deser et al., etc.). The response of the recirculation, which is associated with the western ...

Shantong Sun; Lixin Wu; Bo Qiu

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

$P-V$ criticality of AdS black hole in $f(R)$ gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study thermodynamics of a charged AdS black hole in the special $f(R)$ correction with the constant Ricci scalar curvature. Our results show that the the $f(R)$ correction influences the Gibbs free energy and the phase transition of system. The ratio $\\rho_c$ occurred at the critical point increases monotonically with the derivative term $f'(R_0)$. We also disclose that the critical exponents are the same as those of the liquid-gas phase transition in the Van der Waals model, which does not depend on the $f(R)$ correction considered here.

Songbai Chen; Xiaofang Liu; Changqing Liu

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Performance and emission studies on biodiesel-liquefied petroleum gas dual fuel engine with exhaust gas recirculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel is an alternative fuel to diesel derived from vegetable oils by transesterification process. It can be used in diesel engines with/without any modification in the engine system. Biodiesel engines emit slightly higher NO x emissions

A. S. Ramadhas; S. Jayaraj; C. Muraleedharan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Recirculating Beam Breakup Study for the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two new high gradient C100 cryomodules with a total of 16 new cavities were installed at the end of the CEBAF south linac during the 2011 summer shutdown as part of the 12-GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab. We surveyed the higher order modes (HOMs) of these cavities in the Jefferson Lab cryomodule test facility and CEBAF tunnel. We then studied recirculating beam breakup (BBU) in November 2011 to evaluate CEBAF low energy performance, measure transport optics, and evaluate BBU thresholds due to these HOMs. This paper discusses the experiment setup, cavity measurements, machine setup, optics measurements, and lower bounds on BBU thresholds by new cryomodules.

Ilkyoung Shin, Todd Satogata, Shahid Ahmed, Slawomir Bogacz, Mircea Stirbet, Haipeng Wang, Yan Wang, Byung Yunn, Ryan Bodenstein

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A recirculating linac-based facility for ultrafast X-ray science  

SciTech Connect

We present an updated design for a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac, in particular the incorporation of EUV and soft x-ray production. The project has been named LUX - Linac-based Ultrafast X-ray facility. The source produces intense x-ray pulses with duration of 10-100 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with synchronization of 10 s fs, optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. The photon range covers the EUV to hard x-ray spectrum by use of seeded harmonic generation in undulators, and a specialized technique for ultra-short-pulse photon production in the 1-10 keV range. High-brightness rf photocathodes produce electron bunches which are optimized either for coherent emission in free-electron lasers, or to provide a large x/y emittance ration and small vertical emittance which allows for manipulation to produce short-pulse hard x-rays. An injector linac accelerates the beam to 120 MeV, and is followed by four passes through a 600-720 MeV recirculating linac. We outline the major technical components of the proposed facility.

Corlett, J.N; Barletta, W.A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.M.; Green, M.A.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.; Placidi, M.; Pirkl, W.; Parmigiani, F.

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

Linear Fixed-Field Multi-Pass Arcs for Recirculating Linear Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA's) provide a compact and efficient way of accelerating particle beams to medium and high energies by reusing the same linac for multiple passes. In the conventional scheme, after each pass, the different energy beams coming out of the linac are separated and directed into appropriate arcs for recirculation, with each pass requiring a separate fixed-energy arc. In this paper we present a concept of an RLA return arc based on linear combined-function magnets, in which two and potentially more consecutive passes with very different energies are transported through the same string of magnets. By adjusting the dipole and quadrupole components of the constituting linear combined-function magnets, the arc is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final reference orbit offsets for all transported beam energies. We demonstrate the concept by developing a design for a droplet-shaped return arc for a dog-bone RLA capable of transporting two beam passes with momenta different by a factor of two. We present the results of tracking simulations of the two passes and lay out the path to end-to-end design and simulation of a complete dog-bone RLA.

V.S. Morozov, S.A. Bogacz, Y.R. Roblin, K.B. Beard

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A field-scale test of in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ chemical oxidation is a developing class of remediation technologies in which organic contaminants are degraded in place by powerful oxidants. Successful implementation of this technology requires an effective means for dispersing the oxidant to contaminated regions in the subsurface. An oxidant delivery technique has been developed wherein the treatment solution is made by adding an oxidant to extracted groundwater. The oxidant-laden groundwater is then injected and recirculated into a contaminated aquifer through multiple horizontal and/or vertical wells. This technique, referred to as in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation (ISCOR), can be applied to saturated and hydraulically conductive formations and used with relatively stable oxidants such as potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}). A field-scale test of ISCOR was conducted at a site (Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) where groundwater in a 5-ft thick silty gravel aquifer is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) at levels that indicate the presence of residual dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The field test was implemented using a pair of parallel horizontal wells with 200-ft screened sections. For approximately one month, groundwater was extracted from one horizontal well, dosed with crystalline KMnO{sub 4}, and re-injected into the other horizontal well 90 ft away. Post-treatment characterization showed that ISCOR was effective at removing TCE in the saturated region. Lateral and vertical heterogeneities within the treatment zone impacted the uniform delivery of the oxidant solution. However, TCE was not detected in groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells and soil samples from borings in locations where the oxidant had permeated.

West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Holden, W.L.; Gardner, F.G.; Schlosser, B.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Siegrist, R.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Houk, T.C. [Bechtel-Jacobs, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Study of gas purifiers for the CMS RPC detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CMS RPC muon detector utilizes a gas recirculation system called closed loop (CL) to cope with large gas mixture volumes and costs. A systematic study of CL gas purifiers has been carried out over 400 days between July 2008 and August 2009 at CERN in a low-radiation test area, with the use of RPC chambers with currents monitoring, and gas analysis sampling points. The study aimed to fully clarify the presence of pollutants, the chemistry of purifiers used in the CL, and the regeneration procedure. Preliminary results on contaminants release and purifier characterization are reported.

L. Benussi; S. Bianco; S. Colafranceschi; F. L. Fabbri; F. Felli; M. Ferrini; M. Giardoni; T. Greci; A. Paolozzi; L. Passamonti; D. Piccolo; D. Pierluigi; A. Russo; G. Saviano; S. Buontempo; A. Cimmino; M. de Gruttola; F Fabozzi d A. O. M. Iorio; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; P. Baesso; G. Belli; D. Pagano; S. P. Ratti; A. Vicini; P. Vitulo; C. Viviani; R. Guida; A. Sharma

2010-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

Gas turbine topping combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustor for burning a mixture of fuel and air in a rich combustion zone, in which the fuel bound nitrogen in converted to molecular nitrogen. The fuel rich combustion is followed by lean combustion. The products of combustion from the lean combustion are rapidly quenched so as to convert the fuel bound nitrogen to molecular nitrogen without forming NOx. The combustor has an air radial swirler that directs the air radially inward while swirling it in the circumferential direction and a radial fuel swirler that directs the fuel radially outward while swirling it in the same circumferential direction, thereby promoting vigorous mixing of the fuel and air. The air inlet has a variable flow area that is responsive to variations in the heating value of the fuel, which may be a coal-derived fuel gas. A diverging passage in the combustor in front of a bluff body causes the fuel/air mixture to recirculate with the rich combustion zone.

Beer, Janos (Winchester, MA); Dowdy, Thomas E. (Orlando, FL); Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Delmont, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Achievement of Low Emissions by Engine Modification to Utilize Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Advanced Emission Controls on a Class 8 Truck  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 2002 Cummins ISM engine was modified to be optimized for operation on gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and advanced emission control devices. The engine modifications included increased exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), decreased compression ratio, and reshaped piston and bowl configuration.

Alleman, T. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Barton, G.; Rumminger, M.; Duggal, V.; Nelson, C.; Ray, M.; Cherrillo, R. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Investigations into the reproductive performance and larval rearing of the Brown shrimp, Farfantepenaeus aztecus, using closed recirculating systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of unilateral eyestalk ablation, diets and sex ratios were evaluated on two wild populations of Farfantepenaeus aztecus in a closed recirculating maturation system. Ovarian development and spawning frequencies of ablated females in both studies were higher than the non-ablated females. Replacement of bloodworms in maturation diet with enriched adult Artemia sp. had no negative effect on the number of eggs spawned and resulted in increased hatch and survival rates from Nauplius I to Zoea I. Life span of ablated females fed enriched Artemia sp. was longer than ablated females fed bloodworms. Replacement of the expensive bloodworm diet component with adult enriched Artemia sp. is possible without negative impact on female reproductive performance. Reducing male to female ratio from 2:1 to 1:1 resulted in a 1.25% decrease in spawning activities of ablated females. The life cycle of pond-raised F1 generation F. aztecus also was completed in the closed recirculating system using unilateral eyestalk ablation as previously described. This study found diets that contained an enriched adult Artemia sp. component performed superior (i.e. hatch rate, nauplii and zoea production) to a diet containing bloodworms. Six consecutive larval rearing trials evaluated changes in select water quality indicators and their effect on growth, survival, and stress tolerance of F. aztecus postlarvae cultured in artificial seawater under closed recirculating and flow-through conditions. The closed recirculating larval rearing system successfully produced five-day-old postlarvae (PL) from Zoea I (Z1) with similar dry weights, lengths and stress resistance to PL produced under standard water exchange practices. The trickling biofilters were found to be a limiting component of this system. A submerged coral biofilter was added to the system and effectively processed culture water for re-use. Addition of the submerged biofilter resulted in improved survival rates in Trials 4, 5 and 6. These studies demonstrate maturation and larval rearing of F. aztecus is feasible in closed recirculating systems. Implementation of these systems in hatcheries bolsters biosecurity while reducing the environmental impact of hatchery effluent. Recirculating and re-use systems are therefore essential in the further development of sustainable hatchery programs for endemic species.

Gandy, Ryan Leighton

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Study of gas contaminants and interaction with materials in RPC closed loop system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resistive Plate Counters (RPC) detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments use gas recirculation systems to cope with large gas mixture volumes and costs. In this paper a long-term systematic study about gas purifiers, gas contaminants and detector performance is discussed. The study aims at measuring the lifetime of purifiers with new and used cartridge material along with contaminants release in the gas system. During the data-taking the response of several RPC double-gap detectors was monitored in order to characterize the correlation between dark currents, filter status and gas contaminants.

S. Colafranceschi; R. Aurilio; L. Benussi; S. Bianco; L. Passamonti; D. Piccolo; D. Pierluigi; A. Russo; M. Ferrini; T. Greci; G. Saviano; C. Vendittozzi; M. Abbrescia; C. Calabria; A. Colaleo; G. Iaselli; M. Maggi; S. Nuzzo; G. Pugliese; P. Verwilligen; A. Sharma

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

83

Study of gas contaminants and interaction with materials in RPC closed loop system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resistive Plate Counters (RPC) detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments use gas recirculation systems to cope with large gas mixture volumes and costs. In this paper a long-term systematic study about gas purifiers, gas contaminants and detector performance is discussed. The study aims at measuring the lifetime of purifiers with new and used cartridge material along with contaminants release in the gas system. During the data-taking the response of several RPC double-gap detectors was monitored in order to characterize the correlation between dark currents, filter status and gas contaminants.

Colafranceschi, S; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Russo, A; Ferrini, M; Greci, T; Saviano, G; Vendittozzi, C; Abbrescia, M; Calabria, C; Colaleo, A; Iaselli, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Pugliese, G; Verwilligen, P; Sharma, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Reconciling dark energy models with f(R) theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higher order theories of gravity have recently attracted a lot of interest as alternative candidates to explain the observed cosmic acceleration without the need of introducing any scalar field. A critical ingredient is the choice of the function f(R) of the Ricci scalar curvature entering the gravity Lagrangian and determining the dynamics of the universe. We describe an efficient procedure to reconstruct f(R) from the Hubble parameter $H$ depending on the redshift z. Using the metric formulation of f(R) theories, we derive a third order linear differential equation for f(R(z)) which can be numerically solved after setting the boundary conditions on the basis of physical considerations. Since H(z) can be reconstructed from the astrophysical data, the method we present makes it possible to determine, in principle, what is the f(R) theory which best reproduces the observed cosmological dynamics. Moreover, the method allows to reconcile dark energy models with f(R) theories finding out what is the expression of f(R) which leads to the same H(z) of the given quintessence model. As interesting examples, we consider "quiessence" (dark energy with constant equation of state) and the Chaplygin gas.

S. Capozziello; V. F. Cardone; A. Troisi

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 5091  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Behzadian, Majid A hybrid Delphi-SWOT paradigm for oil and gas pipeline strategic planning in Caspian Sea to the repository administrator: staff-oatao@inp-toulouse.fr #12;A hybrid Delphi-SWOT paradigm for oil and gas, Shomal University, Amol 46134, Iran Keywords: Oil and gas pipeline planning Caspian Sea Multi

Mailhes, Corinne

86

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Reactor Coolant Pump/Reactor Recirculation Pump Motor Lubrication Oil Systems Maintenance G uide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RCP and RRP Motor Lubrication system issues have ranked high on NMAC maintenance Issues Surveys in recent years. Problems reported have included oil leakage at power, the need for additional reservoirs to accommodate leakage, oil degradation (foaming, particulate) as well as sludge problems due to the design of the motor and some as a result of new oil formulations and other changes made by the oil suppliers. Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP) used in Pressurized Water Reactors and Reactor Recirculation Pumps ...

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

87

Investigation of groundwater recirculation for the removal of RDX from the Pantex Plant perched aquifer  

SciTech Connect

The Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas, is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility that has been in operation since 1942. Past and present operations at Pantex include the creation of chemical high explosives components for nuclear weapons and assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons. The Pantex Plant is underlain by the Ogallala aquifer, which in this area, consists of the main water-bearing unit and a perched water zone. These are separated by a fine-grained zone of low permeability. Multiple contaminant plumes containing high explosive (HE) compounds have been detected in the perched aquifer beneath the plant. The occurrence of these contaminants is the result of past waste disposal practices at the facility. RDX is an HE compound, which has been detected in the groundwater of the perched aquifer at significant concentrations. A pilot-scale, dual-phase extraction treatment system has been installed at one location at the plant, east of Zone 12, to test the effectiveness of such a system on the removal of these contaminants from the subsurface. A tracer test using a conservative tracer, bromide (Br), was conducted at the treatment site in 1996. In addition to the bromide, RDX and water elevations in the aquifer were monitored. Using data from the tracer test and other relevant data from the investigations at Pantex, flow and contaminant transport in the perched aquifer were simulated with groundwater models. The flow was modeled using MODFLOW and the transport of contaminants in the aqueous phase was modeled using MT3D. Modeling the perched aquifer had been conducted to characterize the flow in the perched aquifer; estimate RDX retardation in the perched aquifer; and evaluate the use of groundwater re-circulation to enhance the extraction of RDX from the perched aquifer.

Woods, A.L. [ed.; Barnes, D.L. [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Boles, K.M.; Charbeneau, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Black, S.; Rainwater, K. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Water Resources Center

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Feasibility study for a recirculating linac-based facility for femtosecond dynamics  

SciTech Connect

LBNL is pursuing design studies and the scientific program for a facility dedicated to the production of x-ray pulses with ultra-short time duration, for application in dynamical studies of processes in physics, biology, and chemistry. The proposed x-ray facility has the short x-ray pulse length ({approx}60 fs FWHM) necessary to study very fast dynamics, high flux (up to approximately 10E11 photons/sec/0.1 percentBW) to study weakly scattering systems, and tuneability over 1-12 keV photon energy. The hard x-ray photon production section of the machine accommodates seven 2-m long undulators. Design studies for longer wavelength sources, using high-gain harmonic generation, are in progress. The x-ray pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz is matched to studies of dynamical processes (initiated by ultra-short laser pulses) that typically have a long recovery time or are not generally cyclic or reversible and need time to allow relaxation, replacement, or flow of the sample. The technique for producing ultra-short x-ray pulses uses relatively long electron bunches to minimize high-peak-current collective effects, and the ultimate x-ray duration is achieved by a combination of bunch manipulation and optical compression. Synchronization of x-ray pulses to sample excitation signals is expected to be of order 50 - 100 fs. Techniques for making use of the recirculating geometry to provide beam-based signals from early passes through the machine are being studied.

Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Barletta, W.A.; Byrd, J.M.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.; Green, M.A.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; Kairan, D.; Kujawski, E.; Li, D.; Lidia, S.; Luft, P.; McClure, R.; Parmigiani, F.; Petroff, Y.; Pirkl, W.; Placidi, M.; Reavill, D.; Reichel, I.; Rimmer, R.A.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.E.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Tanabe, J.; Truchlikova, D.; Wan, W.; Wang, S.; Wells, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

2002-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

89

Spark gap switch system with condensable dielectric gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spark gap switch system is disclosed which is capable of operating at a high pulse rate comprising an insulated switch housing having a purging gas entrance port and a gas exit port, a pair of spaced apart electrodes each having one end thereof within the housing and defining a spark gap therebetween, an easily condensable and preferably low molecular weight insulating gas flowing through the switch housing from the housing, a heat exchanger/condenser for condensing the insulating gas after it exits from the housing, a pump for recirculating the condensed insulating gas as a liquid back to the housing, and a heater exchanger/evaporator to vaporize at least a portion of the condensed insulating gas back into a vapor prior to flowing the insulating gas back into the housing.

Thayer, III, William J. (Kent, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A full-scale demonstration of in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation at the X-701B site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) proposed an oxidant delivery technique involving injection and recirculation of the oxidant solution into a contaminated aquifer through multiple horizontal and vertical wells. This technique would be applicable to saturated, hydraulically conductive formations. In the spring of 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) agreed to collaborate with the DOE`s Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area to conduct a field-scale treatability study using in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation (ISCOR). PORTS agreed to support the demonstration at the X-701B site where the technology can potentially be used to remediate TCE-contaminated groundwater and sediments. The ISCOR field demonstration took advantage of existing infrastructure and extensive site characterization data generated from previous field demonstrations at X-701B. The field test was implemented using a pair of previously installed horizontal wells that transect an area of DNAPL contamination. Groundwater was extracted from one horizontal well, pumped to an existing pump and treat facility, dosed with KMnO{sub 4}, and re-injected into a parallel horizontal well approximately 90 ft away. The field demonstration lasted approximately one month. Treatment effectiveness was determined by comparing contaminant levels in pre-treatment, during, and post-treatment groundwater samples and pre- and post-treatment soil samples.

West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Holden, W.L.; Gardner, F.G.; Schlosser, B.M.; Thate, J.E.; Pickering, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houk, T.C. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Technology Applications, Piketon, OH (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Systems and methods for reactive distillation with recirculation of light components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems and methods for producing gas-to-liquids products using reactive distillation are provided. The method for producing gas-to-liquids products can include reacting a feedstock in a column having a distillation zone and a reaction zone to provide a bottoms stream and an overhead stream. A first portion of the overhead stream can be recycled to the column at the top of the reaction zone and second portion of the overhead stream can be recycled to the column at the bottom of the reaction zone.

Stickney, Michael J. (Nassau Bay, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

92

Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates a vapor from the liquid natural gas. A portion of the liquid gas is used for additional cooling. Gas produced within the system may be recompressed for reintroduction into a receiving line or recirculation within the system for further processing.

Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

System and method for converting wellhead gas to liquefied petroleum gases (LPG)  

SciTech Connect

A method of converting natural wellhead gas to liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) may comprise the steps of: separating natural gas from petroleum fluids exiting a wellhead; compressing the natural gas; refrigerating the natural gas, liquefying at least a portion thereof; separating LPG from gas vapors of the refrigerated natural gas; storing the separated LPG in a storage tank with a vapor space therein; and recirculating a portion of the LPG vapors in the storage tank with the natural gas exiting the wellhead to enhance recovery of LPG. A system for performing the method may comprise: a two-stage gas compressor connected to the wellhead; a refrigeration unit downstream of the gas compressor for refrigerating the compressed gases therefrom; at least one product separator downstream of the refrigerator unit for receiving refrigerated and compressed gases discharged from the refrigerator unit and separating LPG therein from gases remaining in vapor form; and a storage tank for receiving and storing the separated LPG therein, the storage tank having a vapor space therein connected upstream of the gas compressor through a pressure regulator allowing recirculation of some LPG vapors with the natural gases through said system.

May, R.L.; Sinclair, B.W.

1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Motorola's Exhaust Optimization Program: Tracer Gas Application for Gas Panel Enclosures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Motorola Exhaust Optimization Program strives toward identifying the optimum exhaust requirements for gas panel enclosures to help conserve energy and provide future exhaust capacity for new tools. Various Motorola studies have shown that at least 20% of total fab electrical usage is attributed to make-up air fans, exhaust fans, and chilled water systems for recirculation and make-up air. This is equivalent to over 35 million kWh per a year for a typical Motorola Semiconductor Products Sector (SPS) fab. These obtained studies have prompted Motorola to focus on a broad range of energy conservation projects. This paper will focus on exhaust optimization through tracer gas testing. Testing has resulted in exhaust and make-up air reductions of as high as 70% of manufacturer's specifications per gas enclosure. This approach leads to energy conservation and infrastructure cost avoidance for new exhaust fans, ductwork, abatement equipment, and make-up air systems.

Myart, H. R.; Camacho, R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Evacuated-Tube Heat-Pipe Solar Collectors Applied to the Recirculation Loop in a Federal Building: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, simulation, construction, and initial performance of a solar water heating system (a 360-tube evacuated-tube heat-pipe solar collector, 54 m2 in gross area, 36 m2 in net absorber area) installed at the top of the hot water recirculation loop in the Social Security Administration's Mid-Atlantic Center in Philadelphia. When solar energy is available, water returning to the hot water storage tank is heated by the solar array. This new approach, in contrast to the more conventional approach of preheating incoming water, is made possible by the thermal diode effect of heat pipes and low heat loss from evacuated-tube solar collectors. The simplicity of this approach and its low installation costs support the deployment of solar energy in existing commercial buildings, especially where the roof is some distance away from the water heating system, which is often in the basement. Initial performance measurements of the system are reported.

Walker, A.; Mahjouri, F.; Stiteler, R.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Microelectronic chip cooling: an experimental assessment of a liquid-passing heat sink, a microchannel heat rejection module, and a microchannel-based recirculating-liquid cooling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of heat transfer testing of heat absorption modules (HAM), heat rejection modules (HRM), and a recirculating-liquid cooling system are reported. Low-profile, Cu-based, microchannel heat exchangers (MHEs) were fabricated and used as the HAM as ...

Bin Lu; W. J. Meng; Fanghua Mei

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Gas turbine topping combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustor is described for burning a mixture of fuel and air in a rich combustion zone, in which the fuel bound nitrogen in converted to molecular nitrogen. The fuel rich combustion is followed by lean combustion. The products of combustion from the lean combustion are rapidly quenched so as to convert the fuel bound nitrogen to molecular nitrogen without forming NOx. The combustor has an air radial swirler that directs the air radially inward while swirling it in the circumferential direction and a radial fuel swirler that directs the fuel radially outward while swirling it in the same circumferential direction, thereby promoting vigorous mixing of the fuel and air. The air inlet has a variable flow area that is responsive to variations in the heating value of the fuel, which may be a coal-derived fuel gas. A diverging passage in the combustor in front of a bluff body causes the fuel/air mixture to recirculate with the rich combustion zone. 14 figs.

Beer, J.; Dowdy, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Closed-cycle gas turbine chemical processor  

SciTech Connect

A closed-cycle gas turbine chemical processor separates the functions of combustion air and dilution fluid in a gas turbine combustor. The output of the turbine stage of the gas turbine is cooled and recirculated to its compressor from where a proportion is fed to a dilution portion of its combustor and the remainder is fed to a chemical recovery system wherein at least carbon dioxide is recovered therefrom. Fuel and combustion air are fed to a combustion portion of the gas turbine combustor. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the gas turbine is employed to drive an electric generator. A heat recovery steam generator and a steam turbine may be provided to recover additional energy from the gas turbine exhaust. The steam turbine may be employed to also drive the electric generator. additional heat may be added to the heat recovery steam generator for enhancing the electricity generated using heat recovery combustors in which the functions of combustion and dilution are separated. The chemical recovery system may employ process steam tapped from an intermediate stage of the steam turbine for stripping carbon dioxide from an absorbent liquid medium which is used to separate it from the gas stream fed to it. As the amount of carbon dioxide in the fuel fed to the chemical processor increases, the amount of process steam required to separate it from the absorbent fluid medium increases and the contribution to generated electricity by the steam turbine correspondingly decreases.

Stahl, C. R.

1985-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Use of Polymeric Dispersants in the Condensate/Feedwater Line during Long-Path Recirculation Cleanup at Pressurized Water Reacto rs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam generator (SG) deposit fouling causes heat-transfer losses, tube and internals corrosion degradation, level instabilities, and reductions in plant output. Utilities routinely devote substantial resources to limiting or reducing the level of such deposit fouling. This report summarizes the results of a two-year EPRI effort to develop dispersant application during the long-path recirculation cleanup process as a SG deposit management strategy. The work showed that the addition of dispersant is very l...

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

100

Steam Generator Management Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Generic Tube Degradation Predictions: Recirculating Steam Generators with Alloy 600TT, Alloy 690TT, and Alloy 800NG Tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mill-annealed Alloy 600 heat transfer tubing in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators (SGs) has experienced numerous modes of degradation. This report describes predictive models for determining expected tube degradation in recirculating steam generators with Alloy 600TT, Alloy 690TT, and Alloy 800NG tubing. Predictions are based on operating experience with similar designs and use improvement factors to characterize benefits resulting from SG design and material ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tree ring studies indicate that, for the greater part of the last three decades, New Mexico has been relatively 'wet' compared to the long-term historical norm. However, during the last several years, New Mexico has experienced a severe drought. Some researchers are predicting a return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters to supplement current fresh water supplies for power plant operation and cooling and other uses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. These were (1) an assessment of using water produced with oil and gas as a supplemental supply for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS); (2) a field evaluation of the wet-surface air cooling (WSAC) system at SJGS; and (3) the development of a ZeroNet systems analysis module and an application of the Watershed Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to evaluate a range of water shortage management plans. The study of the possible use of produced water at SJGS showed that produce water must be treated to justify its use in any reasonable quantity at SJGS. The study identified produced water volume and quality, the infrastructure needed to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements, and delivery and treatment economics. A number of produced water treatment alternatives that use off-the-shelf technology were evaluated along with the equipment needed for water treatment at SJGS. Wet surface air-cooling (WSAC) technology was tested at the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) to determine its capacity to cool power plant circulating water using degraded water. WSAC is a commercial cooling technology and has been used for many years to cool and/or condense process fluids. The purpose of the pilot test was to determine if WSAC technology could cool process water at cycles of concentration considered highly scale forming for mechanical draft cooling towers. At the completion of testing, there was no visible scale on the heat transfer surfaces and cooling was sustained throughout the test period. The application of the WARMF decision framework to the San Juan Basis showed that drought and increased temperature impact water availability for all sectors (agriculture, energy, municipal, industry) and lead to critical shortages. WARMF-ZeroNet, as part of the integrated ZeroNet decision support system, offers stakeholders an integrated approach to long-term water management that balances competing needs of existing water users and economic growth under the constraints of limited supply and potential climate change.

C. McGowin; M. DiFilippo; L. Weintraub

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

On white dwarfs and neutron stars in Palatini f(R) gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Palatini $f(R)$ gravity, the parameters of the Schwarzschild - de Sitter solution as well as the whole interior solutions of compact objects are expected to change when compared to general relativity. We solve the Palatini field equations numerically in the case of the models $f(R) = R + \\alpha R^2$ and $f(R) = R - \\mu^4/R$, and using the equation of state of Fermi gas. We show how the density profiles and the prediction for the maximum masses of white dwarfs (the Chandrasekhar limit) and neutron stars (the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff limit) are altered, and thereby conclude that observations on compact stars may be used to exclude alternative gravity models.

Vappu Reijonen

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

Method for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved sulfur-ammonia process is disclosed for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gases. In the improved process, a concentrator formerly used for standby operation is used at all normal times as an ammonia scrubber to improve the efficiency of gas separation during normal operation and is used as a concentrator for its intended standby functions during the alternative operations. In its normal function, the concentrator/scrubber functions as a scrubber to strip ammonia gas from recirculating liquid streams and to permit introduction of an ammonia-rich gas into a hydrogen sulfide scrubber to increase the separation efficiency of that unit. In the standby operation, the same concentrator/scrubber serves as a concentrator to concentrate hydrogen sulfide in a ''strong liquor'' stream for separate recovery as a strong liquor.

Ritter, H.

1982-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

104

ARE LARGE, COMETARY-SHAPED PROPLYDS REALLY (FREE-FLOATING) EVAPORATING GAS GLOBULES?  

SciTech Connect

We report the detection of strong and compact molecular line emission (in the CO J = 3-2, 4-3, 6-5, 7-6, {sup 13}CO J = 3-2, HCN, and HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 transitions) from a cometary-shaped object (Carina-frEGG1) in the Carina star-forming region (SFR) previously classified as a photoevaporating protoplanetary disk (proplyd). We derive a molecular mass of 0.35 M{sub Sun} for Carina-frEGG1, which shows that it is not a proplyd, but belongs to a class of free-floating evaporating gas globules (frEGGs) recently found in the Cygnus SFR by Sahai et al. Archival adaptive optics near-IR (Ks) images show a central hourglass-shaped nebula. The derived source luminosity (about 8-18 L{sub Sun }), the hourglass morphology, and the presence of collimated jets seen in Hubble Space Telescope images imply the presence of a jet-driving, young, low-mass star deeply embedded in the dust inside Carina-frEGG1. Our results suggest that the true nature of many or most such cometary-shaped objects seen in massive SFRs and previously labeled as proplyds has been misunderstood, and that these are really frEGGs.

Sahai, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Guesten, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Morris, M. R., E-mail: raghvendra.sahai@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

105

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Gas flow stabilized megavolt spark gap for repetitive pulses  

SciTech Connect

A high voltage spark gap switch including a housing having first and second end walls being spaced apart by a predetermined distance. A first electrode is positioned on the first end wall and a second electrode is positioned on the second end wall. The first and second electrodes are operatively disposed relative to each other and are spaced apart by a predetermined gap. An inlet conduit is provided for supplying gas to the first electrode. The conduit includes a nozzle for dispersing the gas in the shape of an annular jet. The gas is supplied into the housing at a predetermined velocity. A venturi housing is disposed within the second electrode. An exhaust conduit is provided for discharging gas and residue from the housing. The gas supplied at the predetermined velocity to the housing through the inlet conduit and the nozzle in an annular shape traverses the gap between the first and second electrodes and entrains low velocity gas within the housing decreasing the velocity of the gas supplied to the housing and increasing the diameter of the annular shape. The venturi disposed within the second electrode recirculates a large volume of gas to clean and cool the surface of the electrodes.

Lawson, Robert N. (Albuquerque, NM); O' Malley, Martin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohwein, Gerald J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Recirculating electric air filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage eleode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

Bergman, Werner (Pleasanton, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The behavior of $f(R)$ gravity in the solar system, galaxies and clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For cosmologically interesting $f(R)$ gravity models, we derive the complete set of the linearized field equations in the Newtonian gauge, under environments of the solar system, galaxies and clusters respectively. Based on these equations, we confirmed previous $\\gamma=1/2$ solution in the solar system. However, $f(R)$ gravity models can be strongly environment-dependent and the high density (comparing to the cosmological mean) solar system environment can excite a viable $\\gamma=1$ solution for some $f(R)$ gravity models. Although for $f(R)\\propto -1/R$, it is not the case; for $f(R)\\propto -\\exp(-R/\\lambda_2H_0^2)$, such $\\gamma=1$ solution does exist. This solution is virtually indistinguishable from that in general relativity (GR) and the value of the associated curvature approaches the GR limit, which is much higher than value in the $\\gamma=1/2$ solution. We show that for some forms of $f(R)$ gravity, this solution is physically stable in the solar system and can smoothly connect to the surface of the Sun. The derived field equations can be applied directly to gravitational lensing of galaxies and clusters. We find that, despite significant difference in the environments of galaxies and clusters comparing to that of the solar system, gravitational lensing of galaxies and clusters can be virtually identical to that in GR, for some forms of $f(R)$ gravity. Fortunately, galaxy rotation curve and intra-cluster gas pressure profile may contain valuable information to distinguish these $f(R)$ gravity models from GR.

Pengjie Zhang

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Preliminary gas turbine combustor design using a network approach  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary design process of a gas turbine combustor often involves the use of cumbersome, geometry restrictive semi-empirical models. The objective of this analysis is the development of a versatile design tool for gas turbine combustors, able to model all conceivable combustor types. A network approach is developed that divides the flow into a number of independent semi-empirical subflows. A pressure-correction methodology solves the continuity equation and a pressure-drop/flow rate relationship. The development of a full conjugate heat transfer model allows the calculation of flame tube heat loss in the presence of cooling films, annulus heat addition, and flame tube feature heat pick-up. A constrained equilibrium calculation, incorporating mixing and recirculation models, simulates combustion processes. Comparison of airflow results to a well-validated combustor design code showed close agreement. The versatility of the network solver is illustrated with comparisons to experimental data from a reverse flow combustor.

Stuttaford, P.J.; Rubini, P.A. [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Mechanical Engineering

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

112

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

113

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated several coal fired power plant configurations designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for use or sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB units results in significant Boiler Island cost savings. Additionally, ALSTOM has identified several advanced/novel plant configurations, which improve the efficiency and cost of the CO{sub 2} product cleanup and compression process. These advanced/novel concepts require long development efforts. An economic analysis indicates that the proposed oxygen-firing technology in circulating fluidized boilers could be developed and deployed economically in the near future in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications or enhanced gas recovery (EGR), such as coal bed methane recovery. ALSTOM received a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) in 2001 to carry out a project entitled ''Greenhouse Gas Emissions Control by Oxygen Firing in Circulating Fluidized Bed Boilers.'' This two-phased project is in effect from September 28, 2001, to October 27, 2004. (U.S. DOE NETL Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41146). Phase I consisted of an evaluation of the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants, and supporting bench-scale testing. And Phase II consists of pilot-scale testing, supporting a refined performance and economic evaluation of the oxygen-fired AFC concept. Phase I, detailed in this report, entails a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen separate but related cases (listed below), representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated as described herein. The first seven cases represent coal combustion cases in CFB type equipment. The next four cases represent Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The last two cases represent advanced Chemical Looping systems, which were completely paid for by ALSTOM and included herein for completeness.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes an off-gas stack for a melter, furnace or reaction vessel comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes prevents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

Wright, G.T.

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

116

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

117

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

118

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

119

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

120

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

122

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

123

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

124

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

125

NIST Report of Test FR 4016  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Home Smoke Alarm Project, Manufactured Home Tests Report of Test FR 4016 February, 2005. Richard D. Peacock, Jason ...

2013-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

126

Investigation of a Multiphase Twin-screw Pump Operating at High Gas Volume Fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of twin-screw pumps for moving fluids is not new technology but its application to wet gas compression (high gas volume fraction [GVF]) is still considered relatively new. There are many advantages for using twin-screw pumps for oil field applications; three of the immediate improvements include reducing hardware costs, reducing well bore pressure, and producing a pressure boost to move the product to a central collection facility. While there are many advantages to using twin-screw pumps in wet gas applications, there are some problems that have been encountered while operating at high GVFs. When operating at high GVF, over 95 percent twin-screw pumps experience a severe loss of efficiency and an increase of operating temperature. A common way to increase the efficiency while operating in the high GVF range includes adding a liquid recirculation system where a portion of liquid is stored downstream of the pump and is injected into the pump inlet. These systems lower the effective GVF of the multiphase fluid below 95 percent in order to increase the pump efficiency. The first objective is to characterize the performance of a twin-screw pump fitted with a liquid recirculation system while operating under high GVF conditions. The second objective is to investigate the transient heat rise associated with high GVF operation. While traditional twin-screw pumps can be fitted with a liquid recirculation system to allow them to operate under high GVF conditions the pumps themselves are not optimized for wet gas compression and still suffer performance penalties. The results of this investigation show that the liquid recirculation system can allow the pump to operate under high GVF but the heat added to the system reduces the systems efficiency. Without a method of removing the heat generated in the pumping process the pump will not run at its optimal efficiency. The following investigation provides recommendations for further research in area of multiphase pumping using twin-screw pumps based on the characterization and transient studies provided in this thesis.

Kroupa, Ryan Daniel

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

129

Gas Mileage of 2013 Vehicles by Scion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Scion Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2013 Scion FR-S 4 cyl, 2.0 L, Automatic (S6), Premium Gasoline Compare 2013 Scion FR-S View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 25...

130

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

131

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

133

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

134

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

135

Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

136

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

137

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

138

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

139

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

140

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

142

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

143

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

145

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

146

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

147

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

148

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

149

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

150

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

151

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

152

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

153

On use of CO{sub 2} chemiluminescence for combustion metrics in natural gas fired reciprocating engines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flame chemiluminescence is widely acknowledged to be an indicator of heat release rate in premixed turbulent flames that are representative of gas turbine combustion. Though heat release rate is an important metric for evaluating combustion strategies in reciprocating engine systems, its correlation with flame chemiluminescence is not well studied. To address this gap an experimental study was carried out in a single-cylinder natural gas fired reciprocating engine that could simulate turbocharged conditions with exhaust gas recirculation. Crank angle resolved spectra (266-795 nm) of flame luminosity were measured for various operational conditions by varying the ignition timing for MBT conditions and by holding the speed at 1800 rpm and Brake Mean effective Pressure (BMEP) at 12 bar. The effect of dilution on CO*{sub 2}chemiluminescence intensities was studied, by varying the global equivalence ratio (0.6-1.0) and by varying the exhaust gas recirculation rate. It was attempted to relate the measured chemiluminescence intensities to thermodynamic metrics of importance to engine research -- in-cylinder bulk gas temperature and heat release rate (HRR) calculated from measured cylinder pressure signals. The peak of the measured CO*{sub 2} chemiluminescence intensities coincided with peak pressures within {+-}2 CAD for all test conditions. For each combustion cycle, the peaks of heat release rate, spectral intensity and temperature occurred in that sequence, well separated temporally. The peak heat release rates preceded the peak chemiluminescent emissions by 3.8-9.5 CAD, whereas the peak temperatures trailed by 5.8-15.6 CAD. Such a temporal separation precludes correlations on a crank-angle resolved basis. However, the peak cycle heat release rates and to a lesser extent the peak cycle temperatures correlated well with the chemiluminescent emission from CO*{sub 2}. Such observations point towards the potential use of flame chemiluminescence to monitor peak bulk gas temperatures as well as peak heat release rates in natural gas fired reciprocating engines.

Gupta, S. B.; Bihari, B.; Biruduganti, M.; Sekar, R.; Zigan, J. (Energy Systems); (Cummins Technical Center)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

155

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Dark Energy and Dark Matter in $f(R)$ Gravity and an Alternative Chameleon Mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metric $f(R)$ gravity theories behave like GR with cosmological constant when $f"(R)$ = 0, and like scalar-tensor theories elsewhere. I investigate the transition from $f"(R) \

Kelleher, Adam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Dark Energy and Dark Matter in $f(R)$ Gravity and an Alternative Chameleon Mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metric $f(R)$ gravity theories behave like GR with cosmological constant when $f"(R)$ = 0, and like scalar-tensor theories elsewhere. I investigate the transition from $f"(R) \

Adam Kelleher

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

158

Ltr._to_Gottlieb_-_Response_from_LLNL_75_FR_72036_3-23-09.pdf...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ltr.toGottlieb-ResponsefromLLNL75FR720363-23-09.pdf Ltr.toGottlieb-ResponsefromLLNL75FR720363-23-09.pdf Ltr.toGottlieb-ResponsefromLLNL75FR720363-23-0...

159

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

160

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

162

A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on our research in developing a micro power generation system based on gas turbine engine and piezoelectric converter. The micro gas turbine engine consists of a micro combustor, a turbine and a centrifugal compressor. Comprehensive simulation has been implemented to optimal the component design. We have successfully demonstrated a silicon-based micro combustor, which consists of seven layers of silicon structures. A hairpin-shaped design is applied to the fuel/air recirculation channel. The micro combustor can sustain a stable combustion with an exit temperature as high as 1600 K. We have also successfully developed a micro turbine device, which is equipped with enhanced micro air-bearings and driven by compressed air. A rotation speed of 15,000 rpm has been demonstrated during lab test. In this paper, we will introduce our research results major in the development of micro combustor and micro turbine test device.

Shan, X -C; Maeda, R; Sun, Y F; Wu, M; Hua, J S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

164

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

165

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

166

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

167

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

168

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

169

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

170

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

171

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

172

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

173

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

174

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

175

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

176

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

177

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

178

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

179

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

180

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

182

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

183

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

184

Energy Distribution in f(R) Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The well-known energy problem is discussed in f(R) theory of gravity. We use the generalized Landau-Lifshitz energy-momentum complex in the framework of metric f(R) gravity to evaluate the energy density of plane symmetric solutions for some general f(R) models. In particular, this quantity is found for some popular choices of f(R) models. The constant scalar curvature condition and the stability condition for these models are also discussed. Further, we investigate the energy distribution of cosmic string spacetime.

Sharif, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Energy Distribution in f(R) Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The well-known energy problem is discussed in f(R) theory of gravity. We use the generalized Landau-Lifshitz energy-momentum complex in the framework of metric f(R) gravity to evaluate the energy density of plane symmetric solutions for some general f(R) models. In particular, this quantity is found for some popular choices of f(R) models. The constant scalar curvature condition and the stability condition for these models are also discussed. Further, we investigate the energy distribution of cosmic string spacetime.

M. Sharif; M. Farasat Shamir

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

186

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

188

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

189

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

190

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

191

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

192

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

193

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

194

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

195

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

196

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

197

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

198

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

199

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

200

Bubble retention in synthetic sludge: Testing of alternative gas retention apparatus  

SciTech Connect

Several of the underground storage tanks currently used to store waste at Hanford have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. The objective of this experimental study is to develop a method to measure gas bubble retention in simulated tank waste and in diluted simulant. The method and apparatus should (1) allow for reasonably rapid experiments, (2) minimize sample disturbance, and (3) provide realistic bubble nucleation and growth. The scope of this experimental study is to build an apparatus for measuring gas retention in simulated waste and to design the apparatus to be compatible with future testing on actual waste. The approach employed for creating bubbles in sludge involves dissolving a soluble gas into the supernatant liquid at an elevated pressure, recirculating the liquid containing the dissolved gas through the sludge, then reducing the pressure to allow bubbles to nucleate and grow. Results have been obtained for ammonia as the soluble gas and SY1-SIM-91A, a chemically representative simulated tank waste. In addition, proof-of-principle experiments were conducted with both ammonia and CO{sub 2} as soluble gases and sludge composed of 90-micron glass beads. Results are described.

Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs).

202

Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas: Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir, as in contrast to injected gas volumes. Natural Gas: A gaseous mixture...

203

Gas Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... automobile industry meeting more stringent … more. Audit of EPA Protocol Gas Suppliers EPA Protocol gas mixture calibration ...

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

204

New models of f(R) theories of gravity  

SciTech Connect

We introduce new models of f(R) theories of gravity that are a generalization of Horava-Lifshitz gravity.

Kluson, J. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37, Brno (Czech Republic)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

New Models of f(R) Theories of Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce new models of f(R) theories of gravity that are generalization of Horava-Lifshitz gravity.

J. Kluson

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

New Models of f(R) Theories of Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce new models of f(R) theories of gravity that are generalization of Horava-Lifshitz gravity.

Kluson, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Reconstructing f(R) theory according to holographic dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper a connection between the holographic dark energy model and the $f(R)$ theory is established. We treat the $f(R)$ theory as an effective description for the holographic dark energy and reconstruct the function $f(R)$ with the parameter $c>1$, $c=1$ and $cR)$ theory, especially for the future evolution.

Xing Wu; Zong-Hong Zhu

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

Recirculation of Materials and Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013... Chemical Manufacturing and Its Impact on Environment – A Review: Sergio Sanchez-Segado1; Animesh Jha1; 1University of Leeds

209

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

211

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

212

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

213

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

214

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

215

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

216

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

217

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

218

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

219

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

220

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

222

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

223

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

224

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

225

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

226

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

227

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

228

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

229

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

230

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

231

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

232

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

233

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

234

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

235

Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Eligibility...

237

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

238

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

239

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

240

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

242

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

243

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

Verwaltungshandbuch Ausfhrungsbestimmungen fr den  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2V K 0,24 Natural Gas Storage in Porous Media 2 4 WPF 2V K 0,24 Natural Gas Storage in Rock Caverns in Porous Media (C) 19 20 Natural Gas Storage in Rock Caverns (V) Adv.Transp. & Stor'e Topics (S) 21 22,22 Natural Gas Storage in Porous Media 2 4 PF 2V K 0,25 Natural Gas Storage in Rock Caverns 2 4 PF 2V K 0

Angermann, Lutz

245

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

246

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

247

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and a weather snapshot. Monthly Natural Gas Monthly Natural and supplemental gas production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices in the...

248

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

249

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

250

Gas scrubbing liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowrie, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Natural Gas Processed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

252

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas prices, successful application of horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, as well as significant investments made by natural gas companies in production...

253

Natural Gas Dry Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

254

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service “Evolving Estimate” in Natural Gas Monthly.

255

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7, 2009 Next Release: May 14, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 6, 2009) Natural gas...

256

February Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

257

November Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

258

January Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

259

March Natural Gas Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

260

May Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

262

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

263

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

264

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

265

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Experimental Evaluation of SI Engine Operation Supplemented by Hydrogen Rich Gas from a Compact Plasma Boosted Reformer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is well known that hydrogen addition to spark-ignited (SI) engines can reduce exhaust emissions and increase efficiency. Micro plasmatron fuel converters can be used for onboard generation of hydrogen-rich gas by partial oxidation of a wide range of fuels. These plasma-boosted microreformers are compact, rugged, and provide rapid response. With hydrogen supplement to the main fuel, SI engines can run very lean resulting in a large reduction in nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emissions relative to stoichiometric combustion without a catalytic converter. This paper presents experimental results from a microplasmatron fuel converter operating under variable oxygen to carbon ratios. Tests have also been carried out to evaluate the effect of the addition of a microplasmatron fuel converter generated gas in a 1995 2.3-L four-cylinder SI production engine. The tests were performed with and without hydrogen-rich gas produced by the plasma boosted fuel converter with gasoline. A one hundred fold reduction in NO x due to very lean operation was obtained under certain conditions. An advantage of onboard plasma-boosted generation of hydrogen-rich gas is that it is used only when required and can be readily turned on and off. Substantial NO x reduction should also be obtainable by heavy exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) facilitated by use of hydrogen-rich gas with stoichiometric operation.

J. B. Green, Jr.; N. Domingo; J. M. E. Storey; R.M. Wagner; J.S. Armfield; L. Bromberg; D. R. Cohn; A. Rabinovich; N. Alexeev

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

267

Separation of particulate from flue gas of fossil fuel combustion and gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gas from combustion or gasification of fossil fuel contains fly ash and other particulates. The fly ash is separated from the gas in a plurality of standleg moving granular-bed filter modules. Each module includes a dipleg through which the bed media flows into the standleg. The bed media forms a first filter bed having an upper mass having a first frusto-conical surface in a frusto-conical member at the entrance to the standleg and a lower mass having a second frusto-conical surface of substantially greater area than the first surface after it passes through the standleg. A second filter media bed may be formed above the first filter media bed. The gas is fed tangentially into the module above the first surface. The fly ash is captured on the first frusto-conical surface and within the bed mass. The processed gas flows out through the second frusto-conical surface and then through the second filter bed, if present. The bed media is cleaned of the captured fly ash and recirculated to the moving granular bed filter. Alternatively, the bed media may be composed of the ash from the combustion which is pelletized to form agglomerates. The ash flows through the bed only once; it is not recycled. 11 figs.

Yang, W.C.; Newby, R.A.; Lippert, T.E.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

Separation of particulate from flue gas of fossil fuel combustion and gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gas from combustion or gasification of fossil fuel contains flyash and other particulate. The flyash is separated from the gas in a plurality of standleg moving granular-bed filter modules. Each module includes a dipleg through which the bed media flows into the standleg. The bed media forms a first filter bed having an upper mass having a first frusto-conical surface in a frusto-conical member at the entrance to the standleg and a lower mass having a second frusto-conical surface of substantially greater area than the first surface after it passes through the standleg. A second filter media bed may be formed above the first filter media bed. The gas is fed tangentially into the module above the first surface. The flyash is captured on the first frusto-conical surface and within the bed mass. The processed gas flows out through the second frusto-conical surface and then through the second filter bed, if present. The bed media is cleaned of the captured flyash and recirculated to the moving granular bed filter. Alternatively, the bed media may be composed of the ash from the combustion which is pelletized to form agglomerates. The ash flows through the bed only once; it is not recycled.

Yang, Wen-Ching (Murrysville, PA); Newby, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Collett, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage by State About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through...

271

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and <0.1 g/bhp-hr emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). A summary of the goals for the ARES program is given in Table 1-1. ARICE 2007 goals are 45% thermal efficiency and <0.015 g/bhp-hr NOx. Several approaches for improving the efficiency and emissions of natural gas reciprocating engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial oxidation and reforming chemistry, and the effects of sulfur poisons on the partial oxidation

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Ponnusamy, Senthil [ORNL; Ferguson, Harley Douglas [ORNL; Williams, Aaron M [ORNL; Tassitano, James B [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

FR PI Report April-June 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2012 9, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION _L7 _ r FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 176 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 95 percent of

274

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

275

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

276

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

277

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

278

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

279

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

280

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

282

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

283

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

284

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

285

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

286

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

287

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

288

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

290

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

291

Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial oxidation and reforming chemistry, and the effects of sulfur poisons on the partial oxidation

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Ponnusamy, Senthil [ORNL; Ferguson, Harley Douglas [ORNL; Williams, Aaron M [ORNL; Tassitano, James B [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Spherical Symmetric Solution in f(R) Model Around Charged Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A static, asymptotically flat, spherically symmetric solutions is investigated in f(R) theories of gravity for a charged black hole. We have studied the weak field limit of f(R) gravity for the some f(R) model such as f(R) = R + epsilon h(R). In particular, weconsider the case lim_{R =0} {h(R)/ dh(R)/dR}=0 and find the space time metric for f(R) = R + {mu}^{4} /R and f(R) = R^{1-epsilon} theories of gravity far away a charged mass point.

A. Aghamohammadi; Kh. Saaidi; M. R. Abolhasani; A. Vajdi

2010-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Measurements of gas permeability on crushed gas shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, more attention has been given to unconventional gas reservoirs, including tight gas shales. Accurate description of gas transport and permeability measurements… (more)

Guarnieri, R.V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transmission...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Transmission Path Diagram About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Transmission Path Natural...

295

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Other Heating...

296

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

297

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Generalized Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Design Schematic Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capcity Design Schematic...

298

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

299

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corridors > Major U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates...

300

Tracking $f(R)$ cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metric $f(R)$ gravity theories are conformally equivalent to models of quintessence in which matter is coupled to dark energy. We derive a condition for stable tracker solution for metric $f(R)$ gravity in the Einstein frame. We find that tracker solutions with $-0.3610$, where $\\Gamma=\\frac{V_{\\varphi\\varphi}V}{V_{\\varphi}^{2}}$ is dimensionless function, $\\omega_{\\varphi}$ is the equation of state parameter of the scalar field and $\\tilde{R}$ refers to Jordan frame's curvature scalar. Also, we show that there exists $f(\\tilde{R})$ gravity models which have tracking behavior in the Einstein frame and so the curvature of space time is decreasing with time while they lead to the solutions in the Jordan frame that the curvature of space time can be increasing with time.

Mahmood Roshan; Fatimah Shojai

2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

December Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DOEEIA-0130(9712) Distribution CategoryUC-950 Natural Gas Monthly December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC...

302

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

303

Southern California Gas Co  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Southern California Gas Co ... 236,147,041 98,326,527 274,565,356 690,930 139,093,560 748,823,414 Lone Star Gas Co......

304

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage...

305

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to withdraw natural gas from storage to meet current demand. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 2,406 Bcf as of...

306

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas futures also reversed gains made in the previous week. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased by 63 Bcf...

307

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

308

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,451,1,35,17,,,10,3,0,48...

309

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,13889,36,837,1016,,,1129,181,...

310

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,151,-1,1,6,,,0,0,0,36...

311

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,6305,-3,226,165,,,884,391,10,...

312

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,495,-3,48,11,,,113,0,31,60...

313

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,11457,-3,122,171,,,219,21,7,7...

314

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,877,0,37,79,,,93,32,2,62...

315

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Res., 104(B10), 22985-23003. Collett, T.S. (1992), Potential of gas hydrates outlined, Oil Gas J., 90(25), 84-87. 70 Cook, A.E., Goldberg, D., and R.L. Kleinberg (2008),...

316

Natural gas annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

318

Landfill Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Landfill Gas Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLandfillGas&oldid267173"...

319

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves U.S. natural gas liquids proved reserves decreased 7 percent to 7,459 million ...

320

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofreplacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for households and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Exports...

322

Prediction of ? Phase Embrittlement in 316FR Stainless Steel Welds ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fast breeder reactors was examined for 316FR stainless steel welds with different ... Analysis of the Fusion Boundary Region in Dissimilar Metal Welds at Low ...

323

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association ConferenceMarch 12, 2004

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

324

Gas Turbine Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...times higher than atmospheric pressure.Ref 25The gas turbine was developed generally for main propulsion and power

325

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

with active programs. More information is available at: http:www.eia.doe.govcneafelectricitypagerestructuringrestructureelect.html. Information about natural gas...

326

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 6 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ... 7 Task 6: Numerical Models for...

327

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

328

Natural gas annual 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association Conference, March 12, 2004 Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, Administrator, Energy Information Administration

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

330

Residual gas analysis device  

SciTech Connect

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Characteristics and reactivity of rapidly hydrated sorbent for semidry flue gas desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The semidry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process has many advantages over the wet FGD process for moving sulfur dioxide emissions from pulverized coal-fired power plants. Semidry FGD with a rapidly hydrated sorbent was studied in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) experimental facility. The sorbent was made from lumps of lime and coal fly ash. The desulfurization efficiency was measured for various operating parameters, including the sorbent recirculation rate and the water spray method. The experimental results show that the desulfurization efficiencies of the rapidly hydrated sorbent were 1.5-3.0 times higher than a commonly used industrial sorbent for calcium to sulfur molar ratios from 1.2 to 3.0, mainly due to the higher specific surface area and pore volume. The Ca(OH){sub 2} content in the cyclone separator ash was about 2.9% for the rapidly hydrated sorbent and was about 0.1% for the commonly used industrial sorbent, due to the different adhesion between the fine Ca(OH){sub 2} particles and the fly ash particles, and the low cyclone separation efficiency for the fine Ca(OH){sub 2} particles that fell off the sorbent particles. Therefore the actual recirculation rates of the active sorbent with Ca(OH){sub 2} particles were higher for the rapidly hydrated sorbent, which also contributed to the higher desulfurization efficiency. The high fly ash content in the rapidly hydrated sorbent resulted in good operating stability. The desulfurization efficiency with upstream water spray was 10-15% higher than that with downstream water spray. 20 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Jie Zhang; Changfu You; Suwei Zhao; Changhe Chen; Haiying Qi [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Natural gas industry directory  

SciTech Connect

This directory has information on the following: associations and organizations; exploration and production; gas compression; gas processors; gathering and transmission companies; liquefied natural gas; local distribution companies; marketing firms; regulatory agencies; service companies; suppliers and manufacturers; and regional buyer`s guide.

NONE

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

334

Gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

A core engine or gas generator is described for use in a range of gas turbine engines. A multi-stage compressor and a single stage supersonic turbine are mounted on a single shaft. The compressor includes a number of stages of variable angle and the gas generator has an annular combustion chamber.

MacDonald, A.G.

1976-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ Fossil backed by a growing portfolio of assets. #12;Shale Gas Geography 5 | MARCELLUS SHALE COALITION #12;Shale Permits Price #12;Pricing Trend of Oil and Gas in the US $- $5.00 $10.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00 USDper

Lee, Dongwon

336

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, storage, and usage of compressed gas cylinders. 2.0 POLICY Colorado School of Mines ("Mines" or "the, storage, and usage requirements outlined below. This policy is applicable school-wide including all, or electrical circuits. Flammable gas cylinders must be stored in the building's gas cylinder storage cage until

337

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly highlights of activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry are presented. Feature articles for this issue are: Natural Gas Overview for Winter 1983-1984 by Karen A. Kelley; and an Analysis of Natural Gas Sales by John H. Herbert. (PSB)

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas & North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: 350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: 500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas & North Shore Gas Furnace: 200 - 500...

339

Experimental Study of Main Gas Ingestion and Purge Gas Egress Flow in Model Gas Turbine Stages.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Efficient performance of gas turbines depends, among several parameters, on the mainstream gas entry temperature. At the same time, transport of this high temperature gas… (more)

Balasubramanian, Jagdish Harihara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

342

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

343

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

344

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

345

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

346

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

347

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

348

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

349

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

350

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

351

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

352

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

353

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

354

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

355

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

356

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

357

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

358

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

359

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

360

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

362

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

363

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

364

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

365

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

366

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

367

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

368

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

369

NUCLEAR GAS ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary design study of the nuclear gas engine, consisting of a gas-cooled reactor directly coupled to a reciprocating engine, is presented. The principles of operation of the proposed gas engine are outlined and typical variations anre discussed. The nuclear gas engine is compared with other reciprocating engines and air compressors. A comparison between the ideal and actual cycles is made, with particular attention given to pumping, heat, and other losses to be expected. The applications and development of the nuclear gas engine are discussed. (W.D.M.)

Fraas, A.P.

1958-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands...

371

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, especially NOX. The project involved operating gas reburning technology combined with low NO, burner technology (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired utility boiler. Low NOX burners are designed to create less NOX than conventional burners. However, the NO, control achieved is in the range of 30-60-40, and typically 50%. At the higher NO, reduction levels, CO emissions tend to be higher than acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce the level of NO. in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. When combined, GR and LNBs work in harmony to both minimize NOX emissions and maintain an acceptable level of CO emissions. The demonstration was performed at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit 3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW. wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal and had a pre GR-LNB baseline NOX emission of 0.73 lb/1 Oe Btu. The target for the project was a reduction of 70 percent in NOX emissions. Project sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). EER conducted a comprehensive test demonstration program over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved. Intensive measurements were taken to quantify the reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability, and all factors influencing costs. The results showed that GR-LNB technology achieved excellent emission reductions. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was somewhat less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 180A. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at higher gas heat inputs. The impact on boiler equipment was determined to be very minimal. Toward the end of the testing, the flue gas recirculation (used to enhance gas penetration into the furnace) system was removed and new high pressure gas injectors were installed. Further, the low NOX burners were modified and gave better NO. reduction performance. These modifications resulted in a similar NO, reduction performance (64%) at a reduced level of gas heat input (-13Yo). In addition, the OFA injectors were re-designed to provide for better control of CO emissions. Although not a part of this project, the use of natural gas as the primary fuel with gas reburning was also tested. The gas/gas reburning tests demonstrated a reduction in NOX emissions of 43% (0.30 lb/1 OG Btu reduced to 0.17 lb/1 OG Btu) using 7% gas heat input. Economics are a key issue affecting technology development. Application of GR-LNB requires modifications to existing power plant equipment and as a result, the capital and operating costs depend largely on site-specific factors such as: gas availability at the site, gas to coal delivered price differential, sulfur dioxide removal requirements, windbox pressure, existing burner throat diameters, and reburn zone residence time available. Based on the results of this CCT project, EER expects that most GR-LNB installations will achieve at least 60% NOX control when firing 10-15% gas. The capital cost estimate for installing a GR-LNB system on a 300 MW, unit is approximately $25/kW. plus the cost of a gas pipeline (if required). Operating costs are almost entirely related to the differential cost of the natural gas compared to coal.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

373

Natural-gas liquids  

SciTech Connect

Casinghead gasoline or natural gasoline, now more suitably known as natural-gas liquids (NGL), was a nuisance when first found, but was developed into a major and profitable commodity. This part of the petroleum industry began at about the turn of the century, and more than 60 yr later the petroleum industry recovers approx. one million bbl of natural-gas liquids a day from 30 billion cu ft of natural gas processed in more than 600 gasoline plants. Although casinghead gasoline first was used for automobile fuel, natural-gas liquids now are used for fuel, industrial solvents, aviation blending stock, synthetic rubber, and many other petrochemical uses. Production from the individual plants is shipped by tank car, tank truck, pipeline, and tankers all over the world. Most of the natural-gas liquids come from wet natural gas which contains a considerable quantity of vapor, ranging from 0.5 to 6 gal/Mcf, and some particularly rich gases contain even more which can be liquefied. Nonassociated gas is generally clean, with a comparatively small quantity of gasoline, 0.1 to 0.5 gas/Mcf. The natural-gas liquids branch of the industry is build around the condensation of vapors in natural gas. Natural-gas liquids are processed either by the compression method or by adsorption processes.

Blackstock, W.B.; McCullough, G.W.; McCutchan, R.C.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Natural gas sdtrategic plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s natural gas program is aimed at meeting simultaneously our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy The Natural Gas Strategic Plan for 1995 represents a Department-wide effort to articulate the key issues related to the expanded development and utilization of natural gas, and defines the roles of the federal government and US industry in partnering to accomplish the strategic goals defined. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Strategic Plan are to: foster the development of advanced natural gas technologies; encourage the adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets; support the removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets; and foster technologies and policies to maximize the environmental benefits of natural gas use. DOE`s proposed fiscal year (FY) 1996 budget represents a commitment to natural gas research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) from reservoir to end use. DOE has redirected and increased funding for its natural gas exploration, production, delivery and storage, processing, and utilization RD&D programs, shifting funds from other energy programs to programs that will enhance efficiency and advance the role of natural gas in our domestic energy resources portfolio.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

376

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

Southwest Gas Corporation - Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Insulation: 0.15sq ft Floor Insulation: 0.30sq ft Builders Energy Star Certified Home: 450 Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: 450 Attic Insulation: 0.15sq ft Equipment...

378

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs? Gas pipelines attract substantial reseach to improve safety and cut costs. They operate ...

380

Natural Gas 1995: Preliminary Highlights  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Monthly April 1996 1. ... Widespread economic growth ... Growth in electric utility gas con-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Viscose Cosmology in $f(R)$ Gravity for Kasner Type Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study $f(R)$ modifications of Einstein's gravity in a viscous Bianchi type I for a Kasner form metric. We get the $f(R)$ function that satisfy dominant energy condition.

Kh. Saaidi; A. Aghamohammadi; H. Hossienkhani

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

382

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

383

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

384

Graviton and scalar propagations on AdS(4) space in f(R) gravities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate propagations of graviton and additional scalar on four-dimensional anti de Sitter (AdS$_4$) space using $f(R)$ gravity models with external sources. It is shown that there is the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov (vDVZ) discontinuity in $f(R)$ gravity models because $f(R)$ gravity implies GR with additional scalar. This indicates a difference between general relativity and $f(R)$ gravity clearly.

Yun Soo Myung

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

387

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

388

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

389

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

390

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

391

Flue gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

393

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

394

GAS METERING PUMP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid piston gas pump is described, capable of pumping minute amounts of gas in accurately measurable quantities. The pump consists of a flanged cylindrical regulating chamber and a mercury filled bellows. Sealed to the ABSTRACTS regulating chamber is a value and having a gas inlet and outlet, the inlet being connected by a helical channel to the bellows. A gravity check valve is in the gas outlet, so the gas passes through the inlet and the helical channel to the bellows where the pumping action as well as the metering is accomplished by the actuation of the mercury filled bellows. The gas then flows through the check valve and outlet to any associated apparatus.

George, C.M.

1957-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Natural Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .versus AEO and Henry Hub Natural Gas Prices . . . . . .

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .versus AEO and Henry Hub Natural Gas Prices . . . . . .

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Yun Soo Myung

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

398

GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The construction of gas discharge devices where the object is to provide a gas discharge device having a high dark current and stabilized striking voltage is described. The inventors have discovered that the introduction of tritium gas into a discharge device with a subsequent electrical discharge in the device will deposit tritium on the inside of the chamber. The tritium acts to emit beta rays amd is an effective and non-hazardous way of improving the abovementioned discharge tube characteristics

Arrol, W.J.; Jefferson, S.

1957-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

399

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Myung, Yun Soo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Pulsed gas laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed gas laser is constituted by Blumlein circuits wherein space metal plates function both as capacitors and transmission lines coupling high frequency oscillations to a gas filled laser tube. The tube itself is formed by spaced metal side walls which function as connections to the electrodes to provide for a high frequency, high voltage discharge in the tube to cause the gas to lase. Also shown is a spark gap switch having structural features permitting a long life.

Anderson, Louis W. (Madison, WI); Fitzsimmons, William A. (Madison, WI)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, Charles A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burbage, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

each of the consumption sectors, excluding the industrial sector, according to BENTEK Energy Services, LLC. Moderating temperatures likely contributed to lower natural gas...

403

4. Natural Gas Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

hydraulic fracturing, including shales and low permeability (tight) formations. Total U.S. dry natural gas reserves additions replaced 237 percent of 2007 dry

404

Greenhouse Gas Emission Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... climate change as a serious problem and that greenhouse gas (GHG ... models to determine the baselines of GHG emissions and the effect of GHG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

405

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Report," and the Historical Weekly Storage Estimates Database. Other Market Trends: FERC Investigates Natural Gas Wash-Trading: The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)...

406

String Gas Baryogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

G. L. Alberghi

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

407

Natural Gas Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for ... Tables 1 and 2 ...

408

Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Outlook National Association of State Energy Officials State Heating Oil and Propane Conference August 30, 2004 William Trapmann Energy Information ...

409

Gas Turbine Optimum Operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many offshore installations are dependent on power generated by gas turbines and a critical issue is that these experience performance deterioration over time. Performance deterioration… (more)

Flesland, Synnøve Mangerud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

increased to 3,683 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, October 15, according to the Energy Information Administrations (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The West...

411

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

storage facilities. Other Market Trends: EIA Releases Report on Underground Natural Gas Storage Developments: The Energy Information Administration (EIA) released a special...

412

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","9302013"...

413

,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

414

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

415

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,...

416

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

417

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

418

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

419

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

420

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

,"Illinois Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

422

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

423

,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

301967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

424

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

425

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

426

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

427

,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

428

Natural Gas Citygate Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross...

429

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","9302013" ,"Next Release...

430

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

damage was not immediately clear, and the pipeline did not indicate how long the three lines will be out of service. Texas Gas Transmission Company has begun unscheduled...

431

,"Idaho Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","102013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","172014"...

432

String Gas Baryogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

Alberghi, G L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

String Gas Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

String gas cosmology is a string theory-based approach to early universe cosmology which is based on making use of robust features of string theory such as the existence of new states and new symmetries. A first goal of string gas cosmology is to understand how string theory can effect the earliest moments of cosmology before the effective field theory approach which underlies standard and inflationary cosmology becomes valid. String gas cosmology may also provide an alternative to the current standard paradigm of cosmology, the inflationary universe scenario. Here, the current status of string gas cosmology is reviewed.

Brandenberger, Robert H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

String gas baryogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

Alberghi, G. L. [Physics Department, Bologna University, I.N.F.N. Bologna (Italy)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Natural Gas Citygate Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January ...

436

Gas utilization technologies  

SciTech Connect

One of the constant challenges facing the research community is the identification of technology needs 5 to 15 years from now. A look back into history indicates that the forces driving natural gas research have changed from decade to decade. In the 1970s research was driven by concerns for adequate supply; in the 1980s research was aimed at creating new markets for natural gas. What then are the driving forces for the 1990s? Recent reports from the natural gas industry have helped define a new direction driven primarily by market demand for natural gas. A study prepared by the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America Foundation entitled ``Survey of Natural Research, Development, and Demonstration RD&D Priorities`` indicated that in the 1990s the highest research priority should be for natural gas utilization and that technology development efforts should not only address efficiency and cost, but environmental and regulatory issues as well. This study and others, such as the report by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.) entitled ``Strategic Vision for Natural Gas Through the Year 2000,`` clearly identify the market sectors driving today`s technology development needs. The biggest driver is the power generation market followed by the industrial, transportation, appliance, and gas cooling markets. This is best illustrated by the GRI 1994 Baseline Projection on market growth in various sectors between the year 1992 and 2010. This paper highlights some of the recent technology developments in each one of these sectors.

Biljetina, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Slide 19 of 27. Price: Wellhead. Natural gas wellhead prices are projected to move up 5 percent this winter, averaging about $2.28 per Mcf during this ...

438

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of about 50 percent of natural gas production from the Gulf. (See "Other Market Trends" below for details.) Ivan's major impact on prices occurred on Monday, September 13,...

439

Breathable gas distribution apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for safely supplying breathable gas or air through individual respirators to personnel working in a contaminated area.

Garcia, Elmer D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

since July 27, 2004. Prices: Moderate temperatures and a favorable supply situation led to widespread declines in natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States since last...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Pot Gas Cooling Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... has been enormously increased by the suppliers of pot gas treatment plants, ... and Capillary Instabilities in Carbon-anode using Lattice Boltzmann Method.

442

Gas pressure reduction circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes passive pressure reduction devices for use with sensitive instruments. Two gas circuits are developed which not only provide a pressure reduction under flow demand

D. W. Guillaume; D. DeVries

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Release: Thursday, August 26, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 18, 2010) Natural...

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release: Thursday, November 4, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 27, 2010) As the...

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next Release: Thursday, May 13, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 5, 2010) Since...

446

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

that have helped reshape the natural gas market, with particular emphasis on policy directives during the past 26 years. The linked files provided on the web site provide...

447

Gas-recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear explosions have been proposed as a means for recovering gas from underground gas-bearing rock formations. In present practice, the nuclear device is positioned at the end of a long pipe which is subsequently filled with grout or concrete. After the device is exploded, the grout is drilled through to provide a flow path for the released gas to the ground surface. As settled grout is brittle, often the compressive shock of the explosion fractures the grout and deforms the pipe so that it may not be removed nor reused. In addition, the pipe is sometimes pinched off completely and the gas flow is totally obstructed. (2 claims)

Heckman, R.A.

1971-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

448

Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Others wanting to learn more about greenhouse gas emissions and their reduction. About the ... based on ensuring the sustainability of finite natural resources.

449

Natural Gas Storage Valuation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, one methodology for natural gas storage valuation is developed and two methodologies are improved. Then all of the three methodologies are applied… (more)

Li, Yun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"...

451

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"...

452

,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"...

453

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

454

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"6...

455

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

456

,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 5","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

457

,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

458

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

459

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"6...

460

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

462

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

463

,"Iowa Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Iowa Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

464

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

465

,"Vermont Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

466

,"Ohio Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

467

,"California Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

468

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

469

,"Maryland Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

470

,"Michigan Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

471

,"Illinois Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

472

,"Kansas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

473

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

474

,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

475

,"Arizona Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

476

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

477

,"Florida Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

478

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

479

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

480

,"Virginia Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recirculation fr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

482

,"Washington Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

483

,"Maine Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

484

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

485

,"Utah Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

486

,"Oregon Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

487

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

488

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

489

,"Nevada Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

490

,"Delaware Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

491

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

492

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

493

,"Montana Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

494

,"Idaho Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

495

,"Missouri Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

496

,"Georgia Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

497

,"Indiana Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

498

,"Alabama Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

499

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

500

,"Alaska Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...