Sample records for gas production estimates

  1. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

  2. Dry Natural Gas Estimated Production (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623and2,819 143,4362009 2010Year

  3. Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623and2,81920,523 21,594 22,239 23,555

  4. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0Month PreviousThousandCubic0 0Estimated

  5. Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343Decade81Feet)3,174 2,763Estimated

  6. Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384 388 413 2009-2013YearEstimated

  7. Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade Year-0Year JanDecadeEstimated Production

  8. Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet)Year Jan(Million CubicEstimated Production

  9. Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet) Base Gas)1,727 1,342 1,298

  10. Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0

  11. Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0 0 0 0 0AcquisitionsFeet)

  12. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15Thousand

  13. Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003of Energy for39 TableErrors of21,415

  14. Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003ofDec.Adjustments (Billion

  15. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Estimated Production, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 566 8021 1 2 22008 2009 2010

  16. Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade (MillionThousand CubicYearEstimated

  17. Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,998 10,64397 272 522. U.S.AcquisitionsEstimated

  18. Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198Separation 321 601 631 909Estimated

  19. California Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;5,,"I",86,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0000,7,00000,"WAT","HY"5Year JanFeet) Estimated

  20. Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

    Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

  1. U.S. Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State OffshoreProductionAdjustments (Billion Cubic

  2. Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boden, T.A.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Andres, R.J. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.

  3. Estimating the upper limit of gas production from Class 2 hydrate accumulations in the permafrost: 2. Alternative well designs and sensitivity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    m). As in all cases of gas hydrates (Moridis et al. , 2007;by destroying the secondary gas hydrate barrier (if such aInduced Gas Production From Class 1 Hydrate Deposits,” SPE

  4. Shale Gas Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. Natural GasquestionnairesquestionnairesGasA.San JuanGas Production

  5. Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, Francis

    Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

  6. Oil and Gas Production (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A State Oil and Gas Council regulates and oversees oil and gas production in Missouri, and conducts a biennial review of relevant rules and regulations. The waste of oil and gas is prohibited. This...

  7. Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas Shales Using Production Data Razi Identification of infill drilling locations has been challenging with mixed results in gas shales. Natural fractures are the main source of permeability in gas shales. Natural fracture patterns in shale has a random

  8. Measurements of Methane Emissions at Natural Gas Production Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightsey, Glenn

    Measurements of Methane Emissions at Natural Gas Production Sites in the United States #12;Why = 21 #12;Need for Study · Estimates of methane emissions from natural gas production , from academic in assumptions in estimating emissions · Measured data for some sources of methane emissions during natural gas

  9. Gas Production Tax (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A tax of 7.5 percent of the market value of natural gas produced in the state of Texas is imposed on every producer of gas.

  10. Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 328 370 396After898 701200973 178

  11. Coalbed Methane Estimated Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 47 62CarbonCubic1,966 1,914 1,886

  12. RADIOLYTIC GAS PRODUCTION RATES OF POLYMERS EXPOSED TO TRITIUM GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from previous reports on studies of polymers exposed to tritium gas is further analyzed to estimate rates of radiolytic gas production. Also, graphs of gas release during tritium exposure from ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, a trade name is Teflon®), and Vespel® polyimide are re-plotted as moles of gas as a function of time, which is consistent with a later study of tritium effects on various formulations of the elastomer ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM). These gas production rate estimates may be useful while considering using these polymers in tritium processing systems. These rates are valid at least for the longest exposure times for each material, two years for UHMW-PE, PTFE, and Vespel®, and fourteen months for filled and unfilled EPDM. Note that the production “rate” for Vespel® is a quantity of H{sub 2} produced during a single exposure to tritium, independent of length of time. The larger production rate per unit mass for unfilled EPDM results from the lack of filler- the carbon black in filled EPDM does not produce H{sub 2} or HT. This is one aspect of how inert fillers reduce the effects of ionizing radiation on polymers.

  13. Shale Natural Gas Estimated Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) YearPriceThousandThousand

  14. Natural Gas Liquids Estimated Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb Marthrough Monthly Download Series History802 827

  15. Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report Independent...

  16. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review This independent review is...

  17. Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential

  18. Autothermal production of synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, J.L.

    1987-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An autothermal reactor is described for the production of a synthesis gas in which both primary reforming and secondary reforming are achieved at a high level of efficiency. The method comprises a heat exchange chamber having a first portion and a second portion, a first inlet connected to the heat exchange chamber for the introduction of steam and feed gas to the heat exchange chamber, reaction tubes mounted within the first portion of the heat exchanger chamber at a location spaced longitudinally from the first inlet in communication with the first inlet and in non-concentric relationship therewith so as to provide a flow path for the steam and feed gas from the first inlet through the plurality of reaction tubes.

  19. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory% postconsumer waste #12;i Independent Review Panel Summary Report September 28, 2011 From: Independent Review Panel, Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification To: Mr. Mark Ruth, NREL, DOE

  20. Application of the Continuous EUR Method to Estimate Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Currie, Stephanie M.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Reservoirs 19. Cheng et al. (2007) Decline Curve Analysis for Multilayered Tight Gas Reservoirs 20. Blasingame and Rushing Method for Gas-in-Place and Reserves Estimation (2005) 21. Clarkson et al. (2007) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane... Wells 22. Clarkson et al. (2008) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane Wells 23. Rushing et al. (2008) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane Wells 24. Lewis and Hughes (2008) Production Data Analysis for Shale Gas Wells 25. Mattar et al...

  1. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Gas Price ($/Mscf) for Offshore Gas Hydrate StudyEvaluation of deepwater gas-hydrate systems. The Leadingfor Gas Production from Gas Hydrates Reservoirs. J. Canadian

  2. Some methods of oil and gas reserve estimation in Azerbaijan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abasov, M.T.; Buryakovsky, L.A.; Kondrushkin, Y.M.; Dzhevanshir, R.D.; Bagarov, T.Y. [Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Chilingar, G.V. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article deals with the scientific and practical problems related to estimating oil and gas reserves in terrigenous reservoirs of the Productive Series of middle Pliocene and in Upper Cretaceous volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The deposits in question are spread over onshore Azerbaijan and adjacent offshore areas in the Caspian Sea and are approximately 6.5 km deep. This article presents lithologic, stratigraphic, and petrophysical criteria used for selecting prospects for reserve estimation. Also presented are information on structure of rocks and estimation of their lithologic and physical properties. New methods for the interpretation and application of petrophysical and logging data, as well as statistical estimation of reserves, in complex volcaniclastic reservoir rocks, are also discussed.

  3. GASCAP: Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model documentation, June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model (GASCAP) has been developed by EIA to provide a historical analysis of the monthly productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead and a projection of monthly capacity for 2 years into the future. The impact of drilling, oil and gas price assumptions, and demand on gas productive capacity are examined. Both gas-well gas and oil-well gas are included. Oil-well gas productive capacity is estimated separately and then combined with the gas-well gas productive capacity. This documentation report provides a general overview of the GASCAP Model, describes the underlying data base, provides technical descriptions of the component models, diagrams the system and subsystem flow, describes the equations, and provides definitions and sources of all variables used in the system. This documentation report is provided to enable users of EIA projections generated by GASCAP to understand the underlying procedures used and to replicate the models and solutions. This report should be of particular interest to those in the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas.

  4. Estimating Externalities of Natural Gas Fuel Cycles, Report 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes methods for estimating the external costs (and possibly benefits) to human health and the environment that result from natural gas fuel cycles. Although the concept of externalities is far from simple or precise, it generally refers to effects on individuals' well being, that result from a production or market activity in which the individuals do not participate, or are not fully compensated. In the past two years, the methodological approach that this report describes has quickly become a worldwide standard for estimating externalities of fuel cycles. The approach is generally applicable to any fuel cycle in which a resource, such as coal, hydro, or biomass, is used to generate electric power. This particular report focuses on the production activities, pollution, and impacts when natural gas is used to generate electric power. In the 1990s, natural gas technologies have become, in many countries, the least expensive to build and operate. The scope of this report is on how to estimate the value of externalities--where value is defined as individuals' willingness to pay for beneficial effects, or to avoid undesirable ones. This report is about the methodologies to estimate these externalities, not about how to internalize them through regulations or other public policies. Notwithstanding this limit in scope, consideration of externalities can not be done without considering regulatory, insurance, and other considerations because these institutional factors affect whether costs (and benefits) are in fact external, or whether they are already somehow internalized within the electric power market. Although this report considers such factors to some extent, much analysis yet remains to assess the extent to which estimated costs are indeed external. This report is one of a series of reports on estimating the externalities of fuel cycles. The other reports are on the coal, oil, biomass, hydro, and nuclear fuel cycles, and on general methodology.

  5. Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Waqar A.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important...

  6. Natural gas hydrates - issues for gas production and geomechanical stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Tarun

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    occurring at the field. Further, the controlling parameters for hydrate dissociation in porous media are quantified and a sensitivity study is presented. Chapter VI presents the results of a simulation experiment done to evaluate the performance of a..., the location iv of perforations and the gas hydrate saturation to be important parameters for gas production at the Messoyakha. Second, I simulated the gas production using a hydraulic fracture in hydrate bearing sediments. The simulation results showed...

  7. Statistical estimation of multiple faults in aircraft gas turbine engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    415 Statistical estimation of multiple faults in aircraft gas turbine engines S Sarkar, C Rao of multiple faults in aircraft gas-turbine engines, based on a statistical pattern recognition tool called commercial aircraft engine. Keywords: aircraft propulsion, gas turbine engines, multiple fault estimation

  8. Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel...

  9. ,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release...

  10. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release...

  11. ,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release...

  12. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release...

  13. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release...

  14. ,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release...

  15. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release...

  16. ,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","112014","1151991" ,"Release...

  17. Pressure Transient Analysis and Production Analysis for New Albany Shale Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Bo

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and approaches special for estimating rate decline and recovery of shale gas wells were developed. As the strategy of the horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures (MTFHW) was discovered and its significance to economic shale gas production...

  18. Stretched Exponential Decline Model as a Probabilistic and Deterministic Tool for Production Forecasting and Reserve Estimation in Oil and Gas Shales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbarnejad Nesheli, Babak

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , this work suggests a physics-based regularization approach, based on critical velocity concept. Applied to selected Barnett Shale gas wells, the suggested method leads to reliable and consistent EURs. To further understand the interaction of the different...

  19. Gas plants, new fields spark production rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenzini, D.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas plant construction is welcomed by operators in the Williston Basin, North Dakota. Petroleum and gas production has increased. The Montana portion of the Williston Basin shows new discoveries. Some secondary recovery efforts are in operation. Industrial officials share the same enthusiasm and optimism for rising production as they do for exploration potential in the basin. 5 tables.

  20. Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methane hydrate-bearing sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated theof gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs. Fieldpermeability function in gas hydrate-bearing sediments is

  1. Scientific Visualization Applications in Oil & Gas Exploration and Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewiner, Thomas (Thomas Lewiner)

    Scientific Visualization Applications in Oil & Gas Exploration and Production SIBGRAPI 2009 #12 Property cross plots #12;Oil and gas production analysis and optimization SIBGRAPI 2009 Structural maps with property distributions Well schematics Production network Gas injection optimization Reservoir slices #12

  2. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoderbek, David; Farrell, Helen; Howard, James; Raterman, Kevin; Silpngarmlert, Suntichai; Martin, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Klein, Perry

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  3. Estimation of original gas in place from short-term shut-in pressure data for commingled tight gas reservoirs with no crossflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khuong, Chan Hung

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    gas production (GP) under these circumstances. This research studies different empirical methods to estimate the original gas in place (OGIP) for one-layer or commingled two-layer tight gas reservoirs without crossflow, from short-term (72-hour) shut...

  4. Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids: Prototype Development and Full-Scale Testing, April 2013 Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas...

  5. Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel...

  6. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including residential gas furnaces, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  7. Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column heights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column that the CO2 is in a dense phase (either liquid or supercritical). Accurate assessment of the storage capacity also requires an estimation of the amount of CO2 that can be safely stored beneath the reservoir seal

  8. Adjusted Estimates of Texas Natural Gas Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:short version)ecTotalnerrSpring 2008 Meeting1

  9. Optimized replica gas estimation of absolute integrals and partition functions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minh, D. (Biosciences Division)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast with most Monte Carlo integration algorithms, which are used to estimate ratios, the replica gas identities recently introduced by Adib enable the estimation of absolute integrals and partition functions using multiple copies of a system and normalized transition functions. Here, an optimized form is presented. After generalizing a replica gas identity with an arbitrary weighting function, we obtain a functional form that has the minimal asymptotic variance for samples from two replicas and is provably good for a larger number. This equation is demonstrated to improve the convergence of partition function estimates in a two-dimensional Ising model.

  10. Method for the production of synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escher, G.; Harjung, J.; Wenning, H.P.

    1981-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is claimed for the continuous production of synthesis gas comprising of carbon monoxide and hydrogen through the autothermal gasification of solid combustibles in a pressure reactor. The method involves the following: introducing into a screw machine containing two parallely ordered shafts, a finely divided solid combustible; moistening and intimately mixing the solid combustible with 2 to 30% by weight of water, degasing and compressing the moist solid combustible to a pressure higher than that of the reactor; adding the gas-tight compressed and moist solid combustible to a reaction chamber-through a burner where the combustible is brought into contact with the gasification medium; evaporating the water in the compressed and moist solid combustible and producing a comminuted dispersion of the solid combustible in the mixture of the gasification medium and water vapor; reacting the combustible dispersion to give a raw synthesis gas; and removing the raw synthesis gas from the reactor.

  11. Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial gas water heaters, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  12. Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition...

  13. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for gas storage...

  14. Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 states 1984 through 1996, February 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth wellhead productive capacity report. The three previous ones were published in 1991, 1993, and 1994. This report should be of particular interest to those in Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas. The EIA Dallas Field Office has prepared five earlier reports regarding natural gas productive capacity. These reports, Gas Deliverability and Flow Capacity of Surveillance Fields, reported deliverability and capacity data for selected gas fields in major gas producing areas. The data in the reports were based on gas-well back-pressure tests and estimates of gas-in-place for each field or reservoir. These reports use proven well testing theory, most of which has been employed by industry since 1936 when the Bureau of Mines first published Monograph 7. Demand for natural gas in the United States is met by a combination of natural gas production, underground gas storage, imported gas, and supplemental gaseous fuels. Natural gas production requirements in the lower 48 States have been increasing during the last few years while drilling has remained at low levels. This has raised some concern about the adequacy of future gas supplies, especially in periods of peak heating or cooling demand. The purpose of this report is to address these concerns by presenting a 3-year projection of the total productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead for the lower 48 States. Alaska is excluded because Alaskan gas does not enter the lower-48 States pipeline system. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) generates this 3-year projection based on historical gas-well drilling and production data from State, Federal, and private sources. In addition to conventional gas-well gas, coalbed gas and oil-well gas are also included.

  15. Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gross production tax applies to most gas produced in North Dakota. Gas burned at the well site to power an electrical generator that consumes at least 75 percent of the gas is exempt from...

  16. The U.S. Natural Gas and Shale Production Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas and Shale Production Outlook for North American Gas Forum September 29, 2014 by Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas...

  17. Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav.ntnu.no) Abstract: The information content in measurements of offshore oil and gas production is often low, and when in the context of offshore oil and gas fields, can be considered the total output of production wells, a mass

  18. Synthesis Gas Production from Partial Oxidation of Methane with Air in AC Electric Gas Discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallinson, Richard

    Synthesis Gas Production from Partial Oxidation of Methane with Air in AC Electric Gas Discharge K 73019 Received October 11, 2002 In this study, synthesis gas production in an AC electric gas discharge of methane and air mixtures at room temperature and ambient pressure was investigated. The objective

  19. STEO September 2012 - natural gas production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORTSORNRecoverynatural gas production at

  20. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas,095,3628,527 9,029 8,794CubicExportsProductionCubicAlaska

  1. Estimation of initial reservoir pressure in tight gas sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leach, Susan Ann

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ESTIMATION OF INITIAL RESERVOIR PRESSURE IN TIGHT GAS SANDS A Thesis by SUSAN ANN LEACH Approved as to style and content by: R. A. Norse (Chairman of Comaittee) A. Wattenbarger (Nember) R. R. Berg (Membe... of the Department of Petroleum Engineering, for his interest and faith during the author's graduate studies. Dr. R. A. Wattenbarger and Dr. R. R. Berg for serving as members of the author's Advisory Committee. TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS...

  2. Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev, and environmental effects. In turn, the greenhouse gas and atmospheric aerosol assumptions underlying climate://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O

  3. 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    reduce the environmental impact and improve the safety of shale gas production. Natural gas is a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, providing a quarter of the country's total...

  4. Weigel, Southworth, and Meyer 1 Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weigel, Southworth, and Meyer 1 Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Transit Agency Vehicle Fleet Operations ABSTRACT This paper reviews calculation tools available for quantifying the greenhouse gas emissions associated with different types

  5. Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Augustin J et al. Automated gas chromatographic system forof the atmospheric trace gases methane, carbon dioxide, andfuel consumption and of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

  6. Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update October 18, 2012 Prepared By: Brian D. James Andrew B. Spisak...

  7. Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to economically Page viable gas production. The overallare not promising targets for gas production. AcknowledgmentEnergy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology,

  8. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","12015","1151989"...

  9. Development of gas production type curves for coalbed methane reservoirs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Arenas, Anangela.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists on methane production from the coal seams. The unique coal characteristic results in a dual-porosity system.… (more)

  10. Annual report of the origin of natural gas liquids production form EIA-64A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The collection of basic, verifiable information on the Nation`s reserves and production of natural gas liquids (NGL) is mandated by the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (FEAA) (Public Law 93-275) and the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91). Gas shrinkage volumes reported on Form EIA-64A by natural gas processing plant operators are used with natural gas data collected on a {open_quotes}wet after lease separation{close_quotes} basis on Form EIA-23, Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves, to estimate {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} natural gas reserves and production volumes regionally and nationally. The shrinkage data are also used, along with the plant liquids production data reported on Form EIA-64A, and lease condensate data reported on Form EIA-23, to estimate regional and national gas liquids reserves and production volumes. This information is the only comprehensive source of credible natural gas liquids data, and is required by DOE to assist in the formulation of national energy policies.

  11. Estimation of Gas Leak Rates Through Very Small Orifices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100 ton StanatAccepted forEstimation of Gas Leak

  12. Reconsidering diversityproductivity relationships: directness of productivity estimates matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novoplansky, Ariel

    LETTER Reconsidering diversity­productivity relationships: directness of productivity estimates diversity­productivity (D­P) patterns in natural communities still looms large. Recent meta-analyses suggest are more common in animal studies. These patterns, however, are based on studies in which productivity

  13. Estimating the potential of greenhouse gas mitigation in Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monacrovich, E.; Pilifosova, O.; Danchuck, D. [Kazakh Scientific-Research Hydrometeorlogical Institute, Almaty (Kazakhstan)] [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the studies related to the obligations of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Republic of Kazakhstan started activities to inventory greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and assess of GHG mitigation options, The objective of this paper is to present an estimate of the possibility of mitigating GHG emissions and determine the mitigation priorities. It presents a compilation of the possible options and their assessment in terms of major criteria and implementation feasibility. Taking into account the structure of GHG emissions in Kazakhstan in 1990, preliminary estimates of the potential for mitigation are presented for eight options for the energy sector and agriculture and forestry sector. The reference scenario prepared by expert assessments assumes a reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in 1996-1998 by about 26% from the 1990 level due to general economic decline, but then emissions increase. It is estimated that the total potential for the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions for the year 2000 is 3% of the CO{sub 2} emissions in the reference scenario. The annual reduction in methane emissions due to the estimated options can amount to 5%-6% of the 1990 level. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    price for a condensing commercial water heater is $1,579.For condensing commercial water heaters with a thermalFound products for water heater in any product field and gas

  15. DPA and Gas Production from Protons on W and Be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Production in Tungsten · Ran the Mu2e target in MARS15 using the following parameters: ­ 8 GeV protonsDPA and Gas Production from Protons on W and Be Brian Hartsell FNAL March 20, 2013 #12;DPA and Gas on Tungsten target ­ Gaussian distribution with 1mm X and Y sigma ­ 6mm diameter, 160mm length target ­ 3 bins

  16. Intraruminal infusion technique for the estimation of ruminal VFA production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Intraruminal infusion technique for the estimation of ruminal VFA production P Huhtanen, S Jaakkola, in which x is the amount of Bu (or Pr) infused (g/d). Production of Ac (or other VFA) was calculated as [((mmol/mol Ac) / (mmol/mol Bu)) x Bu production (mmol/d)] - amount of Ac infused (mmol

  17. Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert B. (Allentown, PA); Hegarty, William P. (State College, PA); Studer, David W. (Wescosville, PA); Tirados, Edward J. (Easton, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

  18. The Use of Horizontal Wells in Gas Production from Hydrate Accumulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E.D. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status,International Conference on Gas Hydrates, Trondheim, Norway,for Gas Production from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs, J. Can. Pet.

  19. Coupled multiphase fluid flow and wellbore stability analysis associated with gas production from oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toward Production from Gas Hydrates: Current Status,Facing Gas Production From Gas-Hydrate Deposits. Society ofConference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2011), Edinburgh, Scotland,

  20. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Black Liquor Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for removal of acid gases from black liquor-derived syngas for use in both power and liquid fuels synthesis. Two 3,200 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, both low-temperature/low-pressure (1100 deg F, 40 psi) and high-temperature/high-pressure (1800 deg F, 500 psi) were used for syngas production. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Princeton University. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  1. Gas well operation with liquid production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lea, J.F.; Tighe, R.E.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of liquid loading in gas wells is discussed in terms of intersecting tubing or system performance curves with IPR curves and by using a more simplified critical velocity relationship. Different methods of liquid removal are discussed including such methods as intermittent lift, plunger lift, use of foam, gas lift, and rod, jet, and electric submersible pumps. Advantages, disadvantages, and techniques for design and application of the methods of liquid removal are discussed.

  2. ESP/rotary gas separator duo found to optimize production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, G.H.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field test conducted on a low-volume waterflood well in West Texas equipped with an electric submersible pump (ESP) proved to rotary gas separator (RGS) to be more efficient than conventional reverse flow gas separators, achieving gas separation efficiencies close to 90%. Further, the RGS increased the run time of the ESP, thus lowering the wellbore fluid level and increasing oil production. The one drawback found is that RGSs can be susceptible to fluid erosion.

  3. that precise estimation of production can be done within 30 d by sampling for eggs; this goal seems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motivating factors for conducting this research. Production and transport of crude oil appeared to havethat precise estimation of production can be done within 30 d by sampling for eggs; this goal seems- Alaskan oil pipeline and planned outer conti- nental shelf oil and gas lease sales were the principal

  4. The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on gas production from hydrate accumulations in the permafrost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reagan, M. T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial distributions of gas and hydrate phase saturations (from the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Wellsimulating the behavior of gas hydrates, Energy Conversion

  5. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:22:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NA1160SNY2"...

  6. Montana Oil and Natural Gas Production Tax Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State of Montana imposes a quarterly tax on the gross taxable value of oil and natural gas production. This tax replaces several previous taxes, simplifying fees and rates as well as compliance...

  7. The U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Production Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oil and Natural Gas Production Outlook for PRG Energy Outlook Conference September 22, 2014 by Adam Sieminski, Administrator 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005...

  8. Process for production desulfurized of synthesis gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Najjar, Mitri S. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1900.degree.-2600.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises a calcium-containing compound portion, a sodium-containing compound portion, and a fluoride-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (1) a sulfur-containing sodium-calcium-fluoride silicate phase; and (2) a sodium-calcium sulfide phase.

  9. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Hancock, S.; Santamarina, C.; Boswell, R.; Kneafsey, T.; Rutqvist, J.; Kowalsky, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Sloan, E.D.; Sum, A.K.; Koh, C.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current paper complements the Moridis et al. (2009) review of the status of the effort toward commercial gas production from hydrates. We aim to describe the concept of the gas hydrate petroleum system, to discuss advances, requirement and suggested practices in gas hydrate (GH) prospecting and GH deposit characterization, and to review the associated technical, economic and environmental challenges and uncertainties, including: the accurate assessment of producible fractions of the GH resource, the development of methodologies for identifying suitable production targets, the sampling of hydrate-bearing sediments and sample analysis, the analysis and interpretation of geophysical surveys of GH reservoirs, well testing methods and interpretation of the results, geomechanical and reservoir/well stability concerns, well design, operation and installation, field operations and extending production beyond sand-dominated GH reservoirs, monitoring production and geomechanical stability, laboratory investigations, fundamental knowledge of hydrate behavior, the economics of commercial gas production from hydrates, and the associated environmental concerns.

  10. Estimating production functions with damage control inputs: an application to Korean vegetable production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Pil Ja

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the use of chemicals for pest control in Korean cucumber production. The empirical issue addressed is whether estimating crop production functions consistent with the economic theory of damage control inputs makes significant...

  11. Table 17. Estimated natural gas plant liquids and dry natural gas content of total wet natural gas proved reserves, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the1,033Estimated natural gas

  12. 90-day Second Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    90-day Second Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 90-day Second Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Novemeber 18,...

  13. Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from soils amended with biogas waste compared to otherCrutzen et al. 2008). Biogas production from organicamounts of fermentation effluent (biogas waste) remain after

  14. NOVEL REACTOR FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilis Papavassiliou; Leo Bonnell; Dion Vlachos

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Praxair investigated an advanced technology for producing synthesis gas from natural gas and oxygen This production process combined the use of a short-reaction time catalyst with Praxair's gas mixing technology to provide a novel reactor system. The program achieved all of the milestones contained in the development plan for Phase I. We were able to develop a reactor configuration that was able to operate at high pressures (up to 19atm). This new reactor technology was used as the basis for a new process for the conversion of natural gas to liquid products (Gas to Liquids or GTL). Economic analysis indicated that the new process could provide a 8-10% cost advantage over conventional technology. The economic prediction although favorable was not encouraging enough for a high risk program like this. Praxair decided to terminate development.

  15. Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 WeekMarketProduct:

  16. Estimation of Air-Sea Gas Transfer Using Conically Scanning SeaWinds Scatterometer Normalized Backscatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, David M.

    Backscatter David M. Glover Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry Woods Hole Oceanographic 2001 -- 31 March 2005 FINAL REPORT #12;Estimation of Air-Sea Gas Transfer from Scatterometry; Glover et . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-23 #12;Estimation of Air-Sea Gas Transfer from Scatterometry; Glover et al. ii B Daily Non

  17. Adaptive Air Charge Estimation for Turbocharged Diesel Engines without Exhaust Gas Recirculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Adaptive Air Charge Estimation for Turbocharged Diesel Engines without Exhaust Gas Recirculation an adaptive observer for in-cylinder air charge estimation for turbocharged diesel engines without exhaust gas (734) 764-4256 1 #12;Storset et al.- Adaptive Air Charge Est. for TC Diesel Engines 2 1 Introduction

  18. Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

  19. Local Frequency Based Estimators for Anomaly Detection in Oil and Gas Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Local Frequency Based Estimators for Anomaly Detection in Oil and Gas Applications Alexander Singh industrial applications such as the smart grid and oil and gas are continuously monitored. The massive to positively impact the bottom line. In the oil and gas industry, modern oil rigs are outfitted with thousands

  20. US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

  1. The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

  2. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  3. Canadian offshore oil production solution gas utilization alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.V.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil and gas development in the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador is in its early stage and the offshore industry emphasis is almost exclusively on oil production. At the Hibernia field, the Gravity Base Structure (GBS) is installed and the first wells are in production. The Terra Nova project, based on a Floating Production Storage Offloading (FPSO) ship shaped concept, is in its engineering and construction stage and first oil is expected by late 2000. Several other projects, such as Husky's White Rose and Chevron's Hebron, have significant potential for future development in the same area. It is highly probably that these projects will employ the FPSO concept. It is also expected that the solution gas disposal issues of such second generation projects will be of more significance in their regulatory approval process and of such second generation projects will be of more significance in their regulatory approval process and the operators may be forced to look for alternatives to gas reinjection. Three gas utilization alternatives for a FPSO concept based project have been considered and evaluated in this paper: liquefied natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG), and gas-to-liquids conversion (GTL). The evaluation and the relative ranking of these alternatives is based on a first pass screening type of study which considers the technical and economical merits of each alternative. Publicly available information and in-house data, compiled within Fluor Daniel's various offices, was used to establish the basic parameters.

  4. Gas Production from Hydrate-Bearing Sediments - Emergent Phenomena -

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jang, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Santamarina, Carlos [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even a small fraction of fine particles can have a significant effect on gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments and sediment stability. Experiments were conducted to investigate the role of fine particles on gas production using a soil chamber that allows for the application of an effective stress to the sediment. This chamber was instrumented to monitor shear-wave velocity, temperature, pressure, and volume change during CO{sub 2} hydrate formation and gas production. The instrumented chamber was placed inside the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS), which was used to control the fluid pressure and temperature. Experiments were conducted with different sediment types and pressure-temperature histories. Fines migrated within the sediment in the direction of fluid flow. A vuggy structure formed in the sand; these small cavities or vuggs were precursors to the development of gas-driven fractures during depressurization under a constant effective stress boundary condition. We define the critical fines fraction as the clay-to-sand mass ratio when clays fill the pore space in the sand. Fines migration, clogging, vugs, and gas-driven fracture formation developed even when the fines content was significantly lower than the critical fines fraction. These results show the importance of fines in gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments, even when the fines content is relatively low.

  5. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johansson, Lennart N. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

  6. Forecasting Gas Production in Organic Shale with the Combined Numerical Simulation of Gas Diffusion in Kerogen, Langmuir Desorption from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    SPE 159250 Forecasting Gas Production in Organic Shale with the Combined Numerical Simulation algorithm to forecast gas production in organic shale that simultaneously takes into account gas diffusion-than-expected permeability in shale-gas formations, while Langmuir desorption maintains pore pressure. Simulations confirm

  7. Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Zigang

    Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis (Siemens) We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas recovery and compare the difference between conventional and unconventional gas reservoir and recovery technologies. Then we did theoretical analysis on the shale gas production. According

  8. Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0Extensions (Billion2009 20106 50

  9. Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0Extensions (Billion2009 20106

  10. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0MonthIncreases (BillionFeet)

  11. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0MonthIncreases (BillionFeet)Alaska

  12. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0 0 0 0Feet)2009Year0

  13. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0 0 0 0Feet)2009Year0Alaska

  14. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342CubicSep-140.0 0.0Sep-14YearU.S.

  15. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342CubicSep-140.0

  16. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3 1979-2013

  17. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3 1979-2013Alaska Federal

  18. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun JulU.S.

  19. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

  20. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year JanThousand Cubic0 0U.S. Offshore

  1. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year JanThousand Cubic0 0U.S.

  2. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384 388 413NewSep-14Exports (NoU.S.

  3. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384 388 413NewSep-14Exports

  4. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 47ExtensionsYear Jan Feb Mar

  5. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 47ExtensionsYear Jan Feb MarAlaska

  6. EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623Primary Metals (33)923Prices 2010

  7. EIA - Natural Gas Production Data & Analysis

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623Primary MetalsOriginCapacity

  8. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 0 0 1979-2013 Adjustments 0 1

  9. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 0 0 1979-2013 Adjustments 0 1Alaska

  10. Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0Decade (MillionSep-14

  11. Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0Decade (MillionSep-14Alaska Federal

  12. Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0 0 1996-2005. 61,707YearU.S.

  13. Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0 0 1996-2005. 61,707YearU.S.Alaska

  14. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This independent review is the conclusion arrived at from data collection, document reviews, interviews and deliberation from December 2010 through April 2011 and the technical potential of Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification. The Panel reviewed the current H2A case (Version 2.12, Case 01D) for hydrogen production via biomass gasification and identified four principal components of hydrogen levelized cost: CapEx; feedstock costs; project financing structure; efficiency/hydrogen yield. The panel reexamined the assumptions around these components and arrived at new estimates and approaches that better reflect the current technology and business environments.

  15. Production of Substitute Natural Gas from Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Lucero

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research program was to develop and demonstrate a novel gasification technology to produce substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. The technology relies on a continuous sequential processing method that differs substantially from the historic methanation or hydro-gasification processing technologies. The thermo-chemistry relies on all the same reactions, but the processing sequences are different. The proposed concept is appropriate for western sub-bituminous coals, which tend to be composed of about half fixed carbon and about half volatile matter (dry ash-free basis). In the most general terms the process requires four steps (1) separating the fixed carbon from the volatile matter (pyrolysis); (2) converting the volatile fraction into syngas (reforming); (3) reacting the syngas with heated carbon to make methane-rich fuel gas (methanation and hydro-gasification); and (4) generating process heat by combusting residual char (combustion). A key feature of this technology is that no oxygen plant is needed for char combustion.

  16. Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    management 30 4.5.1 Overview of factors affecting N use efficiency 30 4.5.2 N2 O Mitigation potential case the report and the authors 5 Acknowledgements 5 Symbols, units, acronyms and abbreviations 6 Executive production and distribution 16 2.7.2 Emissions associated with other agrochemicals 17 2.7.3 On-farm energy

  17. Geomechanical response of permafrost-associated hydrate deposits to depressurization-induced gas production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2008), Vancouver, BritishGSC et al. Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate production research wellfrom the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well

  18. Commercial Gas Water Heaters, Purchasing Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance and purchasing specifications for commercial gas water heaters under the FEMP-designated product program.

  19. Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

  20. Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

  1. Engineering analysis of biomass gasifier product gas cleaning technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Moore, R.H.; Mudge, L.K.; Elliott, D.C.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For biomass gasification to make a significant contribution to the energy picture in the next decade, emphasis must be placed on the generation of clean, pollutant-free gas products. This reports attempts to quantify levels of particulated, tars, oils, and various other pollutants generated by biomass gasifiers of all types. End uses for biomass gases and appropriate gas cleaning technologies are examined. Complete systems analysis is used to predit the performance of various gasifier/gas cleanup/end use combinations. Further research needs are identified. 128 refs., 20 figs., 19 tabs.

  2. The production of activated silica with carbon dioxide gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, William Bell

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ional to the per cent of carbon dioxi. de 1n the flue gas for a constant total gas flow rate. REFE REN CES l. Andrews, R. V, , Hanford Works Eocument (1952), 2. Andrews, R. V. & J. A. W. W. A, , ~46 82 (1954). 3. Andrews, R. V, , Personal Communication 4... of the reciuire . ents for the dedree of iliASTER OF SCIENCE Janus', 1956 Major Subject: Chemi. cal Engineering TH PRODUCTION OP ACTIVATED SILICA 7iIITH CARBON DIOXIDE GAS A Thesis William Bell Hayes III Approved as to style and content by: Chairmen...

  3. Production of low BTU gas from biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yung N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. To utilize this untapped resource, several tech- nologies were proposed. Among them were pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. As the study group ' s objective was focused on actual farm usage, pyrolysis This thesis follows the style and format... for combustion is simple relative to the gasification or pyrolysis and construc- tion and operation of the necessary equipment should also be easier. However, the final product of com- bustion, steam energy, cannot be stored for long periods of time...

  4. Synthesis gas production by mixed conducting membranes with integrated conversion into liquid products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Russek, Steven Lee (Allentown, PA); Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas or other methane-containing feed gas is converted to a C.sub.5 -C.sub.19 hydrocarbon liquid in an integrated system comprising an oxygenative synthesis gas generator, a non-oxygenative synthesis gas generator, and a hydrocarbon synthesis process such as the Fischer-Tropsch process. The oxygenative synthesis gas generator is a mixed conducting membrane reactor system and the non-oxygenative synthesis gas generator is preferably a heat exchange reformer wherein heat is provided by hot synthesis gas product from the mixed conducting membrane reactor system. Offgas and water from the Fischer-Tropsch process can be recycled to the synthesis gas generation system individually or in combination.

  5. Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, W.R.; Cassano, A.A.; Dunbobbin, B.R.; Rao, P.; Erickson, D.C.

    1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange. 4 figs.

  6. Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, William R. (Zionsville, PA); Cassano, Anthony A. (Allentown, PA); Dunbobbin, Brian R. (Allentown, PA); Rao, Pradip (Allentown, PA); Erickson, Donald C. (Annapolis, MD)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange.

  7. Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year JanProduction 4 125 2006 2007 2008New2009U.S.

  8. Process and apparatus for ammonia synthesis gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuderer, A.

    1986-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process is described for the production of ammonia synthesis gas which consists of: (a) catalytically reacting a hydrocarbon feed stream with steam in a primary reforming unit to form a primary reformed gas mixture containing hydrogen and carbon monoxide; (b) passing the primary reformed gas mixture to a secondary reforming unit for reaction of unconverted methane present therein with air, the amount of the air introduced to the secondary reforming unit being considerably in excess of that required to furnish the stoichiometric amount of nitrogen required for reaction with hydrogen for the ammonia synthesis; (c) subjecting the secondary reformed gas mixture to water gas shift conversion to convert most of the carbon monoxide present in the reformed gas mixture to hydrogen and carbon dioxide; (d) passing the thus-shifted gas mixture containing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, residual carbon monoxide, methane, argon and the excess nitrogen, without necessary treatment for removal of a major portion of the carbon dioxide content thereof and without methanation to remove carbon oxides to low levels, to a pressure swing adsorption system capable of selectively adsorbing carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane and other impurities from the hydrogen and from a portion of the nitrogen present in the gas passed to the system.

  9. Improving UK greenhouse gas emission estimates using tall tower observations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howie, James Edward

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere play an important role in regulating surface temperatures. The UK is signatory to international agreements that legally commit the UK to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, and ...

  10. Non-uniqueness problem in estimating original gas in place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ahmady, Mohamed Hamed

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and a negligence of the effect of a considerable encroaching aquifer that could be thought not to exist. This study shows several examples for synthetic gas reservoir/aquifer systems that are modeled mathematically, then programmed, to simulate...

  11. Estimation and projection of the demand for refined petroleum products in Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kianian, S.A.; Amin, M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this study is to construct an econometric model for estimation and projection of oil-refined products in Iran based on the situation of the Iranian energy market. Part 1 reviews the existing literature and contains the salient socio-economic futures of OPEC countries in general and of Iran in particular. Explanation of the structure of Iran's domestic energy market (demand, supply, and price) is the main purpose of this part. In Part 2, the demand function for each refined petroleum product is analyzed, formulated, and estimated. The price and income elasticities of the demands for gasoline, kerosene, gas oil and fuel oil are analyzed and compared with those of other countries. In Part 3, after analyzing and estimating the demand functions for total refined products, first, the full model, including all the estimated demand functions is dynamically simulated over the sample periods (1955-1978) in order to evaluate the performance power of the model, then the amount of consumption of each refined product for the next decade (1979-1988), under three scenarios of the rate of growth of real GNP, 9%, 7% and 5% is projected.

  12. Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    focus is on modeling of hydrogen production and distributionto centralized hydrogen production. One key question thatCalifornia, Davis Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam

  13. Estimate Impact of Strategies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To estimate the GHG impact of a business travel reduction program, a Federal agency or program should quantify the number of trips that could be avoided each year. If an agency has a large proportion of international travel, the agency may estimate changes in domestic and international trips separately because the associated savings in miles can be very different.

  14. Application of the Stretched Exponential Production Decline Model to Forecast Production in Shale Gas Reservoirs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statton, James Cody

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Production forecasting in shale (ultra-low permeability) gas reservoirs is of great interest due to the advent of multi-stage fracturing and horizontal drilling. The well renowned… (more)

  15. Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, once a Federal agency identifies the employee commute alternatives and supporting strategies that will most effectively reduce trips to the worksite, costs of encouraging adoption of those methods can be estimated.

  16. Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate simulating reflectors (BSRs) imply the potential existence of gas hydrates offshore southwestern Taiwan that the fluxes are very high in offshore southwestern Taiwan. The depths of the SMI are different at sites GH6

  17. A Bootstrap Approach to Computing Uncertainty in Inferred Oil and Gas Reserve Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attanasi, Emil D. [US Geological Survey MS 956 (United States)], E-mail: attanasi@usgs.gov; Coburn, Timothy C. [Abilene Christian University, Department of Management Science (United States)

    2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops confidence intervals for estimates of inferred oil and gas reserves based on bootstrap procedures. Inferred reserves are expected additions to proved reserves in previously discovered conventional oil and gas fields. Estimates of inferred reserves accounted for 65% of the total oil and 34% of the total gas assessed in the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 National Assessment of oil and gas in US onshore and State offshore areas. When the same computational methods used in the 1995 Assessment are applied to more recent data, the 80-year (from 1997 through 2076) inferred reserve estimates for pre-1997 discoveries located in the lower 48 onshore and state offshore areas amounted to a total of 39.7 billion barrels of oil (BBO) and 293 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of gas. The 90% confidence interval about the oil estimate derived from the bootstrap approach is 22.4 BBO to 69.5 BBO. The comparable 90% confidence interval for the inferred gas reserve estimate is 217 TCF to 413 TCF. The 90% confidence interval describes the uncertainty that should be attached to the estimates. It also provides a basis for developing scenarios to explore the implications for energy policy analysis.

  18. Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is… (more)

  19. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluationof Technology and Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy; Boswell, Ray; Kurihara, M.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Koh, Carolyn; Sloan, E. Dendy

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates are a vast energy resource with global distribution in the permafrost and in the oceans. Even if conservative estimates are considered and only a small fraction is recoverable, the sheer size of the resource is so large that it demands evaluation as a potential energy source. In this review paper, we discuss the distribution of natural gas hydrate accumulations, the status of the primary international R&D programs, and the remaining science and technological challenges facing commercialization of production. After a brief examination of gas hydrate accumulations that are well characterized and appear to be models for future development and gas production, we analyze the role of numerical simulation in the assessment of the hydrate production potential, identify the data needs for reliable predictions, evaluate the status of knowledge with regard to these needs, discuss knowledge gaps and their impact, and reach the conclusion that the numerical simulation capabilities are quite advanced and that the related gaps are either not significant or are being addressed. We review the current body of literature relevant to potential productivity from different types of gas hydrate deposits, and determine that there are consistent indications of a large production potential at high rates over long periods from a wide variety of hydrate deposits. Finally, we identify (a) features, conditions, geology and techniques that are desirable in potential production targets, (b) methods to maximize production, and (c) some of the conditions and characteristics that render certain gas hydrate deposits undesirable for production.

  20. Thermodynamic limits to the quality of UCG product gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creighton, J.

    1982-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work was to find the limits placed on the quality of UCG product gas by the energy and mass balances, including atom balances. If the outlet gas contains no O/sub 2/, there are only two independent variables. If these are chosen to be the mass fractions, X/sub CO/ and X/sub H/sub 2//, both the temperature of the outlet gas and the heat of combustion available by burning it are functions of these two variables only. The lines of constant temperature are parallel to the lines of constant heat of combustion, so it is clear that the available energy is partitioned between the sensible heat and the heat of combustion of the gas. The maximum heat available is set by the amount of oxygen in the inlet mixture; because the outlet temperature must exceed the minimum coal-surface temperature for burning, only heat losses within the system will generally reduce the heat of combustion. The maximum mass fractions of H/sub 2/ and CO in the product gas are limited by the impossibility of negative mass fractions of H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/. Additional limitations are imposed by the assumption of a minimum temperature. One of the two independent variables can be eliminated if the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium is valid. The product composition then lies on a single line in a phase plane of X/sub H/sub 2// vs X/sub CO/, and at a given outlet temperature the composition is fixed. Unfortunately, it appears that experimental values of X/sub H/sub 2// lie well above the equilibrium curve. Experimental data do indicate, however, that the system tends to operate near the minimum temperature to sustain the steam/char reaction on the coal surface, thus maximizing the heat of combustion of the outlet gas.

  1. Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHG- emitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 ?m) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

  2. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1997-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A tremendous amount of wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge (estimated 20 million metric tons per year in the US) is currently being landfilled at a huge cost to utility companies. Scrubber sludge is the solid precipitate produced during desulfurization of flue-gas from burning high sulfur coal. The amount of this sludge is expected to increase in the near future due to ever increasing governmental regulation concerning the amount of sulfur emissions. Scrubber sludge is a fine, grey colored powder that contains calcium sulfite hemihydrate (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}), calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O), limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), silicates, and iron oxides. This material can continue to be landfilled at a steadily increasing cost, or an alternative for utilizing this material can be developed. This study explores the characteristics of a naturally oxidized wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge and uses these characteristics to develop alternatives for recycling this material. In order for scrubber sludge to be used as a feed material for various markets, it was necessary to process it to meet the specifications of these markets. A physical separation process was therefore needed to separate the components of this sludge into useful products at a low cost. There are several physical separation techniques available to separate fine particulates. These techniques can be divided into four major groups: magnetic separation, electrostatic separation, physico-chemical separation, and density-based separation. The properties of this material indicated that two methods of separation were feasible: water-only cycloning (density-based separation), and froth flotation (physico-chemical separation). These processes could be used either separately, or in combination. The goal of this study was to reduce the limestone impurity in this scrubber sludge from 5.6% by weight to below 2.0% by weight. The resulting clean calcium sulfite/sulfate material can be oxidized into a synthetic gypsum that can be used in several markets which include: wallboard manufacturing, plaster, portland cement, and as a soil conditioner. Single stage water-only cycloning removed nearly 50% of the limestone by weight from the scrubber sludge and maintained a weight recovery of 76%. Froth flotation produced a calcium sulfite/sulfate that contained 4.30% limestone by weight with a 71% weight recovery. These methods were successful in removing some of the limestone impurity, but were not able to meet the specifications needed. However, the combination of water-only cycloning and froth flotation provided a clean, useful calcium sulfite/sulfate material with a limestone grade of 1.70% by weight and a total weight recovery of nearly 66%.

  3. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Application Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the...

  4. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    07 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems...

  5. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008 2009230,456

  6. New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYear JanDecade

  7. North Dakota Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecade Year-0 Year-18 2.4156.09,058Feet)

  8. Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1CubicMajorMillion17 34Feet)

  9. Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet) BaseSep-14

  10. Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2per ThousandBarrels)0 0

  11. Direct estimation of gas reserves using production data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buba, Ibrahim Muhammad

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    results (i.e., G) against other analyses (e.g., material balance, simplified decline curves and decline type curves). The viability of our new methodology was assessed and validated using results from numerical simulation ? where the reservoir model... the new methodology was shown to yield results comparable to other methods (i.e., material balance, simplified decline curves and decline type curves) ? and the new approach was also found to be generally more "error tolerant" than the other techniques...

  12. Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198SeparationTotalAcquisitions

  13. West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)perAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Dry Natural

  14. Nonassociated Natural Gas Estimated Production, Wet After Lease Separation

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan FebFeet)SalesYear Jan Feb Mar0Cubic Feet)19,066

  15. Low permeability gas reservoir production using large hydraulic fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holditch, Stephen A

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extending up to three thousand feet from the producing well. Also, a model simulating a nuclear cavity was designed. This model simulated a well containing an eighty foot radius cavity with a fractured zone of one hundred times the reservoir permeability... of each system was prepared. The results of this study showed that all fractures of greater than one thousand foot radius had greater productivity and greater cumu- lative gas produced than did the nuclear cavity. It appears that large hydraulic...

  16. Gas production response to price signals: Implications for electric power generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, M.L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas production response to price signals is outlined. The following topics are discussed: Structural changes in the U.S. gas exploration and production industry, industry outlook, industry response to price signals, and implications for electric power generators.

  17. Cost Estimation and Production Evaluation for Hopper Dredges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollinberger, Thomas E.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    1848g3040g2879g3014 (7) where fg2933 is the Moody friction factor for water flow, g is gravitational acceleration in m/sec2 (ft/sec2), D is the inner diameter of the pipe in meters (ft), Vg2923 is the mean velocity of the mixture (m/s), Sg2929... COST ESTIMATION AND PRODUCTION EVALUATION FOR HOPPER DREDGES A Thesis by THOMAS ELLIOT HOLLINBERGER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  18. Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters, Purchasing Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance and purchasing specifications for whole-home gas water heaters under the FEMP-designated product program.

  19. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application This presentation reports on the status of mass production cost...

  20. An automated system for measuring gas production from forages inoculated with rumen uid and its use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Gareth

    An automated system for measuring gas production from forages inoculated with rumen ¯uid and its the principles of the gas production technique and provide examples of how the automated system has been used of different systems have been used to measure gas production. Menke et al. (1979) described a method in which

  1. Process for the production of fuel gas from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patel, Jitendra G. (Bolingbrook, IL); Sandstrom, William A. (Chicago, IL); Tarman, Paul B. (Elmhurst, IL)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus and process for the conversion of hydrocarbonaceous materials, such as coal, to more valuable gaseous products in a fluidized bed gasification reaction and efficient withdrawal of agglomerated ash from the fluidized bed is disclosed. The improvements are obtained by introducing an oxygen containing gas into the bottom of the fluidized bed through a separate conduit positioned within the center of a nozzle adapted to agglomerate and withdraw the ash from the bottom of the fluidized bed. The conduit extends above the constricted center portion of the nozzle and preferably terminates within and does not extend from the nozzle. In addition to improving ash agglomeration and withdrawal, the present invention prevents sintering and clinkering of the ash in the fluidized bed and permits the efficient recycle of fine material recovered from the product gases by contacting the fines in the fluidized bed with the oxygen as it emanates from the conduit positioned within the withdrawal nozzle. Finally, the present method of oxygen introduction permits the efficient recycle of a portion of the product gases to the reaction zone to increase the reducing properties of the hot product gas.

  2. Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2013 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

  3. Fluid pressure arrival time tomography: Estimation and assessment in the presence of inequality constraints, with an application to a producing gas field at Krechba, Algeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucci, A.; Vasco, D.W.; Novali, F.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deformation in the overburden proves useful in deducing spatial and temporal changes in the volume of a producing reservoir. Based upon these changes we estimate diffusive travel times associated with the transient flow due to production, and then, as the solution of a linear inverse problem, the effective permeability of the reservoir. An advantage an approach based upon travel times, as opposed to one based upon the amplitude of surface deformation, is that it is much less sensitive to the exact geomechanical properties of the reservoir and overburden. Inequalities constrain the inversion, under the assumption that the fluid production only results in pore volume decreases within the reservoir. We apply the formulation to satellite-based estimates of deformation in the material overlying a thin gas production zone at the Krechba field in Algeria. The peak displacement after three years of gas production is approximately 0.5 cm, overlying the eastern margin of the anticlinal structure defining the gas field. Using data from 15 irregularly-spaced images of range change, we calculate the diffusive travel times associated with the startup of a gas production well. The inequality constraints are incorporated into the estimates of model parameter resolution and covariance, improving the resolution by roughly 30 to 40%.

  4. Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coexistence of aqueous, gas and hydrate phases, indicatingIntrinsic Rate of Methane Gas Hydrate Decomposition”, Chem.Makogon, Y.F. , “Gas hydrates: frozen energy,” Recherche

  5. Application of the Stretched Exponential Production Decline Model to Forecast Production in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statton, James Cody

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , is widely used in industry to forecast shale gas wells. Left unconstrained, the model often overestimates reserves by a great deal. A minimum decline rate is imposed to prevent overestimation of reserves but with less than ten years of production history...

  6. Estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects: A Costa Rican Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, Christopher; Sathaye, Jayant; Sanchez Azofeifa, G. Arturo

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If the Clean Development Mechanism proposed under the Kyoto Protocol is to serve as an effective means for combating global climate change, it will depend upon reliable estimates of greenhouse gas benefits. This paper sketches the theoretical basis for estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects and suggests lessons learned based on a case study of Costa Rica's Protected Areas Project, which is a 500,000 hectare effort to reduce deforestation and enhance reforestation. The Protected Areas Project in many senses advances the state of the art for Clean Development Mechanism-type forestry projects, as does the third-party verification work of SGS International Certification Services on the project. Nonetheless, sensitivity analysis shows that carbon benefit estimates for the project vary widely based on the imputed deforestation rate in the baseline scenario, e.g. the deforestation rate expected if the project were not implemented. This, along with a newly available national dataset that confirms other research showing a slower rate of deforestation in Costa Rica, suggests that the use of the 1979--1992 forest cover data originally as the basis for estimating carbon savings should be reconsidered. When the newly available data is substituted, carbon savings amount to 8.9 Mt (million tones) of carbon, down from the original estimate of 15.7 Mt. The primary general conclusion is that project developers should give more attention to the forecasting land use and land cover change scenarios underlying estimates of greenhouse gas benefits.

  7. Nevada Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb MarthroughYear Jan Feb MarDry Natural Gas Production

  8. Production rate of cosmogenic 21 Ne in quartz estimated from 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuster, David L.

    Production rate of cosmogenic 21 Ne in quartz estimated from 10 Be, 26 Al, and 21 Ne concentrations Antarctica production rate calibration We estimated the production rate of 21 Ne in quartz using a set production rate. As the erosion rate can be determined from 10 Be and 26 Al concentrations, this allows

  9. ESTIMATING THE IMPACT OF DEMOGRAPHICS AND AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGIES ON GREENHOUSE GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellinga, Bruce

    McNally, MASc Candidate Bruce Hellinga, PhD, PEng Department of Civil Engineering University of Transportation Engineers to be held May 12-15, 2002 in Ottawa Ontario #12;1 Estimating the Impact of Demographics and Automotive Technologies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ryan McNally, MASc Candidate Bruce Hellinga, PhD, PEng

  10. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  11. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF MULTIPHASE FLOW NETWORKS IN OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    1 GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF MULTIPHASE FLOW NETWORKS IN OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION SYSTEMS MSc. Hans in an oil production system is developed. Each well may be manipulated by injecting lift gas and adjusting in the maximum oil flow rate, water flow rate, liquid flow rate, and gas flow rate. The wells may also

  12. Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.M. Freifeild

    2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter estimates made.

  13. Kalman-filtered compressive sensing for high resolution estimation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions from sparse measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; Michalak, Anna M. [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM; McKenna, Sean Andrew [IBM Research, Mulhuddart, Dublin, Ireland

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. The limited nature of the measured data leads to a severely-underdetermined estimation problem. If the estimation is performed at fine spatial resolutions, it can also be computationally expensive. In order to enable such estimations, advances are needed in the spatial representation of ffCO2 emissions, scalable inversion algorithms and the identification of observables to measure. To that end, we investigate parsimonious spatial parameterizations of ffCO2 emissions which can be used in atmospheric inversions. We devise and test three random field models, based on wavelets, Gaussian kernels and covariance structures derived from easily-observed proxies of human activity. In doing so, we constructed a novel inversion algorithm, based on compressive sensing and sparse reconstruction, to perform the estimation. We also address scalable ensemble Kalman filters as an inversion mechanism and quantify the impact of Gaussian assumptions inherent in them. We find that the assumption does not impact the estimates of mean ffCO2 source strengths appreciably, but a comparison with Markov chain Monte Carlo estimates show significant differences in the variance of the source strengths. Finally, we study if the very different spatial natures of biogenic and ffCO2 emissions can be used to estimate them, in a disaggregated fashion, solely from CO2 concentration measurements, without extra information from products of incomplete combustion e.g., CO. We find that this is possible during the winter months, though the errors can be as large as 50%.

  14. Assessment of microbial processes on gas production at radioactive low-level waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, A.J.; Tate, R.L. III; Colombo, P.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors controlling gaseous emanations from low level radioactive waste disposal sites are assessed. Importance of gaseous fluxes of methane, carbon dioxide, and possible hydrogen from the site, stems from the inclusion of tritium and/or carbon-14 into the elemental composition of these compounds. In that the primary source of these gases is the biodegradation of organic components of the waste material, primary emphasis of the study involved an examination of the biochemical pathways producing methane, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen, and the environmental parameters controlling the activity of the microbial community involved. Initial examination of the data indicates that the ecosystem is anaerobic. As the result of the complexity of the pathway leading to methane production, factors such as substrate availability, which limit the initial reaction in the sequence, greatly affect the overall rate of methane evolution. Biochemical transformations of methane, hydrogen and carbon dioxide as they pass through the soil profile above the trench are discussed. Results of gas studies performed at three commercial low level radioactive waste disposal sites are reviewed. Methods used to obtain trench and soil gas samples are discussed. Estimates of rates of gas production and amounts released into the atmosphere (by the GASFLOW model) are evaluated. Tritium and carbon-14 gaseous compounds have been measured in these studies; tritiated methane is the major radionuclide species in all disposal trenches studied. The concentration of methane in a typical trench increases with the age of the trench, whereas the concentration of carbon dioxide is similar in all trenches.

  15. Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Thoma; John Veil; Fred Limp; Jackson Cothren; Bruce Gorham; Malcolm Williamson; Peter Smith; Bob Sullivan

    2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed during the initial period of the project 'Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems.' The specific region that is within the scope of this study is the Fayetteville Shale Play. This is an unconventional, tight formation, natural gas play that currently has approximately 1.5 million acres under lease, primarily to Southwestern Energy Incorporated and Chesapeake Energy Incorporated. The currently active play encompasses a region from approximately Fort Smith, AR east to Little Rock, AR approximately 50 miles wide (from North to South). The initial estimates for this field put it almost on par with the Barnett Shale play in Texas. It is anticipated that thousands of wells will be drilled during the next several years; this will entail installation of massive support infrastructure of roads and pipelines, as well as drilling fluid disposal pits and infrastructure to handle millions of gallons of fracturing fluids. This project focuses on gas production in Arkansas as the test bed for application of proactive risk management decision support system for natural gas exploration and production. The activities covered in this report include meetings with representative stakeholders, development of initial content and design for an educational web site, and development and preliminary testing of an interactive mapping utility designed to provide users with information that will allow avoidance of sensitive areas during the development of the Fayetteville Shale Play. These tools have been presented to both regulatory and industrial stakeholder groups, and their feedback has been incorporated into the project.

  16. Numerical simulations of depressurization-induced gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs at the Walker Ridge 312 site, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Gaddipati, Manohar; Rose, Kelly; Anderson, Brian J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Gas Hydrates Joint-Industry-Project (JIP) Leg II drilling program confirmed that gas hydrate occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the GOM. A comprehensive logging-while-drilling dataset was collected from seven wells at three sites, including two wells at the Walker Ridge 313 site. By constraining the saturations and thicknesses of hydrate-bearing sands using logging-while-drilling data, two-dimensional (2D), cylindrical, r-z and three-dimensional (3D) reservoir models were simulated. The gas hydrate occurrences inferred from seismic analysis are used to delineate the areal extent of the 3D reservoir models. Numerical simulations of gas production from the Walker Ridge reservoirs were conducted using the depressurization method at a constant bottomhole pressure. Results of these simulations indicate that these hydrate deposits are readily produced, owing to high intrinsic reservoir-quality and their proximity to the base of hydrate stability. The elevated in situ reservoir temperatures contribute to high (5–40 MMscf/day) predicted production rates. The production rates obtained from the 2D and 3D models are in close agreement. To evaluate the effect of spatial dimensions, the 2D reservoir domains were simulated at two outer radii. The results showed increased potential for formation of secondary hydrate and appearance of lag time for production rates as reservoir size increases. Similar phenomena were observed in the 3D reservoir models. The results also suggest that interbedded gas hydrate accumulations might be preferable targets for gas production in comparison with massive deposits. Hydrate in such accumulations can be readily dissociated due to heat supply from surrounding hydrate-free zones. Special cases were considered to evaluate the effect of overburden and underburden permeability on production. The obtained data show that production can be significantly degraded in comparison with a case using impermeable boundaries. The main reason for the reduced productivity is water influx from the surrounding strata; a secondary cause is gas escape into the overburden. The results dictate that in order to reliably estimate production potential, permeability of the surroundings has to be included in a model.

  17. An activity-based-parametric hybrid cost model to estimate the unit cost of a novel gas turbine component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    An activity-based-parametric hybrid cost model to estimate the unit cost of a novel gas turbine in gas turbine compressors. However, the model disc (blisk) designs which are used by the aerospace industry in gas turbine compressors. The tool

  18. Exploring the Optimum Role of Natural Gas in Biofuels Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-D: Natural Gas & Biomass to Liquids Vann Bush, Managing Director, Energy Conversion, Gas Technology Institute

  19. Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    . SPE SPE 23442 Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer, Richardson, TX 7S0834S36 U.5A. Telex, 730989 SPEDAL. ABSTRACT A family of pressure and production decline as gas reservoirs which produce substan- tial amounts of water together with ~as. Production of water

  20. USING FIRM OPTIMIZATION TO EVALUATE AND ESTIMATE PRODUCTIVITY AND RETURNS TO SCALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    USING FIRM OPTIMIZATION TO EVALUATE AND ESTIMATE PRODUCTIVITY AND RETURNS TO SCALE Yuriy, not production function. Given this observation, the paper argues that, under weak assumptions, micro profits. The puzzle arises because popular estimators ignore heterogeneity and endogeneity in factor/product

  1. A Taxonomically Based Ordinal Estimate of Soil Productivity for Landscape-Scale Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    A Taxonomically Based Ordinal Estimate of Soil Productivity for Landscape-Scale Analyses Randall J, and apply a new ordinally based soil Productivity Index (PI). The PI uses family-level Soil Taxonomy to be associated with low or high soil productivity, to rank soils from 0 (least productive) to 19 (most productive

  2. Cost and production estimation for a cutter suction dredge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miertschin, Michael Wayne

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for accurate cost estimates is well recognized in the dredging industry. In order for a dredging contractor to efficiently execute a project from its conception to its completion, an accurate estimate of the final cost is imperative...

  3. Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model. [Cyclic thermal injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

  4. Coupled flow and geomechanical analysis for gas production in the Prudhoe Bay Unit L-106 well Unit C gas hydrate deposit in Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status,Geologic Controls on Gas Hydrate Occurrence in the MountCollett T.S. 1993. Natural Gas Hydrates of the Prudhoe Bay

  5. Economic viability of shale gas production in the Marcellus Shale; indicated by production rates, costs and current natural gas prices.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duman, Ryan J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? The U.S. natural gas industry has changed because of the recent ability to produce natural gas from unconventional shale deposits. One of the largest… (more)

  6. Development of a high-throughput fermentation assay using colorimetric measurement of gas production.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bly, Steven

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Typical methods for determining ethanol production from biomass feedstocks involve the use of High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) or Gas Chromatography (GC). Such methods require… (more)

  7. A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING GAS PRESSURE IN 3013 CONTAINERS USING AN ISP DATABASE QUERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friday, G; L. G. Peppers, L; D. K. Veirs, D

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) is responsible for the storage and surveillance of plutonium-bearing material. During storage, plutonium-bearing material has the potential to generate hydrogen gas from the radiolysis of adsorbed water. The generation of hydrogen gas is a safety concern, especially when a container is breached within a glove box during destructive evaluation. To address this issue, the DOE established a standard (DOE, 2004) that sets the criteria for the stabilization and packaging of material for up to 50 years. The DOE has now packaged most of its excess plutonium for long-term storage in compliance with this standard. As part of this process, it is desirable to know within reasonable certainty the total maximum pressure of hydrogen and other gases within the 3013 container if safety issues and compliance with the DOE standards are to be attained. The principal goal of this investigation is to document the method and query used to estimate total (i.e. hydrogen and other gases) gas pressure within a 3013 container based on the material properties and estimated moisture content contained in the ISP database. Initial attempts to estimate hydrogen gas pressure in 3013 containers was based on G-values (hydrogen gas generation per energy input) derived from small scale samples. These maximum G-values were used to calculate worst case pressures based on container material weight, assay, wattage, moisture content, container age, and container volume. This paper documents a revised hydrogen pressure calculation that incorporates new surveillance results and includes a component for gases other than hydrogen. The calculation is produced by executing a query of the ISP database. An example of manual mathematical computations from the pressure equation is compared and evaluated with results from the query. Based on the destructive evaluation of 17 containers, the estimated mean absolute pressure was significantly higher (P<.01) than the mean GEST pressure. There was no significant difference (P>.10) between the mean pressures from DR and the calculation. The mean predicted absolute pressure was consistently higher than GEST by an average difference of 57 kPa (8 psi). The mean difference between the estimated pressure and digital radiography was 11 kPa (2 psi). Based on the initial results of destructive evaluation, the pressure query was found to provide a reasonably conservative estimate of the total pressure in 3013 containers whose material contained minimal moisture content.

  8. World oil and gas resources-future production realities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masters, C.D.; Root, D.H.; Attanasi, E.D. (U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA (US))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to uncertainty was the phrase Jack Schanz used to introduce both layman and professionals to the maze of petroleum energy data that must be comprehended to achieve understanding of this critical commodity. Schanz was referring to the variables as he and his colleagues with Resources for the Future saw them in those years soon after the energy-awakening oil embargo of 1973. In some respects, the authors have made progress in removing uncertainty from energy data, but in general, we simply must accept that there are many points of view and many ways for the blindman to describe the elephant. There can be definitive listing of all uncertainties, but for this paper the authors try to underscore those traits of petroleum occurrence and supply that the author's believe bear most heavily on the understanding of production and resource availability. Because oil and gas exist in nature under such variable conditions and because the products themselves are variable in their properties, the authors must first recognize classification divisions of the resource substances, so that the reader might always have a clear perception of just what we are talking about and how it relates to other components of the commodity in question.

  9. Table 17. Estimated natural gas plant liquids and dry natural gas content of total wet natural gas proved reserves, 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1. Summary statisticsRecoverableEstimated

  10. Consumer Surplus in the Digital Economy: Estimating the Value of Increased Product Variety at Online Booksellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brynjolfsson, Erik

    2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a framework and empirical estimates that quantify the economic impact of increased product variety made available through electronic markets. While efficiency ...

  11. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Mexico, http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/of Mexico, http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil- gas/

  12. International Lige Colloquium on Ocean Dynamics, GAS TRANSFER AT WATER SURFACES, May 2 -6 2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and surface wave measurements and much higher heat fluxes. In addition, the infrared imagery analysis reveals potentially significant the infrared images. It is also shown that the difference in the surface boundary conditions for heat and gas

  13. A tool to estimate materials and manufacturing energy for a product

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duque Ciceri, Natalia

    This study proposes an easy-to-use methodology to estimate the materials embodied energy and manufacturing energy for a product. The tool requires as input the product's Bill of Materials and the knowledge on how these ...

  14. Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

  15. Environmental benefits of advanced oil and gas exploration and production technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THROUGHOUT THE OIL AND GAS LIFE CYCLE, THE INDUSTRY HAS APPLIED AN ARRAY OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY, PRODUCTIVITY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE. THIS REPORT FOCUSES SPECIFICALLY ON ADVANCES IN EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION (E&P) OPERATIONS.

  16. Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine HydrateDeposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol,Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Although significant hydrate deposits are known to exist in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea, their survey and evaluation as a possible energy resource has not yet been completed. However, it is possible to develop preliminary estimates of their production potential based on the limited data that are currently available. These include the elevation and thickness of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL), the water depth, and the water temperature at the sea floor. Based on this information, we developed estimates of the local geothermal gradient that bracket its true value. Reasonable estimates of the initial pressure distribution in the HBL can be obtained because it follows closely the hydrostatic. Other critical information needs include the hydrate saturation, and the intrinsic permeabilities of the system formations. These are treated as variables, and sensitivity analysis provides an estimate of their effect on production. Based on the geology of similar deposits, it is unlikely that Ulleung Basin accumulations belong to Class 1 (involving a HBL underlain by a mobile gas zone). If Class 4 (disperse, low saturation accumulations) deposits are involved, they are not likely to have production potential. The most likely scenarios include Class 2 (HBL underlain by a zone of mobile water) or Class 3 (involving only an HBL) accumulations. Assuming nearly impermeable confining boundaries, this numerical study indicates that large production rates (several MMSCFD) are attainable from both Class 2 and Class 3 deposits using conventional technology. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the dependence of production on the well design, the production rate, the intrinsic permeability of the HBL, the initial pressure, temperature and hydrate saturation, as well as on the thickness of the water zone (Class 2). The study also demonstrates that the presence of confining boundaries is indispensable for the commercially viable production of gas from these deposits.

  17. Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale CSP systems, this analysis focuses on clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emission estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough technology and 17 for power tower technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published GHG emission estimates was 83 and 20 g CO2eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively, with medians of 26 and 38 g CO2eq/kWh. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. Compared to the published estimates, IQR was reduced by 69% and median increased by 76% for troughs. IQR was reduced by 26% for towers, and median was reduced by 34%. A second level of harmonization was applied to five well-documented trough LC GHG emission estimates, harmonizing to consistent values for GHG emissions embodied in materials and from construction activities. As a result, their median was further reduced by 5%, while the range increased by 6%. In sum, harmonization clarified previous results.

  18. Parameter identification in large-scale models for oil and gas production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    Parameter identification in large-scale models for oil and gas production Jorn F.M. Van Doren: Models used for model-based (long-term) operations as monitoring, control and optimization of oil and gas information to the identification problem. These options are illustrated with examples taken from oil and gas

  19. Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

  20. Forecasting long-term gas production from shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis

    Oil and natural gas from deep shale formations are transforming the United States economy and its energy outlook. Back in 2005, the US Energy Information Administration published projections of United States natural gas ...

  1. Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MW Reciprocating Engine 3 MW Gas Turbine 1 MW ReciprocatingEngine 5 MW Gas Turbine 3MW Gas Turbine 40 MW Gas Turbine 1 MW Reciprocating Engine

  2. Forecasting long-term gas production Luis Cueto-Felguerosoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    by increasing the length of a single well within the gas-bearing shale. Hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking" (9

  3. Model methodology and data description of the Production of Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the methodology and data used in the Production of Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas (PROLOG) model. The model forecasts annual oil and natural gas production on a regional basis. Natural gas is modeled by gas category, generally conforming to categories defined by the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) of 1978, as well as a category representing gas priced by way of a spot market (referred to as ''spot'' gas). A linear program is used to select developmental drilling activities for conventional oil and gas and exploratory drilling activities for deep gas on the basis of their economic merit, subject to constraints on available rotary rigs and constraints based on historical drilling patterns. Using exogenously specified price paths for oil and gas, net present values are computed for fixed amounts of drilling activity for oil and gas development and deep gas exploration in each of six onshore regions. Through maximizing total net present value, the linear program provides forecasts of drilling activities, reserve additions, and production. Oil and shallow gas exploratory drilling activities are forecast on the basis of econometrically derived equations, which are dependent on specified price paths for the two fuels. 10 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During April-September 2002, the JIP concentrated on: Reviewing the tasks and subtasks on the basis of the information generated during the three workshops held in March and May 2002; Writing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and Cost, Time and Resource (CTRs) estimates to accomplish the tasks and subtasks; Reviewing proposals sent in by prospective contractors; Selecting four contractors; Selecting six sites for detailed review; and Talking to drill ship owners and operators about potential work with the JIP.

  5. Production of Oxygen Gas and Liquid Metal by Electrochemical Decomposition of Molten Iron Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    on the moon and on Mars for the generation of oxygen along with the production of structural metalsProduction of Oxygen Gas and Liquid Metal by Electrochemical Decomposition of Molten Iron Oxide) is the electrolytic decomposition of a metal oxide, most preferably into liquid metal and oxygen gas. The successful

  6. The elimination of liquid loading problems in low productivity gas wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neves, Toby Roy

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    investigated. The Beggs and Brill multiphase pressure drop correlation was programmed and used as a basis to generate tubing performance curves and to study the effects of various parameters on long term gas production. Turner's method for predicting... the known methods of analyzing liquid loading problems in gas wells. A computer program will be developed to aid in generating tubing performance curves along with calculated gas velocity profiles. The calculated gas velocity profile...

  7. Production and analysis of a Southern Ocean state estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazloff, Matthew R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modern general circulation model of the Southern Ocean with one-sixth of a degree resolution is optimized to the observed ocean in a weighted least squares sense. Convergence toward the state estimate solution is carried ...

  8. Estimating production and cost for clamshell mechanical dredges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adair, Robert Fletcher

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    factor. This is the percent of the bucket that will fill with sediment depending on the type of soil being excavated. Using cycle time as the basis for production calculation a spreadsheet has been created to simplify the calculation of production...

  9. Joint inversion of seismic AVO and EM data for gas saturation estimation using a sampling-based stochastic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    hypothesis using a sampling-based stochastic model, based on a typical situation of gas explorationJoint inversion of seismic AVO and EM data for gas saturation estimation using a sampling- based stochastic model Jinsong Chen*, G. Michael Hoversten, and D. W. Vasco, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  10. Accounting for Adsorbed gas and its effect on production bahavior of Shale Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mengal, Salman Akram

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    pressures )( p by conventional well tests due to very low permeabilities. Decline curves for conventional gas, when applied on shale gas reservoirs, can not be validated by material balance due to unavailability of average reservoir pressure. However...* variable rate gas BDF including adsorbed gas exhibiting exponential decline (b = 1)................. 25 4.6 Plot of [m(pi )? m(pwf )] / qg(t) vs material balance pseudo time tca*, xii FIGURE...

  11. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION THROUGH WATER GAS SHIFT REACTION OVER NICKEL CATALYSTS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haryanto, Agus

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The progress in fuel cell technology has resulted in an increased interest towards hydrogen fuel. Consequently, water gas shift reaction has found a renewed significance.… (more)

  12. Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, J.; Callaghan, V.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Independent review report on the available information concerning the technologies needed for forecourts producing 150 kg/day of hydrogen from natural gas.

  13. Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal for Electricity, under the Mexican scenario. Javier C. Palacios, Gustavo Alonso, Ramn Ramrez, Armando Gmez, Javier Ortiz, Luis C....

  14. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the CFR as being storage water heaters, instantaneous watersupply boilers. Storage water heater means a water heaterAppliance Gas storage water heaters Definition a water

  15. Polystyrene foam products equation of state as a function of porosity and fill gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulford, Roberta N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swift, Damian C [LLNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam. Differences between air-filled, Ar-blown, and CO{sub 2}-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with products of polystyrene decomposition. O{sub 2}-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to amplify any consequences of reaction with oxygen in air. He-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to provide an extremum of density. Product pressures are slightly higher for oxygen-containing fill gases than for non-oxygen-containing fill gases. Examination of product species indicates that CO{sub 2} decomposes at high temperatures.

  16. Microsoft Word - Coal Production Estimates Evaluation.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Performance Evaluation of the Weekly Coal Production Report for 2011 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information...

  17. Microsoft Word - 2012_EIA_Coal_Production_Estimates_Comparison...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Performance Evaluation of the Weekly Coal Production Report for 2012 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information...

  18. Productivity and Efficiency Change in the Australian Broadacre Agriculture: Nonparametric Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Productivity and Efficiency Change in the Australian Broadacre Agriculture: Nonparametric Estimates U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia. e-mails: Ruhul.Salim@cbs.curtin.edu.au #12;2 Productivity productivity of Australian broadacre agriculture. Färe- Primont indexes have some distinguishing features

  19. Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 States, 1980 through 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to analyze monthly natural gas wellhead productive capacity in the lower 48 States from 1980 through 1992 and project this capacity from 1993 through 1995. For decades, natural gas supplies and productive capacity have been adequate to meet demand. In the 1970`s the capacity surplus was small because of market structure (split between interstate and intrastate), increasing demand, and insufficient drilling. In the early 1980`s, lower demand, together with increased drilling, led to a large surplus capacity as new productive capacity came on line. After 1986, this large surplus began to decline as demand for gas increased, gas prices fell, and gas well completions dropped sharply. In late December 1989, the decline in this surplus, accompanied by exceptionally high demand and temporary weather-related production losses, led to concerns about the adequacy of monthly productive capacity for natural gas. These concerns should have been moderated by the gas system`s performance during the unusually severe winter weather in March 1993 and January 1994. The declining trend in wellhead productive capacity is expected to be reversed in 1994 if natural gas prices and drilling meet or exceed the base case assumption. This study indicates that in the low, base, and high drilling cases, monthly productive capacity should be able to meet normal production demands through 1995 in the lower 48 States (Figure ES1). Exceptionally high peak-day or peak-week production demand might not be met because of physical limitations such as pipeline capacity. Beyond 1995, as the capacity of currently producing wells declines, a sufficient number of wells and/or imports must be added each year in order to ensure an adequate gas supply.

  20. ARM - Evaluation Product - Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborne Visible/InfraredProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloudthe CSAPR

  1. ARM - Evaluation Product - Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborne Visible/InfraredProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloudthe CSAPR(RIPBE)

  2. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    releases during drilling, and well integrity issues duringand ? Ensuring well structural integrity with subsidence inat nearby wells, seal integrity loss and associated gas

  3. Geomechanical Development of Fractured Reservoirs During Gas Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jian

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    is constructed by implementing a poroviscoelastic model into the dual permeability (DPM)-finite element model (FEM) to investigate the coupled time-dependent viscoelastic deformation, fracture network evolution and compressible fluid flow in gas shale reservoir...

  4. SciTech Connect: Elemental Fluorine-18 Gas: Enhanced Production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and nuclear medicine initiatives through other federally funded agencies such as NIH and DoD. New reactions involving the use of 18FF2 gas will lead to direct labeling of...

  5. Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation prohibits the waste of oil or gas and the pollution of water, air, or land. The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to implement regulations designed to...

  6. Mining and Gas and Oil Production (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the North Dakota Code contains provisions for oil, gas, and coal mining and the development of geothermal resources. This chapter addresses claims to mines, licensing and control of...

  7. Gas treatment and by-products recovery of Thailand`s first coke plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diemer, P.E.; Seyfferth, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coke is needed in the blast furnace as the main fuel and chemical reactant and the main product of a coke plant. The second main product of the coke plant is coke oven gas. During treatment of the coke oven gas some coal chemicals like tar, ammonia, sulphur and benzole can be recovered as by-products. Since the market prices for these by-products are rather low and often erratic it does not in most cases justify the investment to recover these products. This is the reason why modern gas treatment plants only remove those impurities from the crude gas which must be removed for technical and environmental reasons. The cleaned gas, however, is a very valuable product as it replaces natural gas in steel work furnaces and can be used by other consumers. The surplus can be combusted in the boiler of a power plant. A good example for an optimal plant layout is the new coke oven facility of Thai Special Steel Industry (TSSI) in Rayong. The paper describes the TSSI`s coke oven gas treatment plant.

  8. Gas phase reaction products during tungsten atomic layer deposition using WF6 and Si2H6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven M.

    Gas phase reaction products during tungsten atomic layer deposition using WF6 and Si2H6 R. K; published 23 July 2004 The gas phase reaction products during tungsten W atomic layer deposition ALD using WF6 and Si2H6 were studied using quadrupole mass spectrometry. The gas phase reactions products were

  9. Production-management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Annual Report, August 1990-December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Abbott, W.A.; Arsenault, J.W.; Jones, R.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was designed to investigate production management strategies through a field study approach. The initial task was to prepare a summary of industry experience with water-drive gas and water-drive gas storage reservoirs. This activity was necessary to define the variety of reservoir situations in which water influx occurs, to identify those cases where alternative production practices will increase ultimate recovery, and to develop techniques to better characterize these reservoirs for further analysis. Four fields were selected for study: 1 onshore Gulf Coast gas reservoir, 2 offshore Gulf Coast reservoirs, and 1 mid-continent aquifier gas storage field. A modified material balance technique was developed and validated which predicts the pressure and production performance of water-drive gas reservoirs. This method yields more accurate results than conventional water influx techniques.

  10. Controls of coal fabric on coalbed gas production and compositional shift in both field production and canister desorption tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The production rates of coalbed gas wells commonly vary significantly, even in the same field with similar reservoir permeability and gas content. The compositional variation in produced gas is also not everywhere predictable, although in most fields produced gas becomes progressively enriched in CO, through the production life of a reservoir, such as parts of the San Juan basin. In contrast, it is generally observed that the ratio of CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} declines with time during field and laboratory desorption testing of coal cores. In this study, we investigate numerically the importance of coal fabric, namely cleat spacing and aperture width, on the performance of coalbed gas wells and gas compositional shifts during production. Because of the cubic relationship between fracture permeability and fracture aperture width (and thus fracture porosity) for a given cleat permeability, the production profile of coal seams varies depending on whether the permeability is distributed among closely spaced fractures (cleat) with narrower apertures or more widely spaced fractures (cleat) with wider apertures. There is a lower fracture porosity for coal with widely spaced fractures than for coal with closely spaced fractures. Therefore, the relative permeability to gas increases more rapidly for coals with more widely spaced cleats as less dewatering from fractures is required, assuming that the fractures are initially water saturated. The enrichment of CO{sub 2} in the production gas with time occurs because of the stronger adsorption of coals for CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 4}. However, during desorption of coal cores, CO{sub 2} desorbs more rapidly than methane because desorption rate is governed more by diffusion than by sorption affinity, and CO{sub 2} has much higher effective diffusivity in microporous coals than CH{sub 4}.

  11. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Application: 2009 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application: 2009 Update This report is the third annual update of a...

  12. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive...

  13. Dual gas and oil dispersions in water: production and stability of foamulsion Anniina Salonen,*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dual gas and oil dispersions in water: production and stability of foamulsion Anniina Salonen of oil droplets and gas bubbles and show that the oil can have two very different roles, either suppressing foaming or stabilising the foam. We have foamed emulsions made from two different oils (rapeseed

  14. ANALYSIS OF GAS PRODUCTION FROM HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED WELLS IN THE HAYNESVILLE SHALE USING SCALING METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    ANALYSIS OF GAS PRODUCTION FROM HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED WELLS IN THE HAYNESVILLE SHALE USING P. Marder University of Texas at Austin ABSTRACT The Haynesville Shale is one of the largest. The reservoir temperature is also high, up to 3000 F. These pressures are uniquely high among shale gas

  15. Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

  16. Minimizing Water Production from Unconventional Gas Wells Using a Novel Environmentally Benign Polymer Gel System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gakhar, Kush

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Excess water production is a major economic and environmental problem for the oil and gas industry. The cost of processing excess water runs into billions of dollars. Polymer gel technology has been successfully used in controlling water influx...

  17. Oil, Gas, and Minerals, Exploration and Production, Lease of Public Land (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state, counties and cities and other political subdivisions may lease publicly owned lands for the purpose of oil or gas or metallic minerals exploration and production.  Any such leases shall...

  18. Evidence of Pressure Dependent Permeability in Long-Term Shale Gas Production and Pressure Transient Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera Rosales, Fabian 1986-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The current state of shale gas reservoir dynamics demands understanding long-term production, and existing models that address important parameters like fracture half-length, permeability, and stimulated shale volume assume constant permeability...

  19. Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

  20. Estimating long-term world coal production with logit and probit transforms David Rutledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinreb, Sander

    from measurements of coal seams. We show that where the estimates based on reserves can be testedEstimating long-term world coal production with logit and probit transforms David Rutledge form 27 October 2010 Accepted 27 October 2010 Available online 4 November 2010 Keywords: Coal reserves

  1. The effects of production rate and gravitational segregation on gas injection performance of oil reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Ed Martin

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Approved as. to style...

  2. Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Najjar, Mitri S. (Hopewell Junction, NY); Corbeels, Roger J. (Wappingers Falls, NY); Kokturk, Uygur (Wappingers Falls, NY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800.degree.-2200.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (i) a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and (ii) a sodium-iron sulfide phase. The sulfur capture additive may optionally comprise a copper-containing compound portion.

  3. Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adger, W.N. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

  4. Methanol production with elemental phosphorus byproduct gas: technical and economic feasibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and economic feasibility of using a typical, elemental, phosphorus byproduct gas stream in methanol production is assessed. The purpose of the study is to explore the potential of a substitute for natural gas. The first part of the study establishes economic tradeoffs between several alternative methods of supplying the hydrogen which is needed in the methanol synthesis process to react with CO from the off gas. The preferred alternative is the Battelle Process, which uses natural gas in combination with the off gas in an economically sized methanol plant. The second part of the study presents a preliminary basic design of a plant to (1) clean and compress the off gas, (2) return recovered phosphorus to the phosphorus plant, and (3) produce methanol by the Battelle Process. Use of elemental phosphorus byproduct gas in methanol production appears to be technically feasible. The Battelle Process shows a definite but relatively small economic advantage over conventional methanol manufacture based on natural gas alone. The process would be economically feasible only where natural gas supply and methanol market conditions at a phosphorus plant are not significantly less favorable than at competing methanol plants. If off-gas streams from two or more phosphorus plants could be combined, production of methanol using only offgas might also be economically feasible. The North American methanol market, however, does not seem likely to require another new methanol project until after 1990. The off-gas cleanup, compression, and phosphorus-recovery system could be used to produce a CO-rich stream that could be economically attractive for production of several other chemicals besides methanol.

  5. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    require some form of artificial lift (typically gas lift forGH development will require artificial lift such as electriclow pressure at surface. Artificial lift will be required to

  6. SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueroa, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bed Solids Waste Gasifier," Forest Products Journal, Vol.BASIS IV. SUMMARY APPENDIX A - Gasifier Liquefaction Design1 - Modified Lurgi Gasifier with Liquefaction Reactor 2 -

  7. Estimates Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    Estimates Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives by E Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives by E.R. Keeley1 , P.A. Slaney2 from the literature to assess the effects of stream restoration efforts on densities of salmonid fish

  8. Simulation of production and injection performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagoort, J. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands))

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a simple yet comprehensive mathematical model for simulation of injection and production performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations. The model predicts the pressure and temperature of the gas in the cavern and at the wellhead for an arbitrary sequence of production and injection cycles. The model incorporates nonideal gas properties, thermodynamic heat effects associated with gas expansion and compression in the cavern and tubing, heat exchange with the surrounding salt formation, and non-uniform initial temperatures but does not include rock-mechanical effects. The model is based on a mass and energy balance for the gas-filled cavern and on the Bernoulli equation and energy balance for flow in the wellbore. Cavern equations are solved iteratively at successive timesteps, and wellbore equations are solved within an iteration cycle of the cavern equations. Gas properties are calculated internally with generally accepted correlations and basic thermodynamic relations. Example calculations show that the initial temperature distribution has a strong effect on production performance of a typical gas storage cavern. The primary application of the model is in the design, planning, and operation of gas storage projects.

  9. The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two base case flow sheets have now been prepared. In the first, which was originally presented in TPR4, a Texaco gasifier is used. Natural gas is also burned in sufficient quantity to increase the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of the synthesis gas to the required value of 1. 1 for alcohol synthesis. Acid gas clean up and sulfur removal are accomplished using the Rectisol process followed by the Claus and Beavon processes. About 10% of the synthesis gas is sent to a power generation unit in order to produce electric power, with the remaining 90% used for alcohol synthesis. For this process, the estimated installed cost is $474.2 mm. The estimated annual operating costs are $64.5 MM. At a price of alcohol fuels in the vicinity of $1. 00/gal, the pay back period for construction of this plant is about four years. The details of this case, called Base Case 1, are presented in Appendix 1. The second base case, called Base Case 2, also has a detailed description and explanation in Appendix 1. In Base Case 2, a Lurgi Gasifier is used. The motivation for using a Lurgi Gasifier is that it runs at a lower temperature and pressure and, therefore, produces by-products such as coal liquids which can be sold. Based upon the economics of joint production, discussed in Technical Progress Report 4, this is a necessity. Since synthesis gas from natural gas is always less expensive to produce than from coal, then alcohol fuels will always be less expensive to produce from natural gas than from coal. Therefore, the only way to make coal- derived alcohol fuels economically competitive is to decrease the cost of production of coal-derived synthesis gas. one method for accomplishing this is to sell the by-products from the gasification step. The details of this strategy are discussed in Appendix 3.

  10. Offsite commercial disposal of oil and gas exploration and production waste :availability, options, and cost.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey conducted in 1995 by the American Petroleum Institute (API) found that the U.S. exploration and production (E&P) segment of the oil and gas industry generated more than 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, almost 18 billion bbl of produced water, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes. The results of that survey, published in 2000, suggested that 3% of drilling wastes, less than 0.5% of produced water, and 15% of associated wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) collected information on commercial E&P waste disposal companies in different states in 1997. While the information is nearly a decade old, the report has proved useful. In 2005, Argonne began collecting current information to update and expand the data. This report describes the new 2005-2006 database and focuses on the availability of offsite commercial disposal companies, the prevailing disposal methods, and estimated disposal costs. The data were collected in two phases. In the first phase, state oil and gas regulatory officials in 31 states were contacted to determine whether their agency maintained a list of permitted commercial disposal companies dedicated to oil. In the second stage, individual commercial disposal companies were interviewed to determine disposal methods and costs. The availability of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities falls into three categories. The states with high oil and gas production typically have a dedicated network of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities in place. In other states, such an infrastructure does not exist and very often, commercial disposal companies focus on produced water services. About half of the states do not have any industry-specific offsite commercial disposal infrastructure. In those states, operators take their wastes to local municipal landfills if permitted or haul the wastes to other states. This report provides state-by-state summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities that are found in each state. In later sections, data are presented by waste type and then by disposal method.

  11. Fuel gas production by microwave plasma in liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Tawara, Michinaga; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kenya [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Shikoku Industry and Technology Promotion Center, 2-5 Marunouchi, Takamatsu, Kagawa 760-0033 (Japan)

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to apply plasma in liquid to replace gas-phase plasma because we expect much higher reaction rates for the chemical deposition of plasma in liquid than for chemical vapor deposition. A reactor for producing microwave plasma in a liquid could produce plasma in hydrocarbon liquids and waste oils. Generated gases consist of up to 81% hydrogen by volume. We confirmed that fuel gases such as methane and ethylene can be produced by microwave plasma in liquid.

  12. The effects of production rates and some reservoir parameters on recovery in a strong water drive gas reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soemarso, Christophorus

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 11 12 17 23 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 Reservoir Configuration and the Cell Break-up . . . 2 Relative Permeability Data 3 Capillary Pressure Data 4 Compressibility (Z) Factor Vs Pressure . . 5a P/Z Vs Cumulative Gas Produced for Cases 1, 2... Cumulative Gas Produced for Cases 16, 17, 18 g P/Z Vs Cumulative Gas Produced for Cases 19, 20, 21 6a Gas Production Rate Vs Time for Cases I, 2, 3 b Gas Production Rate Vs Time for Cases 4, 5, 6 c Gas Production Rate Vs Time for Cases 7, 8, 9 . . . . d...

  13. CO2 gas production understanding above a partly flooded coal post-mining area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - The Westphalian deposit is constituted by numerous exploited coal seams of different thicknesses. These seamsCO2 gas production understanding above a partly flooded coal post-mining area Candice Lagnya, a former coal mining area. To understand the origin of this production, a borehole of 90 meters deep

  14. Synthetic aggregates prepared from flue gas desulfurization by-products using various binder materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellucci, J.; Graham, U.M.; Hower, J.C.; Robl, T.L. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products can be converted into environmentally safe and structurally stable aggregates. One type of synthetic aggregate was prepared using an optimum mixture of (FGD) by-products, fly ash, and water. Mineral reactions have been examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope.

  15. Title: Using acidic electrolyzed water to reduce objectionable gas emissions from poultry production facilities in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Title: Using acidic electrolyzed water to reduce objectionable gas emissions from poultry Summary: There are increasing numbers of poultry production buildings, with large, densely housed flocks to allow producers to meet the increasing demand for poultry products and, yet, reduce the environmental

  16. Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including whole-home gas tankless water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  17. ESTIMATION OF RADIOLYTIC GAS GENERATION RATE FOR CYLINDRICAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES - APPLICATION TO SPENT ION EXCHANGE RESIN CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Husain, A.; Lewis, Brent J.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste packages containing water and/or organic substances have the potential to radiolytically generate hydrogen and other combustible gases. Typically, the radiolytic gas generation rate is estimated from the energy deposition rate and the radiolytic gas yield. Estimation of the energy deposition rate must take into account the contributions from all radionuclides. While the contributions from non-gamma emitting radionuclides are relatively easy to estimate, an average geometry factor must be computed to determine the contribution from gamma emitters. Hitherto, no satisfactory method existed for estimating the geometry factors for a cylindrical package. In the present study, a formulation was developed taking into account the effect of photon buildup. A prototype code, called PC-CAGE, was developed to numerically solve the integrals involved. Based on the selected dimensions for a cylinder, the specified waste material, the photon energy of interest and a value for either the absorption or attenuation coefficient, the code outputs values for point and average geometry factors. These can then be used to estimate the internal dose rate to the material in the cylinder and hence to calculate the radiolytic gas generation rate. Besides the ability to estimate the rates of radiolytic gas generation, PC-CAGE can also estimate the dose received by the container material. This is based on values for the point geometry factors at the surface of the cylinder. PC-CAGE was used to calculate geometry factors for a number of cylindrical geometries. Estimates for the absorbed dose rate in container material were also obtained. The results for Ontario Power Generation's 3 m3 resin containers indicate that about 80% of the source gamma energy is deposited internally. In general, the fraction of gamma energy deposited internally depends on the dimensions of the cylinder, the material within it and the photon energy; the fraction deposited increases with increasing dimensions of the cylinder and decreases with increasing photon energy.

  18. SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueroa, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Estimates for a Medium BTU Gasification Plant Using A4.6 D /Dt / D Sus 0.7 (=) Btu/H 2 hr °F h ~ _3_,.5. ,..-thennal conductivity (=) Btu-ft/ ft2 hroF l)_ "' p particle

  19. Gas-chromatographic identification of volatile products from thermal processing of Bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zenkevich, I.G.; Ventura, K. [Advanced Chemical Engineering Institute, Pardubice (Czechoslovakia)

    1992-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The variety of bitumen industrial brands is evident in the significant variation of composition and ratio of volatile thermal processing products, which makes their detailed characterization difficult. For that reason, in the authors` opinion a simple and easily reproducible method for gas chromatographic analysis and identification of these substances should be of greater interest than gathering more such results. In this report the authors discuss the selection of an optimal combination of group and individual gas chromatographic methods for identification of volatile thermal processing products in the presence of air, using the example of AP bitumen, the main brand used in Czechoslavakia for production of asphalt. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  1. EFFECTS ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY OF H2 PRODUCTION THROUGH PARTIAL OXYDATION OF NATURAL GAS OVER TWO GROUP VIII METAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EFFECTS ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY OF H2 PRODUCTION THROUGH PARTIAL OXYDATION OF NATURAL GAS OVER TWO with natural gas in spark ignition engines can increase for electric efficiency. In-situ H23 production for spark ignition engines fuelled by natural gas has therefore been investigated recently, and4 reformed

  2. Report Title: Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth In New Mexico Type of Report: Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Report Title: Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth In New Mexico Type of Report: Technical agency thereof. #12;Page | ii Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth in New Mexico James Peach and C Mexico's marketed value of oil and gas was $19.2 billion (24.0 percent of state GDP). This paper

  3. The future of U.S. natural gas production, use, and trade Sergey Paltsev a,b,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The future of U.S. natural gas production, use, and trade Sergey Paltsev a,b,n , Henry D. Jacoby 19 May 2011 Available online 16 June 2011 Keywords: Natural gas Climate Policy International gas.S. regional detail, are applied to analysis of the future of U.S. natural gas. The focus is on uncertainties

  4. Estimating crop net primary production using inventory data and MODIS-derived parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    National estimates of spatially-resolved cropland net primary production (NPP) are needed for diagnostic and prognostic modeling of carbon sources, sinks, and net carbon flux. Cropland NPP estimates that correspond with existing cropland cover maps are needed to drive biogeochemical models at the local scale and over national and continental extents. Existing satellite-based NPP products tend to underestimate NPP on croplands. A new Agricultural Inventory-based Light Use Efficiency (AgI-LUE) framework was developed to estimate individual crop biophysical parameters for use in estimating crop-specific NPP. The method is documented here and evaluated for corn and soybean crops in Iowa and Illinois in years 2006 and 2007. The method includes a crop-specific enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), shortwave radiation data estimated using Mountain Climate Simulator (MTCLIM) algorithm and crop-specific LUE per county. The combined aforementioned variables were used to generate spatially-resolved, crop-specific NPP that correspond to the Cropland Data Layer (CDL) land cover product. The modeling framework represented well the gradient of NPP across Iowa and Illinois, and also well represented the difference in NPP between years 2006 and 2007. Average corn and soybean NPP from AgI-LUE was 980 g C m-2 yr-1 and 420 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. This was 2.4 and 1.1 times higher, respectively, for corn and soybean compared to the MOD17A3 NPP product. Estimated gross primary productivity (GPP) derived from AgI-LUE were in close agreement with eddy flux tower estimates. The combination of new inputs and improved datasets enabled the development of spatially explicit and reliable NPP estimates for individual crops over large regional extents.

  5. Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation: 50% of electricity from central grid natural gas plantsgeneration: 100% of electricity from central grid natural gas plantselectricity comes from central station natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the other half comes from natural-gas-fired single cycle plants. •

  6. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, WetReserves

  7. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas,

  8. Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet) Base Gas)1,727Feet)Fuel

  9. Texas Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2perSep-14Base Gas) (Million74,284Year

  10. Texas Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2perSep-14Base Gas)

  11. Texas Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Kansas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2perSep-14Base Gas)(Million Cubic

  12. Kansas Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0YearDecadeThousand Cubic7Year Jan

  13. Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0ExtensionsYear JanFuel

  14. Kansas Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0Month Previous YearThousand1 3 2 4 6

  15. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0Month PreviousThousandCubic0 0 0 0

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15Industrial Consumers (Number

  17. Kentucky Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15IndustrialVehicleThousand Cubic20 55 10

  18. LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 328 370 396After898 701 371

  19. Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2013CubicYear

  20. Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0 0FuelFuel ConsumptionPlant

  1. Louisiana Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289886,084 889,570 893,400 897,5137

  2. Louisiana Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289886,084 889,570 893,400

  3. Louisiana Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289886,084 889,570 893,400

  4. Louisiana Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289886,084 889,570 893,400Louisiana

  5. Louisiana Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289886,084 889,5705,02044 149858

  6. Louisiana--Onshore Natural Gas Dry Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289886,084

  7. Maryland Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342CubicSep-140.0 0.0 0.0CommercialYear

  8. Michigan Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343Decade81Feet)

  9. Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3Year Jan Feb (MillionFuelLiquids

  10. Michigan Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3YearDecade Year-0per9 6 0 0

  11. Miscellaneous Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15Thousand CubicYear46 4722 35 42724

  12. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15Thousand CubicYear46 4722252 254Year

  13. Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year Jan Feb (Million CubicFuelLiquids

  14. Mississippi Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year JanThousand Cubic Feet)(Million

  15. Missouri Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year JanThousand Cubic0 0 0 2011 2012Dry

  16. Montana Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384 388 413 2009-2013Year Jan Feb

  17. Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384Fuel Consumption (Million

  18. Montana Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384FuelYear125 137 186 192 216 229

  19. Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 (Million Cubic Feet)Fuel

  20. Colorado Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623 42 180 208 283 607 1996-20132008

  1. Federal Offshore Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003of Energy2009 2010NA NA NA NA 0 0

  2. Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003of Energy2009 2010NA NA NA NA44,902

  3. Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003of Energy2009 2010NA NA NA

  4. Federal Offshore Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003of Energy2009 2010NA NA NA2 2003

  5. Florida Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003ofDec. 31ES5CommercialCubicYear

  6. Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 0 0 1979-2013Fuel Consumption

  7. Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 058.5 57.1CubicVehicle0perLiquids, Monthly

  8. Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 058.5 57.1CubicVehicle0perLiquids,

  9. Illinois Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0Decade (Million CubicDecadeThousand0.666

  10. Illinois Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0DecadeWithdrawals (MillionPlant Fuel

  11. Imputed Wellhead Value of Natural Gas Marketed Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0 0 1996-2005 Lease9.5

  12. Indiana Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0 0 1996-2005. 61,707 58,6938 8 7

  13. Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0 0WithdrawalsPlant Liquids

  14. Nevada Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomic team:6-2015 Illinois NA NA,0,DecadeYearDry Natural Gas

  15. U.S. Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198 18Biomass Gas (Million

  16. Hydrogen Production: Natural Gas Reforming | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andof Energy EmbrittlementFact Sheet HydrogenCoalNatural Gas

  17. Kansas Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,643NorwayBase Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa264,771Decade

  18. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,643NorwayBase Gas)Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK LiquefiedYear Jan Feb

  19. Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas,095,3628,527 9,029 8,794CubicExports ofCubic17 34 44 67Year Jan

  20. California Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 566 8021 1Reserves,835 2,939 3,009

  1. California Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 566 (Million0,515,162180,648(Million Cubic

  2. Colorado Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 47 62CarbonCubic1,966Year Jan Feb

  3. Utah Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007York"Hawaii" "Sector", (MillionDecadeDecadeDecreasesFeet) Gas2009893

  4. Analysis of error in using fractured gas well type curves for constant pressure production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schkade, David Wayne

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of normalized time and normalized cumulative production is a large improvement over using a constant evaluation pressure. 0 imens ion less cumulative production type curves are particularly useful in modeling production for economic projections, such as re... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYSIS OF ERROR IN USING FRACTURED GAS WELL TYPE CURVES FOR CONSTANT PRESSURE PRDDUCTION A Thesis by DAVID WAYNE SCHKADE Approved as to style and content by: S. A. Ho lditch...

  5. Evidence of Reopened Microfractures in Production Data of Hydraulically Fractured Shale Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apiwathanasorn, Sippakorn

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequently a discrepancy is found between the stimulated shale volume (SSV) estimated from production data and the SSV expected from injected water and proppant volume. One possible explanation is the presence of a fracture network, often termed...

  6. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 1: Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This deliverable is the Final Report for Task 1, Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems, as part of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 1.1 looked into processes and technologies that have been commercially built at both large and small scales, with three technologies, Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) of refinery gas oil, Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) of Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) Expanders, chosen for further investigation. These technologies were chosen due to their applicability relative to other technologies being considered by NREL for future commercial applications, such as indirect gasification and fluidized bed tar cracking. Research in this subject is driven by an interest in the impact that scaling has on the cost and major process unit designs for commercial technologies. Conclusions from the evaluations performed could be applied to other technologies being considered for modular or skid-mounted applications.

  7. Estimate of federal relighting potential and demand for efficient lighting products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankle, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Richman, E.E.; Grover, S.E.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing level of electric utility rebates for energy-efficient lighting retrofits has recently prompted concern over the adequacy of the market supply of energy-efficient lighting products (Energy User News 1991). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed an estimate of the total potential for energy-efficient lighting retrofits in federally owned buildings. This estimate can be used to address the issue of the impact of federal relighting projects on the supply of energy-efficient lighting products. The estimate was developed in 1992, using 1991 data. Any investments in energy-efficient lighting products that occurred in 1992 will reduce the potential estimated here. This analysis proceeds by estimating the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings. The lighting technology screening matrix is then used to determine the minimum life-cycle cost retrofit for each type of existing lighting fixture. Estimates of the existing stock are developed for (1) four types of fluorescent lighting fixtures (2-, 3-, and 4-lamp, F40 4-foot fixtures, and 2-lamp, F96 8-foot fixtures, all with standard magnetic ballasts); (2) one type of incandescent fixture (a 75-watt single bulb fixture); and (3) one type of exit sign (containing two 20-watt incandescent bulbs). Estimates of the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings, estimates of the total potential demand for energy-efficient lighting products if all cost-effective retrofits were undertaken immediately, and total potential annual energy savings (in MWh and dollars), the total investment required to obtain the energy savings and the present value of the efficiency investment, are presented.

  8. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 2, offshore gulf coast over-pressured, dry gas reservoirs. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.E.; Jirik, L.A.; Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of reservoir management strategies for optimization of ultimate hydrocarbon recovery and net present value from an overpressured, high yield gas condensate reservoir with water influx is reported. This field evaluation was based on a reservoir simulation. Volumetric and performance-derived original gas-in-place estimates did not agree: the performance-derived values were significantly lower than those predicted from volumetric analysis. Predicted field gas recovery was improved significantly by methods which accelerated gas withdrawals. Recovery was also influenced by well location. Accelerated withdrawals from wells near the aquifer tended to reduce sweep by cusping and coning water. This offset any benefits of increased gas rates.

  9. Apparatus for production of synthesis gas using convective reforming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karafian, M.; Tsang, I.C.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a system for the steam reforming of hydrocarbons into a hydrogen-rich gas. It comprises a convective reformer device having indirect heat exchange means for partially reforming a feed mixture of hydrocarbons and steam; a steam reforming furnace having a radiant section, reforming tubes in the radiant section, and means for producing radiant heat for the further reforming of the partially reformed effluent; an auto-thermal reformer for fully reforming the effluent; conduit means for passing the partially reformed effluent; conduit means for passing the effluent; and conduit means for passing the fully reformed effluent to supply the heat of reaction for the partial reformation of the hydrocarbon-steam feed mixture.

  10. The production characteristics of a solution gas-drive reservoir as measured on a centrifugal model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodwin, Robert Jennings

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures and Cetus Oil - Natural Gas Mixtures Reservoir Pez&ormance Characteristics for Test Number 17 Through Well Number Three with Fluid Number One Reservoir Perfozmanco Characteristics for Test Number 32 Through Well Number One with Fluid Number.... recoveries were obtained vhen the fluid was produced through a central weAl than when production was through a well in the extreme end of the reservoir. Lower viscosity gave substantially higher recoveries~ but larger amounts of gas in solution had...

  11. U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, John H.; Grape, Steven G.; Green, Rhonda S.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S.WyomingExpansion andFeet) Marketed Production

  13. Louisiana--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year inBarrels) CrudeMarketed Production (Million

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricityAlternativeProduction and Distribution to

  15. Oil production from thin oil columns subject to water and gas coning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chai, Kwok Kit

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OIL PRODUCTION FROM THIN OIL COLUMNS SUBJECT TO MATER AND GAS CONING A Thesis by KMOK KIT CHAI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering OIL PRODUCTION FROM THIN OIL COLUMNS SUBJECT TO WATER AND GAS CONING A Thesis by KWOK KIT CHAI Approved as to style and content by airman of o t ee Member Member Head o Department May 1981 ABSTRACT Oil...

  16. Hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated hydrocarbons are produced as reactor gases in a fast quench reactor. During the fast quench, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  17. Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2012-13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1. Summary:Principal shale gas plays:

  18. Utah Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYear Jan MonthlyProduction (Billion

  19. Utah Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYear Jan MonthlyProduction (BillionDecade Year-0

  20. Utah Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  1. Utah Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  2. Utah Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  3. Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  4. Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  5. Utah and Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYear JanWellhead Price (DollarsProduction(Million

  6. West Virginia Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  7. West Virginia Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYearFeet) YearProduction (MillionDecadeYear

  8. West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYearFeet) YearProductionElements)(Million

  9. U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  10. U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State OffshoreProduction Forecast-DrilledFeet)

  11. Calif--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYearReservesm 3 (D CD ^Marketed Production

  12. U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26, 2008Product:7.1EnergyU OImportYear Jan

  13. Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartmentfor EngineeringDepartment ofBoilers Covered ProductFryers

  14. West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases349,980Additions89Production 246Year

  15. Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87 1967-2010Barrels) Reserves Based Production

  16. Florida Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96NebraskaWells (MillionProductionFirstProvedExpectedDecade

  17. North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year JanProduction 4 12 73 9 12 6 1979-2013Exports to

  18. Ohio Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year JanProduction 4 125 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 View50Year

  19. Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year JanProduction 4 125 2006Year Jan Feb2012 2013511Year Jan

  20. Oregon Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year JanProduction 4 125Feet)SameFeet)6,462

  1. Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

  2. CALCULATION AND USE OF EFFECTIVE EXTERNAL BOUNDARY AND RELATED SETTING PARAMETERS IN CABLE YARDING PRODUCTION ESTIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greulich, Francis E.

    in the more efficient use of existing capital and labor resources. Efficiency in timber harvesting starts YARDING PRODUCTION ESTIMATION Francis E. Greulich1 ABSTRACT.--The concept of the effective external-growth timber, very competitive bidding for logging contracts, high regional labor costs, shorter contract

  3. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications number of vehicles it represents, DOE has established detailed cost targets for automotive fuel cell and track the cost of automotive fuel cell systems as progress is made in fuel cell technology. The purpose

  4. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update it represents, the DOE has established detailed cost targets for automotive fuel cell systems and components of automotive fuel cell systems as progress is made in fuel cell technology. The purpose of these cost analyses

  5. Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation (2012), annually updated costs analyses will be conducted for PEM fuel cell passenger buses as well established detailed cost targets for automotive fuel cell systems and components. To help achieve

  6. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications for transportation. Fuel cell systems will have to be cost-competitive with conventional and advanced vehicle it represents, the DOE has established detailed cost targets for automotive fuel cell systems and components

  7. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2004 producer refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery

  8. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  9. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  10. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  11. Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information 1. GHG Emissions Estimation for Production of Marcellus Shale Gas 1.1 Preparation of Well Pad estimate from Columbia University shows the size of a multi-well pad of Marcellus Shale averages 20

  12. Determining the Cause of a Header Failure in a Natural Gas Production Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthes, S.A.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was made into the premature failure of a gas-header at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) natural gas production facility. A wide variety of possible failure mechanisms were considered: design of the header, deviation from normal pipe alloy composition, physical orientation of the header, gas composition and flow rate, type of corrosion, protectiveness of the interior oxide film, time of wetness, and erosion-corrosion. The failed header was examined using metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, and microanalysis. A comparison of the failure site and an analogous site that had not failed, but exhibited similar metal thinning was also performed. From these studies it was concluded that failure resulted from erosion-corrosion, and that design elements of the header and orientation with respect to gas flow contributed to the mass loss at the failure point.

  13. Feasibility of monitoring gas hydrate production with time-lapse VSP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalsky, M.B.; Nakagawa, S.; Moridis, G.J.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we begin to examine the feasibility of using time-lapse seismic methods-specifically the vertical seismic profiling (VSP) method-for monitoring changes in hydrate accumulations that are predicted to occur during production of natural gas.

  14. Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.

    2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A life cycle assessment of hydrogen production via natural gas steam reforming was performed to examine the net emissions of greenhouse gases as well as other major environmental consequences. LCA is a systematic analytical method that helps identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of a specific process or competing processes.

  15. Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement to an increase of AF use from 8.7% to 20.9% of the total energy consumption. 2. One of the alternative fuels used cement industry produces about 3.3 billion tonnes of cement annually. Cement production is energy

  16. Mixed-Conducting Oxygen Permeable Ceramic Membrane and its Application in the Production of Synthesis Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Qiying

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    than the dense membrane. The reaction performance of BSCF asymmetric membranes in the production of synthesis gas (the partial oxidation and CO2 reforming of CH4) was studied, in which the role of the membranes in the reactions was investigated...

  17. Production management teachniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 3. Offshore gulf coast normally pressured, dry gas reservoir. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Uttley, S.J.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoir, the study conducted on an offshore, normally pressured, dry gas reservoir is reported. The strategies that were particularly effective in increasing both the ultimate recovery and the net present value of the field are high volume water production from strategically located downdip wells and the recompletion of an upstructure well to recover trapped attic gas. High volume water production lowered the average reservoir pressure, which liberated residual gas trapped in the invaded region. Recompleting a new well into the reservoir also lowered the pressure and improved the volumetric displacement efficiency by recovering trapped attic gas. Ultimate recovery is predicted to increase 5-12% of the original gas-in-place.

  18. Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to lower the carbon intensity of the power generationelectricity grid carbon-intensities are considered: •importance of grid carbon intensity. Natural-gas-fired CHP

  19. Permeability Estimation from Fracture Calibration Test Analysis in Shale and Tight Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Han 1988-

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    closure can be used to estimate the reservoir permeability. However, for very low permeability, the time to reach radial flow can exceed any practical duration. This study shows how to use the reservoir pressure to estimate the maximum reservoir...

  20. 2006-01-3276 Residual Gas Fraction Measurement and Estimation on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    on a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine. A novel in- cylinder gas sampling technique of the HCCI cycle and good agreement was found in steady engine running conditions. Some form of oscillating behaviour that HCCI exhibits because of exhaust gas coupling was studied and the model was modified

  1. Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

    1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

  2. Estimating coal production peak and trends of coal imports in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bo-qiang Lin; Jiang-hua Liu [Xiamen University, Xiamen (China). China Center for Energy Economics Research (CCEER)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 20 countries in the world have already reached a maximum capacity in their coal production (peak coal production) such as Japan, the United Kingdom and Germany. China, home to the third largest coal reserves in the world, is the world's largest coal producer and consumer, making it part of the Big Six. At present, however, China's coal production has not yet reached its peak. In this article, logistic curves and Gaussian curves are used to predict China's coal peak and the results show that it will be between the late 2020s and the early 2030s. Based on the predictions of coal production and consumption, China's net coal import could be estimated for coming years. This article also analyzes the impact of China's net coal import on the international coal market, especially the Asian market, and on China's economic development and energy security. 16 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Tar-free fuel gas production from high temperature pyrolysis of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Leguan; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Zhiquan; Liu, Shiming, E-mail: Zhangping101@yeah.net; Cheng, Gong; He, Piwen; Sun, Lei

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • High temperature pyrolysis of sewage sludge was efficient for producing tar-free fuel gas. • Complete tar removal and volatile matter release were at elevated temperature of 1300 °C. • Sewage sludge was converted to residual solid with high ash content. • 72.60% of energy conversion efficiency for gas production in high temperature pyrolysis. • Investment and costing for tar cleaning were reduced. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of sewage sludge was studied in a free-fall reactor at 1000–1400 °C. The results showed that the volatile matter in the sludge could be completely released to gaseous product at 1300 °C. The high temperature was in favor of H{sub 2} and CO in the produced gas. However, the low heating value (LHV) of the gas decreased from 15.68 MJ/N m{sup 3} to 9.10 MJ/N m{sup 3} with temperature increasing from 1000 °C to 1400 °C. The obtained residual solid was characterized by high ash content. The energy balance indicated that the most heating value in the sludge was in the gaseous product.

  4. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves, 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1992, as well as production volumes for the United States, and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1992. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), its two major components (nonassociated and associated-dissolved gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, two components of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, have their reserves and production data presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1992 is provided.

  5. Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Dusek, Joseph T. (Lombard, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Napersville, IL); Kobylinski, Thadeus P. (Lisle, IL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials.

  6. Coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant of Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, V.N.; Anikin, G.J. [Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, (Russian Federation); Gross, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, Russia, decided to erect a new coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant to replace the existing obsolete units and to improve the environmental conditions of the area. The paper deals with the technological concept and the design requirements. Commissioning is scheduled at the beginning of 1996. The paper describes H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, sulfur recovery and ammonia destruction, primary gas cooling and electrostatic tar precipitation, and the distributed control system that will be installed.

  7. Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Kobylinski, T.P.

    1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials. 7 figs.

  8. Determination of uncertainty in reserves estimate from analysis of production decline data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhong

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    intervals associated with probabilistic reserves estimates • Implementation of this procedure in a VBA program for applying our new approaches and showing the improvement results. • Compare the results with existing method to examine the accuracy... by excluding transient data identified using Fetkovich type curves. 6 Note that it can be very difficult to identify the transition point from transient to stabilized flow, particularly for wells with short production times. The results excluding transient...

  9. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  10. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  11. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  12. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  13. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  14. Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Henderson

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

  15. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  16. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  17. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  18. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  19. Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Once a Federal agency identifies the various strategic opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for vehicles and mobile equipment, it is necessary to evaluate the associated costs of adopting each strategy.

  20. Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for out-of-state coal generation, then clearly the GHGElectricity Generation (TWh/a) Natural Gas Coal Natural Gascoal becomes the marginal fuel. Note that the marginal generation

  1. Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    future estimates of hydrogen pipelines. Construction Cost (does this mean for hydrogen pipelines? The objective of thisinto the cost of hydrogen pipelines. To this end I will

  2. Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EG. Formation of gas hydrates in natural gas transmissiongeology of natural gas hydrates. Amsterdam: Springer-Verlag;Soloviev, VA. Submarine gas hydrates. St. Petersburg;1998.

  3. Production of Onshore Lower-48 Oil and Gas-model methodology and data description. [PROLOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, M.; Kurator, W.; Mariner-Volpe, B.; O'Neill, R.; Trapmann, W.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the methodology and data used in the Production of Onshore Lower-48 Oil and Gas (PROLOG) model. The model forecasts annual oil and natural gas production on a regional basis. A linear program is used to select drilling activities for conventional oil and gas on the basis of their economic merit, subject to constraints on available rotary rigs and constraints based on historical drilling patterns. Using an exogenously specified price path, net present values are computed for fixed amounts of drilling activity for oil and gas, and for exploration and development in each of six onshore regions. Forecasts of drilling for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) are exogenously determined, and this drilling is included when considering the constraints on drilling rigs. The report is organized as follows. Chapter 2 is a general overview of the model, describing the major characteristics of the methodology and the logical interaction of the various modules. Chapter 3 specifies the structure of the linear program including the equations for the objective function and the constraints. The details of the methodology used to model exploratory, developmental, and deep gas drilling are presented in Chapters 4-6, respectively. Chapter 7 presents a discussion of the economic evaluation which takes place in each discounted cash flow calculation performed by the model. Cost equations are presented, and various user-specified options as to how to incorporate these costs are discussed. Methodological details and equations used to model finding rates and revisions are given in Chapter 8. Possible areas of future enhancements to the PROLOG model are presented in Chapter 9.

  4. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2003 producer. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics, infrared

  5. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2008 producer of 2008. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics

  6. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2007 producer in the fourth quarter of 2007. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production

  7. Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen walls. Air Products tasked our team to design an insert to place in the tubes of the WHB to increase flow velocity, thereby reducing fouling of the WHB. Objectives Air Products wishes that our team

  8. Method for the catalytic conversion of organic materials into a product gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Baker, E.G.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for converting organic material into a product gas includes: (a) providing a liquid reactant mixture containing liquid water and liquid organic material within a pressure reactor; (b) providing an effective amount of a reduced metal catalyst selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, osmium and iridium or mixtures thereof within the pressure reactor; and (c) maintaining the liquid reactant mixture and effective amount of reduced metal catalyst in the pressure reactor at temperature and pressure conditions of from about 300 C to about 450 C; and at least 130 atmospheres for a period of time, the temperature and pressure conditions being effective to maintain the reactant mixture substantially as liquid, the effective amount of reduced metal catalyst and the period of time being sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the liquid organic material to produce a product gas composed primarily of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. 5 figs.

  9. Method for the catalytic conversion of organic materials into a product gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Sealock, Jr., L. John (Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for converting organic material into a product gas includes: a) providing a liquid reactant mixture containing liquid water and liquid organic material within a pressure reactor; b) providing an effective amount of a reduced metal catalyst selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, osmium and iridium or mixtures thereof within the pressure reactor; and c) maintaining the liquid reactant mixture and effective amount of reduced metal catalyst in the pressure reactor at temperature and pressure conditions of from about 300.degree. C. to about 450.degree. C.; and at least 130 atmospheres for a period of time, the temperature and pressure conditions being effective to maintain the reactant mixture substantially as liquid, the effective amount of reduced metal catalyst and the period of time being sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the liquid organic material to produce a product gas composed primarily of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

  10. ,"California Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion

  11. Gas productivity related to cleat volumes derived from focused resistivity tools in coalbed methane (CBM) fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.H.; Peeters, M.; Cloud, T.A.; Van Kirk, C.W. [Kerr McGee Rocky Mountain Corporation, Denver, CO (United States)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleats are critical for coal-bed methane (CBM) production, but operators usually lack a viable method to determine productivity except for costly well tests. Wireline logs, run over the CBM deposits of the Drunkards Wash Unit located in the Uinta Basin of Utah, were used to develop a new method to relate productivity to the cleat volume. The latter is derived from a focused resistivity log and the wellbore-fluid resistivity. Induction tools are unsuitable for this method, because they are dominated by borehole effects in high resistivity coals and low resistivity mud. Moreover, they read too deep to be significantly affected by the substitution of formation fluid by borehole fluid in the cleats on which the method is based. The method was demonstrated by relating cleat volume to CBM gas productivity in 24 wells, an exercise that clearly separated good from poor producers.

  12. Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have been raised whether development of shale gas resources results in an overall lower greenhouse gas, "Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas," appeared in Environmental Research Letters

  13. A critical review of methods used in the estimation of natural gas reserves: Natural gas reserves in the state of Texas. Some educational prerequisites in the field of petroleum economics and evaluation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crichton, John Alston

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for oil. In order to make an a- urete determination of the recovery factor, it is necessary to pre-determine the pressure history of the field. by material balance and water influx calculations, or by extra- polatutg a curve cf pressure agatnst...-Associated Gas Reserves Volumetr ic Method Discussion of the Factors in tne Volumetri. Formula The Decline Curve Method 7 7 12 Ie Methods of Estimating Associated Gas Reserves Methods of Estimatmg Dissolved Gas Reserves Water Drive Constant Voluxne...

  14. Milk cow feed intake and milk production and distribution estimates for Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.M.; Darwin, R.F.; Erickson, A.R.; Eckert, R.L.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides initial information on milk production and distribution in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project Phase I study area. The Phase I study area consists of eight countries in central Washington and two countries in northern Oregon. The primary objective of the HEDR Project is to develop estimates of the radiation doses populations could have received from Hanford operations. The objective of Phase I of the project was to determine the feasibility of reconstructing data, models, and development of preliminary dose estimates received by people living in the ten countries surrounding Hanford from 1944 to 1947. One of the most important contributors to radiation doses from Hanford during the period of interest was radioactive iodine. Consumption of milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated with iodine is likely the dominant pathway of human exposure. To estimate the doses people could have received from this pathway, it is necessary to estimate the amount of milk that the people living in the Phase I area consumed, the source of the milk, and the type of feed that the milk cows ate. The objective of the milk model subtask is to identify the sources of milk supplied to residents of each community in the study area as well as the sources of feeds that were fed to the milk cows. In this report, we focus on Grade A cow's milk (fresh milk used for human consumption).

  15. Estimated size and performance of a natural gas fired duplex Stirling for domestic refrigeration applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berchowitz, D.M. (Sunpower, Inc., Athens, OH (United States)); Shonder, J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calibrated calculations are used to size an integrated Stirling cooler and engine (Duplex configuration). Fuel for the engine is natural gas and the working fluid is helium. The potential exists for long life and low noise. Performance is shown to be very competitive when compared to standard vapor compression systems. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Special Section --Marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Methods A Bayesian model for gas saturation estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    Special Section -- Marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Methods A Bayesian model for gas Vasco1 , Yoram Rubin2 , and Zhangshuan Hou2 ABSTRACT We develop a Bayesian model to jointly invert reservoir model. We consid- er the porosity and fluid saturation of each layer in the reservoir, the bulk

  17. Worldwide estimates and bibliography of net primary productivity derived from pre-1982 publications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esser, G. [Justus-Liebig-Univ., Giessen (Germany). Inst. for Plant Ecology; Lieth, H.F.H. [Univ. of Osnabrueck (Germany). Systems Research Group; Scurlock, J.M.O.; Olson, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive compilation of more than 700 field estimates of net primary productivity of natural and agricultural ecosystems worldwide was synthesized in Germany in the 1970s and early 1980s. Although the Osnabrueck data set has not been updated since the 1980s, it represents a wealth of information for use in model development and validation. This report documents the development of this data set, its contents, and its recent availability on the Internet from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center for Biogeochemical Dynamics. Caution is advised in using these data, which necessarily include assumptions and conversions that may not be universally applicable to all sites.

  18. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

  19. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

  20. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

  1. Comprehensive verification of new method "Ethanol as Internal Standard" for determination of volatile compounds in alcohol products by gas chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charapitsa, Siarhei V; Markovsky, Mikhail G; Yakuba, Yurii F; Kotov, Yurii N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently proposed new method "Ethanol as Internal Standard" for determination of volatile compounds in alcohol products by gas chromatography is investigated from different sides. Results of experimental study from three different laboratories from Belarus and Russian Federation are presented.

  2. A New Type Curve Analysis for Shale Gas/Oil Reservoir Production Performance with Dual Porosity Linear System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulal, Haider Jaffar

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With increase of interest in exploiting shale gas/oil reservoirs with multiple stage fractured horizontal wells, complexity of production analysis and reservoir description have also increased. Different methods and models were used throughout...

  3. Analytical estimation of neutron yield in a micro gas-puff X pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derzon, M. S.; Galambos, P. C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Hagen, E. C. [NSTec, North Las Vegas, Nevada 89031 (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present the basic concepts for developing a micro x pinch as a small-scale neutron source. For compact sources, these concepts offer repetitive function at higher yields and pulsing rates than competing methods. The uniqueness of these concepts arises from the use of microelectronic technology to reduce the size of the target plasma and to efficiently heat the target gas. The use of repetitive microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) gas puff technology, as compared to cryogenic wires or solid targets (for the beam-target alternatives), has the potential to be robust and have a long lifetime because the plasma is not created from solid surfaces. The modeling suggests that a 50 J at the wall plug pulse could provide >10{sup 5} tritium (DT) neutrons and 10{sup 3} deuterium (DD) neutrons at temperatures of a few keV. At 1 kHz, this would be >10{sup 8} and 10{sup 6} neutrons per second, DT and DD, respectively, with a 250 {mu}m anode-cathode gap. DT gas puff devices may provide >10{sup 12} neutrons/s operating at 1 kHz and requiring 100 kW. The MEMs approach offers potentially high pulse rates and yields.

  4. Strategies for gas production from hydrate accumulations under various geologic conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.; Collett, T.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L- 38 Gas Hydrate Research Well, Mackenziedeposits. INTRODUCTION Gas hydrates are solid crystallinequantity of hydrocarbon gas hydrates range between 10 15 to

  5. Feasibility of monitoring gas hydrate production with time-lapse VSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalsky, M.B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    density of the aqueous, gas, and hydrate phases, which isfunction of the aqueous, gas and hydrate phase saturations;in Marine Sediments with Gas Hydrates: Effective Medium

  6. 2012 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS Issued April 2013 OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2012 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

  7. 2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS Issued August 2011 DIVISION OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2010 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

  8. Microalgae Production from Power Plant Flue Gas: Environmental Implications on a Life Cycle Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadam, K. L.

    2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Power-plant flue gas can serve as a source of CO{sub 2} for microalgae cultivation, and the algae can be cofired with coal. This life cycle assessment (LCA) compared the environmental impacts of electricity production via coal firing versus coal/algae cofiring. The LCA results demonstrated lower net values for the algae cofiring scenario for the following using the direct injection process (in which the flue gas is directly transported to the algae ponds): SOx, NOx, particulates, carbon dioxide, methane, and fossil energy consumption. Carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons emissions were statistically unchanged. Lower values for the algae cofiring scenario, when compared to the burning scenario, were observed for greenhouse potential and air acidification potential. However, impact assessment for depletion of natural resources and eutrophication potential showed much higher values. This LCA gives us an overall picture of impacts across different environmental boundaries, and hence, can help in the decision-making process for implementation of the algae scenario.

  9. Entropy production in diffusion-reaction systems: The reactive random Lorentz gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laszlo Matyas; Pierre Gaspard

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the study of a random Lorentz gas with a reaction of isomerization $A\\rightleftharpoons B$ between the two colors of moving particles elastically bouncing on hard disks. The reaction occurs when the moving particles collide on catalytic disks which constitute a fraction of all the disks. Under the dilute-gas conditions, the reaction-diffusion process is ruled by two coupled Boltzmann-Lorentz equations for the distribution functions of the colors. The macroscopic reaction-diffusion equations with cross-diffusion terms induced by the chemical reaction are derived from the kinetic equations. We use a $H$-theorem of the kinetic theory in order to derive a macroscopic entropy depending on the gradients of color densities and which has a non-negative entropy production in agreement with the second law of thermodynamics.

  10. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

  11. Estimated gas reserves and availability of the Viking-Kinsella Field, Alberta, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Lawrence Joffre

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the author. h study of thi. s field was a part of a pro, ]act in which T~s- canada pipe Lines Limited cojmsissioned the firm oi' DeGolyer and thc?aughton to determine the resez-its and the a-, nilability of gas of the Pe&vince of Alberta, Canada i..., ' aa ths kogpxiteL %egs. Operating. pzessmze cf the pips ~ "%asst ef the pme~? ' The smyaztsg pressers drep psr maft of ~metfcef mast be dieted- Xf mdaymba, ssd aee~ ptzessmms verses ~foa dsga sea ~le foz a peodseing reaervofr fer i+feh She...

  12. Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

  13. The feasibility assessment of a U.S. natural gas production reporting system uniform production reporting model. Final report, July 1993--June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uniform Production Reporting Model (UPRM) project was charged with identifying the best practices and procedures of the natural gas producing states related to the gathering, management, and dissemination of production data. It is recommended that the producing states begin the process of upgrading state systems using the concepts embodied in the UPRM model.

  14. ,"California Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry Natural Gas Expected Future ProductionCrude Oil

  15. ,"California--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry Natural GasMarketed Production (MMcf)"

  16. ,"California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry Natural GasMarketed Production (MMcf)"Plant

  17. Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Dry Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289886,084Dry Production (Million

  18. ,"West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"BruneiReserves inDry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion

  19. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"BruneiReserves inDry Natural GasPlant Liquids, Expected Future Production

  20. Natural gas monthly, November 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration. Estimates extend through November for many data series, and through August for most natural gas prices. Highlights of the most recent data estimates are: (1) Preliminary estimates of dry natural gas production and total consumption available through November 1997 indicate that both series are on track to end the year at levels close to those of 1996. Cumulative dry production is one-half percent higher than in 1996 and consumption is one-half percent lower. (2) Natural gas production is estimated to be 52.6 billion cubic feet per day in November 1997, the highest rate since March 1997. (3) After falling 8 percent in July 1997, the national average wellhead price rose 10 percent in August 1997, reaching an estimated $2.21 per thousand cubic feet. (4) Milder weather in November 1997 compared to November 1996 has resulted in significantly lower levels of residential consumption of natural gas and net storage withdrawls than a year ago. The November 1997 estimates of residential consumption and net withdrawls are 9 and 20 percent lower, respectively, than in November 1996.

  1. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1996 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

  2. U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1995 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. Production-data analysis of single-phase (gas) coalbed-methane wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, C.R.; Bustin, R.M.; Seidle, J.P. [ConocoPhillips Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The current work illustrates how single-well production-data-analysis (PDA) techniques, such as type curve, flowing material balance (FMB), and pressure-transient (PT) analysis, may be altered to analyze single-phase CBM wells. Examples of how reservoir inputs to the PDA techniques and subsequent calculations are modified to account for CBM-reservoir behavior are given. This paper demonstrates, by simulated and field examples, that reasonable reservoir and stimulation estimates can be obtained from PDA of CBM reservoirs only if appropriate reservoir inputs (i.e., desorption compressibility, fracture porosity) are used in the analysis. As the field examples demonstrate, type-curve, FMB, and PT analysis methods for PDA are not used in isolation for reservoir-property estimation, but rather as a starting point for single-well and multiwell reservoir simulation, which is then used to history match and forecast CBM-well production (e.g., for reserves assignment). To study the effects of permeability anisotropy upon production, a 2D, single-phase, numerical CBM-reservoir simulator was constructed to simulate single-well production assuming various permeability-anisotropy ratios. Only large permeability ratios ({lt} 16:1) appear to have a significant effect upon single-well production characteristics. Multilayer reservoir characteristics may also be observed with CBM reservoirs because of vertical heterogeneity, or in cases where the coals are commingled with conventional (sandstone) reservoirs. In these cases, the type-curve, FMB, and PT analysis techniques are difficult to apply with confidence. Methods and tools for analyzing multilayer CBM (plus sand) reservoirs are presented. Using simulated and field examples, it is demonstrated that unique reservoir properties may be assigned to individual layers from commingled (multilayer) production in the simple two-layer case.

  4. Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maria Cecilia Bravo; Mariano Gurfinkel

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying possible relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. Based on a critical review of the available literature, a better understanding of the main weaknesses of the current state of the art of modeling and simulation for tight sand reservoirs has been reached. Progress has been made in the development and implementation of a simple reservoir simulator that is still able to overcome some of the deficiencies detected. The simulator will be used to quantify the impact of microscopic phenomena in the macroscopic behavior of tight sand gas reservoirs. Phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization are being considered as part of this study. To date, the adequate modeling of gas slippage in porous media has been determined to be of great relevance in order to explain unexpected fluid flow behavior in tight sand reservoirs.

  5. Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maria Cecilia Bravo

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

  6. Estimates of Biogenic Methane Production Rates in Deep Marine Sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. S. Colwell; S. Boyd; M. E. Delwiche; D. W. Reed; T. J. Phelps; D. T. Newby

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane hydrate found in marine sediments is thought to contain gigaton quantities of methane and is considered an important potential fuel source and climate-forcing agent. Much of the methane in hydrates is biogenic, so models that predict the presence and distribution of hydrates require accurate rates of in situ methanogenesis. We estimated the in situ methanogenesis rates in Hydrate Ridge (HR) sediments by coupling experimentally derived minimal rates of methanogenesis to methanogen biomass determinations for discrete locations in the sediment column. When starved in a biomass recycle reactor Methanoculleus submarinus produced ca. 0.017 fmol methane/cell/day. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) directed at the methyl coenzyme M reductase subunit A (mcrA) gene indicated that 75% of the HR sediments analyzed contained <1000 methanogens/g. The highest methanogen numbers were mostly from sediments <10 meters below seafloor. By combining methanogenesis rates for starved methanogens (adjusted to account for in situ temperatures) and the numbers of methanogens at selected depths we derived an upper estimate of <4.25 fmol methane produced/g sediment/day for the samples with fewer methanogens than the QPCR method could detect. The actual rates could vary depending on the real number of methanogens and various seafloor parameters that influence microbial activity. However, our calculated rate is lower than rates previously reported from such sediments and close to the rate derived using geochemical modeling of the sediments. These data will help to improve models that predict microbial gas generation in marine sediments and determine the potential influence of this source of methane on the global carbon cycle.

  7. The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong in the U.S. causes a net increase in GHG emissions on a global scale. We couple a global agricultural production in the United States. The effects on emissions from agricultural production (i.e., methane

  8. Hydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction of iron oxides in blast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    of coal and coke are consumed for heating and reducing iron oxides [2,3]. As a result, BFs have becomeHydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction 2012 Available online 18 June 2012 Keywords: Steam reforming Hydrogen and syngas production Coke oven

  9. New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYearDecadeYear Jan Feb136Adjustments

  10. U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunOld

  11. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Reserves, Estimated Production (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinter 2013-14Deliveries (NumberYear

  12. ESTIMATE OF THE TOTAL MECHANICAL FEEDBACK ENERGY FROM GALAXY CLUSTER-CENTERED BLACK HOLES: IMPLICATIONS FOR BLACK HOLE EVOLUTION, CLUSTER GAS FRACTION, AND ENTROPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, William G.; Guo Fulai, E-mail: mathews@ucolick.org [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The total feedback energy injected into hot gas in galaxy clusters by central black holes can be estimated by comparing the potential energy of observed cluster gas profiles with the potential energy of non-radiating, feedback-free hot gas atmospheres resulting from gravitational collapse in clusters of the same total mass. Feedback energy from cluster-centered black holes expands the cluster gas, lowering the gas-to-dark-matter mass ratio below the cosmic value. Feedback energy is unnecessarily delivered by radio-emitting jets to distant gas far beyond the cooling radius where the cooling time equals the cluster lifetime. For clusters of mass (4-11) x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}, estimates of the total feedback energy, (1-3) x 10{sup 63} erg, far exceed feedback energies estimated from observations of X-ray cavities and shocks in the cluster gas, energies gained from supernovae, and energies lost from cluster gas by radiation. The time-averaged mean feedback luminosity is comparable to those of powerful quasars, implying that some significant fraction of this energy may arise from the spin of the black hole. The universal entropy profile in feedback-free gaseous atmospheres in Navarro-Frenk-White cluster halos can be recovered by multiplying the observed gas entropy profile of any relaxed cluster by a factor involving the gas fraction profile. While the feedback energy and associated mass outflow in the clusters we consider far exceed that necessary to stop cooling inflow, the time-averaged mass outflow at the cooling radius almost exactly balances the mass that cools within this radius, an essential condition to shut down cluster cooling flows.

  13. Natural gas monthly, February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration. Estimates extend through February 1998 for many data series, and through November 1997 for most natural gas prices. Highlights of the natural gas data contained in this issue are: Preliminary estimates for January and February 1998 show that dry natural gas production, net imports, and consumption are all within 1 percent of their levels in 1997. Warmer-than-normal weather in recent months has resulted in lower consumption of natural gas by the residential sector and lower net withdrawals of gas from under round storage facilities compared with a year ago. This has resulted in an estimate of the amount of working gas in storage at the end of February 1998 that is 18 percent higher than in February 1997. The national average natural gas wellhead price is estimated to be $3.05 per thousand cubic feet in November 1997, 7 percent higher than in October. The cumulative average wellhead price for January through November 1997 is estimated to be $2.42 per thousand cubic feet, 17 percent above that of the same period in 1996. This price increase is far less than 36-percent rise that occurred between 1995 and 1996. 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  14. Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newson, R

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Raman lidars are semi-autonomous ground-based systems that transmit at a wavelength of 355 nm with 300 mJ, {approx}5 ns pulses, and a pulse repetition frequency of 30Hz. Signals from the various detection channels are processed to produce time- and height-resolved estimates of several geophysical quantities, such as water vapor mixing ratio, relative humidity, aerosol scattering ratio, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization ratio. Data processing is currently handled by a suite of six value-added product (VAP) processes. Collectively, these processes are known as the Raman Lidar Profiles VAP (RLPROF). The top-level best-estimate (BE) VAP process was introduced in order to bring together the most relevant information from the intermediate-level VAPs. As such, the BE process represents the final stage in data processing for the Raman lidar. Its principal function is to extract the primary variables from each of the intermediate-level VAPs, perform additional quality control, and combine all of this information into a single output file for the end-user. The focus of this document is to describe the processing performed by the BE VAP process.

  15. Natural gas monthly, November 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during November 1988, were estimated at 1755 billion cubic feet, 1.3 percent above withdrawals during November 1987. Of the total quantity, an estimated 215 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 35 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed; and 13 billion cubic feet were vented or flared. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1492 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 70 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1422 billion cubic feet, similar to the November 1987 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in November 1988 was estimated at 1702 billion cubic feet, including 173 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 12 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 95 billion cubic feet that were imported. In November 1987, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1684 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in November 1988, an estimated 1467 billion cubic feet were consumed, 148 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs, and 5 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 82 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

  16. Natural gas monthly, March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during March 1989, were estimated at 1777 billion cubic feet, 0.4 percent below withdrawals during March 1988. Of the total quantity, an estimated 211 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 36 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed; and 12 billion cubic feet were vented or flared. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1518 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 71 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1447 billion cubic feet, similar to the March 1988 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in March 1989 was estimated at 1881 billion cubic feet, including 319 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 14 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 101 billion cubic feet that were imported. In March 1988, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1841 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in March 1989, an estimated 1837 billion cubic feet were consumed, 93 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs and 8 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 57 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

  17. Natural gas monthly, March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The March 1998 edition of the Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. This report also features an article on the correction of errors in the drilling activity estimates series, and in-depth drilling activity data. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  18. HD gas purification for polarized HDice targets production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whisnant, Charles; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Colaneri, Luca; Devilbiss, J.; Kageya, Tsuneo; Loving, D.A.; Lowry, Michael; Rizzo, Alessandro; Sandorfi, Andrew; Schaerf, Carlo; Storey, J.D.; Wallace, C.M.; Wei, Xiangdong; Zonta, Irene

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid, frozen-spin targets of molecular HD were #12;rst developed for nuclear physics by a collaboration between Syracuse University and Brookhaven National Lab. They have been successfully used in measurements with photon beams, #12;rst at the Laser-Electron-Gamma-Source [1] and most recently at Je#11;erson Lab during the running of the E06-101 (g14) experiment [2]. Preparations are underway to utilize the targets in future electron experiments after the completion of the 12 GeV JLab upgrade [3]. HD is an attractive target since all of the material is polarizable, of low Z, and requires only modest holding #12;elds. At the same time, the small contributions from the target cell can be subtracted from direct measurements. Reaching the frozen-spin state with both high polarization and a signi#12;cant spin relaxation time requires careful control of H2 and D2 impurities. Commercially available HD contains 0.5 - 2% concentrations of H2 and D2. Low-temperature distillation is required to reduce these concentrations to the 10􀀀4 level to enable useful target production. This distillation is done using a column #12;lled with heli-pack C [4] to give good separation e#14;ciency. Approximately 12 moles of commercial HD is condensed into the mechanically refrigerated system at the base temperature of 11K. The system is then isolated and the temperature stabilized at 18K producing liquid HD, which is boiled by a resistive heater. The circulation established by the boil-o#11; condensing throughout the column then #12;ltering back down produces a steady-state isotopic separation permitting the extraction of HD gas with very low H2 and D2 content. A residual gas analyzer initially monitors distillation. Once the H2 concentration falls below its useful operating range, samples are periodically collected for analysis using gas chromatography [5] and Raman scattering. Where the measurement techniques overlap, good agreement is obtained. The operation of the distillery and results of gas analysis will be discussed. References [1] Phy. Rev. Lett. 101 (2009) 172002. [2] www.jlab.org/exp_prog/proposals/06/PR-06-101.pdf [3] www.jlab.org/exp_prog/proposals/12/PR12-12-009.pdf, www.jlab.org/exp_prog/proposals/12/PR12-12-010.pdf, and www.jlab.org/exp_prog/proposals/11/PR12-11-111.pdf [4] Nucl. Inst. Meth. 664 (2012) 347, www.wilmad-labglass.com/Products/LG-6730-104/ [5] Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 024101 (2011).

  19. Natural gas monthly, April 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Estimates extend through April 1998 for many data series. The report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, feature articles are presented designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This issue contains the special report, ``Natural Gas 1997: A Preliminary Summary.`` This report provides information on natural gas supply and disposition for the year 1997, based on monthly data through December from EIA surveys. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  20. Natural gas monthly, October 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article in this issue is a special report, ``Comparison of Natural Gas Storage Estimates from the EIA and AGA.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.