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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions Chris Brierley, Alan Thorpe, Mat Collins's to perform the integrations Currently uses a `slab' ocean #12;An Ocean Model Required to accurately model transient behaviour Will have its own uncertainties Requires even more computing power Create new models

Jones, Peter JS

2

Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects of ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects. Here we present a set of regional climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean best estimate of twenty-first century sea level rise in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, given the current

Drijfhout, Sybren

3

ORIGINAL PAPER Impacts of ocean acidification on respiratory gas exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER Impacts of ocean acidification on respiratory gas exchange and acid­base balance / Revised: 11 April 2012 / Accepted: 14 April 2012 � Springer-Verlag 2012 Abstract The oceanic carbonate Gill HCO3 - uptake Introduction The earth's oceanic carbonate system (partial pressure of CO2, p

Grosell, Martin

4

Including Non-Boussinesq Effects in Boussinesq Ocean Circulation Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set of equations is derived to modify z-level Boussinesq ocean circulation models to account for non-Boussinesq effects. These equations take the same form as those of the Boussinesq models except for the addition of a few correction terms that ...

Youyu Lu

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

6

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

7

The simulation of gas production from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by the combination of ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new method is proposed to produce gas from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by combining the ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization which can efficiently utilize the synthetic effects of therma...

Hao Yang; Yu-Hu Bai; Qing-Ping Li

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Modeling the Interaction between the Atmospheric and Oceanic Boundary Layers, Including a Surface Wave Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction between the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers is simulated by solving a closed system of equations including equations of motion, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), turbulent exchange coefficient (TEC), expressions for air and ...

Le Ngoc Ly

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bound gas in marine sediments: how much is really out there?methane hydrate in ocean sediment. Energy & Fuels 2005: 19:Accumulations in Oceanic Sediments George J. Moridis 1 and

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download...

12

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

13

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

14

Modeled natural and excess radiocarbon: Sensitivities to the gas exchange formulation and ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeled natural and excess radiocarbon: Sensitivities to the gas exchange formulation and ocean. Stocker (2008), Modeled natural and excess radiocarbon: Sensitivities to the gas exchange formulation descriptions of the air-sea gas exchange the models produce similar column inventories for excess 14 C among

Fischlin, Andreas

15

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 September 6, 2005 - 9:50am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone hotline. The hotline is available to American consumers starting today. "While we've largely seen the best of American generosity and unity throughout the recovery effort, we recognize that there are some bad actors that may try to take advantage of the situation. Consumers are our first line of defense in guarding against gas price gouging. I can assure you, our Administration - from the President down - takes this issue very

16

Mechanisms Leading to Co-existence of Gas and Hydrate in Ocean Sediments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leading to Co-existence of Gas Leading to Co-existence of Gas and Hydrate in Ocean Sediments Steven Bryant Dept. of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering The University of Texas at Austin and Ruben Juanes Dept. of Civil Engineering MIT Observations and Ruminations * Some proposed explanations for co-existence - kinetics of hydrate formation; - regional geotherms; - hypersaline brines as a result of hydrate formation;

17

EIS-0140: Ocean State Power Project, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission prepared this statement to evaluate potential impacts of construction and operation of a new natural gas-fired, combined-cycle power plant which would be located on a 40.6-acre parcel in the town of Burrillville, Rhode Island, as well as construction of a 10-mile pipeline to transport process and cooling water to the plant from the Blackstone River and a 7.5-mile pipeline to deliver No. 2 fuel oil to the site for emergency use when natural gas may not be available. The Economic Regulatory Administration adopted the EIS on 7/15/1988.

18

Influence of rain on air-sea gas exchange: Lessons from a model ocean David T. Ho,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of rain on air-sea gas exchange: Lessons from a model ocean David T. Ho,1,2 Christopher J-sea gas exchange: Lessons from a model ocean, J. Geophys. Res., 109, C08S18, doi:10.1029/2003JC001806. 1; published 1 July 2004. [1] Rain has been shown to significantly enhance the rate of air-water gas exchange

Ho, David

19

Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Measurements of air-sea gas exchange at high wind speeds in the Southern Ocean: Implications for global parameterizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

August 2006. [1] The SOLAS Air-Sea Gas Exchange (SAGE) Experiment was conducted in the western Pacific of air-sea gas exchange. Globally, the dominant control of air-sea gas exchange is turbulent energy as the primary source of energy for the atmospheric and oceanic molecular boundary layers have been derived from

Ho, David

23

Molecular and Structural Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter from the Deep Ocean by FTICR-MS, Including Hydrophilic Nitrogenous Organic Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular and Structural Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter from the Deep Ocean by FTICR-MS, Including Hydrophilic Nitrogenous Organic Molecules ... With its high mass resolving power it is, yet, the only technique to determine individual molecular species out of complex DOM mixtures, and with its mass accuracy it enables the calculation of molecular formulas for these species. ... The marine DOM budget comprises about 700 × 1015 g of carbon, and the majority of this material is stored in the deep oceans (7). ...

Thorsten Reemtsma; Anja These; Michael Linscheid; Jerry Leenheer; Alejandro Spitzy

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

25

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation Ian S F Jones, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York i.jones@ldeo.columbia.edu Helen E Young Earth Ocean and Space, Australian Technology Park, Sydney, HelenYoung@ozemail.com.au Introduction The carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere is rising rapidly, mostly as a result of fossil fuel burning. This is leading to more trapping of solar radiation in the atmosphere with the expectation that the world's climate will change. Rapid climate change has a downside risk of endangering the food security of the poor and raising the spectra of large scale transmigration. The UNFCCC was an agreement amongst most of the sovereign nations of the world

28

Applications of radon distribution and radon flux for the determination of oceanic mixing and air-sea gas exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPLICATIONS OF RADON DISTRIBUTION AND RADON FLUX FOR THE DETERS 1INATION Ol OCEANIC IvfIXING AND AIR -SEA GAS EXCHA NGE A Thesis by ROBERT I. EWIS BREWER Submitted to the Graduate College oi T e xa s A '4 I'. 1 Univ c r s i ty in partial... luiiillment of the requirement for the degree of KIASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major Subject: Oceanography APPLICATIONS OF RADON DIS TBIBUTION AND RADON FLUX FOR THE DETERMINATION OF OCEANIC MIXING A ND AIR ? SEA GAS EXCIdA NGE A Thesis by ROBERT LEWIS...

Brewer, Robert Lewis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

30

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to economically Page viable gas production. The overallare not promising targets for gas production. AcknowledgmentEnergy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology,

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. World crude and natural gas reserves rebound in 2000. Oilto the conventional gas reserve of 0.15x10 15 m 3 methane (

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Oceans '88  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings discuss the following papers: Solid waste disposal crisis; Plastics in Ocean; Continental shelf environmental research; Seafood technology advancements; Gulf of Mexico chemosynthetic petroleum seep communities; Water reuse on onshore mariculture and processing facilities; Oil and gas industry conflicts on the outer continental shelf; Cumulative environmental effects of the oil and gas leasing program; Oil and gas exploration; and Oil and gas resource management; Aids to navigation systems and equipment; and Surveillance experiments.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Parametric study of an efficient renewable power-to-substitute-natural-gas process including high-temperature steam electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Power-to-Substitute Natural Gas processes are investigated to offer solutions for renewable energy storing or transportation. In the present study, an original Power-to-SNG process combining high-temperature steam electrolysis and CO2 methanation is implemented and simulated. A reference process is firstly defined, including a specific modelling approach of the electrolysis and a methanation modelling including a kinetic law. The process also integrates a unit to clean the gas from residual CO2, H2 and H2O for gas network injection. Having set all the units, simulations are performed with ProsimPlus 3™ software for a reference case where the electrolyser and the methanation reactors are designed. The reference case allows to produce 67.5 Nm3/h of SNG with an electrical energy consumption of 14.4 kW h/Nm3. The produced SNG satisfies specifications required for network injection. From this reference process, two sensitivity analyses on electrolysis and methanation working points and on external parameters and constraints are considered. As a main result, we observe that the reference case maximises both process efficiency and SNG production when compared with other studied cases.

Myriam De Saint Jean; Pierre Baurens; Chakib Bouallou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Ocean Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some of these technologies are taking off from very low power capacities, although with an intense activity....4, 5] including La Rance tidal power station calculate a capacity of ocean energy facilities worldwid...

Ricardo Guerrero-Lemus; José Manuel Martínez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

36

Investigation of materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials performances in high moisture materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines Gerald Meier, Frederick Pettit and Keeyoung Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jung University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA 15260 Peer review Workshop III UTSR Project 04 01 SR116 October 18-20, 2005 Project Approach Task I Selection and Preparation of Specimens Task II Selection of Test Conditions Specimens : GTD111+CoNiCrAlY and Pt Aluminides, N5+Pt Aluminides Deposit : No Deposit, CaO, CaSO 4 , Na 2 SO 4 1150℃ Dry 1150℃ Wet 950℃ Wet 750℃ SO 3 950℃ Dry Selection of Test Temperature, T 1 , Gas Environment and Deposit Composition, D

37

Experimental study of industrial gas turbine flames including quantification of pressure influence on flow field, fuel/air premixing and flame shape  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A commercial swirl burner for industrial gas turbine combustors was equipped with an optically accessible combustion chamber and installed in a high-pressure test-rig. Several premixed natural gas/air flames at pressures between 3 and 6 bar and thermal powers of up to 1 MW were studied by using a variety of measurement techniques. These include particle image velocimetry (PIV) for the investigation of the flow field, one-dimensional laser Raman scattering for the determination of the joint probability density functions of major species concentrations, mixture fraction and temperature, planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH for the visualization of the flame front, chemiluminescence measurements of OH* for determining the lift-off height and size of the flame and acoustic recordings. The results give insights into important flame properties like the flow field structure, the premixing quality and the turbulence–flame interaction as well as their dependency on operating parameters like pressure, inflow velocity and equivalence ratio. The 1D Raman measurements yielded information about the gradients and variation of the mixture fraction and the quality of the fuel/air mixing, as well as the reaction progress. The OH PLIF images showed that the flame was located between the inflow of fresh gas and the recirculated combustion products. The flame front structures varied significantly with Reynolds number from wrinkled flame fronts to fragmented and strongly corrugated flame fronts. All results are combined in one database that can be used for the validation of numerical simulations.

Ulrich Stopper; Wolfgang Meier; Rajesh Sadanandan; Michael Stöhr; Manfred Aigner; Ghenadie Bulat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

OceanEnergyMMS.p65  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Teacher Guide .......................................................... 2 Related National Science Standards .......................... 3 Introduction to Ocean Energy .................................. 4 Petroleum & Natural Gas ......................................... 5 Natural Oil and Gas Seeps ........................................ 7 Methane Hydrates .................................................... 8 Solar Energy .............................................................. 9 Wind Energy ........................................................... 10 Wave Energy ........................................................... 11 OTEC: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion .............

39

Interstellar Simulations Using A Unified Microscopic-Macroscopic Monte Carlo Model with a full Gas-Grain Network including Bulk Diffusion in Ice Mantles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have designed an improved algorithm that enables us to simulate the chemistry of cold dense interstellar clouds with a full gas-grain reaction network. The chemistry is treated by a unified microscopic-macroscopic Monte Carlo approach that includes photon penetration and bulk diffusion. To determine the significance of these two processes, we simulate the chemistry with three different models. In Model 1, we use an exponential treatment to follow how photons penetrate and photodissociate ice species throughout the grain mantle. Moreover, the products of photodissociation are allowed to diffuse via bulk diffusion and react within the ice mantle. Model 2 is similar to Model 1 but with a slower bulk diffusion rate. A reference Model 0, which only allows photodissociation reactions to occur on the top two layers, is also simulated. Photodesorption is assumed to occur from the top two layers in all three models. We found that the abundances of major stable species in grain mantles do not differ much among these...

Chang, Qiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ocean Acidification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean Acidification ... The first assignment I give my students in Environmental Modeling class is to calculate the mass of the oceans versus the mass of the atmosphere and the “living” soil. ... As a young chemical engineer in the early 1970s, I remember discussing the horrors of sulfur and particulate pollution from steel mills, smelters, and power plants. ...

Jerald L. Schnoor

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Numerical Simulations of Bubble Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Pool Boiling--Including the Effects of Conjugate Conduction, Level of Gravity, and Noncondensable Gas Dissolved in the Liquid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microgravity Fluid Physics and Heat Transfer, 62-71. 47.that included the heat transfer between the fluid and solidflux, only one fluid—water—showed significant heat transfer

Aktinol, Eduardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Gulf of Alaska (including Lower Cook Inlt) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, September 1980  

SciTech Connect

The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the Gulf of Alaska subregion of the Alaska leasing region began in 1967, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. Two lease sales have been held in the subregion. Lease Sale 39, for the Northern Gulf of Alaska, was held on April 13, 1976, and resulted in the leasing of 76 tracts. Lease Sale CI, for Lower Cook Inlet, was held on October 27, 1977, and resulted in the leasing of 87 tracts. Exploratory drilling on the tracts leased in Sale 39 began in September 1976, and exploratory drilling on tracts leased in Sale CI began in July 1978. Commercial amounts of hydrocarbons have not been found in any of the wells drilled in either sale area. Seventy-four of the leases issued in the Northern Gulf of Alaska have been relinquished. As of June 1980, exploratory drilling in both areas had ceased, and none was planned for the near future. The next lease sale in the Gulf of Alaska, Sale 55, is scheduled for October 1980. Lease Sale 60 (Lower Cook Inlet and Shelikof Strait) is scheduled for September 1981, and Lease Sale 61 (OCS off Kodiak Island) is scheduled for April 1983. Sale 60 will be coordinated with a State lease sale in adjacent State-owned waters. The most recent estimates (June 1980) by the US Geological Survey of risked, economically recoverable resources for the 2 tracts currently under lease in the Northern Gulf of Alaska are negligible. For the 87 tracts currently under lease in Lower Cook Inlet, the USGS has produced risked, economically recoverable resource estimates of 35 million barrels of oil and 26 billion cubic feet of gas. These resource estimates for the leased tracts in both areas are short of commercially producible amounts. Onshore impacts from OCS exploration have been minimal. Two communities - Yakutat and Seward - served as support bases for the Northern Gulf of Alaska.

Jackson, J.B.; Dorrier, R.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

atlantic region including: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R: L. Tossey, T. Beeson, Parks, B. TruittTNC, UD MPEO staff 2 Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects of ocean...

44

Ocean - FAQ | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQ FAQ Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Frequently Asked Questions Following are some Frequently Asked Questions, we hope to add to this list as we hear from you. Questions What is Ocean.data.gov? How can I use this resource? What data can I expect to find here? Where do these data come from? Can data from State and academic sources be included in this portal? Who can suggest data and information to be included in Ocean.data.gov? Who decides what data are included? How do I get involved? How does this differ from other data efforts such as regional data portals? Where do I find information about data standards, metadata standards, and formats? Can we provide feedback about a particular dataset?

45

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. Carl Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA #12;PUBLISHER'S NOTES Material in this publication may be copied

46

Inherent optical properties of the ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and Monterey Bay, and includes Gulf Stream, Loop Current, slope, shelf, and ... The solar-induced fluorescence of CDOM ...

1999-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

47

Graduate Opportunities in Atmospheric Modeling to Understand Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy infrastructure. The graduate projects, fully funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions. Samples of guiding questions as part of the projects include: � What can explain; (3) demonstrated computer skills (e.g., Linux, R, Matlab, Fortran, GIS); (4) excellent oral

Lin, John Chun-Han

48

Impacts of the Indian Ocean on the ENSO cycle Jin-Yi Yu, Carlos R. Mechoso, James C. McWilliams, and Akio Arakawa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the ocean model domain includes only the tropical Pacific Ocean (the Pacific Run). In the other experiment, the ocean model domain includes both the Indian and tropical Pacific Oceans (the Indo-Pacific Run Oceans tends to be more realistic than that including the tropical Pacific Ocean only. In particular

Yu, Jin-Yi

49

Noble gases as proxies of mean ocean temperature: sensitivity studies using a climate model of reduced complexity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-core measurements of krypton, xenon, and argon into a global mean ocean temperature change. Simulated noble gas-to-nitrogen gas Krypton Xenon Argon Mean ocean temperature Paleoclimatic proxy a b s t r a c t Past global mean ocean temperature may be reconstructed from measurements of atmospheric noble gas concentrations in ice

Stocker, Thomas

50

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 829-843, December 2006 Gas Hydrate Stability Zone in Offshore Southern Taiwan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Offshore Southern Taiwan Wu-Cheng Chi 1, *, Donald L. Reed 2 , and Chih-Chin Tsai 3 (Manuscript received 17 in meeting natural gas demand in the future. To study the feasibility of recovering methane from the offshore hydrates in the sediments offshore of southern Taiwan. We used a dense grid of 6-channel and 120-channel

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

52

Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 933-950, December 2006 Methane Venting in Gas Hydrate Potential Area Offshore of SW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Area Offshore of SW Taiwan: Evidence of Gas Analysis of Water Column Samples Tsanyao Frank Yang 1 areas offshore of SW Taiwan for analysis of dissolved gases. Some these samples show unusually high-shore and offshore of southwestern Taiwan (e.g., Chow et al. 2000; Yang et al. 2004; Chiu et al. 2006). The gases

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

53

Modelling rogue waves through exact dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents Anjan Kundu Abhik Mukherjee Tapan...soliton under the influence of an ocean current appears and disappears preceded...include higher order dispersion or ocean currents, which are suspected to have...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Geochemical and geologic factors effecting the formulation of gas hydrate: Task No. 5, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of our work has been to determine the primary geochemical and geological factors controlling gas hydrate information and occurrence and particularly in the factors responsible for the generation and accumulation of methane in oceanic gas hydrates. In order to understand the interrelation of geochemical/geological factors controlling gas hydrate occurrence, we have undertaken a multicomponent program which has included (1) comparison of available information at sites where gas hydrates have been observed through drilling by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) on the Blake Outer Ridge and Middle America Trench; (2) regional synthesis of information related to gas hydrate occurrences of the Middle America Trench; (3) development of a model for the occurrence of a massive gas hydrate as DSDP Site 570; (4) a global synthesis of gas hydrate occurrences; and (5) development of a predictive model for gas hydrate occurrence in oceanic sediment. The first three components of this program were treated as part of a 1985 Department of Energy Peer Review. The present report considers the last two components and presents information on the worldwide occurrence of gas hydrates with particular emphasis on the Circum-Pacific and Arctic basins. A model is developed to account for the occurrence of oceanic gas hydrates in which the source of the methane is from microbial processes. 101 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

Kvenvolden, K.A.; Claypool, G.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Related Links List of Ocean Thermal Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOcean&oldid273467" Categories: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks Sectors...

56

Variability of the Indo-Pacific Ocean exchanges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ECCO–GODAE global estimate of the ocean circulation 1992–2007 is analyzed in the region of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), including the Southern Ocean flow south of Australia. General characteristics are an intense ...

Wunsch, Carl

57

A predictive ocean oil spill model  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Papodopoulos, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaudt, K. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Szabo, D. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Application of the Seasat Altimeter Data for Estimations of Sea Surface Height and Ocean Tide in the Northwest Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the study of effects of oceanic load upon the solid Earth, the SEASAT altimeter data were analyzed to estimate variations of the sea surface height including the ocean tide. Instrumental error, orbital eph...

K. Sato; M. Ooe; T. Teramoto

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Pacific Ocean’s Acidification Laboratory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Pacific Ocean’s Acidification Laboratory ... Five years ago, at the quadrennial International Coral Reef Symposium in Okinawa, Japan, a poll of the scientists and resource managers present ranked ocean acidification 38th out of a list of 39 possible threats facing reefs, recalls Rusty Brainard, head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Coral Reef Ecosystem Division. ... As the oceans absorb CO2 from the atmosphere at the rate of one million tons per hour, the pH of the water is changing. ...

Christopher Pala

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

60

Data-based estimates of suboxia, denitrification, and N2O production in the ocean and their sensitivities to dissolved O2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pathways, N2O is a powerful greenhouse gas that affects the Earth's energy balance and climate. The ocean

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Ocean - Tools | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools Tools Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Decision-Support Tools (DSTs): Science and information are fundamental to effective marine planning. Marine planning involves inclusive discussion and analyses of the status and potential uses of 3-dimensional areas of coastal, marine and Great Lakes ecosystems (including the water column) and their potential changes over time. Relevant spatial data and derived interpretive and analytical products (i.e. decision-support tools) help inform all phases of the marine planning process. To date, several decision-support tools have been develop to support marine planning efforts. Marine planners should carefully evaluate which tools best apply to their region or specific issue or project. Below is a list of

63

Extension of the semi-empirical correlation for the effects of pipe diameter and internal surface roughness on the decompression wave speed to include High Heating Value Processed Gas mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The decompression wave speed, which is used throughout the pipeline industry in connection with the Battelle two-curve method for the control of propagating ductile fracture, is typically calculated using GASDECOM (GAS DECOMpression). GASDECOM, developed in the 1970's, idealizes the decompression process as isentropic and one-dimensional, taking no account of pipe wall frictional effects or pipe diameter. Previous shock tube tests showed that decompression wave speeds in smaller diameter and rough pipes are consistently slower than those predicted by GASDECOM for the same conditions of mixture composition and initial pressure and temperature. Previous analysis based on perturbation theory and the fundamental momentum equation revealed a correction term to be subtracted from the ‘idealized’ value of the decompression speed calculated by GASDECOM. One parameter in this correction term involves a dynamic spatial pressure gradient of the outflow at the rupture location. While this is difficult to obtain without a shock tube or actual rupture test, data from 14 shock tube tests, as well as from 14 full scale burst tests involving a variety of gas mixture compositions, were analyzed to correlate the variation of this pressure gradient with two characteristics of the gas mixture, namely; the molecular weight and the higher heating value (HHV). For lean to moderately-rich gas mixes, the developed semi-empirical correlation was found to fit very well the experimentally determined decompression wave speed curve. For extremely rich gas mixes, such as High Heating Value Processed Gas (HHVPG) mixtures of HHV up to 58 MJ/m3, it was found that it overestimates the correction term. Therefore, additional shock tube tests were conducted on (HHVPG) mixes, and the previously developed semi-empirical correlation was extended (revised) to account for such extremity in the richness of the gas mixtures. The newly developed semi-empirical correlation covers a wider range of natural gas mixtures from as lean as pure methane up to HHVPG mixtures of HHV = 58 MJ/m3.

K.K. Botros; L. Carlson; M. Reed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Causes of ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the foregoing analysis of the ocean and the atmosphere as two interacting subsystems, we have identified two major energy inputs into the ocean. These are the wind stress over the sea surface and heat fluxe...

David Tolmazin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

66

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS GAS HYDRATE SAMPLING ON THE BLAKE RIDGE Drive College Station, Texas 77845-9547 U.S.A. Timothy J.G. Francis Acting Director ODP/TAMU Jack Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas, 77845

67

The Indian Ocean Tsunami of December 26, 2004  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Indian Ocean tsunami of December 26, 2004, was a natural disaster of... 1 1 The TEC was created in early 2005 and included more...

Saskia de Pee; Regina Moench-Pfanner…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

NREL: Energy Analysis - Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Ocean Energy OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for ocean power technologies. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of wave and tidal range technologies. Credit: Lewis, A., S. Estefen, J. Huckerby, W. Musial, T. Pontes, J. Torres-Martinez, 2011: Ocean Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds)], Cambridge University Press. Figure 6.11 Enlarge image

69

ocean | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean ocean Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

70

Ocean | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Ocean Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean Welcome to our COMMUNITY This is the National Ocean Council's portal for data, information, and decision tools to support people engaged in regional marine planning for the future use of the ocean, our coasts, and the Great Lakes. Our goal is to enhance discovery of and access to data and information for planners, stakeholders, and the public. Please visit our Feedback page to tell us what would make the site most useful to you as we expand our content. Start Here! Previous Pause Next PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager View More West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework View More Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal

71

LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO SIMULATE CO2 OCEAN DISPOSAL  

SciTech Connect

This Final Technical Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of an investigation entitled ''Laboratory Experiments to Simulate CO{sub 2} Ocean Disposal'', funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's University Coal Research Program. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation was to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. A number of critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} were addressed by performing laboratory experiments on liquid CO{sub 2} jet break-up into a dispersed droplet phase, and hydrate formation, under deep ocean conditions. Major accomplishments of this study included: (1) five jet instability regimes were identified that occur in sequence as liquid CO{sub 2} jet disintegration progresses from laminar instability to turbulent atomization; (2) linear regression to the data yielded relationships for the boundaries between the five instability regimes in dimensionless Ohnesorge Number, Oh, and jet Reynolds Number, Re, space; (3) droplet size spectra was measured over the full range of instabilities; (4) characteristic droplet diameters decrease steadily with increasing jet velocity (and increasing Weber Number), attaining an asymptotic value in instability regime 5 (full atomization); and (5) pre-breakup hydrate formation appears to affect the size distribution of the droplet phase primary by changing the effective geometry of the jet.

Stephen M. Masutani

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A method to measure Kr/N2 ratios in air bubbles trapped in ice cores and its application in reconstructing past mean ocean temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in krypton inventory in the glacial ocean due to higher gas solubility in colder water causes a decrease reflect past ocean temperature change due to the dependence of gas solubility on temperature. The increase of LGM deep ocean temperature based on foraminiferal d18 O and sediment pore water d18 O and chlorinity

Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

75

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:29am Addthis Photo of water flowing from several openings in a hydropower dam. Hydropower produces 10% of the nation's energy, including power from the Ice Harbor Dam in Burbank, Washington. This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector. Overview Hydropower has been used for centuries to power machinery, but the application most commonly associated with hydropower is electricity production through dams. Ocean energy refers to various forms of renewable energy harnessed from the ocean. There are two primary types of ocean energy: mechanical and thermal.

76

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

How ocean currents are studied  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

How infinite and boundless the ocean must have seemed to the first man to set foot upon its shore. Kind or stern, shallow or steep, the ocean’s shores have always held a peculiar fascination for man. The moist...

David Tolmazin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Challenges in Ocean Energy Utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean is a reservoir of energy. It is ... . Development of suitable cost effective technologies for power generation from different forms of ocean energy (like wave energy, tidal energy, Ocean Thermal Energy Conv...

S. Neelamani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

File:BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 - 2012 Size of this preview: 700 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,250 × 4,500 pixels, file size: 1.39 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 - 2012 Sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2008-09-12 Extent Continental US plus Alaska Countries United States UN Region Northern America US Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 - 2012. Includes Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Pacific and Alaska Regions.Shows existing leases, areas available for leasing, areas withdrawn from leasing,

80

Ocean Map Regional | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Regional Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Featured Maps The following maps are from data sources that are regional in scope. These are some of the data sources available in the Ocean Community that are most useful in the identified region. This includes several of the human use atlases now available. Regional/State Maps .view-map-gallery .views-row { float: inherit; margin: 0; } .map-align { float: left; margin: 0 20px; } .map-gallery-thumbnail{width:202px;height:133px;} .pane-map-gallery h2.pane-title { color: #284A78 !important; font: bold 16px Georgia,"Times New Roman",Serif !important; margin-left: 25px !important; } Oregon Submarine Cables Marine Reserves and Protected areas of Oregon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Chapter 16 - Ocean Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Ocean thermal energy converters (OTECs) took advantage of the ocean acting as an immense collector and storer of solar radiation, thus delivering a steady flow of low-grade thermal energy. The ocean plays a similar role in relation to the wind energy, which is transformed into waves far steadier than the air currents that created them. Nevertheless, waves are neither steady nor concentrated enough to constitute a highly attractive energy source notwithstanding their large total power. There is little net horizontal motion of water in a surface ocean wave. A floating object drifts in the direction of the wave with about 1% of the wave velocity. A given elementary cell of water will move in a vertical circle, surging forward near the crest of the wave but receding by an almost equal amount at the trough. Any system in which the wave velocity depends on wavelength is called dispersive; hence the deep ocean is dispersive.

Aldo Vieira da Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Open Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration K. Coale coale@mlml.calstate.edu (831) 632-4400 Moss Landing Marine Laboratories 8272 Moss Landing Road Moss Landing, California 95039 USA Abstract The trace element iron has been recently shown to play a critical role in nutrient utilization, phytoplankton growth and therefore the uptake of carbon dioxide from the surface waters of the global ocean. Carbon fixation in the surface waters, via phytoplankton growth, shifts the ocean/atmosphere exchange equilibrium for carbon dioxide. As a result, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and iron flux to the oceans have been linked to climate change (glacial to interglacial transitions). These recent findings have led some to suggest that large scale

84

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Zender, Charles

85

Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

86

Simple ocean carbon cycle models  

SciTech Connect

Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pertinent question, however, is: what is the worldwide power resource that could be extracted with OTEC plants without affecting the thermohaline ocean circulation? The estimate is that the maximum steady-state...

Dr. Luis A. Vega Ph.D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pertinent question, however, is: what is the worldwide power resource that could be extracted with OTEC plants without affecting the thermohaline ocean circulation? The estimate is that the maximum steady-state...

Dr. Luis A. Vega Ph.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Use of Ocean Energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For converting the current of water for the production of electricity, there is a wide range of technological approaches. The Italian ocean current power plant named Kobold (Fig. 6.2) was the first commercial o...

Prof. Dr.-Ing Hermann-Josef Wagner…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

On the Strong Seasonal Currents in the Deep Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a set of models, including one with a resolution of ¼°, several aspects of the simulated seasonal currents in the deep ocean are considered. It is shown that over vast areas of the deep interior, particularly in the Indian Ocean, annual-...

Oleg A. Saenko

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

ocean energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

93

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Gas hydrate occurrences and their relation to host sediment properties: Results from Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition, East Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) recovered various forms of gas-hydrate bearing sediments from 10 drill sites in the lower slope and basin floor of the Ulleung Basin. To characterize the gas-hydrate occurrences and the properties of the host sediments, whole-round core samples were taken from portions of recovered cores determined to be hydrate-bearing based on infrared (IR) scanning. These samples were further characterized by a variety of shipboard experiments such as imaging of the sediments with hand-held IR and visual cameras, measurements of pore water chlorinity within and around IR inferred cold regions in the core and grain-size analysis of pore-water squeeze cakes. Sediment compositions of selected samples were further characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopes during post-cruise analysis. The shipboard and post-cruise analysis results collectively indicate that the recovered gas hydrates mainly occur as 1) “pore-filling” type bounded by discrete silty sand to sandy silt layers, 2) “fracture-filling” veins and nodules, or 3) “disseminated” type in silt. In addition, minor but significant variation in gas hydrate concentrations were observed in diatomaceous silt where gas hydrates occur as “pore-filling” material in layers dominated by intact diatom frustules. Gas hydrate accumulations of “fracture-filling” type occur predominantly in regions where acoustic blanking features in the seismic record suggest gas migration from below the gas hydrate stability zone. Results from the UBGH2 core studies along with the analysis of similar samples from other expeditions, including those executed by the Ocean Drilling Program, the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and the First Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition, greatly improved our understanding of lithologic controls on marine gas hydrate occurrences.

J.-J. Bahk; D.-H. Kim; J.-H. Chun; B.-K. Son; J.-H. Kim; B.-J. Ryu; M.E. Torres; M. Riedel; P. Schultheiss

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Basin scale assessment of gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change  

SciTech Connect

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating climate. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. Field investigations have discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor along the Arctic Ocean margin, and the plumes appear at depths corresponding to the upper limit of a receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the first visible signs of the dissociation of shallow hydrate deposits due to ongoing climate change in the arctic. We simulate the release of methane from oceanic deposits, including the effects of fully-coupled heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate dissociation, and other thermodynamic processes, for systems representative of segments of the Arctic Ocean margins. The modeling encompasses a range of shallow hydrate deposits from the landward limit of the hydrate stability zone down to water depths beyond the expected range of century-scale temperature changes. We impose temperature changes corresponding to predicted rates of climate change-related ocean warming and examine the possibility of hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. The assessment is performed at local-, regional-, and basin-scales. The simulation results are consistent with the hypothesis that dissociating shallow hydrates alone can result in significant methane fluxes at the seafloor. However, the methane release is likely to be confined to a narrow region of high dissociation susceptibility, defined by depth and temperature, and that any release will be continuous and controlled, rather than explosive. This modeling also establishes the first realistic bounds for methane release along the arctic continental shelf for potential hydrate dissociation scenarios, and ongoing work may help confirm whether climate change is already impacting the stability of the vast oceanic hydrate reservoir.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Cameron-Smith, P.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A model of the ocean migration of Pacific salmon Chloe Bracis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advection by ocean currents with fish swimming behavior to model trajectories of salmon. The behavior rules are based on possible responses to components of the earth's magnetic field, and the ocean currents the high seas to the Columbia River, including the effects of interannual variability in ocean currents

Washington at Seattle, University of

97

E ect of a Simple Storm on a Simple Ocean Je Moehlis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can excite near-inertial currents in the mixed layer of the ocean; recent observations include [8, 13E#11;ect of a Simple Storm on a Simple Ocean Je#11; Moehlis 1 Introduction: Near-frequency cuto#11; for internal waves in the ocean. An internal wave with frequency near f is called a near

Moehlis, Jeff

98

High Abundances of Aerobic Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria in the South Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Photosynthetic Bacteria in the South Pacific Ocean Published ahead of print on 11...AAP bacteria across the South Pacific Ocean, including the center of the...distribution of AAP bacteria in the South Pacific Ocean and to assess their relative importance...

Raphaël Lami; Matthew T. Cottrell; Joséphine Ras; Osvaldo Ulloa; Ingrid Obernosterer; Hervé Claustre; David L. Kirchman; Philippe Lebaron

2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

A power analysis and data acquisition system for ocean wave energy device testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the testing of ocean wave energy devices, the demand for a portable and robust data acquisition and electrical loading system has become apparent. This paper investigates the development of a 30 kW inclusive system combining loading capabilities, real-time power analysis, and data acquisition for the testing of deployed ocean wave energy devices. Hardware results for ocean testing are included.

Ean Amon; Ted K.A. Brekken; Annette von Jouanne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

2014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Covering Cita ons Related to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

records include books, reports, serial conference proceedings, monographs, maps, and abstracts of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, Proceedings of the Interna onal Ocean Discovery Program, and the report

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Infiltrating the Ocean Floor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Grant S. Bromhal, Duane H. Smith, US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 Ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide is considered to be a potentially important method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions (US DOE, 1999). Oceans are currently the largest atmospheric carbon dioxide sink; and certainly, enough storage capacity exists in the oceans to hold all of the CO 2 that we can emit for many years. Additionally, technologies exist that allow us to pump liquid CO 2 into the oceans at depths between one and two kilometers for extended periods of time and five times that deep for shorter durations. The biggest unknown in the ocean sequestration process, however, is the fate and

102

Ocean Energy Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Solar Wind Homes & Buildings Industry Vehicles & Fuels...

103

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

104

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

105

Magnetic properties of dredged oceanic gabbros and the source of marine magnetic anomalies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Is the Troodos massif of Cyprus a fragment of Mesozoic ocean floor? Nature, 200, Gas, I. G. & Smewing, J...from the Troodos massif, Cyprus,Nature, 242, 26-29...1971. The Troodos Massif, Cyprus and other ophiolites as oceanic......

D. V. Kent; B. M. Honnorez; N. D. Opdyke; P. J. Fox

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

107

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

"1. Rhode Island State Energy Partners","Gas","FPL Energy Operating Serv Inc",528  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "1. Rhode Island State Energy Partners","Gas","FPL Energy Operating Serv Inc",528 "2. Manchester Street","Gas","Dominion Energy New England, LLC",447 "3. Tiverton Power Plant","Gas","Tiverton Power Inc",250 "4. Ocean State Power II","Gas","Ocean State Power II",219 "4. Ocean State Power","Gas","Ocean State Power Co",219 "6. Pawtucket Power Associates","Gas","Pawtucket Power Associates LP",63 "7. Ridgewood Providence Power","Other Renewables","Ridgewood Power Management LLC",24 "8. Central Power Plant","Gas","State of Rhode Island",10

109

Infrasonic ambient ocean noise: Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of ocean ambient noise were made at three widely separated deep?water bottom locations in the N. E. Pacific at eight frequencies in the range from 2.5–20.0 Hz for 40 consecutive days. Concurrent data on wind speed and wave height were collected. Analysis indicates that the spectrum level of infrasonicnoise is linearly related to the log of the wind speed above a threshold level. There is evidence that the noise can be directly associated with the wind rather than through the surface waves it produces. [Work supported by ONR.

Rudolph H. Nichols

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Uncertainty in the oceanic heat and carbon uptake and their impact on climate projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of uncertainty in the rate of heat and carbon uptake by the deep ocean on climate response to increases in greenhouse gas concentrations is studied by means of numerical simulations with the two-dimensional ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.; Wang, Chien.; Holian, Gary L.; Stone, Peter H.; Prinn, Ronald G.

111

Incursion of the Pacific Ocean Water into the Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the data collected during the International Indian Ocean Expedition, maps showing the distribution of depth ... became clear that low-salinity water from the Pacific intrudes into the western Indian Ocean t...

G S Sharma; A D Gouveia…

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Maritime support for ocean-resources development. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The issues associated with ocean development to determine their implication for the US maritime industry have been examined. The examination embraced ocean energy systems, offshore oil and gas activities, food from the sea, deep seabed mining, and the use of ocean space. The requirements that ocean-resource development places on the maritime industry do not show sharp differences from one resource to the next. While the technological base on which the means of recovery and use of the resources can be built and deployed has been developed, more scientific work and technological development are needed. However, it is the committee's opinion that the true factors pacing the effort to bring many of the resources into use and to achieve the many benefits are of an economic, legal, and public-policy nature.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Tropical atmosphere - Ocean interactions in a conceptual framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical analysis of observations (including atmospheric reanalysis and forced ocean model simulations) is used to address two questions: First, does an analogous mechanism to that of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) ...

Jansen, Malte Friedrich

114

13.012 Hydrodynamics for Ocean Engineering, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics and their simplifications for several areas of marine hydrodynamics. Application of these principles to the solution of ocean engineering problems. Topics include ...

Techet, Alexandra Hughes

115

Simulating Temperature, Salinity and Currents in the Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effective use of scarce resources requires a coherent and rational approach to oceanic system development. Included in this approach is the simulation of the performance of the proposed system, be it oceanogra...

Kim David Saunders; David B. King

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

2.019 Design of Ocean Systems, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course is the completion of the cycle of designing, implementing and testing an ocean system, including hardware and software implementation, that begins with 2.017J. Design lectures are given in hydrodynamics, power ...

Chryssostomidis, Chryssostomos

117

Generating electricity from the oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean energy has many forms, encompassing tides, surface waves, ocean circulation, salinity and thermal gradients. This paper will considers two of these, namely those found in the kinetic energy resource in tidal streams or marine currents, driven by gravitational effects, and the resources in wind-driven waves, derived ultimately from solar energy. There is growing interest around the world in the utilisation of wave energy and marine currents (tidal stream) for the generation of electrical power. Marine currents are predictable and could be utilised without the need for barrages and the impounding of water, whilst wave energy is inherently less predictable, being a consequence of wind energy. The conversion of these resources into sustainable electrical power offers immense opportunities to nations endowed with such resources and this work is partially aimed at addressing such prospects. The research presented conveys the current status of wave and marine current energy conversion technologies addressing issues related to their infancy (only a handful being at the commercial prototype stage) as compared to others such offshore wind. The work establishes a step-by-step approach that could be used in technology and project development, depicting results based on experimental and field observations on device fundamentals, modelling approaches, project development issues. It includes analysis of the various pathways and approaches needed for technology and device or converter deployment issues. As most technology developments are currently UK based, the paper also discusses the UK's financial mechanisms available to support this area of renewable energy, highlighting the needed economic approaches in technology development phases. Examination of future prospects for wave and marine current ocean energy technologies are also discussed.

AbuBakr S. Bahaj

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development among the ocean energy options, and other relatively...paper focuses on ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). However, much of the paper's content has relevance to the use of the other ocean energy sources. Techniques of ocean...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,032 979 1,003 855 565 457 471 518 560 657 654 1,014 1990 1,195 903 893 857 577 244 413 365 508 587 763 774 1991 1,089 979 864 605 667 414 538 540 555 628 496 895 1992 1,076 1,128 1,103 1,047 676 498 448 479 411 609 654 951 1993 1,140 1,359 1,325 907 429 330 273 364 243 503 1,008 1,324 1994 1,919 1,974 1,626 1,092 653 542 343 599 384 569 1,010 1,338 1995 1,077 1,679 1,883 1,353 901 562 413 582 294 580 1,216 1,523 1996 1,963 1,919 1,606 1,251 757 446 421 443 581 648 972 1,290 1997 1,694 1,744 1,739 1,144 892 537 430 399 460 637 1,211 1,416 1998 1,817 1,642 1,518 1,141 694 506 496 195 483 628 1,019 1,338

120

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 96,012 79,547 77,363 52,992 33,092 26,098 25,208 27,662 29,499 38,457 46,614 63,083 2002 80,458 74,651 70,773 53,368 38,209 33,401 32,700 34,743 30,425 40,462 58,542 83,877 2003 101,975 96,176 79,246 53,759 36,015 29,095 30,298 32,640 26,799 39,895 47,467 78,054 2004 100,298 95,715 73,189 54,937 42,873 33,367 36,047 33,735 32,060 34,578 50,908 74,224 2005 90,958 84,388 85,058 50,137 38,196 34,547 36,133 37,648 32,674 35,439 50,234 80,301 2006 76,519 77,324 76,877 49,039 37,224 36,803 44,307 41,471 31,545 40,867 49,703 63,941 2007 78,283 95,894 81,570 63,089 41,955 37,217 42,996 50,308 38,092 42,936 57,228 82,068

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,069 7,033 6,197 2,868 1,601 1,279 1,180 1,097 1,241 1,528 2,542 5,873 1990 7,587 5,618 4,176 3,424 2,281 1,519 1,312 1,355 1,235 1,613 2,520 4,567 1991 8,702 6,014 4,265 2,489 1,702 1,330 1,290 1,279 1,299 1,590 3,974 5,653 1992 6,180 5,310 3,653 2,956 1,785 1,540 1,407 1,292 1,240 1,449 2,608 5,771 1993 7,076 6,147 5,910 3,743 2,057 1,439 1,324 1,432 1,345 1,544 3,424 5,327 1994 6,644 6,611 4,717 2,954 1,875 1,384 1,364 1,256 1,384 1,475 2,207 4,632 1995 6,358 6,001 5,160 2,968 2,354 1,794 1,558 1,524 1,903 1,836 3,020 5,164 1996 7,808 7,923 5,595 4,413 2,222 1,770 1,798 1,678 1,759 1,900 3,273 6,014

122

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 136,340 110,078 102,451 66,525 41,541 34,864 34,025 32,667 33,129 48,517 59,935 87,118 2002 106,011 98,576 94,429 70,082 51,854 40,885 40,538 38,774 34,999 51,972 76,275 108,800 2003 140,436 123,688 99,629 65,861 43,326 32,959 33,810 37,562 32,918 52,253 65,617 103,846 2004 137,568 117,976 93,845 67,347 46,827 33,561 34,567 34,689 34,129 47,268 64,279 99,290 2005 122,404 107,459 105,183 63,669 47,239 37,221 35,833 37,060 33,808 42,569 65,578 113,292 2006 95,548 97,666 85,732 52,957 42,766 33,443 36,271 36,307 35,048 54,845 69,951 88,329 2007 105,108 128,279 87,809 70,627 41,797 34,877 33,361 40,637 34,554 41,730 69,858 102,787

123

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,481 15,747 13,983 11,129 7,094 5,429 8,556 6,368 5,506 5,854 10,730 11,012 2002 16,123 14,049 12,938 10,424 6,676 4,984 8,748 7,414 6,786 6,218 9,753 13,269 2003 15,675 15,319 13,354 8,644 6,232 4,472 7,653 7,469 5,904 6,758 8,775 13,011 2004 16,104 16,445 12,058 7,983 6,255 5,830 6,952 6,641 4,338 5,935 8,995 13,129 2005 17,242 14,641 11,440 8,360 6,579 5,853 7,874 8,028 6,345 6,081 8,200 13,733 2006 15,551 13,741 13,940 10,766 7,411 7,500 9,685 9,019 6,665 7,092 10,375 13,432 2007 17,851 19,390 16,040 10,333 9,436 7,602 10,286 11,264 8,529 7,818 10,704 15,974 2008 20,241 20,433 17,488 13,024 9,556 9,390 10,050 10,893 8,126 10,847 13,250 17,360

124

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 23,636 24,435 21,187 13,360 8,237 3,927 3,565 3,735 4,397 8,946 15,949 30,143 1990 25,317 19,642 20,361 13,373 7,446 4,838 3,975 4,165 4,240 7,272 13,757 19,190 1991 26,286 24,481 20,157 11,779 6,341 3,971 3,703 3,933 4,196 8,065 15,488 21,940 1992 26,321 24,820 20,215 15,893 7,455 5,016 4,291 4,260 4,418 9,092 15,094 23,770 1993 25,230 26,706 25,531 15,019 6,359 5,221 3,939 3,860 4,492 9,636 14,979 23,071 1994 33,573 29,301 22,713 14,498 7,933 5,111 4,027 4,287 4,492 7,331 12,594 20,936 1995 28,306 29,814 21,860 14,128 8,132 4,979 4,697 4,406 4,623 7,916 18,650 27,649 1996 33,993 29,732 26,650 16,833 8,960 7,661 4,569 4,401 4,048 8,548 18,274 26,298

125

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 49,414 34,292 35,867 25,368 20,633 20,544 24,229 26,863 21,857 25,679 23,983 34,450 2002 44,041 37,992 33,260 23,775 22,612 24,924 30,113 29,701 24,899 23,785 32,829 47,106 2003 56,470 43,704 31,355 30,232 21,920 20,512 23,789 26,828 21,628 22,981 26,920 45,508 2004 52,486 48,806 31,529 28,718 26,610 24,562 26,132 26,093 22,927 22,025 29,012 49,125 2005 47,756 39,503 39,085 25,191 23,198 26,957 31,619 33,089 28,453 26,199 32,483 52,399 2006 39,904 45,015 35,118 26,670 26,891 30,790 36,980 38,808 25,412 31,321 35,677 40,816 2007 49,163 47,589 32,236 31,955 27,318 31,415 32,039 49,457 31,028 27,420 33,851 41,413

126

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Hampshire (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3,171 3,309 2,951 2,280 1,441 1,134 1,003 888 1,182 1,589 1,904 2,520 2002 2,917 3,188 2,833 2,179 1,815 1,423 1,657 1,055 1,381 1,038 1,847 3,507 2003 6,844 6,457 5,490 3,772 3,085 2,034 3,900 5,640 4,166 4,643 3,574 4,515 2004 5,204 7,595 6,870 6,131 2,712 4,473 4,167 4,306 4,766 3,194 5,704 6,026 2005 6,958 7,545 6,875 5,691 6,049 5,824 5,780 6,010 4,491 4,069 5,173 5,988 2006 7,782 6,823 7,852 4,511 2,505 2,608 3,895 5,107 5,407 5,917 3,850 6,263 2007 6,645 5,329 5,157 5,429 3,826 4,223 5,642 5,420 5,969 4,295 4,527 5,641 2008 7,786 7,653 7,558 5,076 4,511 4,124 5,536 4,876 5,352 5,548 6,443 6,692

127

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,357 1,414 1,111 852 521 368 285 233 268 396 724 1,022 1990 1,305 1,199 1,085 822 628 410 247 234 241 378 759 1,132 1991 1,639 1,249 996 830 680 362 272 248 269 449 873 1,233 1992 1,404 1,078 821 668 438 309 264 269 287 439 760 1,271 1993 1,631 1,376 1,262 882 639 400 362 389 378 667 874 1,407 1994 1,351 1,412 1,065 869 544 369 291 270 308 550 915 1,287 1995 1,671 1,247 1,217 987 873 594 373 258 NA NA NA NA 1996 1,176 1,203 1,030 925 712 342 197 197 250 640 1,301 1,748 1997 1,570 1,309 1,403 1,189 958 491 623 287 316 554 966 1,088 1998 1,628 1,322 1,279 936 597 442 371 253 343 493 927 1,822

128

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 28,398 21,618 21,408 13,900 9,252 8,342 9,046 11,007 9,109 12,662 13,558 17,125 2002 24,221 22,802 20,670 12,534 8,846 8,846 10,514 12,842 10,157 12,911 20,408 28,827 2003 31,739 28,530 21,240 15,685 9,809 8,723 8,128 7,986 7,131 11,863 16,167 27,049 2004 33,576 27,062 20,558 14,623 9,867 8,560 7,704 8,271 7,535 11,725 16,222 26,279 2005 29,469 25,497 24,272 13,414 10,273 10,104 9,641 11,634 8,302 12,060 16,807 28,263 2006 24,101 24,846 19,870 11,807 9,034 9,251 11,438 11,236 8,042 11,895 16,300 21,239 2007 24,841 32,498 20,950 15,805 8,835 9,239 9,540 12,974 9,655 10,242 17,911 25,311 2008 28,394 26,094 20,551 12,340 9,832 9,808 10,778 7,669 8,974 12,394 20,316 25,502

129

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,475 6,484 5,643 5,505 4,182 3,864 3,515 3,541 3,688 4,790 5,518 6,170 2002 6,844 5,846 6,319 5,737 5,034 4,070 4,980 4,124 4,599 6,126 7,421 8,523 2003 7,672 7,313 7,026 5,737 4,976 4,408 4,112 4,164 4,356 5,062 5,554 7,236 2004 7,555 7,180 6,077 5,400 4,775 4,216 4,064 4,187 4,024 5,032 6,153 6,963 2005 7,585 6,443 6,231 5,612 5,092 4,247 4,081 3,903 4,080 4,829 5,360 7,262 2006 7,304 6,824 6,957 5,389 4,762 4,109 4,108 4,063 3,935 5,157 5,893 6,958 2007 7,982 7,322 6,900 5,469 4,958 4,253 3,873 3,944 4,150 5,003 6,095 7,723 2008 8,446 7,443 6,660 5,737 5,057 4,098 3,749 3,805 3,520 4,922 5,595 7,419

130

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 57,089 50,447 49,042 41,157 30,506 23,904 22,403 22,033 19,905 22,672 30,231 42,797 2002 47,541 44,713 45,909 30,319 24,230 22,105 26,301 21,119 21,764 34,563 38,884 46,826 2003 44,971 47,164 38,292 25,380 24,811 18,484 23,772 23,529 20,981 22,248 39,408 48,023 2004 47,548 44,859 30,853 28,458 23,766 20,408 22,895 21,210 20,651 26,731 39,719 50,977 2005 50,356 41,495 39,617 33,501 25,108 20,725 26,350 23,387 22,698 29,399 38,140 54,566 2006 45,074 45,360 42,614 26,074 20,799 20,115 23,277 22,817 18,928 30,373 38,546 49,332 2007 62,803 46,554 33,579 30,243 25,136 25,014 28,465 26,787 27,444 32,786 39,145 57,263

131

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,567 1,575 1,160 692 409 355 301 249 321 435 785 1,176 1990 1,313 1,283 1,000 610 479 389 293 280 292 459 822 1,315 1991 1,848 1,291 956 822 623 405 316 304 329 424 942 1,321 1992 1,543 1,167 834 643 447 343 345 330 369 465 889 1,557 1993 1,806 1,673 1,294 828 566 387 383 360 381 507 947 1,543 1994 1,510 1,457 1,121 771 480 377 374 306 357 571 1,098 1,667 1995 1,754 1,319 1,154 951 708 487 361 346 392 591 997 1,300 1996 1,734 1,783 1,359 996 710 477 346 354 421 597 1,107 1,621 1997 1,810 1,778 1,341 1,037 684 397 372 354 409 584 979 1,687 1998 1,969 1,564 1,417 1,072 686 535 405 380 386 577 1,045 1,640

132

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6,537 6,903 6,950 5,791 7,780 6,957 8,161 9,020 8,835 8,864 9,644 9,127 2002 9,857 10,737 9,131 9,186 10,030 9,602 7,965 10,909 8,186 10,974 12,161 11,924 2003 8,047 5,034 5,581 5,924 4,577 4,916 6,000 5,629 5,606 6,652 5,970 6,036 2004 7,095 8,049 7,635 7,137 6,496 6,314 6,648 7,333 6,100 7,027 7,786 7,858 2005 5,882 5,823 5,955 5,764 4,162 5,163 5,883 6,097 4,936 4,955 4,236 2,234 2006 3,888 4,850 5,239 4,090 5,138 4,996 6,505 5,264 5,580 6,835 5,939 5,217 2007 6,180 5,355 4,869 4,768 4,222 4,680 6,405 6,403 4,340 3,731 4,999 6,480 2008 6,142 5,066 5,389 5,928 5,679 4,545 6,177 5,002 5,965 5,812 6,785 6,712

133

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,164 1,003 1,084 834 544 381 304 307 361 438 658 827 2002 1,127 1,149 960 808 575 428 330 336 348 485 803 1,003 2003 1,153 1,191 1,062 906 539 367 293 312 325 502 708 1,029 2004 1,154 1,381 1,072 829 517 421 331 342 365 479 769 1,011 2005 1,211 1,280 1,199 776 558 404 310 298 295 418 666 943 2006 1,112 1,063 1,190 745 501 415 318 318 347 481 658 893 2007 1,104 1,375 1,250 915 536 382 340 331 342 423 696 1,158 2008 1,202 1,217 1,137 865 512 384 331 333 361 480 702 1,084 2009 1,407 1,307 1,076 794 507 409 348 321 337 508 684 922 2010 1,270 1,126 897 685 488 376 344 335 348 581 801 1,177

134

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80.4 79.7 77.8 77.5 67.3 65.2 1987-2012 80.4 79.7 77.8 77.5 67.3 65.2 1987-2012 Alabama 79.8 80.2 78.8 79.3 78.9 76.2 1990-2012 Alaska 76.0 74.9 85.3 87.7 88.6 94.9 1990-2012 Arizona 93.4 93.1 88.0 88.7 87.8 86.6 1990-2012 Arkansas 70.4 64.5 59.4 55.6 51.5 40.2 1990-2012 California 60.7 56.7 54.9 54.1 54.3 50.0 1990-2012 Colorado 95.7 95.2 94.8 94.6 93.8 92.2 1990-2012 Connecticut 71.5 70.7 69.0 65.4 65.4 65.1 1990-2012 Delaware 74.8 70.6 53.5 49.8 53.4 43.7 1990-2012 District of Columbia 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 16.9 17.9 1990-2012 Florida 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 38.5 37.0 1990-2012 Georgia 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990-2012 Hawaii 100 100 100 100 100 100 1990-2012 Idaho 84.8 86.0 83.7 82.0 80.8 77.0 1990-2012 Illinois

135

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,133 2,021 2,066 1,635 999 803 692 763 712 775 1,090 2,052 1990 1,986 1,857 1,789 1,384 951 699 514 572 721 574 836 1,589 1991 2,204 2,308 2,131 1,381 1,063 784 705 794 689 658 1,071 1,764 1992 2,300 2,256 2,132 1,774 1,056 764 718 673 653 753 1,103 1,921 1993 2,352 2,438 2,166 1,550 1,150 731 664 703 684 841 1,040 1,909 1994 2,303 1,865 1,483 1,588 979 815 753 692 740 785 1,082 1,658 1995 2,280 2,583 2,089 1,607 1,158 884 820 744 766 794 1,116 2,194 1996 2,147 1,942 1,551 1,925 1,233 824 878 750 774 804 1,195 2,325 1997 2,334 2,315 2,183 1,738 1,372 951 782 853 852 899 1,354 2,379

136

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,156 2,125 1,533 1,100 1,004 890 790 805 811 954 1,257 1,690 1990 1,959 1,963 1,740 1,185 1,006 970 879 782 701 1,157 1,026 1,705 1991 2,447 1,839 1,739 1,593 1,333 1,121 947 1,005 761 1,104 1,095 1,976 1992 2,327 1,873 1,725 1,335 1,012 945 1,015 824 872 982 1,022 2,170 1993 2,271 2,110 2,016 1,314 1,341 1,052 919 939 909 1,047 1,421 2,211 1994 2,334 2,277 1,995 1,456 1,300 1,136 995 909 978 1,146 1,541 2,625 1995 2,551 2,139 1,868 1,784 1,558 1,268 1,082 978 1,009 1,151 1,444 1,871 1996 2,466 2,309 2,268 1,811 1,454 1,286 1,145 1,062 1,116 1,269 1,817 2,417 1997 2,717 2,634 2,447 1,900 1,695 1,412 1,099 1,148 1,195 1,273 1,800 2,638

137

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 52,126 51,020 52,466 24,969 17,238 15,421 16,478 16,540 16,716 25,355 26,981 41,400 2002 49,850 43,815 48,646 31,946 24,278 16,100 16,531 15,795 16,659 28,429 39,330 49,912 2003 62,523 55,695 44,756 32,270 20,752 15,502 15,630 18,099 16,485 24,636 36,907 47,677 2004 65,038 48,498 41,599 27,544 21,106 15,420 15,949 14,951 16,063 23,268 33,602 56,693 2005 59,667 45,463 47,647 29,885 23,265 22,788 21,959 22,549 19,566 23,868 35,232 54,600 2006 44,700 49,036 42,628 24,331 20,527 17,607 20,221 19,919 18,038 31,566 36,227 44,483 2007 53,637 61,738 41,274 32,627 19,348 17,305 18,156 21,627 17,044 22,827 36,770 53,091

138

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 35,585 27,368 26,284 16,906 10,552 11,171 18,862 17,962 13,422 11,375 14,263 20,610 2002 28,513 25,068 25,566 17,348 13,424 13,947 18,253 20,062 15,937 13,007 21,946 26,371 2003 31,180 29,594 25,952 16,337 13,386 11,371 15,614 15,421 13,725 13,096 15,980 25,771 2004 30,087 29,036 21,955 15,496 13,148 12,282 11,912 13,013 13,177 13,809 15,207 23,992 2005 29,876 25,291 20,604 15,459 12,953 11,687 13,164 13,264 12,147 11,254 14,924 25,902 2006 25,596 23,451 22,320 16,673 12,748 14,289 18,023 17,171 12,559 13,555 17,451 24,135 2007 29,886 31,709 22,007 16,753 13,449 14,165 16,842 20,565 16,098 15,324 19,705 29,579

139

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 45,337 36,026 35,468 29,023 26,153 28,194 41,056 38,697 30,910 29,194 26,719 33,193 2002 42,957 42,546 40,981 36,989 28,784 31,741 39,440 43,092 34,007 26,058 27,197 34,574 2003 44,633 43,363 39,395 32,941 30,147 32,417 46,076 47,914 30,139 28,937 26,588 39,627 2004 44,286 47,720 40,198 35,528 36,608 33,843 39,855 38,791 36,056 30,069 25,036 35,444 2005 42,941 41,516 38,987 36,599 35,972 45,327 48,696 49,698 42,454 32,097 30,402 42,813 2006 42,641 45,534 43,562 45,754 43,689 44,512 51,955 56,344 37,425 35,388 34,881 46,374 2007 55,048 57,329 44,646 43,762 41,758 42,250 47,969 58,650 43,759 42,172 36,392 49,540

140

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kentucky (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 31,659 23,182 21,670 14,953 9,527 8,890 9,668 9,881 10,024 12,591 16,271 23,216 2002 26,131 24,533 23,241 14,879 12,317 11,623 13,804 10,869 11,129 14,628 21,069 27,646 2003 34,776 29,032 20,580 14,017 10,797 9,334 9,467 10,296 10,390 13,196 16,933 27,218 2004 32,640 27,566 21,630 15,771 12,331 11,249 10,810 11,428 10,883 13,355 17,689 27,203 2005 29,373 24,036 24,578 15,557 13,614 13,693 12,658 14,134 12,122 14,104 19,304 29,050 2006 23,093 23,721 20,380 14,447 13,054 12,108 12,861 13,777 11,131 14,865 17,982 22,930 2007 26,916 29,946 20,044 17,410 12,573 11,418 10,304 16,709 11,848 13,874 18,696 24,799

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141

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,176 1,936 2,098 1,489 1,094 891 908 808 866 970 1,324 1,964 1990 2,455 1,649 1,576 1,262 1,040 846 836 830 872 965 1,315 1,749 1991 2,199 2,076 1,746 1,143 908 818 810 859 875 952 1,492 1,917 1992 2,276 2,158 1,745 1,436 1,068 944 820 882 875 1,006 1,345 2,089 1993 2,268 2,155 2,200 1,507 1,007 877 832 840 846 947 1,463 2,070 1994 2,845 2,472 1,910 1,174 1,027 1,342 913 949 947 1,089 1,361 1,843 1995 2,600 2,626 2,111 1,382 1,045 1,013 950 956 1,044 1,054 1,674 2,414 1996 3,136 2,782 2,190 1,884 1,154 997 940 957 1,041 1,157 1,644 2,447 1997 2,378 2,381 1,793 1,202 1,268 1,096 989 1,004 1,884 1,167 1,757 2,639

142

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,784 4,016 4,367 3,046 2,022 1,568 1,475 1,454 1,534 1,843 2,639 4,396 1990 5,379 3,690 3,400 2,747 1,820 1,445 1,394 1,480 1,596 1,795 2,715 3,817 1991 4,947 4,647 3,990 2,629 1,928 1,677 1,613 1,679 1,789 2,052 3,200 4,162 1992 5,169 5,066 3,983 3,296 2,205 1,733 1,591 1,607 1,679 2,138 3,010 4,941 1993 5,866 5,566 5,426 3,602 1,988 1,532 1,437 1,539 1,674 2,067 3,379 3,292 1994 7,247 6,269 4,727 2,761 1,844 1,605 1,487 1,647 1,831 2,115 2,817 4,592 1995 5,839 6,031 4,241 3,065 1,766 1,579 1,487 1,475 1,597 1,740 3,263 5,279 1996 6,913 6,421 4,851 3,760 1,970 1,586 1,415 1,575 1,658 1,917 3,240 5,160

143

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Delaware (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 5,014 4,742 5,389 3,439 2,924 3,276 3,324 4,609 4,923 5,078 3,908 3,419 2002 5,258 4,880 4,847 3,830 2,810 2,738 6,396 3,816 4,170 3,843 3,936 5,597 2003 6,397 5,499 5,102 3,399 2,081 2,433 3,570 3,550 2,728 2,949 3,547 4,833 2004 6,827 5,602 4,600 3,387 3,731 2,595 2,620 2,437 2,880 2,484 4,033 6,759 2005 6,870 5,543 5,427 2,696 2,517 2,866 3,287 3,735 2,652 2,870 3,515 4,876 2006 5,025 4,699 4,451 2,549 2,659 3,204 3,812 3,447 2,516 2,972 3,454 4,379 2007 4,855 5,154 4,783 3,486 2,804 3,196 3,833 4,160 3,127 3,346 3,838 5,551 2008 5,197 5,132 4,474 3,574 2,885 3,871 4,077 3,567 3,009 2,937 4,178 5,239

144

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 26,553 25,448 24,717 16,375 10,150 5,954 4,570 4,467 5,047 8,855 15,776 28,269 1990 26,939 22,780 20,870 15,431 9,230 5,638 4,610 4,865 5,117 8,592 14,122 21,237 1991 29,054 24,902 21,321 14,617 9,583 5,601 4,916 4,508 5,510 9,450 12,966 23,131 1992 26,677 24,979 22,443 17,769 10,406 5,883 4,981 4,964 5,431 9,760 16,298 24,211 1993 28,122 27,427 25,623 18,238 9,009 5,968 5,035 4,140 5,767 10,193 16,875 23,833 1994 33,440 31,356 24,263 16,330 10,123 6,207 5,343 5,363 5,719 8,796 14,511 21,617 1995 27,945 29,223 23,980 18,384 11,004 6,372 5,664 5,778 6,417 9,647 19,742 29,922 1996 32,468 30,447 27,914 19,664 12,272 6,343 5,673 5,383 6,146 9,472 19,486 26,123

145

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arizona (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 19,804 23,088 21,742 19,153 21,113 17,703 18,312 16,919 14,352 14,127 12,164 19,204 2002 19,840 19,954 18,340 14,544 14,463 17,262 23,546 22,088 20,988 19,112 17,712 21,662 2003 20,639 18,895 21,753 16,848 14,559 16,858 28,981 30,940 25,278 24,409 16,317 18,043 2004 25,379 30,143 26,925 23,982 26,878 29,819 35,860 33,244 27,591 23,349 23,090 26,140 2005 24,400 22,209 17,591 20,779 22,660 23,609 35,036 34,587 26,451 24,130 22,651 28,011 2006 26,212 24,177 22,606 21,814 22,339 30,548 34,718 36,448 30,678 32,378 24,493 29,027 2007 34,237 26,857 17,051 20,379 28,959 35,463 43,104 40,305 33,790 29,544 27,001 33,835

146

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 33,183 29,626 26,788 17,172 12,430 10,449 10,249 10,177 10,494 14,476 16,865 23,400 2002 28,527 25,072 25,693 18,706 13,413 10,076 9,731 9,815 10,403 14,561 22,219 27,225 2003 31,445 32,450 25,482 16,870 12,421 10,288 9,892 10,030 10,550 13,644 20,542 26,599 2004 32,639 30,955 23,081 15,569 11,543 10,481 9,546 10,080 10,193 14,132 20,759 27,591 2005 34,272 27,838 24,671 18,370 13,180 12,206 11,888 11,542 11,838 13,551 19,595 30,763 2006 26,997 26,909 23,941 17,158 14,088 12,588 13,244 11,886 12,277 18,360 22,732 25,747 2007 35,848 38,728 28,204 22,726 17,742 14,922 15,363 15,754 14,595 18,051 24,001 35,021

147

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,976 3,700 4,247 2,586 1,701 1,154 968 941 978 1,220 1,801 3,647 1990 4,168 3,115 3,057 2,477 1,557 1,131 1,049 961 1,016 1,095 1,686 2,738 1991 5,709 5,334 4,545 3,320 2,108 1,602 1,545 1,465 1,486 2,289 3,582 5,132 1992 6,323 6,382 5,073 3,807 2,391 1,784 1,553 1,586 1,615 2,491 3,895 5,565 1993 6,273 6,568 6,232 3,772 2,110 1,861 1,507 1,567 1,700 2,231 3,898 5,915 1994 8,122 6,354 5,634 2,844 2,547 1,709 1,732 1,588 2,016 2,531 3,582 5,475 1995 6,743 7,826 4,472 3,736 2,388 1,994 1,612 1,722 2,065 1,907 4,871 7,538 1996 7,648 6,515 5,476 3,766 2,672 1,816 1,608 1,866 1,922 2,427 4,693 5,433

148

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,493 3,435 3,545 3,083 2,670 2,570 2,525 2,369 2,484 2,444 2,868 3,620 1990 4,101 3,305 3,246 3,026 2,860 2,673 2,584 2,497 2,483 2,521 3,285 3,725 1991 3,875 3,770 3,782 3,363 2,978 2,674 2,845 2,708 2,998 2,798 3,519 3,954 1992 4,408 4,364 3,856 3,741 3,382 3,085 2,976 2,881 2,849 2,954 3,317 3,914 1993 3,951 4,078 4,088 3,871 3,362 3,085 2,919 2,830 2,887 2,983 3,336 3,760 1994 4,619 3,941 3,853 3,374 3,078 2,937 2,855 2,909 2,896 2,814 3,089 3,570 1995 4,274 4,361 3,900 3,433 3,055 2,930 2,970 2,751 2,818 2,840 3,171 3,883 1996 4,731 4,272 4,167 3,918 3,336 3,029 2,836 2,716 2,840 2,957 3,179 3,830

149

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,919 4,336 3,961 2,180 1,261 1,357 1,019 1,007 1,096 1,245 1,948 3,942 1990 4,957 3,368 2,807 2,223 1,398 1,065 1,030 1,043 1,081 1,260 1,948 2,949 1991 5,034 4,043 2,848 1,778 1,211 1,027 998 1,023 1,045 1,184 2,497 3,297 1992 4,159 3,861 2,708 2,114 1,358 1,108 1,062 1,022 1,029 1,219 2,078 3,596 1993 4,757 4,174 3,999 2,923 1,540 1,078 1,013 1,047 1,126 1,389 2,480 3,473 1994 5,101 4,707 3,388 2,306 1,360 1,107 990 887 1,253 1,275 1,897 3,136 1995 4,387 4,171 3,478 2,027 1,337 1,156 1,015 1,021 1,060 1,183 2,265 4,311 1996 5,411 5,249 3,895 2,964 1,519 1,052 1,056 1,060 1,106 1,356 2,462 3,876

150

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,139 20,654 21,940 16,528 13,819 12,558 14,779 16,061 15,014 18,239 19,675 22,233 2002 24,431 24,940 22,284 19,166 15,635 16,964 18,741 17,700 16,789 16,932 17,770 21,567 2003 27,116 27,256 22,904 18,625 17,603 17,849 18,208 18,467 15,282 16,402 16,960 20,603 2004 24,746 25,909 21,663 16,382 15,991 14,085 14,456 14,551 11,956 14,094 13,138 18,337 2005 22,386 19,719 19,170 15,597 14,643 15,315 16,703 17,392 13,113 13,511 15,272 20,113 2006 19,984 19,909 19,394 17,499 17,865 19,198 19,107 19,963 16,976 17,107 15,346 19,021 2007 20,936 22,984 17,280 15,779 16,099 17,982 17,998 22,294 15,747 13,225 15,235 18,728

151

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 20,043 17,426 13,012 11,173 7,791 7,056 6,214 6,023 6,572 9,189 11,646 18,505 2002 19,727 17,659 15,165 8,453 7,113 5,260 5,915 6,481 7,591 11,589 13,814 16,447 2003 16,474 16,494 12,825 10,664 6,942 5,612 6,174 6,166 6,229 7,898 13,299 16,533 2004 21,414 17,627 10,247 9,033 6,775 5,344 6,398 5,617 6,456 8,714 13,097 17,058 2005 18,357 16,430 13,763 12,951 9,253 7,461 7,380 6,187 6,053 6,449 9,027 16,786 2006 19,708 17,533 16,428 13,496 8,309 8,516 8,734 8,180 8,599 9,422 13,464 19,710 2007 27,918 22,251 16,927 13,476 12,260 11,106 9,771 9,790 10,976 12,425 15,630 20,497 2008 27,371 26,146 20,495 17,995 13,506 10,286 10,157 10,919 10,422 11,249 14,386 19,141

152

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Carolina (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 29,800 21,808 20,434 14,585 11,544 11,979 13,229 15,763 11,364 14,905 15,898 19,179 2002 27,750 25,444 22,993 16,550 13,274 14,816 16,400 17,088 13,640 15,047 19,024 27,257 2003 32,135 30,180 20,979 15,717 12,038 9,338 12,359 13,177 11,210 12,814 16,520 25,999 2004 31,785 30,416 22,379 16,242 16,033 12,711 12,866 13,027 11,970 11,729 15,635 24,946 2005 30,538 27,324 26,203 17,851 13,162 12,669 15,688 16,197 12,616 12,082 15,331 25,731 2006 25,596 23,904 23,271 15,873 13,091 13,120 17,476 19,153 11,452 14,070 18,457 22,889 2007 26,988 29,743 21,686 17,606 13,644 14,343 14,640 22,849 15,744 14,159 17,540 23,411

153

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,283 3,376 2,280 1,227 653 472 357 346 390 522 1,313 2,304 1990 2,864 2,779 2,272 1,203 860 581 373 364 374 629 1,382 2,540 1991 4,055 3,108 2,282 1,771 1,316 668 405 375 407 551 1,634 2,704 1992 3,330 2,952 1,866 1,155 642 457 410 372 405 545 1,329 3,120 1993 3,922 3,682 2,988 1,839 1,248 707 597 594 606 946 2,023 3,436 1994 3,929 3,846 2,665 2,037 962 814 820 787 882 1,883 3,542 4,335 1995 4,244 3,324 2,948 2,429 1,675 1,122 861 899 1,088 1,905 2,605 3,724 1996 4,549 4,604 3,129 2,479 1,356 892 904 874 1,279 2,073 3,185 4,220 1997 5,030 4,454 3,350 2,664 1,263 942 923 939 1,120 2,012 3,174 5,257

154

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 133,140 112,047 111,301 76,191 48,707 41,686 43,845 44,577 40,142 59,283 71,352 92,053 2002 119,902 108,891 104,208 87,138 63,810 52,457 51,899 47,094 40,938 53,419 82,015 114,268 2003 140,545 133,702 114,085 80,651 53,258 37,279 35,261 42,115 32,744 49,901 69,659 99,067 2004 137,906 127,671 102,442 76,978 54,610 41,310 38,001 37,565 37,285 48,239 71,870 107,025 2005 133,079 112,812 108,608 72,884 50,886 47,768 50,667 44,890 35,502 42,661 64,574 111,058 2006 104,803 99,454 96,633 65,814 43,901 35,824 43,332 39,459 31,740 50,167 70,643 85,634 2007 100,406 124,441 98,314 69,491 43,699 33,353 30,415 38,655 30,211 36,831 59,171 97,411

155

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Louisiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 90,750 82,773 86,038 87,577 81,223 77,877 93,937 105,743 93,365 92,353 85,277 92,797 2002 102,807 96,945 102,315 94,281 91,511 97,058 107,870 109,348 97,986 94,054 96,857 102,289 2003 106,504 91,821 89,554 89,376 88,426 78,863 91,469 95,243 85,824 84,198 83,677 94,139 2004 101,114 98,005 96,851 86,763 89,143 89,075 96,344 98,583 93,156 94,397 89,577 99,046 2005 102,652 87,403 100,620 97,398 104,027 102,860 104,234 99,244 82,252 75,899 72,958 91,598 2006 80,495 79,755 88,341 86,459 88,047 89,170 97,472 103,508 88,124 89,721 89,141 94,300 2007 100,669 93,075 95,251 91,900 94,668 99,373 92,367 104,606 87,792 91,661 83,575 89,348

156

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Florida (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 34,086 30,338 35,463 39,708 42,466 46,947 53,430 53,352 55,306 52,955 42,205 47,598 2002 50,177 41,302 50,453 55,845 56,767 62,343 67,197 70,144 65,136 64,259 47,600 45,144 2003 53,384 43,538 54,761 51,487 62,575 58,312 64,041 61,764 62,150 59,558 56,488 50,525 2004 50,877 49,866 51,687 53,442 62,663 69,628 72,443 70,540 70,259 66,961 50,122 53,169 2005 59,417 49,956 60,238 55,269 64,436 69,719 90,376 84,114 67,877 63,782 55,683 46,489 2006 54,827 56,557 68,707 73,645 85,346 87,268 88,949 86,772 83,397 76,817 58,594 56,867 2007 57,409 56,412 60,397 70,366 76,461 81,312 93,683 97,040 88,865 89,976 66,512 67,153

157

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 28,465 29,564 21,880 18,656 19,249 21,469 15,319 17,351 19,452 19,856 21,665 26,192 1990 30,798 34,767 27,425 23,423 18,540 17,392 21,030 17,705 23,233 17,384 22,637 30,759 1991 31,793 23,911 26,128 28,375 21,468 20,003 22,080 16,547 23,307 26,510 20,109 27,379 1992 38,234 23,834 24,413 18,379 27,118 22,150 21,150 21,633 19,247 19,112 20,999 28,738 1993 27,151 31,334 21,654 18,276 18,032 15,638 18,341 14,348 16,845 19,708 20,404 28,553 1994 29,342 27,032 23,156 18,463 22,621 18,091 25,752 14,123 14,604 17,844 25,032 25,929 1995 31,883 25,693 23,399 23,976 24,831 19,028 21,954 18,362 19,391 21,272 22,818 26,152

158

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 272,530 289,945 288,147 2000's 321,784 412,773 404,873 377,794 378,894 405,509 383,452 435,360...

159

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,109 11,224 12,435 1970's 14,500 16,073 17,005 15,420 16,247 15,928 16,694 16,813 16,940 16,830...

160

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,909 3,749 3,937 2,897 2,106 1,625 1,528 1,579 1,551 1,685 2,324 3,891 1990 4,318 3,869 3,369 3,009 1,743 1,483 1,358...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Connecticut (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 142,216 130,664 149,294 2000's 156,692 143,330 175,072 150,692 159,259 164,740 169,504 175,820...

162

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Connecticut (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 18,442 15,861 16,485 10,646 7,197 7,730 7,420 9,010 11,276 11,370 12,345 15,400 2002 19,009 18,410 17,585 13,782 12,805...

163

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dec 1989 21,163 22,930 20,215 15,779 11,310 10,731 12,786 11,350 9,367 10,345 12,823 23,871 1990 21,376 16,323 17,118 14,054 12,299 14,204 14,184 11,592 9,448 9,571 12,192 19,981...

164

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

285,213 323,054 347,818 1950's 387,838 464,309 515,669 530,650 584,957 629,219 716,871 775,916 871,774 975,107 1960's 1,020,222 1,076,849 1,206,668 1,267,783 1,374,717...

165

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 877,039 792,617 823,448 2000's 871,444 787,719 813,735 832,563 812,084 811,759 729,264 791,733 780,187 723,471 2010's...

166

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Rhode Island (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 116,871 130,415 117,758 2000's 88,124 95,326 87,472 78,074 72,301 80,070 76,401 87,150 88,391...

167

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

40,988 43,950 42,953 43,080 37,466 42,422 40,532 39,821 47,326 1980's 28,576 32,055 30,871 30,758 25,299 24,134 23,816 25,544 25,879 26,920 1990's 24,051 38,117 42,464 43,635...

168

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Dakota (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,988 3,550 3,908 4,743 2003 5,308 4,986 4,115 2,464 2,072 1,511 1,109 963 1,664 2,336 3,871 6,879 2004 5,976 4,565 4,243 2,998 2,087 1,270 1,207 1,858 2,219 2,970 3,638 4,990 2005...

169

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

U.S.'s part of this action). The Treasury Department and IRS announced that "dyed diesel fuel" normally limited to off-road use would be permitted for road use. This action will...

170

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 25,565 24,630 25,344 18,494 12,079 8,747 8,382 8,305 8,812 11,741 16,631 27,650 1990 24,659 23,697 22,939 17,706 11,586 10,272 9,602 9,683 10,261 12,661 17,210 24,715 1991 28,442 25,685 23,462 17,684 11,669 9,641 10,331 9,764 9,195 11,571 17,033 25,121 1992 29,246 29,912 27,748 23,039 13,518 9,915 9,327 9,456 9,582 12,860 16,804 25,808 1993 28,857 29,740 28,926 20,266 11,667 11,221 10,477 10,502 9,972 13,970 18,205 26,928 1994 31,014 32,757 29,376 21,207 13,641 11,207 10,158 10,485 10,002 12,399 16,783 24,226 1995 28,329 29,345 28,182 20,813 14,459 11,501 11,281 10,797 10,619 13,394 22,325 30,309 1996 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

171

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Carolina (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,028 13,472 12,569 10,957 8,683 9,367 10,138 11,625 9,077 11,870 11,334 12,725 2002 20,494 17,611 16,270 14,448 14,921 14,889 16,325 15,616 11,675 10,993 12,221 16,164 2003 18,666 17,514 12,917 11,948 9,803 8,615 10,304 12,231 8,766 8,909 9,675 14,460 2004 19,029 19,575 14,664 11,619 12,602 10,686 12,311 13,363 11,234 9,815 10,497 15,861 2005 19,494 16,945 17,212 12,523 11,619 12,506 16,813 18,833 10,439 8,087 9,210 15,920 2006 14,609 15,594 14,881 12,013 11,535 13,578 18,401 19,755 10,930 12,902 14,061 14,246 2007 18,348 19,666 12,154 11,405 11,154 12,705 14,438 22,784 13,231 12,270 11,398 13,530

172

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 77,275 61,840 57,608 37,045 27,762 26,685 25,473 29,184 25,697 34,650 39,146 51,997 2002 65,893 58,962 58,569 44,882 32,659 27,696 30,899 30,668 28,357 37,204 49,556 68,056 2003 80,534 70,155 52,368 35,903 31,266 25,652 24,580 26,666 27,072 34,914 46,556 64,253 2004 80,680 70,341 53,056 37,842 30,840 25,006 25,592 27,498 26,658 33,102 43,630 65,054 2005 72,775 58,428 61,390 39,473 30,697 28,897 28,628 29,602 26,476 32,838 44,576 70,488 2006 56,899 57,392 54,200 34,311 30,004 26,873 29,579 29,996 27,630 39,210 47,253 56,403 2007 66,914 76,347 49,045 40,498 29,129 27,272 28,150 34,503 29,267 35,013 48,878 63,510

173

Modelling the Effect of Ocean Waves on the Atmospheric and Ocean Boundary Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean waves, in addition to generating direct forces on fixed and floating offshore wind generator structures, also have significant indirect effects via their influence on the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers above and below the water surface. In the atmospheric boundary layer the waves act as roughness elements, influencing the turbulent flow and the vertical wind speed profile, and induce oscillatory motions in the airflow. Spray droplets from breaking wave crests enhance structure corrosion, and may lead to icing under low-temperature conditions. Below the water surface, the air-sea momentum flux and mechanical energy flux, mediated by the waves and wave-generated turbulence, affect the vertical profiles of ocean current, temperature, and salinity. Effects include modifying the structural forces and dynamics, and the movement and dispersion of marine organisms, pollutants, and air bubbles generated by breaking waves, with consequences for fouling, corrosion, and environmental impact. Measurement of relevant airflow and ocean dynamical variables is also challenging, as near the water surface it is often necessary to use instruments mounted on moving measurement platforms. Modelling such boundary-layer effects is a complex task, as a result of feedbacks between the airflow, wave field, current field, and turbulence in the atmosphere and the ocean. We present results from a coupled model study of the North Sea and Norwegian Sea area. We employ a mesoscale atmosphere model (WRF) and a spectral wave model (WAM), running simultaneously and coupled using the open-source coupler MCEL which can interpolate between different model grids and time steps. To investigate the ocean boundary layer, one-dimensional model experiments were performed for an idealized Ekman layer and for locations in the North Sea, Atlantic Ocean, and the northern Pacific, using a version of the GOTM turbulence model, modified to take wave dynamics into account. Results show how the wave field alters the ocean's aerodynamic roughness and the air–sea momentum flux, depending on the relation between the surface wind speed and the propagation speed of the wave crests (the wave age). These effects will feed back into the airflow, wind speed and turbulence profile in the boundary layer. The ocean dynamics experiments showed results which compare favourably with field observations from the LOTUS3 and PROVESS experiments in the north Atlantic and North Sea, and Ocean Weather Station Papa in the Pacific Ocean.

Alastair D. Jenkins; Mostafa Bakhoday Paskyabi; Ilker Fer; Alok Gupta; Muralidhar Adakudlu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Authors: George J. Moridis, Jonny Rutqvist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Venue: 2007 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 30–May 1, 2007 (http://www.otcnet.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The thermal and mechanical loading of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS) can result in hydrate dissociation and a significant pressure increase, with potentially adverse consequences on the integrity and stability of the wellbore assembly, the HBS, and the bounding formations. The perception of HBS instability, coupled with insufficient knowledge of their geomechanical behavior and the absence of predictive capabilities, has resulted in a strategy of avoidance of HBS when locating offshore production platforms. These factors can also impede the development of hydrate deposits as gas resources. For the analysis of the geomechanical stability of HBS, project researchers developed and used a numerical model that integrates a commercial geomechanical code into a simulator describing the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transport, and thermodynamic behavior in geologic media. The geomechanical code includes elastoplastic models for quasi-static yield and failure analysis and viscoplastic models for time-dependent (creep) analysis. The hydrate simulator can model the non-isothermal hydration reactions (equilibrium or kinetic), phase behavior, and flow of fluids and heat in HBS, and can handle any combination of hydrate dissociation mechanisms. The simulations can account for the interdependence of changes in the hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical properties of the HBS, in addition to swelling/shrinkage, displacement (subsidence), and possible geomechanical failure. Researchers investigated in three cases the coupled hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS systems. The first involves hydrate heating as warm fluids from deeper, conventional reservoirs ascend to the ocean floor through uninsulated pipes intersecting the HBS. The second case involves mechanical loading caused by the weight of structures placed on HBS at the ocean floor, and the third describes system response during gas production from a hydrate deposit. The results indicate that the stability of HBS in the vicinity of warm pipes may be significantly affected, especially near the ocean floor where the sediments are unconsolidated and more compressible. Conversely, the increased pressure caused by the weight of structures on the ocean floor increases the stability of hydrates, while gas production from oceanic deposits minimally affects the geomechanical stability of HBS under the conditions that are deemed desirable for production.

175

Ocean Circulation Lynne D Talley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the topography, with low pressure in the center. Ocean currents transport heat from the tropics to the poles have gone to sea. As knowledge about ocean currents and capabilities to observe it below the surfaceOcean Circulation Lynne D Talley Volume 1, The Earth system: physical and chemical dimensions

Talley, Lynne D.

176

ocean energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

177

Why Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? The subarctic Pacific Ocean is one of the areas considered particularly vulnerable to acidification, which could affect the ocean's ability to act as a carbon sink. Global warming affects the food webs and biodiversity in marine ecosystems, especially in regions known as oxygen minimum zones where key components of the global carbon cycle take place. Oxygen minimum zones are found between 200 and 1,000 meters below sea level in the subarctic Pacific, the eastern South Pacific Ocean, the northern parts of the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea, and off southwestern Africa. As global warming continues, researchers believe the oxygen levels in the oceans will decrease, a change that will extend the boundaries of the oxygen minimum

178

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Natural gas monthly, July 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document presents information pertaining to the natural gas industry. Data are included on production, consumption, distribution, and pipeline activities.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .currents in the tropical Pacific Ocean. J. Phys. Oceanogr. ,in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with the

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Chapter 4 - Ocean Thermal Energy Converters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The most plentiful renewable energy source on the planet is solar radiation. Harvesting this energy is difficult because of its dilute and erratic nature. Large collecting areas and large storage capacities are needed. These two requirements are satisfied by the tropical oceans. Oceans cover 71% of Earth's surface. In the tropics, they absorb sunlight, and the top layers heat up to some 25°C. Warm surface waters from the equatorial belt flow poleward, melting both the Arctic and the Antarctic ice. The resulting cold waters return to the equator at great depth, completing a huge planetary thermosyphon. Two basic configurations have been proposed for ocean thermal energy converters (OTECs)—those using hydraulic turbines and those using vapor turbines. The first uses the temperature difference between the surface and bottom waters to create a hydraulic head that drives a conventional water turbine. The advantages of this proposal include the absence of heat exchangers. It is easier to find warm surface water than sufficiently cool abyssal waters, which are not readily available in continental shelf regions. This limits the possible sitings of ocean thermal energy converters.

Aldo Vieira da Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A numerical study for the optimal arrangement of ocean current turbine generators in the ocean current power parks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper deals with the investigation of the flow distribution in the ocean current power park in order to optimize the arrangement of the turbine generators in the sea and the lake sides. To produce more reliable results, the detailed geometry of the ocean current generators is included in the computational domain with frozen rotor method to consider rotating effect. The numerical results show the details of flow distribution in the ocean current power park and propose the appropriate arrangement of the turbine generators for the efficient operation, which is essential for possible maximum power generation.

Seung Ho Lee; Sang Hyuk Lee; Kyungsoo Jang; Jungeun Lee; Nahmkeon Hur

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Methods of natural gas liquefaction and natural gas liquefaction plants utilizing multiple and varying gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of natural gas liquefaction may include cooling a gaseous NG process stream to form a liquid NG process stream. The method may further include directing the first tail gas stream out of a plant at a first pressure and directing a second tail gas stream out of the plant at a second pressure. An additional method of natural gas liquefaction may include separating CO.sub.2 from a liquid NG process stream and processing the CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 product stream. Another method of natural gas liquefaction may include combining a marginal gaseous NG process stream with a secondary substantially pure NG stream to provide an improved gaseous NG process stream. Additionally, a NG liquefaction plant may include a first tail gas outlet, and at least a second tail gas outlet, the at least a second tail gas outlet separate from the first tail gas outlet.

Wilding, Bruce M; Turner, Terry D

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

185

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variations in eastern Indian Ocean upper-ocean thermal properties are assessed for the period 1970–2004, with a particular focus on asymmetric features related to opposite phases of Indian Ocean dipole events, using high-resolution ocean model ...

Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Franziska U. Schwarzkopf; Gary Meyers; Erik Behrens; Arne Biastoch; Claus W. Böning

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Cryogenic treatment of gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

187

ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Currents Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global...

188

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

189

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Authors: Matthew T. Reagan and George J. Moridis Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates 2008, Vancouver, British Columbia, July 9-12, 2008 (http://www.icgh.org [external site]) Abstract: Paleoceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating past global climate. The implication is that global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate is the main culprit for a sequence of rapid global warming affects that occurred during the late Quaternary period. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed coupled thermo-hydrological-chemical simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor, and assessed the potential for methane release into the ecosystem. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and the effects of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that while many deep hydrate deposits are indeed stable during periods of rapid ocean temperature changes, shallow deposits (such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico) can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant carbon fluxes over a period of decades. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane and the formation of carbonates) to sequester the released carbon. This model will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

191

Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Landfill Biomass Facility County Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Ocean County Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Ocean County, New Jersey Coordinates 39.9652553°, -74.3118212° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9652553,"lon":-74.3118212,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

192

Geoengineering Downwelling Ocean Currents: A Cost Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Downwelling ocean currents carry carbon into the deep ocean (the solubility pump), and play a ... weakening of the NADW is modification of downwelling ocean currents, by an increase in carbon concentration or ......

S. Zhou; P. C. Flynn

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ocean currents may prevent stagnation or accumulatioLegal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy #12;Introduction Ocean sequestration of CO2, a potentially significant technique to be used

194

Ocean currents help explain population genetic structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...original work is properly cited. Ocean currents help explain population genetic...larval dispersal estimates based on ocean current observations, we demonstrate...Data-assimilated models of ocean currents for the study region were produced...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Configuration of a Southern Ocean Storm Track  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diagnostics of ocean variability that reflect and influence local transport properties of heat and chemical species vary by an order of magnitude along the Southern Ocean’s Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Topographic “hotspots” are important ...

Tobias Bischoff; Andrew F. Thompson

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

Dales, K Phillips

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Natural gas annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Displacing Natural Gas Consumption and Lowering Emissions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuels and thereby reduce their natural gas consumption. Opportunity gas fuels include biogas from animal and agri- cultural wastes, wastewater plants, and landfills, as well as...

199

EDDY RESOLVING NUTRIENT ECODYNAMICS IN THE GLOBAL PARALLEL OCEAN PROGRAM AND CONNECTIONS WITH TRACE GASES IN THE SULFUR, HALOGEN AND NMHC CYCLES  

SciTech Connect

Ecodynamics and the sea-air transfer of climate relevant trace gases are intimately coupled in the oceanic mixed layer. Ventilation of species such as dimethyl sulfide and methyl bromide constitutes a key linkage within the earth system. We are creating a research tool for the study of marine trace gas distributions by implementing coupled ecology-gas chemistry in the high resolution Parallel Ocean Program (POP). The fundamental circulation model is eddy resolving, with cell sizes averaging 0.15 degree (lat/long). Here we describe ecochemistry integration. Density dependent mortality and iron geochemistry have enhanced agreement with chlorophyll measurements. Indications are that dimethyl sulfide production rates must be adjusted for latitude dependence to match recent compilations. This may reflect the need for phytoplankton to conserve nitrogen by favoring sulfurous osmolytes. Global simulations are also available for carbonyl sulfide, the methyl halides and for nonmethane hydrocarbons. We discuss future applications including interaction with atmospheric chemistry models, high resolution biogeochemical snapshots and the study of open ocean fertilization.

S. CHU; S. ELLIOTT

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

Boynton, Walter R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

202

Ocean Navitas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navitas Navitas Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Navitas Address Nursery House Place United Kingdom Zip DN21 5BQ Sector Ocean Product Ocean Navitas was incorporated in May 2006 by experienced engineers, businessmen and sailing enthusiasts David Hunt, James McCague and Simon Condry. Website http://www.oceannavitas.com Region United Kingdom References Ocean NavitasUNIQ75db538f85b32404-ref-000014E2-QINU LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Ocean Navitas NaREC This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Aegir Dynamo This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

203

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Aspects of modeling the North Pacific Ocean.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Three aspects of the problem of modeling North Pacific Ocean climate are investigated: the effect of viscosity on effective model resolution, the effect of ocean… (more)

Dawe, Jordan Tyler

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Discharge to Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discharge to Ocean Discharge to Ocean Fact Sheet - Discharge to Ocean Past Practices In early offshore oil and gas development, drilling wastes were generally discharged from the platforms directly to the ocean. Until several decades ago, the oceans were perceived to be limitless dumping grounds. During the 1970s and 1980s, however, evidence mounted that some types of drilling waste discharges could have undesirable effects on local ecology, particularly in shallow water. When water-based muds (WBMs) were used, only limited environmental harm was likely to occur, but when operators employed oil-based muds (OBMs) on deeper sections of wells, the resulting cuttings piles created impaired zones beneath and adjacent to the platforms. At some North Sea locations, large piles of oil-based cuttings remain on the sea floor near the platforms. Piles of oil-based cuttings can affect the local ecosystem in three ways: by smothering organisms, by direct toxic effect of the drilling waste, and by anoxic conditions caused by microbial degradation of the organic components in the waste. Current regulatory controls minimize the impacts of permitted discharges of cuttings.

207

Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar, wind, biomass. landfill gas, ocean (including tidal,electric, photovoltaics, landfill gas, wind, biomass,

Lunt, Robin J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Dense gas-compatible enzymes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An enzymatic reaction system including a modified enzyme, and a dense gas system; modified enzymes; and methods of reacting modified enzymes in a dense gas system or liquid carbon dioxide.

Kao, Fu-jung (Dracut, MA); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Sawan, Samuel P. (Tyngsborough, MA); Sivils, L. Dale (Jupiter, FL); Spall, W. Dale (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

Oil and Gas Conservation (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Parts 1 and 2 of this chapter contain a broad range of regulations pertaining to oil and gas conservation, including requirements for the regulation of oil and gas exploration and extraction by the...

210

Gas Utility Pipeline Tax (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All gas utilities, including any entity that owns, manages, operates, leases, or controls a pipeline for the purpose of transporting natural gas in the state for sale or compensation, as well as...

211

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

212

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

213

Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Text Version Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even though the sun affects all ocean activity, the gravitational pull of the moon primarily drives tides, and wind powers ocean waves. Learn more about: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Addthis Related Articles Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

214

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

216

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A REVIEW OF GLOBAL OCEAN TEMPERATURE OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by taking an inventory of changes in energy storage. The main storage is in the ocean, the latest values, Energy Sustainable Economic, Earth's energy imbalance, and thermosteric sea level rise. Up-to-date estimates are provided

218

composition of putative oceans on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Results: Oceanic water composition · Oceanic water is a NaCl-CaCl2 solution · Large Cl mass · Cl in a "soda ocean" Temperature, o C 100 200 300 400 500 Concentration,mole/kgH2O 0.01 0.1 1 Cl- CaCl2 CaCl+ Na calcite · Quartz · Na-K feldspars · Anhydrite · Pyrite · Hematite/magnetite · Evaporites: NaCl+CaCl2 350o

Treiman, Allan H.

219

Shale Gas 101  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This webpage has been developed to answer the many questions that people have about shale gas and hydraulic fracturing (or fracking). The information provided below explains the basics, including what shale gas is, where it’s found, why it’s important, how it’s produced, and challenges associated with production.

220

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

Frandsen, Jannette B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ocean Sci., 3, 417427, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/417/2007/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deacon Cell. When the ocean currents are averaged zon- ally to produce a meridional overturningOcean Sci., 3, 417­427, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/417/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science On the fast response of the Southern Ocean to changes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

222

Silicic acid leakage from the Southern Ocean: Opposing effects of nutrient uptake and oceanic circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the thermocline region of low latitudes. The power of Southern Ocean intermediate waters to affect phytoplanktonSilicic acid leakage from the Southern Ocean: Opposing effects of nutrient uptake and oceanic in formation rate of Southern Ocean intermediate waters. Comparison of d30 Si records from the Southern Ocean

Pahnke, Katharina

223

Natural Gas Hydrate Dissociation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Materials for hydrate synthesis mainly include methane gas of purity 99.9% (produced by Nanjing Special Gases Factory Co., Ltd.), natural sea sand of grain sizes 0.063?0.09,...

Qingguo Meng; Changling Liu; Qiang Chen; Yuguang Ye

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Toward Energetically Consistent Ocean Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Possibilities to construct a realistic quasi-global ocean model in Boussinesq approximation with a closed energy cycle are explored in this study. In such a model, the energy related to the mean variables would interact with all parameterized ...

Carsten Eden; Lars Czeschel; Dirk Olbers

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ocean Currents at Rocas Alijos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flow of oceanic water over and around an obstacle such as a seamount or island has the potential to profoundly affect the local biological community (Hamner and Hauri, 1986; Wolanski and Hamner, 1988). If ...

Shirley Vaughan; Ronald K. Skinner; Robert W. Schmieder; Brian McGuire

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Conference on oceans draws Clinton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Against the tranquil backdrop of Monterey Bay, Calif., President Bill Clinton earlier this month signed a measure extending the U.S. ban on offshore oil drilling, and he proposed several sweeping initiatives to protect, restore, and explore the oceans....

ELIZABETH WILSON

1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

Pacific Ocean Islands – Editorial Introduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Islands in the Pacific Ocean are of three kinds (Nunn 2005). ... Most of the islands lie in the SW Pacific, but the Galapagos, Clipperton, and Easter ... Island are volcanic islands rising from the East Pacific R...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The biogeochemical fate of organic matter in the ocean is an important issue that must be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be considered in order to understand the role of the ocean in climate change. The biological pump involves to the ocean interior, resulting in the temporary or permanent storage of carbon1­3 . The known mechanisms involved in the biological pump include the sedimentation of particulate organic matter (POM) from surface

Hansell, Dennis

229

1. Department, course number, and title ORE 654 Applications of Ocean Acoustics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and bioacoustics. Topics include: marine mammals, fish and plankton imaging, navigation and communication, sound of seismics, ships, wind and rain, using sound to study ocean dynamics, flow imaging and measurement, mapping the ocean. The course will provide an overview of the fundamentals of sound propagation, sound of seismics

Frandsen, Jannette B.

230

Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes of the air-sea system. The perturbation, dIc, includes carbon emissions and changes in the terrestrial), Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes, Global

Follows, Mick

231

Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment. [Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean`s surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry`s law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

Davidovits, P. [Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

EIA - All Natural Gas Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Natural Gas Analysis All Natural Gas Analysis 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) U.S Natural Gas Imports and Exports: 2009 This report provides an overview of U.S. international natural gas trade in 2009. Natural gas import and export data, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) data, are provided through the year 2009 in Tables SR1-SR9. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 9/28/2010, Html format)

233

DSM Will Acquire Ocean Nutrition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DSM Will Acquire Ocean Nutrition ... Dutch chemical maker DSM will spend about $530 million to acquire Ocean Nutrition Canada, which calls itself the world’s largest supplier of omega-3 fatty acids to the dietary supplement and food manufacturing markets. ... DSM says the acquisition is the fifth purchase it has made in the nutrition field since September 2010, when it announced a corporate strategy to expand in the health, nutrition, and industrial materials markets. ...

MICHAEL MCCOY

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

235

Gas Separation With Graphene Membranes By Will Soutter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Separation With Graphene Membranes By Will Soutter Introduction What is Graphene? Benefits of Graphene in Gas Separation Membranes Recent Developments Conclusion References Introduction The separation applications including fuel cells, batteries, gas sensors and gas purification. The materials

Bunch, Scott

236

Homeowners: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

your gas company to report any problems, including: Emergencies-Report gas leaks, pipeline breaks, and other gas-related emergencies to your gas company and the local fire...

237

Chapter 8 - Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although natural gas is a nonrenewable resource, it is included for discussion because its sudden growth from fracking will impact the development and use of renewable fuels. Firms who are engaged in the development of processes that employ synthesis gas as an intermediate have concluded that the synthesis gas is more economically obtainable by steam reforming of natural gas than by gasification of waste cellulose. In some instances, firms have largely abandoned the effort to produce a renewable fuel as such, and in others firms are developing hybrid processes that employ natural gas in combination with a fermentation system. Moreover, natural gas itself is an attractive fuel for internal combustion engines since it can be the least expensive option on a cost per joule basis. It is also aided by its high octane number of 130.

Arthur M. Brownstein

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

239

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

240

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

242

Upper-Ocean Processes under the Stratus Cloud Deck in the Southeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual mean heat budget of the upper ocean beneath the stratocumulus/stratus cloud deck in the southeast Pacific is estimated using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) and an eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Both are ...

Yangxing Zheng; George N. Kiladis; Toshiaki Shinoda; E. Joseph Metzger; Harley E. Hurlburt; Jialin Lin; Benjamin S. Giese

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Echolocation-based foraging by harbor porpoises and sperm whales, including effects of noise and acoustic propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I provide quantitative descriptions of toothed whale echolocation and foraging behavior, including assessment of the effects of noise on foraging behavior and the potential influence of ocean acoustic ...

DeRuiter, Stacy L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Life cycle greenhouse gas footprint of shale gas: a probabilistic approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the increase in natural gas (NG) production in recent years, primarily from shale gas, some sources, including the US Environmental ... the data from the Montney and Horn River shale gas basins in the Northe...

Anjuman Shahriar; Rehan Sadiq…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft ProgrammaticPlan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistantl OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary engineeringCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byFifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plant

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Natural gas monthly, July 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

EARTH AND OCEAN SCIENCES 453 MATLAB homework assignment # 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EARTH AND OCEAN SCIENCES 453 MATLAB homework assignment # 1: FOSSIL FUEL EFFECTS ON THE GLOBAL. Include a 1 or 2 paragraph discussion of your plan with this figure if you wish. · Write a MATLAB script water) over time. (MATLAB files emissionplotmain.m and emissions

Jellinek, Mark

252

INTEGRATING THE OCEAN OBSERVING SYSTEM: MOBILE PLATFORMS Dean Roemmich(1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/AOML, 4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami FL 33149 USA, Email: rick.lumpkin@noaa.gov (12) Center for Ocean, including oxygen, chlorophyll-A, and particulate organic carbon, and coordination with shipboard and moored. The observing system infrastructure must evolve in parallel with the system's scope and complexity. Expanded

253

Ocean Current Drifter CD-ROMs File Naming Conventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Current Drifter CD-ROMs File Naming Conventions Surface Current · Data are located on disc 1 of which are located in the directory FLOATS on disc 1. In summary, the files included in this CD-ROM set on which that file resides.) #12;Technical questions regarding the CD-ROMs should be addressed to: National

254

Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining Permitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" or "Gas" does not include any gaseous or liquid substance processed from coal, oil shale, or tar sands

Utah, University of

255

Greenhouse Gas Program Overview (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Overview of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Greenhouse Gas program, including Federal requirements, FEMP services, and contacts.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Atlantic Ocean CARINA data: overview and salinity adjustments  

SciTech Connect

Water column data of carbon and carbon-relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical parameters from 188 previously non-publicly available cruise data sets in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas, Atlantic and Southern Ocean have been retrieved and merged into a new database: CARINA (CARbon dioxide IN the Atlantic Ocean). The data have gone through rigorous quality control procedures to assure the highest possible quality and consistency. The data for the pertinent parameters in the CARINA database were objectively examined in order to quantify systematic differences in the reported values, i.e. secondary quality control. Systematic biases found in the data have been corrected in the three data products: merged data files with measured, calculated and interpolated data for each of the three CARINA regions, i.e. the Arctic Mediterranean Seas, the Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. These products have been corrected to be internally consistent. Ninety-eight of the cruises in the CARINA database were conducted in the Atlantic Ocean, defined here as the region south of the Greenland-Iceland-Scotland Ridge and north of about 30 S. Here we present an overview of the Atlantic Ocean synthesis of the CARINA data and the adjustments that were applied to the data product. We also report the details of the secondary QC (Quality Control) for salinity for this data set. Procedures of quality control including crossover analysis between stations and inversion analysis of all crossover data are briefly described. Adjustments to salinity measurements were applied to the data from 10 cruises in the Atlantic Ocean region. Based on our analysis we estimate the internal consistency of the CARINA-ATL salinity data to be 4.1 ppm. With these adjustments the CARINA data products are consistent both internally was well as with GLODAP data, an oceanographic data set based on the World Hydrographic Program in the 1990s, and is now suitable for accurate assessments of, for example, oceanic carbon inventories and uptake rates and for model validation.

Tanhua, T. [IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences, Chemical Oceanography, Kiel, Germany; Steinfeldt, R. [University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; Key, Robert [Princeton University; Brown, P. [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Gruber, N. [ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Wanninkhof, R. [Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA; Perez, F.F. [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas de Vigo, CSIC, Vigo, Spain; Kortzinger, A. [IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences, Chemical Oceanography, Kiel, Germany; Velo, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas de Vigo, CSIC, Vigo, Spain; Schuster, U. [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Van Heuven, S. [University of Groningen, The Netherlands; Bullister, J.L. [NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; Stendardo, I. [ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Hoppema, M. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany; Olsen, Are [Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, UNIFOB AS, Bergen, Norway; Kozyr, Alexander [ORNL; Pierrot, D. [Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, U. Miami; Schirnick, C. [IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences, Chemical Oceanography, Kiel, Germany; Wallace, D.W.R. [IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences, Chemical Oceanography, Kiel, Germany

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

An update on modeling land-ice/ocean interactions in CESM  

SciTech Connect

This talk is an update on ongoing land-ice/ocean coupling work within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The coupling method is designed to allow simulation of a fully dynamic ice/ocean interface, while requiring minimal modification to the existing ocean model (the Parallel Ocean Program, POP). The method makes use of an immersed boundary method (IBM) to represent the geometry of the ice-ocean interface without requiring that the computational grid be modified in time. We show many of the remaining development challenges that need to be addressed in order to perform global, century long climate runs with fully coupled ocean and ice sheet models. These challenges include moving to a new grid where the computational pole is no longer at the true south pole and several changes to the coupler (the software tool used to communicate between model components) to allow the boundary between land and ocean to vary in time. We discuss benefits for ice/ocean coupling that would be gained from longer-term ocean model development to allow for natural salt fluxes (which conserve both water and salt mass, rather than water volume).

Asay-davis, Xylar [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

258

Natural gas monthly: December 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

260

An effective medium inversion algorithm for gas hydrate quantification and its application to laboratory and borehole measurements of gas hydrate-bearing sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......reconstituted natural samples showed a large increase in velocities for...in Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results...R.J., Suess E., Ocean Drilling Program, College Station...application to laboratory and borehole measurements of gas hydrate-bearing......

Shyam Chand; Tim A. Minshull; Jeff A. Priest; Angus I. Best; Christopher R. I. Clayton; William F. Waite

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

over which heat losses occur. Spatial distribution of X i .over which heat losses occur. Spatial distribution of X i .

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the HBL does not lead to halite precipitation because ofadverse consequences of halite precipitation if salt-based

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico,” Fire In The Ice: NETL Methane Hydrates R&D Programand Kelly Boswell of DOE-NETL for making the Tigershark data

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment  

SciTech Connect

Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean's surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry's law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

Davidovits, P. (Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. (Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

266

Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glacial cycles redistribute water between the oceans and continents causing pressure changes in the upper mantle, with potential consequences for melting of Earth's interior. A numerical model of mid-ocean ridge dynamics that explicitly includes melt transport is used to calculate the melting effects that would be caused by Plio-Pleistocene sea-level variations. Model results interpreted in the context of an analytical approximation predict sea-level induced variations in crustal thickness on the order of hundreds of meters. The specifics of the response depend on rates of sea-level change, mid-ocean ridge spreading rates, and mantle permeability. Spectral analysis of the bathymetry of the Australian-Antarctic ridge shows significant spectral energy near 23, 41, and 100 ky periods, consistent with model results and with the spectral content of Pleistocene sea-level variability. These results support the hypothesis that sea-floor topography records the magmatic response to changes in sea level, reinforcing the...

Crowley, John W; Huybers, Peter; Langmuir, Charles H; Park, Sung-Hyun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

MHK Technologies/Ocean Energy Rig | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rig Rig < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Energy Rig.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Ocean Energy Rig is a hybrid concept harnessing tidal stream with increased velocity from venturi system wave and wind power The rig also uses solar panels to power computers and warning lights Other unique features include a water ballasting system with automatic self levelling and wave ramps to maximize FreeFlow 69 s new wave power device It is envisaged that the Ocean Energy Rig would be assembled and maintained in dry docks and would be towed out into position before being semi submerged and anchored for operation Power output of the production model would be at least 10MW

268

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

270

Robust acoustic signal detection and synchronization in a time varying ocean environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Signal detection and synchronization in the time varying ocean environment is a difficult endeavor. The current common methods include using a linear frequency modulated chirped pulse or maximal length sequence as a detection ...

Gieleghem, Ryan Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Full Field Inversion Method for Acoustic Tomography of Ocean Currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An extension of the matched field inversion technique to include oceanic current tomography is considered. Matching of the non-reciprocity of acoustic fields propagated in opposite directions (instead of match...

O. A. Godin; D. Yu. Mikhin; A. V. Mokhov

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The INGV–CMCC Seasonal Prediction System: Improved Ocean Initial Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV)–Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC) Seasonal Prediction System (SPS) is documented. In this SPS the ocean initial-conditions estimation includes ...

Andrea Alessandri; Andrea Borrelli; Simona Masina; Annalisa Cherchi; Silvio Gualdi; Antonio Navarra; Pierluigi Di Pietro; Andrea F. Carril

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sphere-sea-ice-ocean... .01.015 12;are included within the latest generation of Earth System Models in order to allow more direct... for Space Studies and Center for Climate...

274

New Altimetric Estimates of Mode-1 M2 Internal Tides in the Central North Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New estimates of mode-1 M2 internal tide energy flux are computed from an extended Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/Poseidon (T/P) altimeter dataset that includes both the original and tandem tracks, improving spatial resolution over previous ...

Zhongxiang Zhao; Matthew H. Alford

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The second Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM: model description, spinup and validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...?This study describes a new coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (OAGCM) developed for studies of climate change and results from a hindcast experiment. The model includes various physical and te...

T. C. Johns; R. E. Carnell; J. F. Crossley; J. M. Gregory…

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Incentives Thermal Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 96 Ocean Thermal Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 96) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Agricultural Commercial Industrial Utility Anaerobic Digestion Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Ocean Thermal Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Small Wind Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes CCEF - Project 150 Initiative (Connecticut) State Grant Program Connecticut Commercial Solar Thermal Electric

277

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

credit for renewable energy, including waste-to-energy and landfill gas combustion. Wastewater treatment, including both domestic wastewater (about two-thirds) and industrial...

278

Ocean Color Web | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Color Web Ocean Color Web Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Ocean Color Web Dataset Summary Description A comprehensive image analysis package for the processing, display, analysis, and quality control of ocean color data. Tags {Ocean,"water color",spectrometer,"sea viewing",MODIS,"marine biology",NASA,GSFC,"Goddard Space Flight Center"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 15-Jan-2010 Publisher National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contact Name Contact Email Gene.C.Feldman@nasa.gov Unique Identifier NASA-1547

279

On Rayleigh Waves Across the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles On Rayleigh Waves Across the Pacific Ocean K. E. Bullen University College, Auckland, N. Z. ON RAYLEIGH WAVES ACROSS THE PACIFIC OCEAN K. E. Bullen (Received 1939November 9) The Bering......

K. E. Bullen

1939-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Air Piston This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGreenOceanWaveEnergy&oldid769161...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ocean Data Impacts in Global HYCOM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of the assimilation of ocean observations on reducing global Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) 48-h forecast errors is presented. The assessment uses an adjoint-based data impact procedure that characterizes the forecast impact of ...

James A. Cummings; Ole Martin Smedstad

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1982 research-article Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion...Lennard J. H. Turner P. Wadhams Renewable ocean energy sources can eventually supply a large fraction of man's energy needs, starting in the 1990s...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

SAGEEP 2010 Keystone, Colorado http://www.eegs.org ULTRASONIC VELOCITIES IN LABORATORY-FORMED GAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about 700 to 1500 m/s. Gas hydrates were then formed a partially saturated Ottawa sand sample, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO Abstract Gas Hydrates are widely distributed in the near surface oceanic or permafrost regions, i.e. in the gas hydrate stability zone. Compressional-wave (p

284

Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of intense climate interest. A large fraction of the carbon fixed in the oceanic surface waters is recycledOceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean are estimated from selected hydrographic sections from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment spanning the world

Wunsch, Carl

285

Ocean Mixing and Climate ChangeOcean Mixing and Climate Change Factors inducing seawater mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the reverse current created when the fluid flows past an obstacle. Ocean Eddies range: cm-100 km. When two energy drives global winds ­ Latitudinal wind belts produce ocean currents · Determine circulation layer depth ~100 m · Heat transfer from equator to pole by ocean currents · Oceans redistribute about

Russell, Lynn

286

Ocean Sci., 4, 1529, 2008 www.ocean-sci.net/4/15/2008/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is everywhere perpendicular to the local direction of gravity. If there were no waves or currents in the oceanOcean Sci., 4, 15­29, 2008 www.ocean-sci.net/4/15/2008/ © Author(s) 2008. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science An Oceanographer's Guide to GOCE and the Geoid C. W

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

287

Ocean Sci., 3, 363377, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/363/2007/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

currents and water mass properties intriguing texture. In the upper ocean observational evidenceOcean Sci., 3, 363­377, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/363/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Variability of Antarctic intermediate Water properties

Boyer, Edmond

288

Indian Ocean Surface Circulations and Their Connection To Indian Ocean Dipole, Identified  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Surface Currents Analysis Realtime (OSCAR) Data Advisor : Peter C Chu Second Reader : Charles Sun Aldisrupting Al--QaidaQaida''s networks network IraqIraq''s Instabilitys Instability #12;Ocean Surface Currents Analysis ­ Realtime (OSCAR) Data Base Ocean Surface currents data available for whole world' oceans at www

Chu, Peter C.

289

Ocean Science, 1, 97112, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/97/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oceanic currents by reducing the shears between them (Hansen and Paul, 1984; Weisberg, 1984Ocean Science, 1, 97­112, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/97/ SRef-ID: 1812-0792/os/2005-1-97 European Geosciences Union Ocean Science Multi-year satellite observations of instability waves

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

290

Ocean Sci., 3, 223228, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/223/2007/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and regional sea level changes associated with changing currents and mass distribution in the ocean. The studyOcean Sci., 3, 223­228, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/223/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Towards measuring the meridional overturning circulation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

291

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

292

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

293

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We receive many benefits from the oceans from seafood, recreation and transportation industriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our ocean impacts our own health and well- being, and in turn how

294

Oceans and ClimateOceans and Climate PeterPeter RhinesRhines 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

say, the ocean is a great thermometer/thermometer/halometerhalometer Levitus, Antonov, Boyer+ Stephens

295

Coupling Mineral Carbonation and Ocean Liming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

systems suggests that, unless air capture significantly outperforms these systems, it is likely to require more than 400 kJ of work per mol of CO2, requiring it to be powered by CO2-neutral power sources in order to be CO2 neg. ... by the oceans at an increased rate if ocean alky. ... Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is altering the seawater chem. of the world's oceans with consequences for marine biota. ...

P. Renforth; T. Kruger

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geoengineering, Ocean Fertilization,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

included switching to less carbon-intensive fuels and non­carbon-based energy sources; conserving energy and Lisa Dilling1 Abstract Many geoengineering projects have been proposed to address climate change, but actually to move the universe to some future, unknown state. Given the introduced criteria, we impose 1

Neff, Jason

297

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

298

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

299

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

300

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

302

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

303

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

304

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

305

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

306

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

307

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

308

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

309

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

310

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

311

Forcing of the Indian Ocean Dipole on the Interannual Variations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean: Roles of the Indonesian Throughflow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Controlled numerical experiments using ocean-only and ocean–atmosphere coupled general circulation models show that interannual sea level depression in the eastern Indian Ocean during the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) events forces enhanced Indonesian ...

Dongliang Yuan; Jing Wang; Tengfei Xu; Peng Xu; Zhou Hui; Xia Zhao; Yihua Luan; Weipeng Zheng; Yongqiang Yu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1 G. Danabasoglu,1 M. Holland,1 Y.-O. Kwon,1 and W. G. Large1] The impacts of parameterized lateral ocean viscosity on climate are explored using three 120-year integrations of a fully coupled climate model. Reducing viscosity leads to a generally improved ocean circulation

Jochum, Markus

313

ACR 891 (?) Ocean Policy: Current Issues seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACR 891 (?) Ocean Policy: Current Issues seminar Fall, 2013 (2 cr, + 1 cr optional) Professor of a common pool resource than the world's oceans it can only be the atmosphere. The latter is currently neglected. This seminar is intended to introduce students to some of the current issues in ocean policy

314

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

Pierce, Stephen

315

Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST -We are implementing and evaluating a feature tracking approach to estimate ocean surface currents. - This approach allows us to estimate://cioss.coas.oregonstate.edu/ Ocean surface currents (vectors) derived from SST (background) modeled fields along the west coast of U

Kurapov, Alexander

316

Ocean indicators Current knowledge and future directions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean indicators Current knowledge and future directions Brian Burke, NOAA Fisheries Brian.Burke@noaa.gov #12;· Review of ocean indicator work · Forecasting · Indicator gaps and the importance of mechanistic understanding · Plugging in to management #12;Haeseker et al. 2012 Ocean survival is low and variable #12;-10 -5

317

Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Forcing: currents Figure: Velocity (m/s) at ocean surface, average of an OPA climatology Marco van Hulten: Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model 5 #12;Forcing: currents Figure: Atlantic OverturningAluminium in an ocean general circulation model Marco van Hulten November 15, 2011 This research

Haak, Hein

318

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

Barth, Jack

319

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, School of Ocean depths of 20 m (surface water) and 1,000 m. OTEC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, the process Energy Conversion. At first, OTEC plantships providing electricity, via submarine power cables, to shore

320

Gravimetric geoid in the Northwest Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Gravimetric geoid in the Northwest Pacific Ocean A. B. Watts A. R. Leeds...gravimetric geoid of the Northwest Pacific Ocean. The 1 1 averages are based on...observations of gravity in the northwest Pacific Ocean, Tr. Intern. Okeanol., AN......

A. B. Watts; A. R. Leeds

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Anthropogenic modification of the oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...calcification in the coralline alga Hydrolithon decreased following...concentration. Epiphytic coralline algae are much less abundant in low-pH...that, like corals, coralline algae will be highly susceptible to...currently very little fossil fuel CO2 in the deep ocean. However...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

ScienceMatters Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the ocean. The growth of marine algae is highest at the ice edge during the brief summer period when the ice of the marine food web, providing the main source of nourishment for fish and marine mammals. Algae also remove at molecular-level manufacturing as attempts to assemble LEGO pieces while wearing boxing gloves

Pedersen, Tom

323

Internal Waves in the Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Salinity temperature and pressure gradients all cause the density of sea water to vary with depth in the ocean and the density gradient affects the motion of the waters. A quantity N having the units radians per second can be defined using the density gradient the velocity of sound and the acceleration of gravity.

Carl Eckart

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Turning Ocean Water Into Rain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...an alternative method of desalination for mainland communities...Although thermally driven desalination may be a good option for...a good attempt, but the economics will have to be proved.” Kathiroli...are just starting out.” Desalination. Turning ocean water into...

Yudhijit Bhattacharjee

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

Tabular icebergs in ocean waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in ocean waves. Two field seasons have been carried out by SPRI in cooperation with Norsk Polarinstitutt, and Foldvik et a/.11 have reported some measurements which took place during ... officers and the crew of the ship for their patience and help. We thank the Norsk Polarinstitutt (NP) and the Radio Echo Group at SPRI for loan of equipment, ...

Monica Kristensen; Vernon A. Squire; Stuart C. Moore

1982-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

326

PACIFIC OCEAN SOUTH BAY HARBOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PACIFIC OCEAN LONG BEACH SOUTH BAY HARBOR GATEWAY NORWALK PASADENA EAST LA DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES W illow P Pacific CoastHw y Anaheim 5th St 1stSt P©$ P©$ Transit Mall P©$ Pacific Long Beach P Lakew

Weinreb, Sander

327

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 89 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

329

Natural Gas Exports from Iran  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Biogenic gas nanostructures as ultrasonic molecular reporters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogenic gas nanostructures as ultrasonic molecular reporters Mikhail G. Shapiro1,2,3 *, Patrick W on the nanoscale. Here, we introduce a new class of reporters for ultrasound based on genetically encoded gas nanostructures from microorganisms, including bacteria and archaea. Gas vesicles are gas-filled protein

Schaffer, David V.

331

Direct fired absorption machine flue gas recuperator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A recuperator which recovers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine. The recuperator includes a housing with liquid flowing therethrough, the liquid being in direct contact with the combustion gas for increasing the effectiveness of the heat transfer between the gas and the liquid.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Cryostat including heater to heat a target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vessel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism. 2 figs.

Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

1990-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

333

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include tight gas sands, gas shales, and coal-bed methane.Figure 3. Although the gas-shale production grows at a

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Apparatus for gas sorption measurement with integrated gas composition measurement device and gas mixing  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for testing of multiple material samples includes a gas delivery control system operatively connectable to the multiple material samples and configured to provide gas to the multiple material samples. Both a gas composition measurement device and pressure measurement devices are included in the apparatus. The apparatus includes multiple selectively openable and closable valves and a series of conduits configured to selectively connect the multiple material samples individually to the gas composition device and the pressure measurement devices by operation of the valves. A mixing system is selectively connectable to the series of conduits and is operable to cause forced mixing of the gas within the series of conduits to achieve a predetermined uniformity of gas composition within the series of conduits and passages.

Micklash. II, Kenneth James; Dutton, Justin James; Kaye, Steven

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

335

Ocean noise in the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean ambient noise is well studied in the North Pacific and North Atlantic but is poorly described for most of the worlds' oceans. Calibrated passive acoustic recordings were collected during 2009–2010 at seven locations in the central and western tropical and subtropical Pacific. Monthly and hourly mean power spectra (15–1000?Hz) were calculated in addition to their skewness kurtosis and percentile distributions. Overall ambient noise at these seven sites was 10–20?dB lower than reported recently for most other locations in the North Pacific. At frequencies 200?Hz with higher levels recorded in the winter than in the summer. Several species of baleen whales humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae) blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales also contributed seasonally to ambient noise in characteristic frequency bands.

Ana Širovi?; Sean M. Wiggins; Erin M. Oleson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Monetizing stranded gas : economic valuation of GTL and LNG projects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Globally, there are significant quantities of natural gas reserves that lie economically or physically stranded from markets. Options to monetize such reserves include Gas to… (more)

Black, Brodie Gene, 1986-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

EIA responds to Nature article on shale gas projections  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and...

338

Gas Companies Operating Within the State of Connecticut (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply a broad definition of “gas company”, which includes any person or entity involved in the manufacture or transportation of gas within Connecticut. The regulations set...

339

Chapter 11 - Managing Multiple Human Stressors in the Ocean: A Case Study in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Pacific Ocean represents almost half of the world’s total ocean area, contains every major variety of marine habitats, and borders the coastline of 50 countries or territories. The huge variety of habitat types, ranging from shallow coasts to the abyssal regions that reach thousands of meters in depth, and including coral reefs, seagrass, mangroves, and estuaries, hosts an immeasurable diversity of organisms. This biodiversity and these ecosystems provide a wide range of services for human society with hundreds of billions of dollars of vital services every year and play an important role in the lives and traditions of its coastal and island inhabitants. For example, more than half of reported global fisheries landings are caught in the Pacific Ocean, providing annual gross revenues amounting to approximately US$50 billion every year. However, today, fisheries resources in the Pacific Ocean are generally fully or overexploited. There are many challenges to overcome if the sustainable management of fisheries resources in the Pacific is to be achieved, including the lack of well-defined and enforced access rights; “bad” subsidies, which intensify overcapitalization; illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing, which distorts markets and makes accurate stock assessments impossible; and, perhaps most fundamentally, the inherent tendency to focus on short-term benefits at the expense of long-term conservation. In addition, climate change is now considered one of the major drivers of change in the Pacific, affecting the sustainability of ecosystem services. Many regions of the Pacific have already experienced the effects of climate change. The full impacts of the synergistic effects of multiple factors, including pollution and habitat destruction, are not yet fully understood. This further highlights the urgent need to address and prepare for the threat of multiple climate and environmental stressors on coastal communities and on the marine fisheries so vital to their lives and livelihoods. Solutions to these challenges must be holistic, multisectoral, and cross-scale, putting into effect the concept of optimizing a complex system presented in Chapter 8. It is vital that the region moves toward ecosystem-based management where multiple threats are addressed within integrated strategies.

William W.L. Cheung; Ussif Rashid Sumaila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Climate change in the sea: the implications of increasing the carbon dioxide inputs to the surface ocean  

SciTech Connect

The oceans are estimated to be absorbing one-third of the fossil fuel carbon released into the atmosphere, a process that is expected to change ocean carbon chemistry. I will present data from the Washington coast showing ocean pH declines and changes to the shell chemistry of bivalves. I will discuss implications of carbon cycle changes for marine species, including insights from a coastal area where I have worked for more than 24 years. I will summarize what we know to date about this process of “ocean acidification”.

Pfister, Cathy [University of Chicago

2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) 2014.02.01 - 2014.10.15 Lead Scientist : Allen Goldstein Description In areas where biogenic emissions are oxidized in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants such as SO2, NOx and black carbon, it has become increasingly apparent that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is substantially enhanced. Research is urgently needed to elucidate fundamental processes of natural

342

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

343

A numerical model of hydrothermal cooling and crustal accretion at a fast spreading mid-ocean ridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 7360 words, 11 figures. Keywords: Mid-ocean ridge processes; hydrothermal cooling; numerical modelA numerical model of hydrothermal cooling and crustal accretion at a fast spreading mid-ocean ridge present a steady state numerical representation of the sill model that explicitly includes hydrothermal

Toomey, Doug

344

Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. spizizenii gtP20b, Isolated from the Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...including seawater (4). The first B. subtilis genome was...608-m depth in the Indian Ocean and from the layer close...bottom surface of the ocean. The sampling was taken...described here is the first version under the accession...A. Bratke, E. C. Powers, and S. L. Salzberg...

Longjiang Fan; Shiping Bo; Huan Chen; Wanzhi Ye; Katrin Kleinschmidt; Heike I. Baumann; Johannes F. Imhoff; Michael Kleine; Daguang Cai

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Authors: Maša Prodanovic (speaker), Javad Behseresht, Yao Peng, Steven L. Bryant, Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 ( http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] ) Abstract: A spectrum of behavior is encountered in methane hydrate provinces, especially ocean sediments, ranging from essentially static accumulations where the pore space is filled with hydrate and brine, to active seeps where hydrate and methane gas phase co-exist in the hydrate stability zone (HSZ). The grain-scale models of drainage and fracturing presented demonstrate key processes involved in pressure-driven gas phase invasion of a sediment. A novel extension of invasion percolation to infinite-acting, physically representative networks is used to evaluate the connectivity of water in a gas-drained sediment. A novel implementation of the level set method (LSM) is used to determine the capillarity-controlled displacement of brine by gas from sediment and from fractures within the sediment. The discrete element method (DEM) is extended to model the coupling between the pore fluids and the solid, and thereby predict the onset of sediment fracturing by gas phase pressure under in situ loading conditions. The DEM grain mechanics model accounts for the different pressure of brine and methane gas in a “membrane” two-fluid model. The fluid-fluid configuration from LSM can be mapped directly to the pore space in DEM, thereby coupling the drainage and mechanics models. The type of behavior that can emerge from the coupled processes is illustrated with an extended LSM model. The extension computes grain displacement by the gas phase with a simple kinematic rule.

346

Natural Gas Regulation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation The Natural Gas Act of 1938, as amended, requires anyone who wants to import or export natural gas, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) from or to a foreign country must first obtain an authorization from the Department of Energy. The Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply, Division of Natural Gas Regulatory Activities is the one-stop-shopping place to obtain these authorizations in the Department. The import/export authorizations are necessary for anyone who wants to import or export natural gas, including LNG. There are basically two types of authorizations, blanket and long-term authorizations. The blanket authorization enables you to import or export on a short-term or spot market basis for a period of up to two years. The

347

Ocean tide energy converter  

SciTech Connect

A tide motor energy source includes a tidal piston with a valved chamber. The piston drives a hydraulic ram to generate electrical power through a pressure accumulator and hydraulic motor. The ram can be locked hydraulically to enable the tidal piston to be held fixed at a desired elevation and the valves in the chamber permit it to be filled with water or air. The piston with its chamber filled with air at its low tide position and then released for controlled ascent while submerged acts as a submerged float for driving the ram upwardly while the tide runs in during one phase of its operation. The piston with its chamber filled with water while locked at its highest position as the tide begins to run out, and then released to fall under control, acts as a weight suspended in air after the water level drops below the piston for driving the ram downwardly during the second phase of its operation. The rising and falling motion of the tidal piston is used as the energy source.

Rainey, D.E.

1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

348

Measuring Ocean Acidification: New Technology for a New Era of Ocean Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 system changes in the upper ocean (wind-mixed layer) at stations in the Pacific (HOT) and Atlantic (BATS) oceans: the carbonate:bicarbonate concentration ratio and pH. ... Ocean alkalinity buffers the effects of oceanic CO2 uptake, but slowing and eventually reversing the trend of increasing ocean acidity will require increased continental weathering and dissolution of ocean carbonate sediments. ... (80) Each platform imposes different constraints on instrument design and performance in terms of measurement frequency, accuracy, and precision, as well as sensor size, power requirements, and endurance. ...

Robert H. Byrne

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

350

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

351

Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

Cheon, Woo Geunn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Chapter 1 - Natural Gas Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is the most energy-efficient fossil fuel; it offers important energy-saving benefits when it is used instead of oil or coal. Although the primary use of natural gas is as a fuel, it is also a source of hydrocarbons for petrochemical feedstocks and a major source of elemental sulfur, an important industrial chemical. Its popularity as an energy source is expected to grow substantially in the future because natural gas can help achieve two important energy goals for the twenty-first century: providing the sustainable energy supplies and services needed for social and economic development and reducing adverse impacts on global climate and the environment in general. Natural gas consumption and trade have been growing steadily over the past two decades, and natural gas has strengthened its position in the world energy mix. Although natural gas demand declined in 2009, as a result of the economic slowdown, it is expected to resume growth in both emerging and traditional markets in the coming decades. Such increase in the near future will be driven because of additional demand in current uses, primarily power generation. There is yet little overlap between the use of natural gas and oil in all large markets. However, there are certain moves in the horizon, including the electrifying of transportation, that will push natural gas use to ever higher levels. This book gives the reader an introduction to natural gas by describing the origin and composition of natural gas, gas sources, phase behavior and properties, and transportation methods. Keywords: Absolute Open Flow, bulk modulus of elasticity, coal-bed methane, cricondenbar, cricondentherm, Expected Ultimate Recovery, gas deviation factor, higher heating value, Inflow Performance Relationship, kerogen, laminar flow, liquefied natural gas, primary thermogenic gas, pyrobitumen, secondary thermogenic gas, super-compressibility factor, thiol, Tubing Performance Curve, turbulent flow, unconventional gas resources, Wobbe Index, Wobbe Number.

Saeid Mokhatab; William A. Poe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(RD&D) projects to benefit the electricity and natural gas ratepayers in California. The Energy for natural gas RD&D. The PIER program strives to conduct the most promising public interest energy research End-Use Energy Efficiency · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy

354

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

357

On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

Reid, Joseph L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Indian Ocean surface circulations and their connection to Indian Ocean dipole, identified from Ocean Surface Currents Analysis Real Time (OSCAR) data .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ocean surface circulation is an essential component of the world climate system. In this study, the Ocean Surface Currents Analysis - Real Time (OSCAR) data,… (more)

Rana, Haris Sarwar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Ocean - Regional Planning Efforts | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Efforts Regional Planning Efforts Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Marine planning is a science-based process that provides transparent information about ocean use and guarantees the public and stakeholders a voice early on in decisions affecting the uses of the marine environment. It is an inclusive, bottom-up approach that gives the Federal Government, States, and Tribes, with input from local communities, stakeholders, and the public, the ability to make informed decisions on how best to optimize the use of and protect the ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes. Under the National Ocean Policy, the United States is subdivided into nine regional planning areas. Within each region, Federal, State, and Tribal

360

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth, Space Sciences » Earth, Space Sciences » Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate change and projecting the impacts of high-latitude change on regions throughout the globe. Get Expertise Phil Jones COSIM Email Matthew Hecht COSIM Email Elizabeth Hunke COSIM Email Mat Maltrud COSIM Email Bill Lipscomb COSIM Email Scott Elliott COSIM Email Todd Ringler COSIM Email We are also developing a set of next-generation ocean and ice models with variable resolution horizontal grids to focus resolution on regions of interest or regions where specific processes (like eddies) need to be resolved. Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

362

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

363

Chapter 2 - The History of Measuring Ocean Currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins with a brief mention of the contributions made by the ancient mariners in the “discovery” of oceanic currents. Subsequent efforts made by several investigators in this direction, toward development of various devices for measurements of oceanic currents, are then addressed. These include technologies for measurement of surface currents, subsurface and abyssal currents, seafloor boundary layer currents, and vertical profiling of horizontal currents. Surface current measurement technologies include the application of drifting surface bodies; imaging of surface water motion trajectories and patterns with the support of aerial photography, radiometry, and active microwave radar systems; and vector mapping based on current-driven sea-surface wave transport. This is followed by discussion of technologies developed for subsurface and abyssal current measurements. These include spatially integrated measurements based on earth’s magnetism and oceanic sound speed, Lagrangian measurements based on motion of drifting subsurface floats, and Eulerian measurements with the support of a multitude of devices such as suspended drag, propeller revolution registration by mechanical counters, unidirectional impeller current meters, Savonius rotor current meters, ultrasonic acoustic methods, thermal sensors for measurements of turbulent motions, laser Doppler sensors, and acoustic Doppler current meters. This chapter further addresses an important topic of seafloor boundary layer current measurements using mechanical devices and nonmechanical devices such as BASS and MAVS. The chapter concludes with a discussion of technologies developed for vertical profiling of horizontal currents.

Antony Joseph

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Evaluation of OSCAR ocean surface current product in the tropical Indian Ocean using in situ data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The OSCAR (ocean surface current analysis real-time), which is a ... , has been evaluated in the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) in two different ways. First ... capture the variabilities of the well-known surface current

RAJESH SIKHAKOLLI; RASHMI SHARMA; SUJIT BASU; B S GOHIL…

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Effects of horizontal mixing on the upper ocean temperature in the equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of horizontal mixing on the thermal structure of the equatorial Pacific Ocean is examined based on a sigma coordinate ... on the upper thermal structure in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, while their ...

Chuanjiang Huang; Fangli Qiao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Is the situation and immediate threat to life and health? Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor? Possible Fire / Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Possible Fire / Natural Gas (including chemicals and bio agents") (not including chemicals or bio agents Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor

367

Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and currents at various resolutions. We briefly present the OFS, then describe three currently available oceanShort Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite L., and Soulat, F. 2008. Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite. ­ ICES

Ribes, Aurélien

368

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Construction Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate See Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $500 Furnace with ECM Fan: $700 - $900 Water Boiler: $800 - $1,200 Steam Boiler: $800 Boiler Reset Control: $100 Indirect Water Heater: $300 Programmable Thermostats: $25 Provider Central Hudson Gas and Electric The Business Energy SavingsCentral program is for non-residential gas customers of Central Hudson. This includes businesses, local governments,

371

History of Gas Lasers, Part 2: Pulsed Gas Lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this second article of a two-part series, Colin Webb explores the origins of pulsed gas lasers, which made possible many critical applications of laser technology, including...

Webb, Colin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ocean Sci., 8, 227248, 2012 www.ocean-sci.net/8/227/2012/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the Arabian Sea, the surface oceanic currents form a cyclonic gyre in January, which weakens in March (KindleOcean Sci., 8, 227­248, 2012 www.ocean-sci.net/8/227/2012/ doi:10.5194/os-8-227-2012 © Author(s) 2012. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

373

Ocean Science, 1, 145157, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/145/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. On the other hand, the thermal forcing has a neg- ligible effect on the ocean currents. For sea ice, both of heat by the ocean current and advect also warmer air in the Weddell Sea and colder air in the Ross SeaOcean Science, 1, 145­157, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/145/ SRef-ID: 1812-0792/os/2005

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

374

Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 September 1933 research-article Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve...

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

On Ocean Currents Produced by Winds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 January 1935 research-article On Ocean Currents Produced by Winds G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access...

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Intermediate Waters of the Pacific Ocean.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

BOOK REVIEWS. 313. REID, J. L., JR. 1965. Intermediate. Waters of the Pacific Ocean. Johns Hopkins Oceano- graphic. Studies,. No. 2. Johns Hopkins. Press ...

1999-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector.

378

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll...

379

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited OCEAN THERMAL EXTRACTABLE ENERGY VISUALIZATION Award DE-EE0002664 October 28, 2012 Final Technical Report Prepared by...

380

Analysis of variations in ocean color  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aug 9, 1976 ... mote sensing values of the color of the ocean .... its spectral variations, we must first study ... tering can be expressed in terms of a power.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

382

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

383

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

384

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

385

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

386

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

387

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

388

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

389

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

390

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

391

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

392

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

393

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

394

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

395

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

396

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

398

Variability, interaction and change in the atmosphere–ocean–ecology system of the Western Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...all. In a symposium on the Indian Ocean over 30 years ago, David...sea level? Why do most modern Indian Ocean reefs only thinly veneer...survival over long time-scales) point to the importance of long-term...regeneration. In the Western Indian Ocean, studies are in place...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Atmosphere–ocean dynamics in the Western Indian Ocean recorded in corals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Atmosphere-ocean-ecology dynamics in the Western Indian Ocean organized by Tom Spencer...18 O (dashed line) and 11-point moving average (solid line...Parker et al. 1995) and 11-point moving average (solid line...to the wind- driven southern Indian Ocean gyre (Allan et al. 1995...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

Meyers, Steven D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Persistent Ocean Monitoring with Underwater Gliders: Towards Accurate Reconstruction of Dynamic Ocean Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to ocean currents. The speed control algorithm then optimizes the speed along the planned path so waters of large magnitude ocean currents, and is length constrained. Secondly, we develop a velocityPersistent Ocean Monitoring with Underwater Gliders: Towards Accurate Reconstruction of Dynamic

Smith, Ryan N.

402

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

Boss, Emmanuel S.

403

TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC-scale interactions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, especially, processes associated with the EI Nino phenomena. He has of ocean temperatures. He suggests that an anomalously high heat supply in the equatorial Pacific

404

Ocean Sci., 3, 299310, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/299/2007/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and industrial fisheries, are experiencing a constant increase, significantly affecting the marine ecosystemOcean Sci., 3, 299­310, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/299/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Observing the Mediterranean Sea from space: 21 years

Boyer, Edmond

405

Anthropogenic modification of the oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...owing in part to the global economic recession...gmd/ccgg/trends/#global ). Human activities have...burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas), but also...vegetation-[2]. 2. Global warming The most well known of...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

EIA - Natural Gas Publications & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Publications & Analysis Publications & Analysis Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S. Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot. Natural Gas Monthly U.S. production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices. Natural Gas Annual Provides comprehensive information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the U.S. ... see complete list of Natural Gas Publications Basics All Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports & Pipelines Storage Consumption Natural Gas Survey Forms Natural Gas Section from International Energy Annual Forecasts & Analysis Includes petroleum and natural gas forecasts and analysis for consumption, production, prices, and sales.

407

Natural Gas Program Archive (Disk1)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eastern U.S. Gas Eastern U.S. Gas Shales Eastern U.S. Gas Eastern U.S. Gas Shales Shales Program Program This DVD contains information related to research and development (R&D) undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) during the 1976-1995 time period. This R&D focused on improving industry understanding of ways to locate and produce natural gas from the fractured organic gas shales of the Eastern U.S. A second DVD is also available that includes similar information related to the five other R&D programs targeting unconventional natural gas during roughly the same time frame: Western U.S. Gas Sands (1977-1992), Methane Recovery from Coalbeds (1978-1982), Methane Hydrates (1982-1992), Deep Source Gas Project (1982-1992), and Secondary Gas Recovery (1987-1995). The following items are found on this DVD.

408

Gas turbine combustor transition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

Gas cooled traction drive inverter  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a modular circuit card configuration for distributing heat among a plurality of circuit cards. Each circuit card includes a housing adapted to dissipate heat in response to gas flow over the housing. In one aspect, a gas-cooled inverter includes a plurality of inverter circuit cards, and a plurality of circuit card housings, each of which encloses one of the plurality of inverter cards.

Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

410

Economics of natural gas upgrading  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels.

Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.cold deep-ocean waters to produce electric power via eitherOffice of Solar Power Applications. Division of Ocean Energy

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an open cycle ocean thermal difference power plant. M.S.screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.1958. Ocean cooling water system for 800 MW power station.

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer1 May 2009. [ 1 ] Global ocean wind power has recently beenincreases mean global ocean wind power by +58% and À4%,

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.cold deep-ocean waters to produce electric power via eitherpower from the temperature differential between warm surface and cold deep-ocean

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Tidal triggering of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean William S. D. Wilcock School...of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, a region of high-amplitude...interaction|forecasting|prediction|Pacific Ocean| Introduction For more than a......

William S. D. Wilcock

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Sensitivity Analysis of Gas Production from Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds in which gas molecules are lodged within the lattices of an ice-like crystalline solid. The vast quantities of hydrocarbon gases trapped in hydrate formations in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments may constitute a new and promising energy source. Class 2 hydrate deposits are characterized by a Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is underlain by a saturated zone of mobile water. Class 3 hydrate deposits are characterized by an isolated Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is not in contact with any hydrate-free zone of mobile fluids. Both classes of deposits have been shown to be good candidates for exploitation in earlier studies of gas production via vertical well designs - in this study we extend the analysis to include systems with varying porosity, anisotropy, well spacing, and the presence of permeable boundaries. For Class 2 deposits, the results show that production rate and efficiency depend strongly on formation porosity, have a mild dependence on formation anisotropy, and that tighter well spacing produces gas at higher rates over shorter time periods. For Class 3 deposits, production rates and efficiency also depend significantly on formation porosity, are impacted negatively by anisotropy, and production rates may be larger, over longer times, for well configurations that use a greater well spacing. Finally, we performed preliminary calculations to assess a worst-case scenario for permeable system boundaries, and found that the efficiency of depressurization-based production strategies are compromised by migration of fluids from outside the system.

Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George; Zhang, Keni

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

California's LNG Terminals: The Promise of New Gas Supplies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LNG Terminals: The LNG Terminals: The Promise of New Gas Supplies November 28, 2007 © 2005 San Diego Gas and Electric and Southern California Gas Company. All copyright and trademark rights reserved What is LNG? LNG is natural gas that has been liquefied, by cooling it to a temperature of -260°F, so it can be shipped across oceans. The gas is then re-vaporized and delivered to customers. 2 Why Do We Need LNG? California Energy Commission * 2007 Integrated Energy Policy Report -North American gas demand to increase at annual rate of 2.1% over next decade -Domestic production expected to remain flat -LNG imports to US expected to increase 14% annually by 2017 3 4 Benefits of LNG * Reduced energy costs for customers * Increased competition between gas suppliers * Improved reliability for customers

418

Study of directional ocean wavefield evolution and rogue wave occurrence using large-scale phase-resolved nonlinear simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is challenging to obtain accurate predictions of ocean surface wavefield evolutions due to several complex dynamic processes involved, including nonlinear wave interaction, wave breaking and wind forcing, and also wave ...

Xiao, Wenting, 1982-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

AVESTAR® - Shale Gas Processing (SGP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shale Gas Processing (SGP) Shale Gas Processing (SGP) SPG The shale gas revolution is transforming America's energy landscape and economy. The shale gas boom, including the Marcellus play in Appalachia, is driving job creation and investment in the energy sector and is also helping to revive other struggling sectors of the economy like manufacturing. Continued growth in domestic shale gas processing requires that energy companies maximize the efficiency and profitability from their operations through excellent control and drive maximum business value from all their plant assets, all while reducing negative environmental impact and improving safety. Changing demographics and rapidly evolving plant automation and control technologies also necessitate training and empowering the next-generation of shale gas process engineering and

420

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Cleaning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleaning Cleaning Chemicals from Coal Complex Chemicals from Coal Complex (Eastman Company) Novel gas cleaning and conditioning are crucial technologies for achieving near-zero emissions, while meeting gasification system performance and cost targets. DOE's Gasification Systems program supports technology development in the area of gas cleaning and conditioning, including advanced sorbents and solvents, particulate filters, and other novel gas-cleaning approaches that remove and convert gas contaminants into benign and marketable by-products. To avoid the cost and efficiency penalties associated with cooling the gas stream to temperatures at which conventional gas clean-up systems operate, novel processes are being developed that operate at mild to high temperatures and incorporate multi-contaminant control to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EA-1976: Emera CNG, LLC Compressed Natural Gas Project, Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with a proposal by Emera CNG, LLC that would include Emera's CNG plant Emera’s CNG plant would include facilities to receive, dehydrate, and compress gas to fill pressure vessels with an open International Organization for Standardization (ISO) container frame mounted on trailers. Emera plans to truck the trailers a distance of a quarter mile from its proposed CNG facility to a berth at the Port of Palm Beach, where the trailers will be loaded onto a roll-on/roll-off ocean going carrier. Emera plans to receive natural gas at its planned compression facility from the Riviera Lateral, a pipeline owned and operated by Peninsula Pipeline Company. Although this would be the principal source of natural gas to Emera’s CNG facility for export, during periods of maintenance at Emera’s facility, or at the Port of Palm Beach, Emera may obtain CNG from other sources and/or export CNG from other general-use Florida port facilities. The proposed Emera facility will initially be capable of loading 8 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/day) of CNG into ISO containers and, after full build-out, would be capable to load up to 25 MMcf/day. For the initial phase of the project, Emera intends to send these CNG ISO containers from Florida to Freeport, Grand Bahama Island, where the trailers will be unloaded, the CNG decompressed, and injected into a pipeline for transport to electric generation plants owned and operated by Grand Bahama Power Company (GBPC). DOE authorizing the exportation of CNG and is not providing funding or financial assistance for the Emera Project.

422

Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1999 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1999. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1999. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1999. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

423

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: SKIP govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: SKIP Pre-campaign Measurements Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: SKIP Pre-campaign Measurements 2013.03.15 - 2015.12.31 Lead Scientist : Heath Powers For data sets, see below. Description The Self-Kontained Instrument Platform (SKIP) container is being deployed at the T3 GOAmazon site containing a basic set of meteorological and radiometric instrumentation including: SMET, SKYRAD, GRNRAD, and ceilometer (all ARM instruments), an ozone monitor, and a nitric Oxide/nitrogen

424

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN Activity of Aerosols Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN Activity of Aerosols 2014.01.01 - 2014.12.31 Lead Scientist : Jian Wang Description Aerosol indirect effects, which represent the impact of aerosols on climate through influencing the properties of clouds, remain one of the main uncertainties in climate predictions (IPCC, 2007). Reducing this large uncertainty requires both improved understanding and representation of aerosol properties and processes in climate models, including the cloud

425

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

Frandsen, Jannette B.

426

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste ... A raucous, hostile crowd of Philadelphia residents shouted down Environmental Protection Agency officials last week at a public hearing on the agency's tentative decision to issue a research permit for an ocean burn of chemical wastes. ...

1986-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

Dynamics of a Snowball Earth ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... a model that couples ice flow and ocean circulation, and is driven by a weak geothermal heat flux under a global ice cover about a kilometre thick. Compared with the ... studies accounted for the combined effects of thick ice cover and flow, and driving by geothermal heating, yet ref. 11 simulated an ocean under a 200-m-thick ice cover ...

Yosef Ashkenazy; Hezi Gildor; Martin Losch; Francis A. Macdonald; Daniel P. Schrag; Eli Tziperman

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

Automated Sensor Networks to Advance Ocean Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

satellite telecom- munications. A regional cabled observa- tory will "wire" a single region in the north- eastern Pacific Ocean with a high-speed optical and power grid. The coastal com- ponent will expand ocean- observing network in the Mid-Atlantic Bight waters (MAB, spanning offshore regions from

429

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis is applied to a set of measured ocean wind waves data collected during the 1990 SWADE {Surface Wave Dynamics Experi- ment) program. The results reveal significantly new and previously unexplored Insights on wave

430

www.hboi.fau.edu Ocean Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to drive turbines #12;At present, the focus is to establish a small-scale ocean current test sitewww.hboi.fau.edu Ocean Energy Collaboration: A Charge for Engineers BULLETIN Summer 2012 Beginning by Executive Director Sue Skemp, they are helping to investigate and develop power extraction from particularly

Fernandez, Eduardo

431

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP/KNMI/TEC/RP/147 Validation of ASCAT 12.5-km winds The Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) delivers an operational level 2 wind product produces a level 1 product with 12.5-km WVC spacing that has a resolution of approximately 25 km. Since

Stoffelen, Ad

432

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP2/KNMI/TEC/RP/194 Quality Control of Ku. The OSCAT level 2a data are available in near-real time and OWDP is used at KNMI to produce the Ocean and Sea Ice (OSI) SAF wind product which is made available to users. A beta version of OWDP is also

Stoffelen, Ad

433

The Curious Case of Indian Ocean Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent studies have pointed out an increased warming over the Indian Ocean warm pool (the central-eastern Indian Ocean characterized by sea surface temperatures greater than 28.0°C) during the past half-century, although the reasons behind this ...

Mathew Koll Roxy; Kapoor Ritika; Pascal Terray; Sébastien Masson

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report  

SciTech Connect

The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

Fleming, Alex J.

2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

435

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

436

The Gas Flow from the Gas Attenuator to the Beam Line  

SciTech Connect

The gas leak from the gas attenuator to the main beam line of the Linac Coherent Light Source has been evaluated, with the effect of the Knudsen molecular beam included. It has been found that the gas leak from the gas attenuator of the present design, with nitrogen as a working gas, does not exceed 10{sup -5} torr x l/s even at the highest pressure in the main attenuation cell (20 torr).

Ryutov, D.D.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

437

Evaluation of gas-liquid separation performance of natural gas filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fibrous filters are often used to remove contaminants including both dusts and liquid droplets from natural gas. This paper aims to evaluate the gas-liquid separation performance of three types of cartridge filte...

Baisong Li; Zhongli Ji; Xue Yang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

gas cylinder storage guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines All cylinders must be stored vertical, top up across the upper half the cylinder but below the shoulder. Small cylinder stands or other methods may be appropriate to ensure that the cylinders are secured from movement. Boxes, cartons, and other items used to support small cylinders must not allow water to accumulate and possible cause corrosion. Avoid corrosive chemicals including salt and fumes - keep away from direct sunlight and keep objects away that could fall on them. Use Gas pressure regulators that have been inspected in the last 5 years. Cylinders that contain fuel gases whether full or empty must be stored away from oxidizer cylinders at a minimum of 20 feet. In the event they are stored together, they must be separated by a wall 5 feet high with

439

Gas-Saving Tips  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Gas-Saving Tips Gas-Saving Tips Some consumers believe fuel economy ratings are a fixed number, like engine size or cargo volume. However, a vehicle's fuel economy can vary significantly due to several factors, including how the vehicle is driven, the vehicle's mechanical condition, and the environment in which it is driven. That's good news. It means you may be able to improve your vehicle's gas mileage through proper maintenance and driving habits. In fact, studies suggest the average driver can improve his/her fuel economy by roughly 10 percent. Here are a few simple tips to help you get the best possible fuel economy from your vehicle and reduce your fuel costs. Adopt Good Driving Habits Drive Sensibly Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration and braking)

440

Natural Gas Annual, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1998 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1998. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1994 to 1998. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1998 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1998, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 27, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 19, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (August 12-19), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.34 to $3.02 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as supplies continued to be viewed as more than adequate to address near-term demand, including heating-related demand increases this winter. The futures contract for September delivery decreased by $0.36 on the week to $3.12 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday is estimated to

442

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

443

Natural Gas Annual, 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1997 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1997. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1993 to 1997. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1997 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1997, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2009 16, 2009 Next Release: April 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 15, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with some exceptions including those in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent. Despite this weekÂ’s upticks at most locations, natural gas spot prices remain at relatively low levels and have continued to trade within a limited range for the past 4 weeks. The Henry Hub spot market prices gained about 10 cents or 2.9 percent per million Btu (MMBtu), ending trading yesterday at $3.60 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 15) at $3.693

445

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

446

An Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions-Weighted  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Analysis ­ Greenhouse Gas Emissions Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawai`i And University of Hawai`i Economic Research, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

447

Ocean Motion International LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Motion International LLC Ocean Motion International LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Motion International LLC Place Saulsbury, Tennessee Zip 38067 Sector Ocean Product Marine energy technology firm developing ocean/ wave powered generators. Coordinates 35.052242°, -89.083299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.052242,"lon":-89.083299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

448

Clean Cities: Ocean State Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ocean State Clean Cities Coalition Ocean State Clean Cities Coalition The Ocean State Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Ocean State Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Wendy Lucht 401-874-2792 wlucht@uri.edu Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Wendy Lucht Photo of Wendy Lucht Wendy Lucht has worked as the Ocean State Clean Cities coordinator at the University of Rhode Island (URI) since 2008 but has worked at URI since 1999. Lucht is working to make Rhode Island the first state certified by Project Get Ready, an initiative preparing cities and states for the arrival of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). As part of this effort, Lucht is serving as chair of the fleet-acquisition committee working on

449

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report about the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization project, which focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy from the world’s ocean thermal resources.

450

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and...

451

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Report summarizing the results of...

452

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Several people are photographed standing on the barge. The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion project at Hawaii's Natural Energy Lab was one of the first successful thermal ocean...

453

Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable (TRL 4 System) - THOR's Power Method...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable (TRL 4 System) - THOR's Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable (TRL 4 System) - THOR's Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices...

454

Regime for Marine Scientific Research in the Indian Ocean Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structural leadership by power-based actors was seen as fundamental by ... IOGOOS members to the successful establishment of an Ocean Observing System in the Indian Ocean.

Manoj Gupta

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Tensile stiffness analysis on ocean dynamic power umbilical  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tensile stiffness of ocean dynamic power umbilical is an important design parameter for ... for the estimation of tensile stiffness of the ocean dynamic power umbilical.

Ming-gang Tang ???; Jun Yan ? ?; Ye Wang ? ?; Qian-jin Yue ???

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Respiration and ammonium excretion by open ocean gelatinous  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mar 26, 1976 ... divers in the western North Atlantic Ocean. In situ rates of ... open ocean regions, however, there is little ..... power functions of body protein (mg.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

457

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Indonesian archipelago links the tropical Indian and western Pacific Oceans, so transmission of oceanic and atmospheric energy across the archipelago has the potential to… (more)

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Oxygen-nutrient relationships in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aug 18, 1972 ... In the northeastern Pacific Ocean the oxygen-phosphate ... different stations in the Pacific and Indian Oceans to study their water masses.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

459

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the first time, the global ocean 80 m wind power and tofirst time, wind power at 80 m (typical wind turbine hub height) above the global ocean

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

462

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Projected ocean dumping rates for municipal and industrial wastes in the year 2000. Report for 26 March 1984-26 August 1985  

SciTech Connect

The amounts of coal ash, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, sewage sludge, industrial waste, and seafood-processing wastes currently ocean dumped were determined, and ocean dumping of these wastes was projected for the year 2000. The projected rates were made using three different scenarios: Scenario I assumed continued ocean dumping only by current permittees, Scenario II assumed some relaxation of ocean dumping regulation, and Scenario III, to provide a maximum estimate, assumed that future ocean-dumping would be based solely on economic considerations. Coal ash and FGD sludge are projected to be the most voluminous waste dumped under Scenarios II and III, and the East coast of the U.S. would produce the greatest amounts to be dumped.

Cura, J.; Menzie, C.; Borchardt, J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Authors: Mark White and Pete McGrail Venue: The 9th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Technologies will be held November 16-20, 2008 at The Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC. The Conference will be organized by MIT in collaboration with the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG), with major sponsorship from the US Department of Energy. http://mit.edu/ghgt9/ . Abstract: Under high pressure and low temperature conditions small nonpolar molecules (typically gases) can combine with water to form crystalline structures known as clathrate hydrates. Methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) form nearly identical clathrate structures (sI), with the CO2 hydrate being thermodynamically favored. Vast accumulations of methane hydrates have been found in suboceanic deposits and beneath the arctic permafrost. Because of the large volumetric storage densities, clathrate hydrates on the deep ocean floor have been suggested as a sequestration option for CO2. Alternatively, CO2 hydrates can be formed in the geologic settings of naturally occurring accumulations of methane hydrates. Global assessments of natural gas resources have shown that gas hydrate resources exceed those of conventional resources, which is indicative of the potential for clathrate hydrate sequestration of CO2. Recovery of natural gas from hydrate-bearing geologic deposits has the potential for being economically viable, but there remain significant technical challenges in converting these natural accumulations into a useable resource. Currently, conventional methods for producing methane hydrates from geologic settings include depressurization, thermal stimulation, and inhibitor injection. Although CO2 clathrates generally are not naturally as abundant as those of CH4, their occurrence forms the foundation of an unconventional approach for producing natural gas hydrates that involves the exchange of CO2 with CH4 in the hydrate structure. This unconventional concept has several distinct benefits over the conventional methods: 1) the heat of formation of CO2 hydrate is greater than the heat of dissociation of CH4 hydrate, providing a low-grade heat source to support additional methane hydrate dissociation, 2) exchanging CO2 with CH4 will maintain the mechanical stability of the geologic formation, and 3) the process is environmentally friendly, providing a sequestration mechanism for the injected CO2. The exchange production technology would not be feasible without the favorable thermodynamics of CO2 hydrates over CH4 hydrates. This situation yields challenges for the technology to avoid secondary hydrate formation and clogging of the geologic repository. Laboratory-scale experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of producing natural gas and sequestering CO2 using the direct exchange technology in geologic media. These experiments have duplicated numerically using the STOMP-HYD simulator, which solves the nonisothermal multifluid flow and transport equations for mixed hydrate systems in geologic media. This paper describes the design (via numerical simulation) of a pilot-scale demonstration test of the CO2 exchange production and sequestration technology for a geologic setting beneath the arctic permafrost, involving a gas-hydrate interval overlying a free-gas interval (i.e., Class 1 Hydrate Accumulation).

466

On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

Hering, Susanne V. (Berkeley, CA); Goldstein, Allen H. (Orinda, CA)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

467

Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

Diaz, Zaida (Katy, TX); Del Paggio, Alan Anthony (Spring, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

468

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

469

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

470

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

471

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

472

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

473

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

474

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

475

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

476

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

477

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

478

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

479

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

480

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

482

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

483

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

486

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22, 2013 - 1:14pm Addthis Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean

487

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22, 2013 - 1:14pm Addthis Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean

488

Gas-liquid separator and method of operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for gas-liquid separation in electrolysis processes is provided. The system includes a first compartment having a liquid carrier including a first gas therein and a second compartment having the liquid carrier including a second gas therein. The system also includes a gas-liquid separator fluidically coupled to the first and second compartments for separating the liquid carrier from the first and second gases.

Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev (Latham, NY); Whitt, David Brandon (Albany, NY)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

489

Definition: Liquid natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liquid natural gas Liquid natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Liquid natural gas Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Liquefied natural gas or LNG is natural gas that has been converted to liquid form for ease of storage or transport. Liquefied natural gas takes up about 1/600th the volume of natural gas in the gaseous state. It is odorless, colorless, non-toxic and non-corrosive. Hazards include flammability after vaporization into a gaseous state, freezing and asphyxia. The liquefaction process involves removal of certain components, such as dust, acid gases, helium, water, and heavy hydrocarbons, which could cause difficulty downstream. The natural gas is then condensed into a

490

Historical Natural Gas Annual - 1930 Through 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Historical Natural Gas Annual Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Historical Natural Gas Annual The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-2000 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-2000. To read reports in PDF format download a free copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

491

Passive gas separator and accumulator device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gas-liquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use. 3 figs.

Choe, H.; Fallas, T.T.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

492

Ocean Energy: Forms and Prospects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...greater working head. Turbine diameter is 5.35 m...expense, relatively short life, polarization problems...of about-22 C and a residual latent heat capacity of...expanding steam cannot form. Gas generation be-comes...1291, which has a half-life of 20 million years...

John D. Isaacs; Walter R. Schmitt

1980-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

493

Flammable gas project topical report  

SciTech Connect

The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

Johnson, G.D.

1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

494

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

495

The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

Weiss, P.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

496

Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)  

SciTech Connect

Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

497

CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean) Data from CDIAC  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The idea for CARINA developed at a workshop (CO2 in the northern North Atlantic) that was held at the HANSE-Wissenschaftskolleg (HANSE Institute for Advanced Study) in Delmenhorst, Germany from June 9 to 11, 1999. While the main scientific focus is the North Atlantic, some data from the South Atlantic have been included in the project, along with data from the Arctic Ocean. Data sets go back to 1972, and more than 100 are currently available. The data are also being used in conjunction with other projects and research groups, such as the Atlantic Ocean Carbon Synthesis Group. See the inventory of data at http://store.pangaea.de/Projects/CARBOOCEAN/carina/data_inventory.htm See a detailed table of information on the cruises at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/CARINA/Carina_table.html and also provides access to data files. The CARBOOCEAN data portal provides a specialized interface for CARINA data, a reference list for historic carbon data, and password protected access to the "Data Underway Warehouse.".

498

Acoustic monitoring of severe weather in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind and rainfall are the principal physical processes responsible for the production of high?frequency (1–50 kHz) ambient sound in the ocean. The primary source of the sound is the resonant ringing of individual bubbles created during wave breaking and raindrop splashes. Larger bubbles (>300 ?m diameter) quickly return to the surface while smaller bubbles can be mixed downward at several meters. During severe weather a layer of smaller ambient bubble forms and effectively absorbs higher?frequency (>10 kHz) sound. These processes are revealed in a two?year record of ambient sound recorded from a subsurface mooring at 50N 145W in the NE Pacific Ocean as part of the Canadian SOLAS program. The passive acoustic signal of wind rain and ambient bubbleclouds are compared to the subsurface mooring data including data from an upward looking 200 kHz active sonar and a 300 kHz ADCP. The acoustic signatures of light moderate and heavy rainfall are superimposed on the signature of high wind demonstrating rainfall detection even in the presence of high wind. [Work supported by ONR Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Canadian CFCAS NSERC.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

500

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...