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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate located on the ocean floor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate on the ocean floor includes a flexible cover, a plurality of steerable base members secured to the cover, and a steerable mining module. A suitable source for inflating the cover over the gas hydrate deposit is provided. The mining module, positioned on the gas hydrate deposit, is preferably connected to the cover by a control cable. A gas retrieval conduit or hose extends upwardly from the cover to be connected to a support ship on the ocean surface.

Wyatt, Douglas E. (Aiken, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Guide to natural gas cogeneration. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

Guide to natural gas cogeneration is the most extensive reference ever written on the engineering and economic aspects of gas fired cogeneration systems. Forty-one chapters cover equipment considerations and applications for gas engines, gas turbines, stem engines, electrical switchgear, and packaged systems. The text is thoroughly illustrated with case studies for both commercial and industrial applications of all sizes, as well as for packaged systems for restaurants and hospitals. A special chapter illustrates market opportunities and keys to successful development. Separate abstracts of most chapters and several appendices have been prepared.

Hay, N.E. (ed.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet)

4

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers...

5

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to...

6

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

8

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st century new we focused on the case of un- conventional natural gas recovery from the Marcellus shale In addition

Walter, M.Todd

9

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

10

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; ...

11

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

12

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

13

A Gas-Capture Buoy for Measuring Bubbling Gas Flux in Oceans and Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, calibration, and deployment of a buoy and gas-capture assembly for measuring bubbling gas flux in oceans and lakes are described. The assembly collects gas in a chamber while continuously measuring the position of the gas–water ...

Libe Washburn; Cyril Johnson; Chris C. Gotschalk; E. Thor Egland

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mexico Week: Record Mexican natural gas imports include higher ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... more than 0.5 Bcf/d. LNG's share of Mexico's imports has declined since then because of growing natural gas imports via pipelines from the United ...

16

Transient Climate Change Simulations with a Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean GCM Including the Tropospheric Sulfur Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-dependent climate response to changing concentrations of greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols is studied using a coupled general circulation model of the atmosphere and the ocean (ECHAM4/OPYC3). The concentrations of the well-mixed ...

E. Roeckner; L. Bengtsson; J. Feichter; J. Lelieveld; H. Rodhe

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices...

18

Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction $f_s$ between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a non-trivial function of the strangeness fraction.

P. Wang; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

19

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial...

20

Oil and gas field code master list, 1983. [Glossary included  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States with field information collected through November 1983. The purpose of the publication is to provide codes for easy identification of domestic fields. A standardization of these field codes will foster consistency in field identification by government and industry. The use of field names and codes listed in this publication is required on the survey forms and reports regarding field-specific data for the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. A glossary of the terms is provided to assist the readers in more fully understanding the information in this Field Code Master List. 8 figures, 4 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

22

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

23

Mechanisms Leading to Co-existence of Gas and Hydrate in Ocean...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leading to Co-existence of Gas and Hydrate in Ocean Sediments Steven Bryant Dept. of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering The University of Texas at Austin and Ruben Juanes Dept....

24

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase, and hydrate phase. AHydrate; V: Vapor (gas phase); I: Ice; Q 1 : Quadruple point

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

The ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by order 12% per decade, with smaller reductions in winter. Coupled models suggest that under greenhouse-gasThe ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and ozone forcing John Marshall, Kyle Armour, Jeffery Scott and Yavor Kostov (MIT) David Ferreira

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

27

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 September 6, 2005 - 9:50am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone hotline. The hotline is available to American consumers starting today. "While we've largely seen the best of American generosity and unity throughout the recovery effort, we recognize that there are some bad actors that may try to take advantage of the situation. Consumers are our first line of defense in guarding against gas price gouging. I can assure you, our Administration - from the President down - takes this issue very

28

Mechanisms Leading to Co-existence of Gas and Hydrate in Ocean Sediments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leading to Co-existence of Gas Leading to Co-existence of Gas and Hydrate in Ocean Sediments Steven Bryant Dept. of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering The University of Texas at Austin and Ruben Juanes Dept. of Civil Engineering MIT Observations and Ruminations * Some proposed explanations for co-existence - kinetics of hydrate formation; - regional geotherms; - hypersaline brines as a result of hydrate formation;

29

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cumulative mass of produced water M W . Note that pro-Salinity X P of the produced water. Gas production fromThe salinity of the produced water may pose significant

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

slow conduction process (the main heat transfer mechanism)Heat transfer and gas relative permeability are challenged by the processestransfers. The resulting thermal regime involves heat addition to the dissociation process

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Method and apparatus for recovering geopressured methane gas from ocean depths  

SciTech Connect

A suggested method for recovering the estimated 50,000 trillion CF of methane that is dissolved in areas of the Gulf of Mexico at depths of 15,000 ft involves liberating the methane molecules by means of an electrolytic process. Electrodes lowered to the desired depth and insulated from the overlying saltwater establish an electrical circuit with the methane-laden water acting as the electrolyte. The a-c current density causes dissociation of the water molecules, freeing the methane gas, which rises to the ocean surface. A tent-like structure lying on the surface traps the gas for transfer to a storage facility.

Carpenter, N.

1982-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

32

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Meridional Overturning and Dianeutral Transport in a z-Coordinate Ocean Model Including Eddy-Induced Advection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study examines the marked changes in the patterns of meridional overturning and dianeutral motion that occur upon introduction of the Gent and McWilliams (GM) scheme for eddy-induced transport into a coarse-resolution global ocean ...

Anthony C. Hirst; Trevor J. McDougall

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation Ian S F Jones, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York i.jones@ldeo.columbia.edu Helen E Young Earth Ocean and Space, Australian Technology Park, Sydney, HelenYoung@ozemail.com.au Introduction The carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere is rising rapidly, mostly as a result of fossil fuel burning. This is leading to more trapping of solar radiation in the atmosphere with the expectation that the world's climate will change. Rapid climate change has a downside risk of endangering the food security of the poor and raising the spectra of large scale transmigration. The UNFCCC was an agreement amongst most of the sovereign nations of the world

36

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Multisensor Comparison of Ocean Wave Frequency Spectra from a Research Vessel during the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obtaining accurate measurements of wave statistics from research vessels remains a challenge due to platform motion. One principal correction is the removal of ship heave and Doppler effects from point measurements. Here, open ocean wave ...

Alejandro Cifuentes-Lorenzen; James. B. Edson; Christopher J. Zappa; Ludovic Bariteau

39

Casting Apparatus Including A Gas Driven Molten Metal Injector And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The casting apparatus (50) includes a holding vessel (10) for containing a supply of molten metal (12) and a casting mold (52) located above the holding vessel (10) and having a casting cavity (54). A molten metal injector (14) extends into the holding vessel (10) and is at least partially immersed in the molten metal (12) in the holding vessel (10). The molten metal injector (14) is in fluid communication with the casting cavity (54). The molten metal injector (14) has an injector body (16) defining an inlet opening (24) for receiving molten metal into the injector body (16). A gas pressurization source (38) is in fluid communication with the injector body (16) for cyclically pressurizing the injector body (16) and inducing molten metal to flow from the injector body (16) to the casting cavity (54). An inlet valve (42) is located in the inlet opening (24) in the injector body (16) for filling molten metal into the injector body (16). The inlet valve (42) is configured to prevent outflow of molten metal from the injector body (16) during pressurization and permit inflow of molten metal into the injector body (16) after pressurization. The inlet valve (42) has an inlet valve actuator (44) located above the surface of the supply of molten metal (12) and is operatively connected to the inlet valve (42) for operating the inlet valve (42) between open and closed positions.

Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate saturations. Large volumes (of order one pore volume) of gaseous and aqueous phases must be transported into the gas hydrate stability zone. The driver for this transport is the pressure sink induced by a reduction in occupied pore volume that accompanies the formation of hydrate from gas and water. Pore-scale imbibition models and bed-scale multiphase flow models indicate that the rate-limiting step in converting gas to hydrate is the supply of water to the hydrate stability zone. Moreover, the water supply rate is controlled by capillarity-driven flux for conditions typical of the Alaska North Slope. A meter-scale laboratory experiment confirms that significant volumes of fluid phases move into the hydrate stability zone and that capillarity is essential for the water flux. The model shows that without capillarity-driven flux, large saturations of hydrate cannot form. The observations of thick zones of large saturation at Mallik and Mt Elbert thus suggest that the primary control on these systems is the rate of transport of gaseous and aqueous phases, driven by the pressure sink at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. A key finding of our project is the elucidation of “capillary fracturing” as a dominant gas transport mechanism in low-permeability media. We initially investigate this phenomenon by means of grain-scale simulations in which we extended a discrete element mechanics code (PFC, by Itasca) to incorporate the dynamics of first single-phase and then multiphase flow. A reductionist model on a square lattice allows us to determine some of the fundamental dependencies of the mode of gas invasion (capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and fracturing) on the parameters of the system. We then show that the morphology of the gas-invaded region exerts a fundamental control on the fabric of methane hydrate formation, and on the overpressures caused by methane hydrate dissociation. We demonstrate the existence of the different invasion regimes by means of controlled laboratory experiments in a radial cell. We collapse the behavior in the form of a phas

Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments  

SciTech Connect

In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate saturations. Large volumes (of order one pore volume) of gaseous and aqueous phases must be transported into the gas hydrate stability zone. The driver for this transport is the pressure sink induced by a reduction in occupied pore volume that accompanies the formation of hydrate from gas and water. Pore-scale imbibition models and bed-scale multiphase flow models indicate that the rate-limiting step in converting gas to hydrate is the supply of water to the hydrate stability zone. Moreover, the water supply rate is controlled by capillarity-driven flux for conditions typical of the Alaska North Slope. A meter-scale laboratory experiment confirms that significant volumes of fluid phases move into the hydrate stability zone and that capillarity is essential for the water flux. The model shows that without capillarity-driven flux, large saturations of hydrate cannot form. The observations of thick zones of large saturation at Mallik and Mt Elbert thus suggest that the primary control on these systems is the rate of transport of gaseous and aqueous phases, driven by the pressure sink at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. A key finding of our project is the elucidation of “capillary fracturing” as a dominant gas transport mechanism in low-permeability media. We initially investigate this phenomenon by means of grain-scale simulations in which we extended a discrete element mechanics code (PFC, by Itasca) to incorporate the dynamics of first singlephase and then multiphase flow. A reductionist model on a square lattice allows us to determine some of the fundamental dependencies of the mode of gas invasion (capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and fracturing) on the parameters of the system. We then show that the morphology of the gas-invaded region exerts a fundamental control on the fabric of methane hydrate formation, and on the overpressures caused by methane hydrate dissociation. We demonstrate the existence of the different invasion regimes by means of controlled laboratory experiments in a radial cell. We collapse the behavior in the form of a phase

Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

43

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to economically Page viable gas production. The overallare not promising targets for gas production. AcknowledgmentEnergy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology,

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page viable gas production. The overall conclusion drawnnot promising targets for gas production. Acknowledgment TheTS. Strategies for gas production from hydrate accumulations

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Chemical Spills, Releases, Explosions, Exposures, or Injuries (includes corrosive, reactive, flammable, and toxic chemicals in solid, liquid or gas form)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Spills, Releases, Explosions, Exposures, or Injuries (includes corrosive, reactive, flammable, and toxic chemicals in solid, liquid or gas form) EHS Contact: Kate Lumley-Sapanski (kxl3@psu apply: When to Report: · All chemical exposures or explosions requiring medical attention must

Yener, Aylin

46

Simulation of tokamak SOL and divertor region including heat flux mitigation by gas puffing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-dimensional (2D), scrape-off layer (SOL)-divertor transport simulations are performed using the integrated plasma-neutral-impurity code KTRAN developed at Seoul National University. Firstly, the code is applied to reproduce a National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) discharge by using the prescribed transport coefficients and the boundary conditions obtained from the experiment. The plasma density, the heat flux on the divertor plate, and the D (alpha) emission rate profiles from the numerical simulation are found to follow experimental trends qualitatively. Secondly, predictive simulations are carried out for the baseline operation mode in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) to predict the heat flux on the divertor target plates. The stationary peak heat flux in the KSTAR baseline operation mode is expected to be 6.5 MW/m(2) in the case of an orthogonal divertor. To study the mitigation of the heat flux, we investigated the puffing effects of deuterium and argon gases. The puffing position is assumed to be in front of the strike point at the outer lower divertor plate. In the simulations, mitigation of the peak heat flux at the divertor target plates is found to occur when the gas puffing rate exceeds certain values, similar to 1.0 x 10(20) /s and similar to 5.0 x 10(18) /s for deuterium and argon, respectively. Multi-charged impurity transport is also investigated for both NSTX and KSTAR SOL and divertor regions.

Park, Jin Woo [Seoul National University, Seoul, S. Korea; Na, Y. S. [Seoul National University, Seoul, S. Korea; Hong, S. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Ahn, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kim, D. K. [Agency Def Dev, Taejon, South Korea; Han, Hyunsun [National Fusion Research Institute, Taejon, South Korea; Shim, Seong Bo [Pusan National University, Busan, Korea; Lee, Hae June [Pusan National University, Busan, Korea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

OVERVIEW OF TUNA FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC OCEAN, INCLUDING ECONOMIC CONDITIONS – 2011 WCPFC-SC8-2012/GN WP-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides a broad description of the major fisheries in the WCPFC Statistical Area (WCP-CA) highlighting activities during the most recent calendar year (2011) and covering the most recent version of catch estimates by gear and species. The provisional total WCP–CA tuna catch for 2011 was estimated at 2,244,776 mt, the lowest since 2005 and 300,000 mt lower than the record in 2009 (2,544,679 mt); this catch represented 79 % of the total Pacific Ocean catch of 2,833,020 mt, and 55 % of the global tuna catch (the provisional estimate for 2011 is 4,077,814 mt, which is the lowest for 10 years). The 2011 WCP–CA catch of skipjack (1,540,189 mt – 69 % of the total catch) was only the fifth highest recorded and around 215,000 mt less than the record catch of 2009 (1,756,628 mt). The WCP–CA yellowfin catch for 2011 (430,506 mt – 19%) was the lowest since 1996 and more than 170,000 mt lower than the record catch taken in 2005 (602,892 mt) due to poor catches in the purse seine fishery. The WCP–CA bigeye catch for 2011 (151,533 mt – 7%) was close to the average for the past decade. The 2011 WCP–CA albacore catch (122,548 mt- 5%) was relatively stable and close to the average for the past decade. The 2011 WCP–CA albacore catch includes catches of north

Republic Of Korea; Peter Williams; Peter Terawasi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Study concerning the utilization of the ocean spreading center environment for the conversion of biomass to a liquid fuel. (Includes Appendix A: hydrothermal petroleum genesis). [Supercritical water  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a report on the feasibility of utilizing energy obtained from ocean spreading centers as process heat for the conversion of municipal solid wastes to liquid fuels. The appendix contains a paper describing hydrothermal petroleum genesis. Both have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

Steverson, M.; Stormberg, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ocean thermal energy conversion gas desorption studies. Volume 1. Design of experiments. [Open-cycle power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seawater deaeration is a process affecting almost all proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power systems. If the noncondensable dissolved air is not removed from a power system, it will accumulate in thecondenser, reduce the effectiveness of condensation, and result in deterioration of system performance. A gas desorption study is being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the goal of mitigating these effects; this study is designed to investigate the vacuum deaeration process for low-temperature OTEC conditions where conventional steam stripping deaeration may not be applicable. The first in a series describing the ORNL studies, this report (1) considers the design of experiments and discusses theories of gas desorption, (2) reviews previous relevant studies, (3) describes the design of a gas desorption test loop, and (4) presents the test plan for achieving program objectives. Results of the first series of verification tests and the uncertainties encountered are also discussed. A packed column was employed in these verification tests and test data generally behaved as in previous similar studies. Results expressed as the height of transfer unit (HTU) can be correlated with the liquid flow rate by HTU = 4.93L/sup 0/ /sup 25/. End effects were appreciable for the vacuum deaeration system, and a correlation of them to applied vacuum pressure was derived.

Golshani, A.; Chen, F.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

EXTENSION OF ISO 14001 ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR THE METAL CASTING INDUSTRY TO INCLUDE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions legislation in the United States is forthcoming. Manufacturers have dealt with past emissions regulations differently, some through implementing environmental management systems… (more)

Miller, Gretchen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Development of a Gas–Liquid Equilibrator for Estimating CO2 Flux at the Ocean Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for measuring partial pressure of CO2 in seawater (pCO2) has been developed as a part of a missing-sink elucidation study. The most important part of this system is the multistage bubbling gas–liquid equilibrator. This equilibrator has ...

Hiroyuki Katayama; Takashi Karasudani; Koji Ishii; Kenji Marubayashi; Hiromasa Ueda

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Oil and natural gas reserve prices : addendum to CEEPR WP 03-016 ; including results for 2003 revisions to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction. A working paper entitled "Oil and Natural Gas Reserve Prices 1982-2002: Implications for Depletion and Investment Cost" was published in October 2003 (cited hereafter as Adelman & Watkins [2003]). Since then ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Parameterization of the Cool Skin of the Ocean and of the Air-Ocean Gas Transfer on the Basis of Modeling Surface Renewal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat and gas transport in molecular sublayers at the air-sea interface is governed by similar laws. A model of renewal type based on the physics of molecular sublayers allows the derivation of a parameterization of the temperature difference ...

Alexander V. Soloviev; Peter Schlüssel

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Examples of management applications that include ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes timing of discharge-related lifecycle, changes food availability, alters sediment and organic 3 0 2 3 Blackfoot (BFT) 2 3 3 2 3 3 Goose (GSE) 3 3 3 0 3 3 Idaho Falls (IFA) 3 3 3 0 3 3 Lower was restricted to Idaho, so the watersheds that cross state boundaries are assessed only for the Idaho portion

55

Propagation of femtosecond terawatt laser pulses in N{sub 2} gas including higher-order Kerr effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Propagation characteristic of femtosecond terawatt laser pulses in N{sub 2} gas with higher-order Kerr effect (HOKE) is investigated. Theoretical analysis shows that HOKE acting as Hamiltonian perturbation can destroy the coherent structure of a laser field and result in the appearance of incoherent patterns. Numerical simulations show that in this case two different types of complex structures can appear. It is found that the high-order focusing terms in HOKE can cause continuous phase shift and off-axis evolution of the laser fields when irregular homoclinic orbit crossings of the field in phase space take place. As the laser propagates, small-scale spatial structures rapidly appear and the evolution of the laser field becomes chaotic. The two complex patterns can switch between each other quasi-periodically. Numerical results show that the two complex patterns are associated with the stochastic evolution of the energy contained in the higher-order shorter-wavelength Fourier modes. Such complex patterns, associated with small-scale filaments, may be typical for laser propagation in a HOKE medium.

Huang, T. W. [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T. [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Climate and the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to determine the role of the ocean in establishing the mean tropical climate and its sensitivity to radiative perturbations. A simple two-box energy balance model is developed that includes ocean heat transports as an ...

Amy Clement; Richard Seager

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

OceanEnergyMMS.p65  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Teacher Guide .......................................................... 2 Related National Science Standards .......................... 3 Introduction to Ocean Energy .................................. 4 Petroleum & Natural Gas ......................................... 5 Natural Oil and Gas Seeps ........................................ 7 Methane Hydrates .................................................... 8 Solar Energy .............................................................. 9 Wind Energy ........................................................... 10 Wave Energy ........................................................... 11 OTEC: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion .............

58

Investigation of materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials performances in high moisture materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines Gerald Meier, Frederick Pettit and Keeyoung Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jung University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA 15260 Peer review Workshop III UTSR Project 04 01 SR116 October 18-20, 2005 Project Approach Task I Selection and Preparation of Specimens Task II Selection of Test Conditions Specimens : GTD111+CoNiCrAlY and Pt Aluminides, N5+Pt Aluminides Deposit : No Deposit, CaO, CaSO 4 , Na 2 SO 4 1150℃ Dry 1150℃ Wet 950℃ Wet 750℃ SO 3 950℃ Dry Selection of Test Temperature, T 1 , Gas Environment and Deposit Composition, D

59

Alaska Federal Oil and Gas Historical Leases | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Oil and Gas Historical Leases Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Data Alaska...

60

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Ocean Terracing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artworks can improve humanity ability to apply macro-engineering principles which skirt or correct oceanographic problems impairing the economic usefulness of coastal land, the overhead airshed, and seawater temperature and salinity stability. A new form of Art, Ocean Art, is here proposed which centers on deliberate terracing of appropriate regions of our world ocean; a proposed example of macro-engineered useful Ocean Art is the technically possible 21-st Century terracing of the Mediterranean Sea. Ocean Art is applicable worldwide to places that might be practically improved by its judicious employment. Such Ocean Art may constitute an entirely unique category of solutions to coastal disaster prevention planning.

Richard Cathcart; Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Production From Oceanic Class 2 Hydrate Accumulations Gas Production From Oceanic Class 2 Hydrate Accumulations Authors: George J. Moridis, Matt T. Reagan, Lawrence Berkeley...

63

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategies for Gas Production From Oceanic Class 3 Hydrate Accumulations Strategies for Gas Production From Oceanic Class 3 Hydrate Accumulations Authors: George J. Moridis, Matt...

64

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and...

65

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Authors: Maa...

66

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Dissociation in Response to Climate Change Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Dissociation in Response to Climate Change Authors: Moridis,...

67

Measurements of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE  

SciTech Connect

All of the technical goals of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) field program which were supported under the Department of Energy research grant ''Measurements of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE'' (DE-FG03-90ER60981) have been met. This has included the measurement of the partial pressures of carbon dioxide (C0{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) in both the surface ocean and the atmosphere on 24 separate shipboard expedition legs of the WOCE Hydrographic Programme. These measurements were made in the Pacific, Indian and Atlantic Oceans over a six-and-a-half year period, and over a distance of nearly 200,000 kilometers of ship track. The total number of measurements, including ocean measurements, air measurements and standard gas measurements, is about 136,000 for each gas, or about 34,000 measurements of each gas in the ocean and in the air. This global survey effort is directed at obtaining a better understanding of the role of the oceans in the global atmospheric budgets of two important natural and anthropogenic modulators of climate through the ''greenhouse effect'', CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O, and an important natural and anthropogenic modulator of the Earth's protective ozone layer through catalytic processes in the stratosphere, N{sub 2}O. For both of these compounds, the oceans play a major role in their global budgets. In the case of CO{sub 2}, roughly half of the anthropogenic production through the combustion of fossil fuels has been absorbed by the world's oceans. In the case of N{sub 2}O, roughly a third of the natural flux to the atmosphere originates in the oceans. As the interpretation of the variability in the oceanic distributions of these compounds improves, measurements such as those supported by this research project are playing an increasingly important role in improving our understanding of natural and anthropogenic influences on climate and ozone. (B204)

Weiss, R.F.

1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Observing System Simulation Experiment for the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated in situ Indian Ocean observing system (IndOOS) is simulated using a high-resolution ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with daily mean forcing, including an estimate of subdaily oceanic variability derived from observations. The ...

Gabriel A. Vecchi; Matthew J. Harrison

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

70

Ocean - FAQ | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQ FAQ Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Frequently Asked Questions Following are some Frequently Asked Questions, we hope to add to this list as we hear from you. Questions What is Ocean.data.gov? How can I use this resource? What data can I expect to find here? Where do these data come from? Can data from State and academic sources be included in this portal? Who can suggest data and information to be included in Ocean.data.gov? Who decides what data are included? How do I get involved? How does this differ from other data efforts such as regional data portals? Where do I find information about data standards, metadata standards, and formats? Can we provide feedback about a particular dataset?

71

Ocean Datasets | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Datasets Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Ocean, Coast, and Great Lakes Planning...

72

Observations and Simulations of Upper-Ocean Response to Wind Events during the Ocean Storms Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ocean Storms dataset is used to compile observations of the oceanic response to midlatitude storms. Of particular interest are episodic mixed layer temperature cooling events whose characteristics are reviewed. The data include subsurface ...

W. G. Large; G. B. Crawford

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

74

Utilizing a cycle simulation to examine the use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for a spark-ignition engine: including the second law of thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system has been widely used to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission, improve fuel economy and suppress knock by using the characteristics of charge dilution. However, previous studies have shown that as the EGR rate at a given engine operating condition increases, the combustion instability increases. The combustion instability increases cyclic variations resulting in the deterioration of engine performance and increasing hydrocarbon emissions. Therefore, the optimum EGR rate should be carefully determined in order to obtain the better engine performance and emissions. A thermodynamic cycle simulation of the four-stroke spark-ignition engine was used to determine the effects of EGR on engine performance, emission characteristics and second law parameters, considering combustion instability issues as EGR level increases. A parameter, called 'Fuel Fraction Burned,' was introduced as a function of the EGR percentage and used in the simulation to incorporate the combustion instability effects. A comprehensive parametric investigation was conducted to examine the effects of variations in EGR, load and speed for a 5.7 liter spark-ignition automotive engine. Variations in the thermal efficiencies, brake specific NOx emissions, average combustion temperature, mean exhaust temperature, maximum temperature and relative heat transfer as functions of exhaust gas recycle were determined for both cooled and adiabatic EGR configurations. Also effects of variations in the load and speed on thermal efficiencies, relative heat transfers and destruction of availability due to combustion were determined for 0% EGR and 20% EGR cases with both cooled and adiabatic configurations. For both EGR configurations, thermal efficiencies first increase, reach a maximum at about 16% EGR and then decrease as the EGR level increases. Thermal efficiencies are slightly higher for cooled EGR configuration than that for adiabatic configuration. Concentration of nitric oxide emissions decreases from about 2950 ppm to 200 ppm as EGR level increases from 0% to 20% for cooled EGR configuration. The cooled EGR configuration results in lower nitric oxide emissions relative to the adiabatic EGR configuration. Also second law parameters show the expected trends as functions of EGR. Brake thermal efficiency is higher for the 20% EGR case than that for the no EGR case over the range of load (0 to WOT) and speed (600 rpm to 6000 rpm). Predictions made from the simulation were compared with some of the available experimental results. Predicted thermal efficiencies showed a similar trend when compared to the available experimental data. Also, percentage of unused fuel availability increases as the EGR level increases, and it can be seen as one of the effects of deteriorating combustion quality as the EGR level increases.

Shyani, Rajeshkumar Ghanshyambhai

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Ocean Map | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Map Gallery Planning for ocean, coastal, and Great...

76

The Ventilated Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adiabatic theories of ocean circulation and density structure have a long tradition, from the concept of the ventilated thermocline to the notion that deep ocean ventilation is controlled by westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. This study ...

Patrick Haertel; Alexey Fedorov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

On Scatterometer Ocean Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scatterometers estimate the relative atmosphere–ocean motion at spatially high resolution and provide accurate inertial-scale ocean wind forcing information, which is crucial for many ocean, atmosphere, and climate applications. An empirical ...

M. Portabella; A. Stoffelen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

79

Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Ocean Thermal Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOcean&oldid273467"...

80

A predictive ocean oil spill model  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Papodopoulos, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaudt, K. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Szabo, D. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

AMOC: Acoustic monitoring of the ocean climate of the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of AMOC is to develop and design an acoustic system for long?term monitoring of the ocean temperature and ice thickness in the Arctic Ocean including the Fram Strait

Ola M. Johannessen; AMOC Group

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

An Assessment Of Atmospheric Water Budget Components Over Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balancing global moisture budgets is a difficult task that is even more challenging at regional scales. Atmospheric water budgets components are investigated within five tropical (15°S, 15°N) ocean regions, including the Indian Ocean, three ...

Paula J. Brown; Christian D. Kummerow

83

Estimating Mixed Layer Depth from Oceanic Profile Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of mixed layer depth are important to a wide variety of oceanic investigations including upper-ocean productivity, air–sea exchange processes, and long-term climate change. In the absence of direct turbulent dissipation measurements, ...

Richard E. Thomson; Isaac V. Fine

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Statistical Characterization of Zonal and Meridional Ocean Wind Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four years of ocean vector wind data are used to evaluate statistics of wind stress over the ocean. Raw swath wind stresses derived from the Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) are compared with five different global gridded wind products, including ...

Sarah T. Gille

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceanic gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change and the fate of hydrate-derived methane Oceanic gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change and the fate...

86

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

About Ocean Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Ocean Community Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean About Ocean Community This...

88

The Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System (MODAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System (MODAS) is used by the U.S. Navy for depiction of three-dimensional fields of temperature and salinity over the global ocean. MODAS includes both a static climatology and a dynamic climatology. While the ...

D. N. Fox; W. J. Teague; C. N. Barron; M. R. Carnes; C. M. Lee

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Ocean Technical | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Technical Community of Practice Through a variety of...

90

Hawaii Ocean Current Resources and Tidal Turbine Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in converting the kinetic energy of ocean current and tidal flow into electrical power has increased in recent years. This report focuses on the ocean current resource in Hawaii, which includes tidal flows as well as uni-directional oceanic current flows around the main Hawaiian Islands, with the exception of Kauai, from the shoreline to approximately the 2000-m depth contour.

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ocean shell noises  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean shell noises Name: Rick A Cazzato Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do you here noises when you put a ocean shell to your ear? Does this happen because of...

92

Ocean Energy Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even...

93

Mixing by ocean eddies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mesoscale eddies mix and transport tracers such as heat and potential vorticity laterally in the ocean. While this transport plays an important role in the climate system, especially in the Southern Ocean, we lack a, ...

Abernathey, Ryan (Ryan Patrick)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Ocean - Tools | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools Tools Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Decision-Support Tools (DSTs): Science and information are fundamental to effective marine planning. Marine planning involves inclusive discussion and analyses of the status and potential uses of 3-dimensional areas of coastal, marine and Great Lakes ecosystems (including the water column) and their potential changes over time. Relevant spatial data and derived interpretive and analytical products (i.e. decision-support tools) help inform all phases of the marine planning process. To date, several decision-support tools have been develop to support marine planning efforts. Marine planners should carefully evaluate which tools best apply to their region or specific issue or project. Below is a list of

95

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ocean ridge flanks have been investigated. These include the Galapagos mounds, the southern flank of the Costa logging tools are expected to provide little information of direct benefit to the scientific objectives

97

On Frontal Dynamics in Two Model Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically homogeneous variable-temperature layer models are often used to describe upper-ocean variability, the dynamics of jets and fronts included. Frontogenesis is known to have a preference for strong cyclonic shears. When a frontal wave ...

Tor Eldevik

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Mixing Measurements on an Equatorial Ocean Mooring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vaned, internally recording instruments that measure temperature fluctuations using FP07 thermistors, including fluctuations in the turbulence wavenumber band, have been built, tested, and deployed on a Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) mooring at ...

J. N. Moum; J. D. Nash

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Solitons in a Continuously Stratified Equatorial Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equatorial soliton studies of Boyd are extended to include the effects of continuous vertical stratification. We use vertical profiles of density measured in the equatorial Pacific Ocean and an idealized profile.

Hal G. Marshall; John P. Boyd

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ocean | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Ocean Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean Welcome to our COMMUNITY This is the National Ocean Council's portal for data, information, and decision tools to support people engaged in regional marine planning for the future use of the ocean, our coasts, and the Great Lakes. Our goal is to enhance discovery of and access to data and information for planners, stakeholders, and the public. Please visit our Feedback page to tell us what would make the site most useful to you as we expand our content. Start Here! Previous Pause Next PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager View More West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework View More Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal

102

Global warming projections: Sensitivity to deep ocean mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The climatological impact of increases in greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere, despite being a subject of intensive study in recent years, is still very uncertain [1, 2]. One major uncertainty affecting possible climate change that has not received enough attention is the uncertainty in heat uptake by the deep ocean. We analyze the influence of this process and its uncertainty on climate predictions by means of numerical simulations with a 2-dimensional (2D) climate model. In the case of high climate sensitivity, as a result of uncertainty in deep ocean heat uptake, there is more than a factor of two uncertainty in the predicted increase of surface temperature. The corresponding uncertainty in the sea level rise due to thermal expansion is much larger than the uncertainty in the predicted temperature change and is significant even in the case of low climate sensitivity. The uncertainty in the rate of heat uptake by the deep ocean has not been included in the projections of climate change made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) [1,2]. However, our results show that this uncertainty plays a very important role in defining the ranges ofÊpossible warming and, especially, of sea level rise. To assess the uncertainty we have used a 2-dimensional (zonally averaged) climate model, the MIT 2D model [3,4,5]. This model allows us to

Andrei P. Sokolov; Peter H. Stone

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

ocean | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean ocean Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

104

NREL: Energy Analysis - Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Ocean Energy OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for ocean power technologies. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of wave and tidal range technologies. Credit: Lewis, A., S. Estefen, J. Huckerby, W. Musial, T. Pontes, J. Torres-Martinez, 2011: Ocean Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds)], Cambridge University Press. Figure 6.11 Enlarge image

105

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

oceans - Geodata icon | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oceans - Geodata icon Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean...

107

Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

108

LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO SIMULATE CO2 OCEAN DISPOSAL  

SciTech Connect

This Final Technical Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of an investigation entitled ''Laboratory Experiments to Simulate CO{sub 2} Ocean Disposal'', funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's University Coal Research Program. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation was to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. A number of critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} were addressed by performing laboratory experiments on liquid CO{sub 2} jet break-up into a dispersed droplet phase, and hydrate formation, under deep ocean conditions. Major accomplishments of this study included: (1) five jet instability regimes were identified that occur in sequence as liquid CO{sub 2} jet disintegration progresses from laminar instability to turbulent atomization; (2) linear regression to the data yielded relationships for the boundaries between the five instability regimes in dimensionless Ohnesorge Number, Oh, and jet Reynolds Number, Re, space; (3) droplet size spectra was measured over the full range of instabilities; (4) characteristic droplet diameters decrease steadily with increasing jet velocity (and increasing Weber Number), attaining an asymptotic value in instability regime 5 (full atomization); and (5) pre-breakup hydrate formation appears to affect the size distribution of the droplet phase primary by changing the effective geometry of the jet.

Stephen M. Masutani

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Oceanic Heat Flux Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors review the procedure for the direct calculation of oceanic heat flux from hydrographic measurements and set out the full “recipe” that is required.

Sheldon Bacon; Nick Fofonoff

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Resources Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource...

111

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron, manganese and lead at Hawaii Ocean Time-series stationof beryllium to the oceans, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. , 114,organic carbon fluxes in the ocean based on the quantitative

Han, Qin; Moore, J. Keith; Zender, Charles; Measures, Chris; Hydes, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:29am Addthis Photo of water flowing from several openings in a hydropower dam. Hydropower produces 10% of the nation's energy, including power from the Ice Harbor Dam in Burbank, Washington. This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector. Overview Hydropower has been used for centuries to power machinery, but the application most commonly associated with hydropower is electricity production through dams. Ocean energy refers to various forms of renewable energy harnessed from the ocean. There are two primary types of ocean energy: mechanical and thermal.

113

Ocean Health and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2002. Indicators of ocean health and human health:Nature 423:280–283. Oceans and Human Health Act. 2003. S.Editorial Guest Editorial Ocean Health and Human Health

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

116

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ocean Thermal Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Ocean Thermal Incentives...

117

Worldwide Natural Gas Supply and Demand and the Outlook for Global ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is a proven commercial technology for transporting natural gas across oceans. The international trade in LNG is more than 30 years old.

118

Ocean Map Regional | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Regional Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Featured Maps The following maps are from data sources that are regional in scope. These are some of the data sources available in the Ocean Community that are most useful in the identified region. This includes several of the human use atlases now available. Regional/State Maps .view-map-gallery .views-row { float: inherit; margin: 0; } .map-align { float: left; margin: 0 20px; } .map-gallery-thumbnail{width:202px;height:133px;} .pane-map-gallery h2.pane-title { color: #284A78 !important; font: bold 16px Georgia,"Times New Roman",Serif !important; margin-left: 25px !important; } Oregon Submarine Cables Marine Reserves and Protected areas of Oregon

119

Microbial metabolism in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon flux through the ocean’s twilight zone. Science 316:sinking particle flux in the ocean’s twilight zone. LimnolRespiration in the dark ocean. Geophys Res Lett 30:doi:

Hansman, Roberta Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Microbial Metabollism in the Deep Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon flux through the ocean’s twilight zone. Science 316:sinking particle flux in the ocean’s twilight zone. LimnolRespiration in the dark ocean. Geophys Res Lett 30:doi:

Hansman, Roberta L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Moore, Keith

122

Open Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration K. Coale coale@mlml.calstate.edu (831) 632-4400 Moss Landing Marine Laboratories 8272 Moss Landing Road Moss Landing, California 95039 USA Abstract The trace element iron has been recently shown to play a critical role in nutrient utilization, phytoplankton growth and therefore the uptake of carbon dioxide from the surface waters of the global ocean. Carbon fixation in the surface waters, via phytoplankton growth, shifts the ocean/atmosphere exchange equilibrium for carbon dioxide. As a result, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and iron flux to the oceans have been linked to climate change (glacial to interglacial transitions). These recent findings have led some to suggest that large scale

123

SOME OCEAN MODEL FUNDAMENTALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of these lectures is to present elements of the equations and algorithms used in numerical models of the large-scale ocean circulation. Such models generally integrate the ocean’s primitive equations, which are based on Newton’s Laws applied to a continuum fluid under hydrostatic balance in a spherical geometry, along with linear irreversible thermodynamics and subgrid scale (SGS) parameterizations. During formulations of both the kinematics and dynamics, we highlight issues related to the use of a generalized vertical coordinate. The vertical coordinate is arguably the most critical element determining how a model is designed and applications to which a model is of use.

Stephen M. Griffies

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Ocean bottom seisometer  

SciTech Connect

An improved ocean bottom seismometer is described comprising: a spherical-shaped main housing having a seismic acquisition portion and a ballast portion below the acquisition portion. The ballast portion controls the ascent and descent of the ocean bottom seismometer; a conical skirt fixed to the main housing elevating the main housing above a horizontal plane coincident with a base of the skirt. The skirt is capable of confining fluid under the main housing when the base rests on an ocean bottom; spherical compartments mounted inside the skirt; and a lifting hook mounted on the outside of the main housing.

Neeley, W.P.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

Efficient flowline simulations of ice-shelf/ocean interactions: Sensitivity studies with a fully coupled model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic flowline and plume models for the ice-shelf/ocean system simplify the ice and ocean dynamics sufficiently to allow extensive exploration of parameters affecting ice-sheet stability while including key physical processes. Comparison ...

Ryan T. Walker; David M. Holland; Byron R. Parizek; Richard B. Alley; Sophie M. J. Nowicki; Adrian Jenkins

126

A Numerical Study of Climatic Oscillations Using a Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean Primitive Equation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled atmosphere-ocean primitive equation model is developed. It is a free-dimensional general circulation model, with two layers in the atmosphere and two layers in the ocean and includes solar radiation, longwave radiation, sensible heating,...

Xiong-Shan Chen

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Unstable and Damped Equatorial Modes in Simple Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free equatorial modes for several simple coupled ocean-atmosphere models are determined. They are found to include unstable and damped modes of large zonal scale and long period. The influence of ocean thermo-dynamics on unstable modal behavior ...

Anthony C. Hirst

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Volcanic forcing improves Atmosphere-Ocean Coupled General Circulation Model scaling performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent Atmosphere-Ocean Coupled General Circulation Model (AOGCM) simulations of the twentieth century climate, which account for anthropogenic and natural forcings, make it possible to study the origin of long-term temperature correlations found in the observed records. We study ensemble experiments performed with the NCAR PCM for 10 different historical scenarios, including no forcings, greenhouse gas, sulfate aerosol, ozone, solar, volcanic forcing and various combinations, such as it natural, anthropogenic and all forcings. We compare the scaling exponents characterizing the long-term correlations of the observed and simulated model data for 16 representative land stations and 16 sites in the Atlantic Ocean for these scenarios. We find that inclusion of volcanic forcing in the AOGCM considerably improves the PCM scaling behavior. The scenarios containing volcanic forcing are able to reproduce quite well the observed scaling exponents for the land with exponents around 0.65 independent of the station dista...

Vyushin, D; Havlin, S; Bunde, A; Brenner, S; Vyushin, Dmitry; Zhidkov, Igor; Havlin, Shlomo; Bunde, Armin; Brenner, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ocean Margins Programs, Phase I research summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 1992, the DOE restructured its regional coastal-ocean programs into a new Ocean Margins Program (OMP), to: Quantify the ecological and biogeochemical processes and mechanisms that affect the cycling, flux, and storage of carbon and other biogenic elements at the land/ocean interface; Define ocean-margin sources and sinks in global biogeochemical cycles, and; Determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or export to the interior ocean. Currently, the DOE Ocean Margins Program supports more than 70 principal and co-principal investigators, spanning more than 30 academic institutions. Research funded by the OMP amounted to about $6.9M in FY 1994. This document is a collection of abstracts summarizing the component projects of Phase I of the OMP. This phase included both research and technology development, and comprised projects of both two and three years duration. The attached abstracts describe the goals, methods, measurement scales, strengths and limitations, and status of each project, and level of support. Keywords are provided to index the various projects. The names, addresses, affiliations, and major areas of expertise of the investigators are provided in appendices.

Verity, P. [ed.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Carbon in Atlantic Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Atlantic Ocean About CARINA NDP-091: CARINA Data Synthesis Project The CARINA Group CARINA Cruise Summary Table and Data CARINA Data Products CARINA Database V1.2 ODV Collection...

131

Nonlinear Midlatitude Ocean Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean adjustment on annual to interdecadal scales to variable forcing is considered for a more nonlinear general circulation than has previously been studied. The nature of the response is a strong function of forcing frequency and importantly ...

William K. Dewar

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Global Ocean Meridional Overturning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decade-mean global ocean circulation is estimated using inverse techniques, incorporating air–sea fluxes of heat and freshwater, recent hydrographic sections, and direct current measurements. This information is used to determine mass, heat, ...

Rick Lumpkin; Kevin Speer

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Tropical Ocean Circulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primitive equation model of the equatorial Pacific Ocean was forced by realistic wind stress distributions over decades. Results were presented for a set of two experiments. In the first experiment the model was forced by an objectively ...

Mojib Latif

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Modeling the Pacific Ocean  

SciTech Connect

Two numerical models utilizing primitive equations (two momentum equations and a mass continuity equation) simulate the oceanography of the Pacific Ocean from 20{degrees}S to 50{degrees}N. The authors examine the abundant model data through visualization , by animating the appropriate model fields and viewing the time history of each model simulation as a color movie. The animations are used to aid understanding of ocean circulation.

Johnson, M.A.; O' Brien, J.J. (Mesoscale Air-Sea Interaction Group, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

137

ocean energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

138

On the Strong Seasonal Currents in the Deep Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a set of models, including one with a resolution of ¼°, several aspects of the simulated seasonal currents in the deep ocean are considered. It is shown that over vast areas of the deep interior, particularly in the Indian Ocean, annual-...

Oleg A. Saenko

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

behavior of oceanic Hydrate Bearing Sediments (HBS), during depressurization-induced gas production in general, and potential wellbore in-stability and casing deformation in...

140

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ocean - Community Practice Block | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Practice Block Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean...

143

Mesozooplankton trophic variability in a changing ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trends in contemporary ocean productivity. Nature 444: 752-Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change.biomass from satellite ocean colour. J. Mar. Syst. 78: 18-

Décima, Moira

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Ocean Map National | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Featured Maps The following maps are from data...

145

Ocean Feedback Form | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feedback Form Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Comments or Suggestions Name * Email Topic...

146

The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 2: Overview and invited papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of summaries of papers presented at the Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems workshop. Topics include; marine forecasting, regulatory agencies and regulations, research and application models, research and operational observing, oceanic and atmospheric data assimilation, and coastal physical processes.

Not Available

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Infiltrating the Ocean Floor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Grant S. Bromhal, Duane H. Smith, US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 Ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide is considered to be a potentially important method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions (US DOE, 1999). Oceans are currently the largest atmospheric carbon dioxide sink; and certainly, enough storage capacity exists in the oceans to hold all of the CO 2 that we can emit for many years. Additionally, technologies exist that allow us to pump liquid CO 2 into the oceans at depths between one and two kilometers for extended periods of time and five times that deep for shorter durations. The biggest unknown in the ocean sequestration process, however, is the fate and

148

Ocean Eddy Dynamics in a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of mesoscale oceanic eddies is analyzed in a quasigeostrophic coupled ocean–atmosphere model operating at a large Reynolds number. The model dynamics are characterized by decadal variability that involves nonlinear adjustment of the ...

P. Berloff; W. Dewar; S. Kravtsov; J. McWilliams

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Indian Ocean Intraseasonal Variability in an Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of atmospheric intraseasonal variability on the tropical Indian Ocean is examined with an ocean general circulation model (OGCM). The model is forced by observation-based wind stresses and surface heat fluxes from an atmospheric ...

A. Schiller; J. S. Godfrey

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Measurements of gas permeability on crushed gas shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, more attention has been given to unconventional gas reservoirs, including tight gas shales. Accurate description of gas transport and permeability measurements… (more)

Guarnieri, R.V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 119 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling sheet, including the 3000-m-high subglacial Gamburtsev Mountains. The glacier follows the line ice drainage basin is believed to be long-lived because of this structural control, and Prydz Bay

153

On the Climatic Impact of Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrations of coupled climate models with mixed-layer and fixed-current ocean components are used to explore the climatic response to varying magnitudes of ocean circulation. Four mixed-layer ocean experiments without ocean heat transports are ...

Michael Winton

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Interactions of the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have investigated the interactions of the tropical oceans on interannual timescales by conducting a series of uncoupled atmospheric and oceanic general circulation experiments and hybrid-coupled model simulations. The results ...

M. Latif; T. P. Barnett

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Technologies Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar...

156

The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 1: Strategic summary  

SciTech Connect

The proposed COPS (Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems) program is concerned with combining numerical models with observations (through data assimilation) to improve our predictive knowledge of the coastal ocean. It is oriented toward applied research and development and depends upon the continued pursuit of basic research in programs like COOP (Coastal Ocean Processes); i.e., to a significant degree it is involved with ``technology transfer`` from basic knowledge to operational and management applications. This predictive knowledge is intended to address a variety of societal problems: (1) ship routing, (2) trajectories for search and rescue operations, (3) oil spill trajectory simulations, (4) pollution assessments, (5) fisheries management guidance, (6) simulation of the coastal ocean`s response to climate variability, (7) calculation of sediment transport, (8) calculation of forces on structures, and so forth. The initial concern is with physical models and observations in order to provide a capability for the estimation of physical forces and transports in the coastal ocean. For all these applications, there are common needs for physical field estimates: waves, tides, currents, temperature, and salinity, including mixed layers, thermoclines, fronts, jets, etc. However, the intent is to work with biologists, chemists, and geologists in developing integrated multidisciplinary prediction systems as it becomes feasible to do so. From another perspective, by combining observations with models through data assimilation, a modern approach to monitoring is provided through whole-field estimation.

Not Available

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

An Ocean Dynamical Thermostat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of ocean dynamics in the regulation of tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) is investigated using the Zebiak-Cane coupled occan-atmosphere model. The model is forced with a uniform heating, or cooling, varying between ±40 W m?2 into ...

Amy C. Clement; Richard Seager; Mark A. Cane; Stephen E. Zebiak

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Navigating oceans of data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some science domains have the advantage that the bulk of the data comes from a single source instrument, such as a telescope or particle collider. More commonly, big data implies a big variety of data sources. For example, the Center for Coastal Margin ... Keywords: environmental data, ocean observatories, spatial-temporal data management

David Maier; V. M. Megler; António M. Baptista; Alex Jaramillo; Charles Seaton; Paul J. Turner

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

160

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

An Eddy-Permitting Southern Ocean State Estimate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An eddy-permitting general circulation model of the Southern Ocean is fit by constrained least squares to a large observational dataset during 2005–06. Data used include Argo float profiles, CTD synoptic sections, Southern Elephant Seals as ...

Matthew R. Mazloff; Patrick Heimbach; Carl Wunsch

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Wave Breaking and Ocean Surface Layer Thermal Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of breaking waves on ocean surface temperatures and surface boundary layer deepening is investigated. The modification of the Mellor–Yamada turbulence closure model by Craig and Banner and others to include surface wave breaking ...

George Mellor; Alan Blumberg

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

2.019 Design of Ocean Systems, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course is the completion of the cycle of designing, implementing and testing an ocean system, including hardware and software implementation, that begins with 2.017J. Design lectures are given in hydrodynamics, power ...

Chryssostomidis, Chryssostomos

164

Data-Based Meridional Overturning Streamfunctions for the Global Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The meridional overturning circulation for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans is computed from absolute geostrophic velocity estimates based on hydrographic data and from climatological Ekman transports. The Atlantic overturn includes the ...

Lynne D. Talley; Joseph L. Reid; Paul E. Robbins

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Circulation Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Upper Ocean Density Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper extends a previous hydrodynamic circulation model of established, persistent upper ocean density fronts by including a thermodynamic or buoyancy equation in the integral treatment. An analysis is also conducted of the variables related ...

Richard W. Garvine

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Entropy Generation In the Ocean by Small-Scale Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expression that includes salt diffusion was developed and evaluated for the rate of entropy production ? in the ocean. The evaluation was done for mixing events produced by turbulent overturns and double diffusion. Temperature and salinity ...

M. C. Gregg

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Southern Ocean Sector Centennial Climate Variability and Recent Decadal Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented for the notion that some contribution to the recent decadal trends observed in the Southern Hemisphere, including the lack of a strong Southern Ocean surface warming, may have originated from longer-term internal centennial ...

Mojib Latif; Torge Martin; Wonsun Park

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

13.012 Hydrodynamics for Ocean Engineering, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics and their simplifications for several areas of marine hydrodynamics. Application of these principles to the solution of ocean engineering problems. Topics include ...

Techet, Alexandra Hughes

169

Failure Mode and Sensitivity Analysis of Gas Lift Valves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-lifted oil wells are susceptible to failure through malfunction of gas lift valves. This is a growing concern as offshore wells are drilled thousands of meters below the ocean floor in extreme temperature and pressure ...

Gilbertson, Eric W.

170

SeaCycler: A Moored Open-Ocean Profiling System for the Upper Ocean in Extended Self-Contained Deployments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper ocean, including the biologically productive euphotic zone and the mixed layer, has great relevance for studies of physical, biogeochemical, and ecosystem processes and their interaction. Observing this layer with a continuous presence, ...

Uwe Send; George Fowler; Greg Siddall; Brian Beanlands; Merle Pittman; Christoph Waldmann; Johannes Karstensen; Richard Lampitt

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

File:BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 - 2012 Size of this preview: 700 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,250 × 4,500 pixels, file size: 1.39 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 - 2012 Sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2008-09-12 Extent Continental US plus Alaska Countries United States UN Region Northern America US Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 - 2012. Includes Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Pacific and Alaska Regions.Shows existing leases, areas available for leasing, areas withdrawn from leasing,

172

Why Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? The subarctic Pacific Ocean is one of the areas considered particularly vulnerable to acidification, which could affect the ocean's ability to act as a carbon sink. Global warming affects the food webs and biodiversity in marine ecosystems, especially in regions known as oxygen minimum zones where key components of the global carbon cycle take place. Oxygen minimum zones are found between 200 and 1,000 meters below sea level in the subarctic Pacific, the eastern South Pacific Ocean, the northern parts of the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea, and off southwestern Africa. As global warming continues, researchers believe the oxygen levels in the oceans will decrease, a change that will extend the boundaries of the oxygen minimum

173

Dynamical Ocean Forcing of the Madden–Julian Oscillation at Lead Times of up to Five Months  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors show that a simple three-dimensional ocean model linearized about a resting basic state can accurately simulate the dynamical ocean response to wind forcing by the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO). This includes the propagation of ...

Benjamin G. M. Webber; David P. Stevens; Adrian J. Matthews; Karen J. Heywood

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

COMPOSITIONALLY DRIVEN CONVECTION IN THE OCEANS OF ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the effect of chemical separation as matter freezes at the base of the ocean of an accreting neutron star, and argue that the retention of light elements in the liquid acts as a source of buoyancy that drives a slow but continual mixing of the ocean, enriching it substantially in light elements, and leading to a relatively uniform composition with depth. We first consider the timescales associated with different processes that can redistribute elements in the ocean, including convection, sedimentation, crystallization, and diffusion. We then calculate the steady-state structure of the ocean of a neutron star for an illustrative model in which the accreted hydrogen and helium burn to produce a mixture of O and Se. Even though the H/He burning produces only 2% oxygen by mass, the steady-state ocean has an oxygen abundance more than 10 times larger, almost 40% by mass. Furthermore, we show that the convective motions transport heat inward, with a flux of {approx}0.2 MeV nucleon{sup -1} for an O-Se ocean, heating the ocean and steepening the outward temperature gradient. The enrichment of light elements and heating of the ocean due to compositionally driven convection likely have important implications for carbon ignition models of superbursts.

Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew, E-mail: zmedin@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: cumming@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

ocean energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

176

Ocean Informatics Monograph. Ocean Informatics Initiative: an Ethnographic Study (2002-2006). Part 1: Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative Care and Ocean Informatics. Proceedings of theOceanography: Probing the Oceans, 1936-1978. San Diego, CA:Collaboration: Towards an Ocean Informatics Environment.

Millerand, Florence; Baker, Karen S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Ocean Informatics Monograph. Ocean Informatics Initiative: an Ethnographic Study (2002-2006). Part 2: Appendices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific Digital Delivery Ocean Informatics: Shaun HaberResearch Publications about the Ocean Informatics initiativeF. and K.S. Baker (2011). Ocean Informatics Monograph (2002-

Millerand, Florence; Baker, Karen S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

13.00 Introduction to Ocean Science and Technology, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introductory subject for students majoring or minoring in ocean engineering and others desiring introductory knowledge in the field. Physical oceanography including distributions of salinity, temperature, and density, heat ...

Leonard, John J.

179

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Basin scale assessment of gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change  

SciTech Connect

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating climate. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. Field investigations have discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor along the Arctic Ocean margin, and the plumes appear at depths corresponding to the upper limit of a receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the first visible signs of the dissociation of shallow hydrate deposits due to ongoing climate change in the arctic. We simulate the release of methane from oceanic deposits, including the effects of fully-coupled heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate dissociation, and other thermodynamic processes, for systems representative of segments of the Arctic Ocean margins. The modeling encompasses a range of shallow hydrate deposits from the landward limit of the hydrate stability zone down to water depths beyond the expected range of century-scale temperature changes. We impose temperature changes corresponding to predicted rates of climate change-related ocean warming and examine the possibility of hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. The assessment is performed at local-, regional-, and basin-scales. The simulation results are consistent with the hypothesis that dissociating shallow hydrates alone can result in significant methane fluxes at the seafloor. However, the methane release is likely to be confined to a narrow region of high dissociation susceptibility, defined by depth and temperature, and that any release will be continuous and controlled, rather than explosive. This modeling also establishes the first realistic bounds for methane release along the arctic continental shelf for potential hydrate dissociation scenarios, and ongoing work may help confirm whether climate change is already impacting the stability of the vast oceanic hydrate reservoir.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Cameron-Smith, P.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

II Observations of the 2004 and 2006 Indian OceanOceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .magnitudes determined from ocean-bottom pressure gauge data

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

NOS Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean...

183

ocean - faq right side block | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ocean - faq right side block Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Frequently Asked Questions...

184

Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Place Portland, Maine Zip 4101 Sector Ocean, Renewable Energy Product Ocean...

185

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variations in eastern Indian Ocean upper-ocean thermal properties are assessed for the period 1970–2004, with a particular focus on asymmetric features related to opposite phases of Indian Ocean dipole events, using high-resolution ocean model ...

Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Franziska U. Schwarzkopf; Gary Meyers; Erik Behrens; Arne Biastoch; Claus W. Böning

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,784 4,016 4,367 3,046 2,022 1,568 1,475 1,454 1,534 1,843 2,639 4,396 1990 5,379 3,690 3,400 2,747 1,820 1,445 1,394 1,480 1,596 1,795 2,715 3,817 1991 4,947 4,647 3,990 2,629 1,928 1,677 1,613 1,679 1,789 2,052 3,200 4,162 1992 5,169 5,066 3,983 3,296 2,205 1,733 1,591 1,607 1,679 2,138 3,010 4,941 1993 5,866 5,566 5,426 3,602 1,988 1,532 1,437 1,539 1,674 2,067 3,379 3,292 1994 7,247 6,269 4,727 2,761 1,844 1,605 1,487 1,647 1,831 2,115 2,817 4,592 1995 5,839 6,031 4,241 3,065 1,766 1,579 1,487 1,475 1,597 1,740 3,263 5,279 1996 6,913 6,421 4,851 3,760 1,970 1,586 1,415 1,575 1,658 1,917 3,240 5,160

187

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Delaware (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 5,014 4,742 5,389 3,439 2,924 3,276 3,324 4,609 4,923 5,078 3,908 3,419 2002 5,258 4,880 4,847 3,830 2,810 2,738 6,396 3,816 4,170 3,843 3,936 5,597 2003 6,397 5,499 5,102 3,399 2,081 2,433 3,570 3,550 2,728 2,949 3,547 4,833 2004 6,827 5,602 4,600 3,387 3,731 2,595 2,620 2,437 2,880 2,484 4,033 6,759 2005 6,870 5,543 5,427 2,696 2,517 2,866 3,287 3,735 2,652 2,870 3,515 4,876 2006 5,025 4,699 4,451 2,549 2,659 3,204 3,812 3,447 2,516 2,972 3,454 4,379 2007 4,855 5,154 4,783 3,486 2,804 3,196 3,833 4,160 3,127 3,346 3,838 5,551 2008 5,197 5,132 4,474 3,574 2,885 3,871 4,077 3,567 3,009 2,937 4,178 5,239

188

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 26,553 25,448 24,717 16,375 10,150 5,954 4,570 4,467 5,047 8,855 15,776 28,269 1990 26,939 22,780 20,870 15,431 9,230 5,638 4,610 4,865 5,117 8,592 14,122 21,237 1991 29,054 24,902 21,321 14,617 9,583 5,601 4,916 4,508 5,510 9,450 12,966 23,131 1992 26,677 24,979 22,443 17,769 10,406 5,883 4,981 4,964 5,431 9,760 16,298 24,211 1993 28,122 27,427 25,623 18,238 9,009 5,968 5,035 4,140 5,767 10,193 16,875 23,833 1994 33,440 31,356 24,263 16,330 10,123 6,207 5,343 5,363 5,719 8,796 14,511 21,617 1995 27,945 29,223 23,980 18,384 11,004 6,372 5,664 5,778 6,417 9,647 19,742 29,922 1996 32,468 30,447 27,914 19,664 12,272 6,343 5,673 5,383 6,146 9,472 19,486 26,123

189

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arizona (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 19,804 23,088 21,742 19,153 21,113 17,703 18,312 16,919 14,352 14,127 12,164 19,204 2002 19,840 19,954 18,340 14,544 14,463 17,262 23,546 22,088 20,988 19,112 17,712 21,662 2003 20,639 18,895 21,753 16,848 14,559 16,858 28,981 30,940 25,278 24,409 16,317 18,043 2004 25,379 30,143 26,925 23,982 26,878 29,819 35,860 33,244 27,591 23,349 23,090 26,140 2005 24,400 22,209 17,591 20,779 22,660 23,609 35,036 34,587 26,451 24,130 22,651 28,011 2006 26,212 24,177 22,606 21,814 22,339 30,548 34,718 36,448 30,678 32,378 24,493 29,027 2007 34,237 26,857 17,051 20,379 28,959 35,463 43,104 40,305 33,790 29,544 27,001 33,835

190

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 33,183 29,626 26,788 17,172 12,430 10,449 10,249 10,177 10,494 14,476 16,865 23,400 2002 28,527 25,072 25,693 18,706 13,413 10,076 9,731 9,815 10,403 14,561 22,219 27,225 2003 31,445 32,450 25,482 16,870 12,421 10,288 9,892 10,030 10,550 13,644 20,542 26,599 2004 32,639 30,955 23,081 15,569 11,543 10,481 9,546 10,080 10,193 14,132 20,759 27,591 2005 34,272 27,838 24,671 18,370 13,180 12,206 11,888 11,542 11,838 13,551 19,595 30,763 2006 26,997 26,909 23,941 17,158 14,088 12,588 13,244 11,886 12,277 18,360 22,732 25,747 2007 35,848 38,728 28,204 22,726 17,742 14,922 15,363 15,754 14,595 18,051 24,001 35,021

191

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,976 3,700 4,247 2,586 1,701 1,154 968 941 978 1,220 1,801 3,647 1990 4,168 3,115 3,057 2,477 1,557 1,131 1,049 961 1,016 1,095 1,686 2,738 1991 5,709 5,334 4,545 3,320 2,108 1,602 1,545 1,465 1,486 2,289 3,582 5,132 1992 6,323 6,382 5,073 3,807 2,391 1,784 1,553 1,586 1,615 2,491 3,895 5,565 1993 6,273 6,568 6,232 3,772 2,110 1,861 1,507 1,567 1,700 2,231 3,898 5,915 1994 8,122 6,354 5,634 2,844 2,547 1,709 1,732 1,588 2,016 2,531 3,582 5,475 1995 6,743 7,826 4,472 3,736 2,388 1,994 1,612 1,722 2,065 1,907 4,871 7,538 1996 7,648 6,515 5,476 3,766 2,672 1,816 1,608 1,866 1,922 2,427 4,693 5,433

192

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,493 3,435 3,545 3,083 2,670 2,570 2,525 2,369 2,484 2,444 2,868 3,620 1990 4,101 3,305 3,246 3,026 2,860 2,673 2,584 2,497 2,483 2,521 3,285 3,725 1991 3,875 3,770 3,782 3,363 2,978 2,674 2,845 2,708 2,998 2,798 3,519 3,954 1992 4,408 4,364 3,856 3,741 3,382 3,085 2,976 2,881 2,849 2,954 3,317 3,914 1993 3,951 4,078 4,088 3,871 3,362 3,085 2,919 2,830 2,887 2,983 3,336 3,760 1994 4,619 3,941 3,853 3,374 3,078 2,937 2,855 2,909 2,896 2,814 3,089 3,570 1995 4,274 4,361 3,900 3,433 3,055 2,930 2,970 2,751 2,818 2,840 3,171 3,883 1996 4,731 4,272 4,167 3,918 3,336 3,029 2,836 2,716 2,840 2,957 3,179 3,830

193

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,919 4,336 3,961 2,180 1,261 1,357 1,019 1,007 1,096 1,245 1,948 3,942 1990 4,957 3,368 2,807 2,223 1,398 1,065 1,030 1,043 1,081 1,260 1,948 2,949 1991 5,034 4,043 2,848 1,778 1,211 1,027 998 1,023 1,045 1,184 2,497 3,297 1992 4,159 3,861 2,708 2,114 1,358 1,108 1,062 1,022 1,029 1,219 2,078 3,596 1993 4,757 4,174 3,999 2,923 1,540 1,078 1,013 1,047 1,126 1,389 2,480 3,473 1994 5,101 4,707 3,388 2,306 1,360 1,107 990 887 1,253 1,275 1,897 3,136 1995 4,387 4,171 3,478 2,027 1,337 1,156 1,015 1,021 1,060 1,183 2,265 4,311 1996 5,411 5,249 3,895 2,964 1,519 1,052 1,056 1,060 1,106 1,356 2,462 3,876

194

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,139 20,654 21,940 16,528 13,819 12,558 14,779 16,061 15,014 18,239 19,675 22,233 2002 24,431 24,940 22,284 19,166 15,635 16,964 18,741 17,700 16,789 16,932 17,770 21,567 2003 27,116 27,256 22,904 18,625 17,603 17,849 18,208 18,467 15,282 16,402 16,960 20,603 2004 24,746 25,909 21,663 16,382 15,991 14,085 14,456 14,551 11,956 14,094 13,138 18,337 2005 22,386 19,719 19,170 15,597 14,643 15,315 16,703 17,392 13,113 13,511 15,272 20,113 2006 19,984 19,909 19,394 17,499 17,865 19,198 19,107 19,963 16,976 17,107 15,346 19,021 2007 20,936 22,984 17,280 15,779 16,099 17,982 17,998 22,294 15,747 13,225 15,235 18,728

195

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 20,043 17,426 13,012 11,173 7,791 7,056 6,214 6,023 6,572 9,189 11,646 18,505 2002 19,727 17,659 15,165 8,453 7,113 5,260 5,915 6,481 7,591 11,589 13,814 16,447 2003 16,474 16,494 12,825 10,664 6,942 5,612 6,174 6,166 6,229 7,898 13,299 16,533 2004 21,414 17,627 10,247 9,033 6,775 5,344 6,398 5,617 6,456 8,714 13,097 17,058 2005 18,357 16,430 13,763 12,951 9,253 7,461 7,380 6,187 6,053 6,449 9,027 16,786 2006 19,708 17,533 16,428 13,496 8,309 8,516 8,734 8,180 8,599 9,422 13,464 19,710 2007 27,918 22,251 16,927 13,476 12,260 11,106 9,771 9,790 10,976 12,425 15,630 20,497 2008 27,371 26,146 20,495 17,995 13,506 10,286 10,157 10,919 10,422 11,249 14,386 19,141

196

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Carolina (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 29,800 21,808 20,434 14,585 11,544 11,979 13,229 15,763 11,364 14,905 15,898 19,179 2002 27,750 25,444 22,993 16,550 13,274 14,816 16,400 17,088 13,640 15,047 19,024 27,257 2003 32,135 30,180 20,979 15,717 12,038 9,338 12,359 13,177 11,210 12,814 16,520 25,999 2004 31,785 30,416 22,379 16,242 16,033 12,711 12,866 13,027 11,970 11,729 15,635 24,946 2005 30,538 27,324 26,203 17,851 13,162 12,669 15,688 16,197 12,616 12,082 15,331 25,731 2006 25,596 23,904 23,271 15,873 13,091 13,120 17,476 19,153 11,452 14,070 18,457 22,889 2007 26,988 29,743 21,686 17,606 13,644 14,343 14,640 22,849 15,744 14,159 17,540 23,411

197

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,283 3,376 2,280 1,227 653 472 357 346 390 522 1,313 2,304 1990 2,864 2,779 2,272 1,203 860 581 373 364 374 629 1,382 2,540 1991 4,055 3,108 2,282 1,771 1,316 668 405 375 407 551 1,634 2,704 1992 3,330 2,952 1,866 1,155 642 457 410 372 405 545 1,329 3,120 1993 3,922 3,682 2,988 1,839 1,248 707 597 594 606 946 2,023 3,436 1994 3,929 3,846 2,665 2,037 962 814 820 787 882 1,883 3,542 4,335 1995 4,244 3,324 2,948 2,429 1,675 1,122 861 899 1,088 1,905 2,605 3,724 1996 4,549 4,604 3,129 2,479 1,356 892 904 874 1,279 2,073 3,185 4,220 1997 5,030 4,454 3,350 2,664 1,263 942 923 939 1,120 2,012 3,174 5,257

198

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 133,140 112,047 111,301 76,191 48,707 41,686 43,845 44,577 40,142 59,283 71,352 92,053 2002 119,902 108,891 104,208 87,138 63,810 52,457 51,899 47,094 40,938 53,419 82,015 114,268 2003 140,545 133,702 114,085 80,651 53,258 37,279 35,261 42,115 32,744 49,901 69,659 99,067 2004 137,906 127,671 102,442 76,978 54,610 41,310 38,001 37,565 37,285 48,239 71,870 107,025 2005 133,079 112,812 108,608 72,884 50,886 47,768 50,667 44,890 35,502 42,661 64,574 111,058 2006 104,803 99,454 96,633 65,814 43,901 35,824 43,332 39,459 31,740 50,167 70,643 85,634 2007 100,406 124,441 98,314 69,491 43,699 33,353 30,415 38,655 30,211 36,831 59,171 97,411

199

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Louisiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 90,750 82,773 86,038 87,577 81,223 77,877 93,937 105,743 93,365 92,353 85,277 92,797 2002 102,807 96,945 102,315 94,281 91,511 97,058 107,870 109,348 97,986 94,054 96,857 102,289 2003 106,504 91,821 89,554 89,376 88,426 78,863 91,469 95,243 85,824 84,198 83,677 94,139 2004 101,114 98,005 96,851 86,763 89,143 89,075 96,344 98,583 93,156 94,397 89,577 99,046 2005 102,652 87,403 100,620 97,398 104,027 102,860 104,234 99,244 82,252 75,899 72,958 91,598 2006 80,495 79,755 88,341 86,459 88,047 89,170 97,472 103,508 88,124 89,721 89,141 94,300 2007 100,669 93,075 95,251 91,900 94,668 99,373 92,367 104,606 87,792 91,661 83,575 89,348

200

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Florida (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 34,086 30,338 35,463 39,708 42,466 46,947 53,430 53,352 55,306 52,955 42,205 47,598 2002 50,177 41,302 50,453 55,845 56,767 62,343 67,197 70,144 65,136 64,259 47,600 45,144 2003 53,384 43,538 54,761 51,487 62,575 58,312 64,041 61,764 62,150 59,558 56,488 50,525 2004 50,877 49,866 51,687 53,442 62,663 69,628 72,443 70,540 70,259 66,961 50,122 53,169 2005 59,417 49,956 60,238 55,269 64,436 69,719 90,376 84,114 67,877 63,782 55,683 46,489 2006 54,827 56,557 68,707 73,645 85,346 87,268 88,949 86,772 83,397 76,817 58,594 56,867 2007 57,409 56,412 60,397 70,366 76,461 81,312 93,683 97,040 88,865 89,976 66,512 67,153

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201

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 28,465 29,564 21,880 18,656 19,249 21,469 15,319 17,351 19,452 19,856 21,665 26,192 1990 30,798 34,767 27,425 23,423 18,540 17,392 21,030 17,705 23,233 17,384 22,637 30,759 1991 31,793 23,911 26,128 28,375 21,468 20,003 22,080 16,547 23,307 26,510 20,109 27,379 1992 38,234 23,834 24,413 18,379 27,118 22,150 21,150 21,633 19,247 19,112 20,999 28,738 1993 27,151 31,334 21,654 18,276 18,032 15,638 18,341 14,348 16,845 19,708 20,404 28,553 1994 29,342 27,032 23,156 18,463 22,621 18,091 25,752 14,123 14,604 17,844 25,032 25,929 1995 31,883 25,693 23,399 23,976 24,831 19,028 21,954 18,362 19,391 21,272 22,818 26,152

202

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,905 8,114 9,443 1970's 10,180 8,504 7,933 8,997 5,806 6,055 14,681 9,661 8,430 6 1980's 330...

203

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 137,700 139,522 133,518 2000's 137,213 135,123 135,699 125,899 128,441 130,286 152,283 183,237...

204

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Massachusetts (Including...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Dec 2001 45,181 40,868 39,690 30,815 23,495 19,798 19,305 23,154 22,753 24,627 24,646 31,456 2002 44,559 40,420 40,295 29,989 27,757 25,316 23,254 26,957 25,422 27,484 31,958...

205

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,685 2,324 3,891 1990 4,318 3,869 3,369 3,009 1,743 1,483 1,358 1,315 1,352 1,603 2,456 3,534 1991 4,341 3,973 3,566 2,352 1,462 1,030 995 1,020 884 1,423 2,396 3,396 1992...

206

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,949 1,569 1,287 1,042 1,091 1,202 1,577 2,144 2,429 1990 2,447 2,584 2,429 1,809 1,456 1,134 1,061 1,077 1,148 1,554 2,106 2,818 1991 2,579 2,388 2,149 1,896 1,576 1,171...

207

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

69,641 64,821 64,903 71,709 73,625 1990's 67,223 68,383 72,720 78,047 75,819 82,726 87,456 81,753 73,117 73,643 2000's 90,378 78,479 82,427 87,225 84,883 76,217 71,081 75,562...

208

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 459,508 490,070 456,573 2000's 450,596 400,740 429,152 443,139 444,514 487,723 528,236 563,474 590,997...

209

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 363,402 360,973 328,730 2000's 408,209 343,698 375,567 372,492 388,751 406,852 414,377 435,919 419,057 456,082 2010's 521,557 512,398 NA...

210

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Texas (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1990's 3,732,807 3,809,430 3,658,039 2000's 4,073,007 3,917,933 3,966,512 3,747,467 3,595,474 3,154,632 3,068,002 3,133,456 3,128,339 2,947,542 2010's 3,185,011 3,257,956 3,376,525...

211

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,139 1,214 1,250 1,461 1,660 1990's 1,678 1,860 2,209 2,311 2,381 2,426 2,566 2,713 2,456 2,547 2000's 2,770 2,642 5,167 4,781 4,811 4,792 4,701 5,749 5,878 5,541 2010's 5,830...

212

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 25,565 24,630 25,344 18,494 12,079 8,747 8,382 8,305 8,812 11,741 16,631 27,650 1990 24,659 23,697 22,939 17,706 11,586 10,272 9,602 9,683 10,261 12,661 17,210 24,715 1991 28,442 25,685 23,462 17,684 11,669 9,641 10,331 9,764 9,195 11,571 17,033 25,121 1992 29,246 29,912 27,748 23,039 13,518 9,915 9,327 9,456 9,582 12,860 16,804 25,808 1993 28,857 29,740 28,926 20,266 11,667 11,221 10,477 10,502 9,972 13,970 18,205 26,928 1994 31,014 32,757 29,376 21,207 13,641 11,207 10,158 10,485 10,002 12,399 16,783 24,226 1995 28,329 29,345 28,182 20,813 14,459 11,501 11,281 10,797 10,619 13,394 22,325 30,309 1996 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

213

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Carolina (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,028 13,472 12,569 10,957 8,683 9,367 10,138 11,625 9,077 11,870 11,334 12,725 2002 20,494 17,611 16,270 14,448 14,921 14,889 16,325 15,616 11,675 10,993 12,221 16,164 2003 18,666 17,514 12,917 11,948 9,803 8,615 10,304 12,231 8,766 8,909 9,675 14,460 2004 19,029 19,575 14,664 11,619 12,602 10,686 12,311 13,363 11,234 9,815 10,497 15,861 2005 19,494 16,945 17,212 12,523 11,619 12,506 16,813 18,833 10,439 8,087 9,210 15,920 2006 14,609 15,594 14,881 12,013 11,535 13,578 18,401 19,755 10,930 12,902 14,061 14,246 2007 18,348 19,666 12,154 11,405 11,154 12,705 14,438 22,784 13,231 12,270 11,398 13,530

214

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 77,275 61,840 57,608 37,045 27,762 26,685 25,473 29,184 25,697 34,650 39,146 51,997 2002 65,893 58,962 58,569 44,882 32,659 27,696 30,899 30,668 28,357 37,204 49,556 68,056 2003 80,534 70,155 52,368 35,903 31,266 25,652 24,580 26,666 27,072 34,914 46,556 64,253 2004 80,680 70,341 53,056 37,842 30,840 25,006 25,592 27,498 26,658 33,102 43,630 65,054 2005 72,775 58,428 61,390 39,473 30,697 28,897 28,628 29,602 26,476 32,838 44,576 70,488 2006 56,899 57,392 54,200 34,311 30,004 26,873 29,579 29,996 27,630 39,210 47,253 56,403 2007 66,914 76,347 49,045 40,498 29,129 27,272 28,150 34,503 29,267 35,013 48,878 63,510

215

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,032 979 1,003 855 565 457 471 518 560 657 654 1,014 1990 1,195 903 893 857 577 244 413 365 508 587 763 774 1991 1,089 979 864 605 667 414 538 540 555 628 496 895 1992 1,076 1,128 1,103 1,047 676 498 448 479 411 609 654 951 1993 1,140 1,359 1,325 907 429 330 273 364 243 503 1,008 1,324 1994 1,919 1,974 1,626 1,092 653 542 343 599 384 569 1,010 1,338 1995 1,077 1,679 1,883 1,353 901 562 413 582 294 580 1,216 1,523 1996 1,963 1,919 1,606 1,251 757 446 421 443 581 648 972 1,290 1997 1,694 1,744 1,739 1,144 892 537 430 399 460 637 1,211 1,416 1998 1,817 1,642 1,518 1,141 694 506 496 195 483 628 1,019 1,338

216

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 96,012 79,547 77,363 52,992 33,092 26,098 25,208 27,662 29,499 38,457 46,614 63,083 2002 80,458 74,651 70,773 53,368 38,209 33,401 32,700 34,743 30,425 40,462 58,542 83,877 2003 101,975 96,176 79,246 53,759 36,015 29,095 30,298 32,640 26,799 39,895 47,467 78,054 2004 100,298 95,715 73,189 54,937 42,873 33,367 36,047 33,735 32,060 34,578 50,908 74,224 2005 90,958 84,388 85,058 50,137 38,196 34,547 36,133 37,648 32,674 35,439 50,234 80,301 2006 76,519 77,324 76,877 49,039 37,224 36,803 44,307 41,471 31,545 40,867 49,703 63,941 2007 78,283 95,894 81,570 63,089 41,955 37,217 42,996 50,308 38,092 42,936 57,228 82,068

217

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,069 7,033 6,197 2,868 1,601 1,279 1,180 1,097 1,241 1,528 2,542 5,873 1990 7,587 5,618 4,176 3,424 2,281 1,519 1,312 1,355 1,235 1,613 2,520 4,567 1991 8,702 6,014 4,265 2,489 1,702 1,330 1,290 1,279 1,299 1,590 3,974 5,653 1992 6,180 5,310 3,653 2,956 1,785 1,540 1,407 1,292 1,240 1,449 2,608 5,771 1993 7,076 6,147 5,910 3,743 2,057 1,439 1,324 1,432 1,345 1,544 3,424 5,327 1994 6,644 6,611 4,717 2,954 1,875 1,384 1,364 1,256 1,384 1,475 2,207 4,632 1995 6,358 6,001 5,160 2,968 2,354 1,794 1,558 1,524 1,903 1,836 3,020 5,164 1996 7,808 7,923 5,595 4,413 2,222 1,770 1,798 1,678 1,759 1,900 3,273 6,014

218

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 136,340 110,078 102,451 66,525 41,541 34,864 34,025 32,667 33,129 48,517 59,935 87,118 2002 106,011 98,576 94,429 70,082 51,854 40,885 40,538 38,774 34,999 51,972 76,275 108,800 2003 140,436 123,688 99,629 65,861 43,326 32,959 33,810 37,562 32,918 52,253 65,617 103,846 2004 137,568 117,976 93,845 67,347 46,827 33,561 34,567 34,689 34,129 47,268 64,279 99,290 2005 122,404 107,459 105,183 63,669 47,239 37,221 35,833 37,060 33,808 42,569 65,578 113,292 2006 95,548 97,666 85,732 52,957 42,766 33,443 36,271 36,307 35,048 54,845 69,951 88,329 2007 105,108 128,279 87,809 70,627 41,797 34,877 33,361 40,637 34,554 41,730 69,858 102,787

219

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,481 15,747 13,983 11,129 7,094 5,429 8,556 6,368 5,506 5,854 10,730 11,012 2002 16,123 14,049 12,938 10,424 6,676 4,984 8,748 7,414 6,786 6,218 9,753 13,269 2003 15,675 15,319 13,354 8,644 6,232 4,472 7,653 7,469 5,904 6,758 8,775 13,011 2004 16,104 16,445 12,058 7,983 6,255 5,830 6,952 6,641 4,338 5,935 8,995 13,129 2005 17,242 14,641 11,440 8,360 6,579 5,853 7,874 8,028 6,345 6,081 8,200 13,733 2006 15,551 13,741 13,940 10,766 7,411 7,500 9,685 9,019 6,665 7,092 10,375 13,432 2007 17,851 19,390 16,040 10,333 9,436 7,602 10,286 11,264 8,529 7,818 10,704 15,974 2008 20,241 20,433 17,488 13,024 9,556 9,390 10,050 10,893 8,126 10,847 13,250 17,360

220

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 23,636 24,435 21,187 13,360 8,237 3,927 3,565 3,735 4,397 8,946 15,949 30,143 1990 25,317 19,642 20,361 13,373 7,446 4,838 3,975 4,165 4,240 7,272 13,757 19,190 1991 26,286 24,481 20,157 11,779 6,341 3,971 3,703 3,933 4,196 8,065 15,488 21,940 1992 26,321 24,820 20,215 15,893 7,455 5,016 4,291 4,260 4,418 9,092 15,094 23,770 1993 25,230 26,706 25,531 15,019 6,359 5,221 3,939 3,860 4,492 9,636 14,979 23,071 1994 33,573 29,301 22,713 14,498 7,933 5,111 4,027 4,287 4,492 7,331 12,594 20,936 1995 28,306 29,814 21,860 14,128 8,132 4,979 4,697 4,406 4,623 7,916 18,650 27,649 1996 33,993 29,732 26,650 16,833 8,960 7,661 4,569 4,401 4,048 8,548 18,274 26,298

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 49,414 34,292 35,867 25,368 20,633 20,544 24,229 26,863 21,857 25,679 23,983 34,450 2002 44,041 37,992 33,260 23,775 22,612 24,924 30,113 29,701 24,899 23,785 32,829 47,106 2003 56,470 43,704 31,355 30,232 21,920 20,512 23,789 26,828 21,628 22,981 26,920 45,508 2004 52,486 48,806 31,529 28,718 26,610 24,562 26,132 26,093 22,927 22,025 29,012 49,125 2005 47,756 39,503 39,085 25,191 23,198 26,957 31,619 33,089 28,453 26,199 32,483 52,399 2006 39,904 45,015 35,118 26,670 26,891 30,790 36,980 38,808 25,412 31,321 35,677 40,816 2007 49,163 47,589 32,236 31,955 27,318 31,415 32,039 49,457 31,028 27,420 33,851 41,413

222

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Hampshire (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3,171 3,309 2,951 2,280 1,441 1,134 1,003 888 1,182 1,589 1,904 2,520 2002 2,917 3,188 2,833 2,179 1,815 1,423 1,657 1,055 1,381 1,038 1,847 3,507 2003 6,844 6,457 5,490 3,772 3,085 2,034 3,900 5,640 4,166 4,643 3,574 4,515 2004 5,204 7,595 6,870 6,131 2,712 4,473 4,167 4,306 4,766 3,194 5,704 6,026 2005 6,958 7,545 6,875 5,691 6,049 5,824 5,780 6,010 4,491 4,069 5,173 5,988 2006 7,782 6,823 7,852 4,511 2,505 2,608 3,895 5,107 5,407 5,917 3,850 6,263 2007 6,645 5,329 5,157 5,429 3,826 4,223 5,642 5,420 5,969 4,295 4,527 5,641 2008 7,786 7,653 7,558 5,076 4,511 4,124 5,536 4,876 5,352 5,548 6,443 6,692

223

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,357 1,414 1,111 852 521 368 285 233 268 396 724 1,022 1990 1,305 1,199 1,085 822 628 410 247 234 241 378 759 1,132 1991 1,639 1,249 996 830 680 362 272 248 269 449 873 1,233 1992 1,404 1,078 821 668 438 309 264 269 287 439 760 1,271 1993 1,631 1,376 1,262 882 639 400 362 389 378 667 874 1,407 1994 1,351 1,412 1,065 869 544 369 291 270 308 550 915 1,287 1995 1,671 1,247 1,217 987 873 594 373 258 NA NA NA NA 1996 1,176 1,203 1,030 925 712 342 197 197 250 640 1,301 1,748 1997 1,570 1,309 1,403 1,189 958 491 623 287 316 554 966 1,088 1998 1,628 1,322 1,279 936 597 442 371 253 343 493 927 1,822

224

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 28,398 21,618 21,408 13,900 9,252 8,342 9,046 11,007 9,109 12,662 13,558 17,125 2002 24,221 22,802 20,670 12,534 8,846 8,846 10,514 12,842 10,157 12,911 20,408 28,827 2003 31,739 28,530 21,240 15,685 9,809 8,723 8,128 7,986 7,131 11,863 16,167 27,049 2004 33,576 27,062 20,558 14,623 9,867 8,560 7,704 8,271 7,535 11,725 16,222 26,279 2005 29,469 25,497 24,272 13,414 10,273 10,104 9,641 11,634 8,302 12,060 16,807 28,263 2006 24,101 24,846 19,870 11,807 9,034 9,251 11,438 11,236 8,042 11,895 16,300 21,239 2007 24,841 32,498 20,950 15,805 8,835 9,239 9,540 12,974 9,655 10,242 17,911 25,311 2008 28,394 26,094 20,551 12,340 9,832 9,808 10,778 7,669 8,974 12,394 20,316 25,502

225

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,475 6,484 5,643 5,505 4,182 3,864 3,515 3,541 3,688 4,790 5,518 6,170 2002 6,844 5,846 6,319 5,737 5,034 4,070 4,980 4,124 4,599 6,126 7,421 8,523 2003 7,672 7,313 7,026 5,737 4,976 4,408 4,112 4,164 4,356 5,062 5,554 7,236 2004 7,555 7,180 6,077 5,400 4,775 4,216 4,064 4,187 4,024 5,032 6,153 6,963 2005 7,585 6,443 6,231 5,612 5,092 4,247 4,081 3,903 4,080 4,829 5,360 7,262 2006 7,304 6,824 6,957 5,389 4,762 4,109 4,108 4,063 3,935 5,157 5,893 6,958 2007 7,982 7,322 6,900 5,469 4,958 4,253 3,873 3,944 4,150 5,003 6,095 7,723 2008 8,446 7,443 6,660 5,737 5,057 4,098 3,749 3,805 3,520 4,922 5,595 7,419

226

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 57,089 50,447 49,042 41,157 30,506 23,904 22,403 22,033 19,905 22,672 30,231 42,797 2002 47,541 44,713 45,909 30,319 24,230 22,105 26,301 21,119 21,764 34,563 38,884 46,826 2003 44,971 47,164 38,292 25,380 24,811 18,484 23,772 23,529 20,981 22,248 39,408 48,023 2004 47,548 44,859 30,853 28,458 23,766 20,408 22,895 21,210 20,651 26,731 39,719 50,977 2005 50,356 41,495 39,617 33,501 25,108 20,725 26,350 23,387 22,698 29,399 38,140 54,566 2006 45,074 45,360 42,614 26,074 20,799 20,115 23,277 22,817 18,928 30,373 38,546 49,332 2007 62,803 46,554 33,579 30,243 25,136 25,014 28,465 26,787 27,444 32,786 39,145 57,263

227

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,567 1,575 1,160 692 409 355 301 249 321 435 785 1,176 1990 1,313 1,283 1,000 610 479 389 293 280 292 459 822 1,315 1991 1,848 1,291 956 822 623 405 316 304 329 424 942 1,321 1992 1,543 1,167 834 643 447 343 345 330 369 465 889 1,557 1993 1,806 1,673 1,294 828 566 387 383 360 381 507 947 1,543 1994 1,510 1,457 1,121 771 480 377 374 306 357 571 1,098 1,667 1995 1,754 1,319 1,154 951 708 487 361 346 392 591 997 1,300 1996 1,734 1,783 1,359 996 710 477 346 354 421 597 1,107 1,621 1997 1,810 1,778 1,341 1,037 684 397 372 354 409 584 979 1,687 1998 1,969 1,564 1,417 1,072 686 535 405 380 386 577 1,045 1,640

228

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6,537 6,903 6,950 5,791 7,780 6,957 8,161 9,020 8,835 8,864 9,644 9,127 2002 9,857 10,737 9,131 9,186 10,030 9,602 7,965 10,909 8,186 10,974 12,161 11,924 2003 8,047 5,034 5,581 5,924 4,577 4,916 6,000 5,629 5,606 6,652 5,970 6,036 2004 7,095 8,049 7,635 7,137 6,496 6,314 6,648 7,333 6,100 7,027 7,786 7,858 2005 5,882 5,823 5,955 5,764 4,162 5,163 5,883 6,097 4,936 4,955 4,236 2,234 2006 3,888 4,850 5,239 4,090 5,138 4,996 6,505 5,264 5,580 6,835 5,939 5,217 2007 6,180 5,355 4,869 4,768 4,222 4,680 6,405 6,403 4,340 3,731 4,999 6,480 2008 6,142 5,066 5,389 5,928 5,679 4,545 6,177 5,002 5,965 5,812 6,785 6,712

229

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,164 1,003 1,084 834 544 381 304 307 361 438 658 827 2002 1,127 1,149 960 808 575 428 330 336 348 485 803 1,003 2003 1,153 1,191 1,062 906 539 367 293 312 325 502 708 1,029 2004 1,154 1,381 1,072 829 517 421 331 342 365 479 769 1,011 2005 1,211 1,280 1,199 776 558 404 310 298 295 418 666 943 2006 1,112 1,063 1,190 745 501 415 318 318 347 481 658 893 2007 1,104 1,375 1,250 915 536 382 340 331 342 423 696 1,158 2008 1,202 1,217 1,137 865 512 384 331 333 361 480 702 1,084 2009 1,407 1,307 1,076 794 507 409 348 321 337 508 684 922 2010 1,270 1,126 897 685 488 376 344 335 348 581 801 1,177

230

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80.4 79.7 77.8 77.5 67.3 65.2 1987-2012 80.4 79.7 77.8 77.5 67.3 65.2 1987-2012 Alabama 79.8 80.2 78.8 79.3 78.9 76.2 1990-2012 Alaska 76.0 74.9 85.3 87.7 88.6 94.9 1990-2012 Arizona 93.4 93.1 88.0 88.7 87.8 86.6 1990-2012 Arkansas 70.4 64.5 59.4 55.6 51.5 40.2 1990-2012 California 60.7 56.7 54.9 54.1 54.3 50.0 1990-2012 Colorado 95.7 95.2 94.8 94.6 93.8 92.2 1990-2012 Connecticut 71.5 70.7 69.0 65.4 65.4 65.1 1990-2012 Delaware 74.8 70.6 53.5 49.8 53.4 43.7 1990-2012 District of Columbia 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 16.9 17.9 1990-2012 Florida 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 38.5 37.0 1990-2012 Georgia 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990-2012 Hawaii 100 100 100 100 100 100 1990-2012 Idaho 84.8 86.0 83.7 82.0 80.8 77.0 1990-2012 Illinois

231

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,133 2,021 2,066 1,635 999 803 692 763 712 775 1,090 2,052 1990 1,986 1,857 1,789 1,384 951 699 514 572 721 574 836 1,589 1991 2,204 2,308 2,131 1,381 1,063 784 705 794 689 658 1,071 1,764 1992 2,300 2,256 2,132 1,774 1,056 764 718 673 653 753 1,103 1,921 1993 2,352 2,438 2,166 1,550 1,150 731 664 703 684 841 1,040 1,909 1994 2,303 1,865 1,483 1,588 979 815 753 692 740 785 1,082 1,658 1995 2,280 2,583 2,089 1,607 1,158 884 820 744 766 794 1,116 2,194 1996 2,147 1,942 1,551 1,925 1,233 824 878 750 774 804 1,195 2,325 1997 2,334 2,315 2,183 1,738 1,372 951 782 853 852 899 1,354 2,379

232

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,156 2,125 1,533 1,100 1,004 890 790 805 811 954 1,257 1,690 1990 1,959 1,963 1,740 1,185 1,006 970 879 782 701 1,157 1,026 1,705 1991 2,447 1,839 1,739 1,593 1,333 1,121 947 1,005 761 1,104 1,095 1,976 1992 2,327 1,873 1,725 1,335 1,012 945 1,015 824 872 982 1,022 2,170 1993 2,271 2,110 2,016 1,314 1,341 1,052 919 939 909 1,047 1,421 2,211 1994 2,334 2,277 1,995 1,456 1,300 1,136 995 909 978 1,146 1,541 2,625 1995 2,551 2,139 1,868 1,784 1,558 1,268 1,082 978 1,009 1,151 1,444 1,871 1996 2,466 2,309 2,268 1,811 1,454 1,286 1,145 1,062 1,116 1,269 1,817 2,417 1997 2,717 2,634 2,447 1,900 1,695 1,412 1,099 1,148 1,195 1,273 1,800 2,638

233

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 52,126 51,020 52,466 24,969 17,238 15,421 16,478 16,540 16,716 25,355 26,981 41,400 2002 49,850 43,815 48,646 31,946 24,278 16,100 16,531 15,795 16,659 28,429 39,330 49,912 2003 62,523 55,695 44,756 32,270 20,752 15,502 15,630 18,099 16,485 24,636 36,907 47,677 2004 65,038 48,498 41,599 27,544 21,106 15,420 15,949 14,951 16,063 23,268 33,602 56,693 2005 59,667 45,463 47,647 29,885 23,265 22,788 21,959 22,549 19,566 23,868 35,232 54,600 2006 44,700 49,036 42,628 24,331 20,527 17,607 20,221 19,919 18,038 31,566 36,227 44,483 2007 53,637 61,738 41,274 32,627 19,348 17,305 18,156 21,627 17,044 22,827 36,770 53,091

234

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 35,585 27,368 26,284 16,906 10,552 11,171 18,862 17,962 13,422 11,375 14,263 20,610 2002 28,513 25,068 25,566 17,348 13,424 13,947 18,253 20,062 15,937 13,007 21,946 26,371 2003 31,180 29,594 25,952 16,337 13,386 11,371 15,614 15,421 13,725 13,096 15,980 25,771 2004 30,087 29,036 21,955 15,496 13,148 12,282 11,912 13,013 13,177 13,809 15,207 23,992 2005 29,876 25,291 20,604 15,459 12,953 11,687 13,164 13,264 12,147 11,254 14,924 25,902 2006 25,596 23,451 22,320 16,673 12,748 14,289 18,023 17,171 12,559 13,555 17,451 24,135 2007 29,886 31,709 22,007 16,753 13,449 14,165 16,842 20,565 16,098 15,324 19,705 29,579

235

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 45,337 36,026 35,468 29,023 26,153 28,194 41,056 38,697 30,910 29,194 26,719 33,193 2002 42,957 42,546 40,981 36,989 28,784 31,741 39,440 43,092 34,007 26,058 27,197 34,574 2003 44,633 43,363 39,395 32,941 30,147 32,417 46,076 47,914 30,139 28,937 26,588 39,627 2004 44,286 47,720 40,198 35,528 36,608 33,843 39,855 38,791 36,056 30,069 25,036 35,444 2005 42,941 41,516 38,987 36,599 35,972 45,327 48,696 49,698 42,454 32,097 30,402 42,813 2006 42,641 45,534 43,562 45,754 43,689 44,512 51,955 56,344 37,425 35,388 34,881 46,374 2007 55,048 57,329 44,646 43,762 41,758 42,250 47,969 58,650 43,759 42,172 36,392 49,540

236

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kentucky (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 31,659 23,182 21,670 14,953 9,527 8,890 9,668 9,881 10,024 12,591 16,271 23,216 2002 26,131 24,533 23,241 14,879 12,317 11,623 13,804 10,869 11,129 14,628 21,069 27,646 2003 34,776 29,032 20,580 14,017 10,797 9,334 9,467 10,296 10,390 13,196 16,933 27,218 2004 32,640 27,566 21,630 15,771 12,331 11,249 10,810 11,428 10,883 13,355 17,689 27,203 2005 29,373 24,036 24,578 15,557 13,614 13,693 12,658 14,134 12,122 14,104 19,304 29,050 2006 23,093 23,721 20,380 14,447 13,054 12,108 12,861 13,777 11,131 14,865 17,982 22,930 2007 26,916 29,946 20,044 17,410 12,573 11,418 10,304 16,709 11,848 13,874 18,696 24,799

237

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,176 1,936 2,098 1,489 1,094 891 908 808 866 970 1,324 1,964 1990 2,455 1,649 1,576 1,262 1,040 846 836 830 872 965 1,315 1,749 1991 2,199 2,076 1,746 1,143 908 818 810 859 875 952 1,492 1,917 1992 2,276 2,158 1,745 1,436 1,068 944 820 882 875 1,006 1,345 2,089 1993 2,268 2,155 2,200 1,507 1,007 877 832 840 846 947 1,463 2,070 1994 2,845 2,472 1,910 1,174 1,027 1,342 913 949 947 1,089 1,361 1,843 1995 2,600 2,626 2,111 1,382 1,045 1,013 950 956 1,044 1,054 1,674 2,414 1996 3,136 2,782 2,190 1,884 1,154 997 940 957 1,041 1,157 1,644 2,447 1997 2,378 2,381 1,793 1,202 1,268 1,096 989 1,004 1,884 1,167 1,757 2,639

238

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 153,376 165,414 175,372 1970's 183,412 189,791 208,068 196,663 192,497 169,357 179,392 149,011...

239

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 877,039 792,617 823,448 2000's 871,444 787,719 813,735 832,563 812,084 811,759 729,264 791,733...

240

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,596 10,988 10,169 6,662 3,882 2,012 1,562 1,499 1,718 3,437 6,386 11,183 1990 11,878 9,411 8,746 5,436 3,701 2,130...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 33,610 36,067 52,315 1970's 54,555 47,662 43,753 55,012 65,705 67,485 57,702 61,280 77,890...

242

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 396,107 363,738 376,409 2000's 389,543 356,915 381,498 391,185 380,014 406,550 369,353 395,519...

243

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,865 11,637 14,069 1970's 14,026 14,072 17,287 13,206 13,241 10,253 9,152 8,767 8,100 8,211 1980's 4,980 4,511 10,098 9,182 9,431 9,139 8,045 8,443...

244

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 241,664 247,908 241,648 2000's 240,672 217,765 233,046 237,428 205,480 202,946 221,378 214,298...

245

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

616 383 315 298 370 561 916 1,363 1991 1,917 1,394 1,253 847 629 320 302 314 348 633 1,241 1,535 1992 1,489 1,380 1,082 937 529 298 279 262 363 576 1,015 1,549 1993 1,911 1,477...

246

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Hawaii (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

235 229 222 226 221 230 236 2005 242 225 240 240 245 238 224 225 226 218 229 240 2006 241 226 242 237 239 235 229 222 233 223 223 231 2007 259 226 229 232 234 244 241 218 223...

247

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 107,796 117,124 130,062 1970's 132,708 146,217 159,970 180,274 189,192 181,949 178,220 131,266...

248

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 958,506 846,478 919,922 2000's 926,633 874,578 926,299 888,584 881,257 875,492 767,509 762,502...

249

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,972 6,374 6,613 1970's 5,851 8,232 10,712 9,387 8,040 12,177 8,742 8,405 5,503 6,923 1980's...

250

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 63,483 63,781 66,160 2000's 66,758 73,723 65,510 65,329 69,572 69,202 69,202 74,395 81,646...

251

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,061 8,656 6,890 5,799 4,539 3,728 4,106 4,145 4,609 5,611 7,528 8,984 2002 8,747 8,547 7,861 5,699 4,667 3,654 3,038...

252

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

quickly to approve requests of loans from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to oil refineries. Within 48 hours of receiving requests, oil was on its way to requesting refineries....

253

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 8,052 7,726 8,025 2000's 10,411 7,906 8,353 8,386 8,672 8,358 8,041 8,851 8,609 8,621 2010's...

254

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 828 831 853 856 1,467 1,575 1,688 1,833 1,941 2,081 1990's 2,049 2,058 2,319 2,382 2,669 2,672...

255

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 315 300 283 199 105 66 57 57 73 130 189 307 1990 338 288 269 196 116 68 46 62 84 127 195 261 1991 335 311 259 187 105 61...

256

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 272,530 289,945 288,147 2000's 321,784 412,773 404,873 377,794 378,894 405,509 383,452 435,360...

257

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

930: 613: 452: 443: 665: 954: 1,681: 2,111: 2004: 2,410: 1,883: 1,454: 1,015: 737: 647: 456: 423: 543: 879: 1,227: 1,735: 2005: 2,388: 1,585: 1,385: 1,127: 850: 589 ...

258

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

98.0 97.5 97.4 97.4 96.2 95.8 1989-2012 Alabama 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Arizona 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0...

259

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Prices are in ...

260

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Illinois (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 151,699 132,638 117,186 62,934 46,113 39,615 44,463 46,777 41,870 67,167 74,519 115,418 2002 131,434 119,430 122,242...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Illinois (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,062,536 944,170 992,865 2000's 1,017,283 940,691 1,036,615 987,964 941,964 958,727 883,080...

262

European Geosciences Union Ocean Science Formulation of an ocean model for global climate simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper summarizes the formulation of the ocean component to the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory’s (GFDL) climate model used for the 4th IPCC Assessment (AR4) of global climate change. In particular, it reviews the numerical schemes and physical parameterizations that make up an ocean climate model and how these schemes are pieced together for use in a state-of-the-art climate model. Features of the model described here include the following: (1) tripolar grid to resolve the Arctic Ocean without polar filtering, (2) partial bottom step representation of topography to better represent topographically influenced advective and wave processes, (3) more accurate equation of state, (4) three-dimensional flux limited tracer advection to reduce overshoots and undershoots, (5) incorporation of regional climatological variability in shortwave penetration,

B. L. Samuels; M. J. Spelman; M. Winton; R. Zhang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

"1. Rhode Island State Energy Partners","Gas","FPL Energy Operating Serv Inc",528  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "1. Rhode Island State Energy Partners","Gas","FPL Energy Operating Serv Inc",528 "2. Manchester Street","Gas","Dominion Energy New England, LLC",447 "3. Tiverton Power Plant","Gas","Tiverton Power Inc",250 "4. Ocean State Power II","Gas","Ocean State Power II",219 "4. Ocean State Power","Gas","Ocean State Power Co",219 "6. Pawtucket Power Associates","Gas","Pawtucket Power Associates LP",63 "7. Ridgewood Providence Power","Other Renewables","Ridgewood Power Management LLC",24 "8. Central Power Plant","Gas","State of Rhode Island",10

265

Arctic Ocean circulation patterns revealed by GRACE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of ocean bottom pressure (OBP) anomalies from the satellite mission GRACE, complemented by information from two ocean models, are used to investigate the variations and distribution of the Arctic Ocean mass from 2002 through 2011. The ...

Cecilia Peralta-Ferriz; James H. Morison; John M. Wallace; Jennifer A. Bonin; Jinlun Zhang

266

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE-EPA Working Group on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion,Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversion

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The bottom of the ocean food chain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The bottom of the ocean food chain 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2013 All Issues submit The bottom of the ocean food chain Global ocean...

268

Strong wind forcing of the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 107 (C2). Vanderbilt, V .in the subtropical pacific ocean. Science, 316, 1017^1021.simulations of the upper ocean's response to hurricane felix

Zedler, Sarah E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Connecting Changing Ocean Circulation with Changing Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of changing ocean currents on climate change is evaluated by comparing an earth system model’s response to increased CO2 with and without an ocean circulation response. Inhibiting the ocean circulation response, by specifying a ...

Michael Winton; Stephen M. Griffies; Bonita L. Samuels; Jorge L. Sarmiento; Thomas L. Frölicher

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Friday, 21 June 2013 10:08 The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the...

271

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate...

272

Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ocean Tidal and Wave Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First published in 2000, the annual Renewable Energy Technical Assessment Guide (TAG-RE) provides a consistent basis for evaluating the economic feasibility of renewable generation technologies. This excerpt from the 2005 TAG-RE addresses ocean tidal and wave energy conversion technologies, which offer promise for converting the significant energy potential available in ocean tidal currents and waves to electricity in the future.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Landfill Biomass Facility County Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Ocean County Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Ocean County, New Jersey Coordinates 39.9652553°, -74.3118212° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9652553,"lon":-74.3118212,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

275

Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones  

SciTech Connect

Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Ocean Navitas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navitas Navitas Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Navitas Address Nursery House Place United Kingdom Zip DN21 5BQ Sector Ocean Product Ocean Navitas was incorporated in May 2006 by experienced engineers, businessmen and sailing enthusiasts David Hunt, James McCague and Simon Condry. Website http://www.oceannavitas.com Region United Kingdom References Ocean NavitasUNIQ75db538f85b32404-ref-000014E2-QINU LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Ocean Navitas NaREC This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Aegir Dynamo This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

277

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

278

The Global Impact of Ocean Nourishment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the ocean to sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide and to increase the sustainable fish catch. The present annual level of photosynthetic activity of the upper ocean is...

279

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Ocean Wave Energy Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenoceanwa Region United States LinkedIn...

280

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when...

282

Pennsylvania Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices ; Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices ...

283

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Minnesota ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices ; Minnesota Natural Gas Prices ...

284

U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices ; U.S. Natural Gas Prices ...

285

New York Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices ; New York Natural Gas Prices ...

286

Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Text Version Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even though the sun affects all ocean activity, the gravitational pull of the moon primarily drives tides, and wind powers ocean waves. Learn more about: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Addthis Related Articles Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

287

Oceanic shipping soundscapes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shipping and wind are key sources in the oceanic soundscape that affects marine mammal habitats. A new method of forming such soundscapes is presented. Frequency and range dependent transmission losses are precomputed from a grid of virtual sources using fast ray computations (BELLHOP) on a specified number of radial lines. Each radial line samples the bathymetry along its bearing out to a given maximum range. A shipping soundscape is then estimated by assigning a source spectral density level (dB re 1 ? Pa2/Hz) and a shipping density (number of ships per unit area per unit time) to the various grid nodes. Such density values are obtained directly from ships carrying an automatic identification system (AIS) that transmit information such as ship type

Christian de Moustier; Michael Porter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Atmospheric and Oceanic Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction It is widely recognized that internal tides have strong influence on the global thermohaline circulation, because it contribute significantly to deep ocean mixing, the essential process for the maintenance of the thermohaline circulation [Munk and Wunsch, 1998]. Internal tides generated by strong tide-topography interactions occasionally break causing intense turbulent mixing [Lien and Gregg, 2001]. Turbulent mixing may also be induced far from wave generation sites, because propagating internal tides can nonlinearly interact with the background internal waves and cascade part of their energy down to small scales where breaking can occur. The East China Sea and adjacent seas are one of the most important generation regions of internal tides, and hence the associated turbulent mixing. Indeed, using a two-dimensional analytical model, Baines [1982] predicted that the continental shelf slope in the East China Sea is the second largest generator of the M 2 internal tide amon

Niwa; Group Representative

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

Rodríguez Buño, Mariana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Authors: George J. Moridis, Jonny Rutqvist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Venue: 2007 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 30–May 1, 2007 (http://www.otcnet.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The thermal and mechanical loading of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS) can result in hydrate dissociation and a significant pressure increase, with potentially adverse consequences on the integrity and stability of the wellbore assembly, the HBS, and the bounding formations. The perception of HBS instability, coupled with insufficient knowledge of their geomechanical behavior and the absence of predictive capabilities, has resulted in a strategy of avoidance of HBS when locating offshore production platforms. These factors can also impede the development of hydrate deposits as gas resources. For the analysis of the geomechanical stability of HBS, project researchers developed and used a numerical model that integrates a commercial geomechanical code into a simulator describing the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transport, and thermodynamic behavior in geologic media. The geomechanical code includes elastoplastic models for quasi-static yield and failure analysis and viscoplastic models for time-dependent (creep) analysis. The hydrate simulator can model the non-isothermal hydration reactions (equilibrium or kinetic), phase behavior, and flow of fluids and heat in HBS, and can handle any combination of hydrate dissociation mechanisms. The simulations can account for the interdependence of changes in the hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical properties of the HBS, in addition to swelling/shrinkage, displacement (subsidence), and possible geomechanical failure. Researchers investigated in three cases the coupled hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS systems. The first involves hydrate heating as warm fluids from deeper, conventional reservoirs ascend to the ocean floor through uninsulated pipes intersecting the HBS. The second case involves mechanical loading caused by the weight of structures placed on HBS at the ocean floor, and the third describes system response during gas production from a hydrate deposit. The results indicate that the stability of HBS in the vicinity of warm pipes may be significantly affected, especially near the ocean floor where the sediments are unconsolidated and more compressible. Conversely, the increased pressure caused by the weight of structures on the ocean floor increases the stability of hydrates, while gas production from oceanic deposits minimally affects the geomechanical stability of HBS under the conditions that are deemed desirable for production.

291

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Discharge to Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discharge to Ocean Discharge to Ocean Fact Sheet - Discharge to Ocean Past Practices In early offshore oil and gas development, drilling wastes were generally discharged from the platforms directly to the ocean. Until several decades ago, the oceans were perceived to be limitless dumping grounds. During the 1970s and 1980s, however, evidence mounted that some types of drilling waste discharges could have undesirable effects on local ecology, particularly in shallow water. When water-based muds (WBMs) were used, only limited environmental harm was likely to occur, but when operators employed oil-based muds (OBMs) on deeper sections of wells, the resulting cuttings piles created impaired zones beneath and adjacent to the platforms. At some North Sea locations, large piles of oil-based cuttings remain on the sea floor near the platforms. Piles of oil-based cuttings can affect the local ecosystem in three ways: by smothering organisms, by direct toxic effect of the drilling waste, and by anoxic conditions caused by microbial degradation of the organic components in the waste. Current regulatory controls minimize the impacts of permitted discharges of cuttings.

292

Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

293

An Operational Real-Time Ocean Sensor Network in the Gulf of Maine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System (GoMOOS) was established in the summer of 2001 as a prototype real-time observing system that now includes eleven solar-powered buoys with physical and optical sensors, four shore-based long-range HF radar surface ... Keywords: CODAR, GoMOOS, Gulf of Maine, Ocean Observing Systems, Sensor networks, neural networks, ocean optics, real-time

Neal R. Pettigrew; Collin S. Roesler; Francois Neville; Heather E. Deese

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Ocean Tidal Dissipation and its Role in Solar System Satellite Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magma ocean dissipation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of the ocean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tidally-driven flow in global satellite oceans

Chen, Erinna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 158 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Français

298

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

299

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

300

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program. Volume 1. Preoperatinal ocean test platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An environmental impact assessment for the field test of the first preoperational Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, referred to as OTEC-1, is presented. The conceptual design of OTEC-1 is described, and the existing environments at the four OTEC-1 study sites (Punta Tuna, Keahole Point, offshore New Orleans, and offshore Tampa) are discussed. The environmental impacts considered include organism impingement, organism entrainment, ocean water mixing, metallic ion release, chlorine release, ammonia leakage, oil release, and platform attraction. The development of a risk assessment model for credible accidents at OTEC-1 is discussed. Also, the federal and state legal, safety, and health policies pertinent to OTEC-1 are presented. A glossary is included. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Thermodynamic Analysis of Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating a streamfunction as function of depth and density is proposed as a new way of analyzing the thermodynamic character of the overturning circulation in the global ocean. The sign of an overturning cell in this streamfunction directly ...

J. Nycander; J. Nilsson; K. Döös; G. Broström

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Humidity Profiles over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere affects climate change through radiative balance and surface evaporation. The variabilities of atmospheric humidity profile over oceans from daily to interannual time scales were examined using ...

W. Timothy Liu; Wenqing Tang; Pearn P. Niiler

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Oceanic Eddy Heat Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rectified eddy heat transport is calculated from a global high-resolution ocean general circulation model. The eddy heat transport is found to be strong in the western boundary currents, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and the equatorial ...

Steven R. Jayne; Jochem Marotzke

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Development of a Free-Surface Bryan–Cox–Semtner Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A version of the Bryan–Cox–Semtner numerical ocean general circulation model, adapted to include a free surface, is described. The model is designed for the following uses: tidal studies (a tidal option is explicitly included); assimilation of ...

Peter D. Killworth; David J. Webb; David Stainforth; Stephen M. Paterson

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

MPAS-Ocean Development Update  

SciTech Connect

The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) is a modeling framework developed jointly between NCAR and LANL, built to allow core developers to: rapidly develop new dynamical cores, and leverage improvements made to shared codes. MPAS-Ocean (MPAS-O) is a functioning ocean model capable of high resolution, or highly vairable resolution simulations. The first MPAS-O publication is expected by the end of the year.

Jacobsen, Douglas W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ringler, Todd D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Petersen, Mark R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jones, Philip W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maltrud, Mathew E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

306

Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States has jurisdiction over 3.4 million square miles of ocean�an expanse greater than the land area of all fifty states combined. This vast marine area offers researchers opportunities to investigate the ocean�s role in an integrated Earth system, but also presents challenges to society, including damaging tsunamis and hurricanes, industrial accidents, and outbreaks of waterborne diseases. The 2010 Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill and 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami are vivid reminders that a broad range of infrastructure is needed to advance our still-incomplete understanding of the ocean. The National Research Council (NRC)�s Ocean Studies Board was asked by the National Science and Technology Council�s Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, comprised of 25 U.S. government agencies, to examine infrastructure needs for ocean research in the year 2030. This request reflects concern, among a myriad of marine issues, over the present state of aging and obsolete infrastructure, insufficient capacity, growing technological gaps, and declining national leadership in marine technological development; issues brought to the nation�s attention in 2004 by the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. A 15-member committee of experts identified four themes that encompass 32 future ocean research questions�enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions in the report (e.g., sea level rise, sustainable fisheries, the global water cycle) reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant today, and are likely to take decades of effort to solve. As such, U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations or autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. Consequently, a coordinated national plan for making future strategic investments becomes an imperative to address societal needs. Such a plan should be based upon known priorities and should be reviewed every 5-10 years to optimize the federal investment. The committee examined the past 20 years of technological advances and ocean infrastructure investments (such as the rise in use of self-propelled, uncrewed, underwater autonomous vehicles), assessed infrastructure that would be required to address future ocean research questions, and characterized ocean infrastructure trends for 2030. One conclusion was that ships will continue to be essential, especially because they provide a platform for enabling other infrastructure � autonomous and remotely operated vehicles; samplers and sensors; moorings and cabled systems; and perhaps most importantly, the human assets of scientists, technical staff, and students. A comprehensive, long-term research fleet plan should be implemented in order to retain access to the sea. The current report also calls for continuing U.S. capability to access fully and partially ice-covered seas; supporting innovation, particularly the development of biogeochemical sensors; enhancing computing and modeling capacity and capability; establishing broadly accessible data management facilities; and increasing interdisciplinary education and promoting a technically-skilled workforce. The committee also provided a framework for prioritizing future investment in ocean infrastructure. They recommend that development, maintenance, or replacement of ocean research infrastructure assets should be prioritized in terms of societal benefit, with particular consideration given to usefulness for addressing important science questions; affordability, efficiency, and longevity; and ability to contribute to other missions or applications. These criteria are the foundation for prioritizing ocean research infrastructure investments by estimating

National Research Council

2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030  

SciTech Connect

The United States has jurisdiction over 3.4 million square miles of ocean�an expanse greater than the land area of all fifty states combined. This vast marine area offers researchers opportunities to investigate the ocean�s role in an integrated Earth system, but also presents challenges to society, including damaging tsunamis and hurricanes, industrial accidents, and outbreaks of waterborne diseases. The 2010 Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill and 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami are vivid reminders that a broad range of infrastructure is needed to advance our still-incomplete understanding of the ocean. The National Research Council (NRC)�s Ocean Studies Board was asked by the National Science and Technology Council�s Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, comprised of 25 U.S. government agencies, to examine infrastructure needs for ocean research in the year 2030. This request reflects concern, among a myriad of marine issues, over the present state of aging and obsolete infrastructure, insufficient capacity, growing technological gaps, and declining national leadership in marine technological development; issues brought to the nation�s attention in 2004 by the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. A 15-member committee of experts identified four themes that encompass 32 future ocean research questions�enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions in the report (e.g., sea level rise, sustainable fisheries, the global water cycle) reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant today, and are likely to take decades of effort to solve. As such, U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations or autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. Consequently, a coordinated national plan for making future strategic investments becomes an imperative to address societal needs. Such a plan should be based upon known priorities and should be reviewed every 5-10 years to optimize the federal investment. The committee examined the past 20 years of technological advances and ocean infrastructure investments (such as the rise in use of self-propelled, uncrewed, underwater autonomous vehicles), assessed infrastructure that would be required to address future ocean research questions, and characterized ocean infrastructure trends for 2030. One conclusion was that ships will continue to be essential, especially because they provide a platform for enabling other infrastructure � autonomous and remotely operated vehicles; samplers and sensors; moorings and cabled systems; and perhaps most importantly, the human assets of scientists, technical staff, and students. A comprehensive, long-term research fleet plan should be implemented in order to retain access to the sea. The current report also calls for continuing U.S. capability to access fully and partially ice-covered seas; supporting innovation, particularly the development of biogeochemical sensors; enhancing computing and modeling capacity and capability; establishing broadly accessible data management facilities; and increasing interdisciplinary education and promoting a technically-skilled workforce. The committee also provided a framework for prioritizing future investment in ocean infrastructure. They recommend that development, maintenance, or replacement of ocean research infrastructure assets should be prioritized in terms of societal benefit, with particular consideration given to usefulness for addressing important science questions; affordability, efficiency, and longevity; and ability to contribute to other missions or applications. These criteria are the foundation for prioritizing ocean research infrastructure investments by estimating

National Research Council

2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

308

ONE OCEAN, ONE HEALTH NOAA IN THE LEAD FINAL REPORT FROM THE OCEANS AND HEALTH WORKING GROUP TO THE NOAA SCIENCE ADVISORY BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ocean 1 provides many health benefits, from low fat, high protein food sources and therapeutic drugs to regulation of global temperature. The ocean also poses many hazards, such as hurricanes, pathogens, animal attacks, toxins and contaminants that can cause loss of life or impair health. The potential impact of these threats is enhanced because more than half of the US population lives along the coast. Even those living inland are not immune to the ocean’s effects, as ocean-driven climate patterns have been linked to inland outbreaks of several pathogens. These and other threats are likely to increase with predicted changes in climate. NOAA has multiple programs intended to promote health, but has struggled to define its role in relation to the many other agencies that also have health-related responsibilities. To help NOAA more clearly define its role and actions needed to fulfill that role, the NOAA Science Advisory Board (SAB) established an Oceans and Health Working Group (OHWG) that includes experts in the fields of epidemiology, toxicology, public health, environmental modeling, veterinary science, marine biotechnology, economics, and ocean sciences. The OHWG has been charged with identifying opportunities to enhance NOAA’s ongoing health-related efforts, including all relationships between the ocean and the physiological well-being of organisms. This report

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

310

Oceanic Influences on the Seasonal Cycle in Evaporation over the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual mean and seasonal cycle in latent heating over the Indian Ocean are investigated using a simple, analytical ocean model and a 3D, numerical, ocean model coupled to a prescribed atmosphere, which permits interaction through sea surface ...

Roxana C. Wajsowicz; Paul S. Schopf

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

In a Perfect Ocean: The State of the Fisheries and Ecosystems in the North Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: In a Perfect Ocean: The State of the Fisheriesin the North Atlantic Ocean By Daniel Pauly and Jay MacleanJay Maclean. In a Perfect Ocean: The State of the Fisheries

Miller, Ryder W.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The dynamic response of oceanic hydrate deposits to ocean temperature change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during transit through the ocean water column Geophys. Res.hydrate in the world's oceans. Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 8,of methane hydrate in ocean sediment. Energy and Fuels, 19,

Reagan, Matthew T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

314

Natural gas annual 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NOS Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOS Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities ...

316

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,thermal energy conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean Systems

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mechanisms of the meridional heat transport in the Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atlas of the Southern Ocean, Natural Environment ResearchMHT. Keywords Southern Ocean . Meridional heat transport .1 Introduction The Southern Ocean (SO) circulation plays an

Volkov, Denis L.; Fu, Lee-Lueng; Lee, Tong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Observation of Physical Fluxes Between an Estuary and the Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the coastal ocean and a semi-enclosed estuarinebetween the coastal ocean and a semi-enclosed estuarinebetween the coastal ocean and a semi-enclosed estuarine

Stacey, Mark; Powell, Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic Ambient Noise in the Ocean: Spectra and Sources,"and Osterhus, S. (1999). "Ocean Ambient Sound Instrumenta Subsurface Package," J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech. 16, 1118-1126.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Ocean Acidification Impacts on Shellfish Workshop: Findings and Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The workshop to investigate ocean acidification impacts on Growers Association.   Ocean Acidification Impacts on Proceedings  Integrated Ocean Observing Systems  California 

Dickson, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Jump to: navigation, search Logo: NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Name NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion AgencyCompany Organization...

322

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo-Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo-affect the dynam- ics and thermodynamics of the upper ocean.

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Authors: Matthew T. Reagan and George J. Moridis Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates 2008, Vancouver, British Columbia, July 9-12, 2008 (http://www.icgh.org [external site]) Abstract: Paleoceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating past global climate. The implication is that global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate is the main culprit for a sequence of rapid global warming affects that occurred during the late Quaternary period. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed coupled thermo-hydrological-chemical simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor, and assessed the potential for methane release into the ecosystem. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and the effects of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that while many deep hydrate deposits are indeed stable during periods of rapid ocean temperature changes, shallow deposits (such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico) can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant carbon fluxes over a period of decades. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane and the formation of carbonates) to sequester the released carbon. This model will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

325

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

326

Echolocation-based foraging by harbor porpoises and sperm whales, including effects of noise and acoustic propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I provide quantitative descriptions of toothed whale echolocation and foraging behavior, including assessment of the effects of noise on foraging behavior and the potential influence of ocean acoustic ...

DeRuiter, Stacy L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Approximation of Ocean Heat Storage by Ocean–Atmosphere Energy Exchange: Implications for Seasonal Cycle Mixed Layer Ocean Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The approximation of ocean heat storage by the net surface energy flux and the implications for zonal mean SST simulation using mixed layer ocean formulation are examined. The analysis considers both constant and variable depth mixed layers. ...

Robert G. Gallimore; David D. Houghton

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

An update on modeling land-ice/ocean interactions in CESM  

SciTech Connect

This talk is an update on ongoing land-ice/ocean coupling work within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The coupling method is designed to allow simulation of a fully dynamic ice/ocean interface, while requiring minimal modification to the existing ocean model (the Parallel Ocean Program, POP). The method makes use of an immersed boundary method (IBM) to represent the geometry of the ice-ocean interface without requiring that the computational grid be modified in time. We show many of the remaining development challenges that need to be addressed in order to perform global, century long climate runs with fully coupled ocean and ice sheet models. These challenges include moving to a new grid where the computational pole is no longer at the true south pole and several changes to the coupler (the software tool used to communicate between model components) to allow the boundary between land and ocean to vary in time. We discuss benefits for ice/ocean coupling that would be gained from longer-term ocean model development to allow for natural salt fluxes (which conserve both water and salt mass, rather than water volume).

Asay-davis, Xylar [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

329

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

330

GLobal Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAP): Data and Analyses  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

GLODAP information available through CDIAC includes gridded and bottle data, a live server, an interactive atlas that provides access to data plots, and other tools for viewing and interacting with the data. [from http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/oceans/glodap/Glopintrod.htm](Specialized Interface)

Sabine, C. L.; Key, R. M.; Feely, R. A.; Bullister, J. L.; Millero, F. J.; Wanninkhof, R.; Peng, T. H.; Kozyr, A.

331

The Southern Ocean and Its Climate in CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4), provides a powerful tool to understand and predict the earth’s climate system. Several aspects of the Southern Ocean in the CCSM4 are explored, including the surface climatology and ...

Wilbert Weijer; Bernadette M. Sloyan; Mathew E. Maltrud; Nicole Jeffery; Matthew W. Hecht; Corinne A. Hartin; Erik van Sebille; Ilana Wainer; Laura Landrum

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Transit-Time Distributions in a Global Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from a simulation of the ocean “transit-time distribution” (“TTD”) for global and regional ocean surface boundary conditions are presented based on a 5000-yr integration using the Parallel Ocean Program ocean general circulation model. ...

Synte Peacock; Mathew Maltrud

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar, wind, biomass. landfill gas, ocean (including tidal,electric, photovoltaics, landfill gas, wind, biomass,

Lunt, Robin J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Ocean Color Web | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Color Web Ocean Color Web Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Ocean Color Web Dataset Summary Description A comprehensive image analysis package for the processing, display, analysis, and quality control of ocean color data. Tags {Ocean,"water color",spectrometer,"sea viewing",MODIS,"marine biology",NASA,GSFC,"Goddard Space Flight Center"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 15-Jan-2010 Publisher National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contact Name Contact Email Gene.C.Feldman@nasa.gov Unique Identifier NASA-1547

335

Dynamics of global ocean heat transport variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art, high-resolution ocean general circulation model is used to estimate the time-dependent global ocean heat transport and investigate its dynamics. The north-south heat transport is the prime manifestation ...

Jayne, Steven Robert

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Open Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Open Ocean Energy Ltd Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.open-ocean-e LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

337

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in...

338

Buoyancy Arrest and Shelf–Ocean Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When steady flow in a stratified ocean passes between the continental slope and open ocean, its ability to cross isobaths is potentially limited by buoyancy arrest. If the bottom Ekman transport vanishes and there are no interior stresses, then ...

K. H. Brink

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Dynamic and Thermodynamic Regulation of Ocean Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative roles of clouds, surface evaporation, and ocean heat transport in limiting maximum sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the western Pacific warm pool are investigated by means of simple and intermediate coupled ocean–atmosphere models. ...

Tim Li; Timothy F. Hogan; C-P. Chang

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

An Ocean Observing System for Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designs and implementation are proceeding for a Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and a Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). The initial design for the ocean component of the GCOS, which is also the climate module of the GOOS, was completed ...

Worth D. Nowlin Jr.; Neville Smith; George Needler; Peter K. Taylor; Robert Weller; Ray Schmitt; Liliane Merlivat; Alain Vézina; Arthur Alexiou; Michael McPhaden; Massaaki Wakatsuchi

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Assimilation of Altimeter Data into Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of assimilating satellite altimeter data into an ocean model is considered for the case in which the ocean currents are weak, so that they can be represented by a superposition of linear Rossby waves, and the altimeter measurements ...

D. J. Webb; A. Moore

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development is described of a Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS)—the result of a cooperative project to collect global weather observations taken near the ocean's surface since 1854, primarily from merchant ships, into a compact and ...

Scott D. Woodruff; Ralph J. Slutz; Roy L. Jenne; Peter M. Steurer

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

MHK Technologies/Ocean Energy Rig | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rig Rig < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Energy Rig.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Ocean Energy Rig is a hybrid concept harnessing tidal stream with increased velocity from venturi system wave and wind power The rig also uses solar panels to power computers and warning lights Other unique features include a water ballasting system with automatic self levelling and wave ramps to maximize FreeFlow 69 s new wave power device It is envisaged that the Ocean Energy Rig would be assembled and maintained in dry docks and would be towed out into position before being semi submerged and anchored for operation Power output of the production model would be at least 10MW

344

4. Natural Gas Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

hydraulic fracturing, including shales and low permeability (tight) formations. Total U.S. dry natural gas reserves additions replaced 237 percent of 2007 dry

345

Natural Gas Citygate Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January ...

346

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

347

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

348

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

349

The 1981 ocean tomography experiment: Preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results from a 1981 test ocean acoustic tomography experiment are presented. The system deployed in the southern North Atlantic

The Ocean Tomography Group; R. C. Spindel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Could we identify hot Ocean-Planets with CoRoT, Kepler and Doppler velocimetry?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planets less massive than about 10 MEarth are expected to have no massive H-He atmosphere and a cometary composition (50% rocks, 50% water, by mass) provided they formed beyond the snowline of protoplanetary disks. Due to inward migration, such planets could be found at any distance between their formation site and the star. If migration stops within the habitable zone, this will produce a new kind of planets, called Ocean-Planets. Ocean-planets typically consist in a silicate core, surrounded by a thick ice mantle, itself covered by a 100 km deep ocean. The existence of ocean-planets raises important astrobiological questions: Can life originate on such body, in the absence of continent and ocean-silicate interfaces? What would be the nature of the atmosphere and the geochemical cycles ? In this work, we address the fate of Hot Ocean-Planets produced when migration ends at a closer distance. In this case the liquid/gas interface can disappear, and the hot H2O envelope is made of a supercritical fluid. Although we do not expect these bodies to harbor life, their detection and identification as water-rich planets would give us insight as to the abundance of hot and, by extrapolation, cool Ocean-Planets.

F. Selsis; B. Chazelas; P. Borde; M. Ollivier; F. Brachet; M. Decaudin; F. Bouchy; D. Ehrenreich; J. -M. Griessmeier; H. Lammer; C. Sotin; O. Grasset; C. Moutou; P. Barge; M. Deleuil; D. Mawet; D. Despois; J. F. Kasting; A. Leger

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

351

Gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

A core engine or gas generator is described for use in a range of gas turbine engines. A multi-stage compressor and a single stage supersonic turbine are mounted on a single shaft. The compressor includes a number of stages of variable angle and the gas generator has an annular combustion chamber.

MacDonald, A.G.

1976-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

352

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, storage, and usage of compressed gas cylinders. 2.0 POLICY Colorado School of Mines ("Mines" or "the, storage, and usage requirements outlined below. This policy is applicable school-wide including all, or electrical circuits. Flammable gas cylinders must be stored in the building's gas cylinder storage cage until

353

ONE OCEAN, ONE HEALTH NOAA IN THE LEAD A REPORT FROM THE NOAA SCIENCE ADVISORY BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ocean 1 provides many health benefits, from low fat, high protein food sources and therapeutic drugs to regulation of global temperature. The ocean also poses many hazards, such as hurricanes, pathogens, animal attacks, toxins and contaminants that can cause loss of life or impair health. The potential impact of these threats is enhanced because more than half of the US population lives along the coast. Even those living inland are not immune to the ocean’s effects, as ocean-driven climate patterns have been linked to inland outbreaks of several pathogens. These and other threats are likely to increase with predicted changes in climate. NOAA has multiple programs intended to promote health, but has struggled to define its role in relation to the many other agencies that also have health-related responsibilities. To help NOAA more clearly define its role and actions needed to fulfill that role, the NOAA Science Advisory Board (SAB) established an Oceans and Health Working Group (OHWG) that includes experts in the fields of epidemiology, toxicology, public health, environmental modeling, veterinary science, marine biotechnology, economics, and ocean sciences. The OHWG was charged with identifying opportunities to enhance NOAA’s ongoing health-related efforts, including all relationships between the ocean and the physiological well-being of organisms. This report from

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Incentives Thermal Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 96 Ocean Thermal Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 96) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Agricultural Commercial Industrial Utility Anaerobic Digestion Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Ocean Thermal Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Small Wind Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes CCEF - Project 150 Initiative (Connecticut) State Grant Program Connecticut Commercial Solar Thermal Electric

355

Transport of Freshwater by the Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global distribution of freshwater transport in the ocean is presented, based on an integration point at Bering Strait, which connects the Pacific and Atlantic oceans via the Artic Ocean. Through Bering Strait, 0.8 × 106 m3 s?1 of relatively ...

Susan E. Wijffels; Raymond W. Schmitt; Harry L. Bryden; Anders Stigebrandt

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy: Reservoirs, Sources,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The coupling of the generation of different energy forms in the dynamics (in either balanced or wave motions are almost nonexistent in the ocean. www.annualreviews.org · Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy 255 Annu.Rev.Fluid processes? Are the seemingly different dynamical ranges coupled? 2. THE OCEANIC ENERGY BUDGET We begin

Ferrari, Raffaele

357

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

358

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Gas mass transfer for stratified flows  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Gas mass transfer for stratified flows  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The CCSM4 Ocean Component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean component of the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) is described, and its solutions from the twentieth-century (20C) simulations are documented in comparison with observations and those of CCSM3. The improvements to the ...

Gokhan Danabasoglu; Susan C. Bates; Bruce P. Briegleb; Steven R. Jayne; Markus Jochum; William G. Large; Synte Peacock; Steve G. Yeager

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Gas lift valve failure mode analysis and the design of a thermally-actuated positive-locking safety valve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-lifted oil wells are susceptible to failure through malfunction of gas lift valves. This is a growing concern as offshore wells are drilled thousands of meters below the ocean floor in extreme temperature and pressure ...

Gilbertson, Eric (Eric W.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

New Altimetric Estimates of Mode-1 M2 Internal Tides in the Central North Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New estimates of mode-1 M2 internal tide energy flux are computed from an extended Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/Poseidon (T/P) altimeter dataset that includes both the original and tandem tracks, improving spatial resolution over previous ...

Zhongxiang Zhao; Matthew H. Alford

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Evaluation of the MODIS Aerosol Retrievals over Ocean and Land during CLAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Lighthouse Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) experiment took place from 10 July to 2 August 2001 in a combined ocean–land region that included the Chesapeake Lighthouse [Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (...

R. C. Levy; L. A. Remer; J. V. Martins; Y. J. Kaufman; A. Plana-Fattori; J. Redemann; B. Wenny

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A Multilayer Model of the Thermohaline and Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid, multilayer model for the oceanic general circulation is formulated and tested. The model includes a mixed layer at the surface which is specified by Eulerian coordinates, and three moving layers below which are specified by quasi-...

Rui Xin Huang; Kirk Bryan

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Water Mass Transformation in the Southern Ocean of a Global Isopycnal Coordinate GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global isopycnal coordinate GCM is used to investigate the processes that drive the meridional circulation, transformation, and interocean exchange of water masses in the Southern Ocean. The noneddy-resolving model (mesh size 1.25°) includes an ...

Robert Marsh; A. J. George Nurser; Alex P. Megann; Adrian L. New

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM). Part I: Shallow-Water Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM) has been developed to extend the capabilities of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to a global model domain. OLAM adopts many features of its predecessor, including physical parameterizations, ...

Robert L. Walko; Roni Avissar

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Annual, Seasonal, and Interannual Variability of Air–Sea Heat Fluxes in the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the accuracy and physical representation of air–sea surface heat flux estimates for the Indian Ocean on annual, seasonal, and interannual time scales. Six heat flux products were analyzed, including the newly developed ...

Lisan Yu; Xiangze Jin; Robert A. Weller

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Effect of Marine Stratocumulus Clouds on the Ocean-Surface Heat Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixed-layer stratocumulus model first developed by Lilly is extended to include liquid-water-dependent solar optical properties and infrared radiative fluxes. The ocean-surface heat budget under these clouds is discussed as a function of ...

Howard P. Hanson; Patricia L. Gruber

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Ocean Gyres and Abrupt Change in the Thermohaline Circulation: A Conceptual Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The implications are investigated of representing ocean gyre circulations by a diffusion term in the Stommel and Rooth box models of the thermohaline circulation (THC) in one and two hemispheres, respectively. The approach includes mostly ...

Hannah Longworth; Jochem Marotzke; Thomas F. Stocker

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Mooring Design Using Wave-State Estimate from the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southern Ocean Flux Station was deployed near 47°S, 140°E. The extreme wind and wave conditions at this location require appropriate mooring design, which includes dynamic fatigue analysis and static analysis. An accurate estimate of the wave ...

E. W. Schulz; M. A. Grosenbaugh; L. Pender; D. J. M. Greenslade; T. W. Trull

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Pressure-slope momentum transfer in ocean surface boundary layers coupled with gravity waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper focuses on the consequences of including surface and subsurface, wind forced, pressure-slope momentum transfer into the oceanic water column, a transfer process which competes with now-conventional turbulence transfer based on mixing ...

George Mellor

373

International Natural Gas Production - 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natura ...

374

The role of clouds and oceans in global greenhouse warming. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This research focuses on assessing connections between anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and global climatic change. it has been supported since the early 1990s in part by the DOE ``Quantitative Links`` Program (QLP). A three-year effort was originally proposed to the QLP to investigate effects f global cloudiness on global climate and its implications for cloud feedback; and to continue the development and application of climate/ocean models, with emphasis on coupled effects of greenhouse warming and feedbacks by clouds and oceans. It is well-known that cloud and ocean processes are major sources of uncertainty in the ability to predict climatic change from humankind`s greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions. And it has always been the objective to develop timely and useful analytical tools for addressing real world policy issues stemming from anthropogenic climate change.

Hoffert, M.I.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Ocean Skeletal Structures Hypotheses and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss hypotheses on formation of ocean skeletal structures. These structures entered the ocean together with atmospheric precipitation and were assembled from fragments of skeletal structures present in clouds. We base interpretation of this phenomenon on surface tension forces between fundamental tubular blocks of the investigated structures that may also occur beneath the ocean surface. A capillary model is presented to explain formation of a network of interacting tubes. Data about the nature of ocean skeletal structures can be instrumental in modeling many processes associated with physics of the ocean.

Rantsev-Kartinov, V A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Ocean Skeletal Structures Hypotheses and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss hypotheses on formation of ocean skeletal structures. These structures entered the ocean together with atmospheric precipitation and were assembled from fragments of skeletal structures present in clouds. We base interpretation of this phenomenon on surface tension forces between fundamental tubular blocks of the investigated structures that may also occur beneath the ocean surface. A capillary model is presented to explain formation of a network of interacting tubes. Data about the nature of ocean skeletal structures can be instrumental in modeling many processes associated with physics of the ocean.

V. A. Rantsev-Kartinov; C. G. Parigger

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cryostat including heater to heat a target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vesssel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism.

Pehl, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA); Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Malone, Donald F. (Oakland, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Cryostat including heater to heat a target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vessel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism. 2 figs.

Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

1990-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

379

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices ; U.S. Natural Gas Prices ...

380

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices ; U.S. Natural Gas Prices ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Design and testing of a deep sea formation water and temeperature sampling probe for the Ocean Drilling Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ocean Drilling Program is an international research consortium dedicated to exploring the structure and history of earth beneath the oceans. The program receives funds from the National Science Foundation and 18 member countries. Texas A&M University serves as the science operator, drill ship operator, and Gulf Coast Core Repository. The objective of the program is to learn about the geological makeup of the ocean floor and develop a better understanding of how it was formed. Fluid and temperature samples are one means of determining the chemistry of the formation. In order to obtain quality samples a tool must probe into the formation approximately 18 inches and capture a small volume of fluid and record temperatures. The Ocean Drilling Program has developed two such probes, the IPOD in situ Pore Water Sampling Probe (PWS) and the Water Sample and Temperature Probe (WSTP). These probes return samples at near in situ conditions; however, fluid samples typically encounter a pressure drop as they enter the tool. Samples collected using these probes are suspected of giving questionable results due to possible gas/fluid separation as the sample experiences a pressure drop upon entering the probe. Fluid returned at formation pressure is hoped to give scientist a more accurate picture of the formation conditions and allow comparison between samples returned at formation pressure and those returned under partial pressure. The objective of this project was to design, test, and manufacture a probe that would consistently-return fluid and temperature samples at in situ conditions, The project was broken down into two stages, namely the design stage and the testing and manufacturing stage. The design stage was governed by a regimented design methodology. Steps included in the methodology were 1) Need Analysis, 2) Conceptual Design, 3) Conceptual Design Evaluation, and 4) Embodiment Design. The manufacturing and testing stage of the project consisted of full sample system testing and supervision of the manufacturing process. the result of the design process was a sampling system that combined a back pressure piston and metering valve. Full testing of this sampling system showed the sampling system allowed sampling of formation fluid with minimal pressure drop between the formation and the probe. Favorable results of the sampling system allowed for the development of a new probe tip configuration, as well as, a new modularized electronics section. Machine drawings were generated for all components of the tool. Components were then fabricated by a local machine shop. All components under went quality inspection and were then assembled. Full scale testing at the Ocean Drilling Programs Annex is the next step. If successful, the probe is to undergo sea trials in October of 1995.

Fisseler, Patrick James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) was established by the Census of Marine Life program. It is an evolving strategic alliance of people and organizations sharing a vision to make marine biogeographic data, from all over the world, freely available over the World Wide Web. It is not a project or program, and is not limited to data from CoML-related projects. Any organization, consortium, project or individual may contribute. OBIS provides, on an open access basis through the World Wide Web, taxonomically and geographically resolved data on marine life and the ocean environment, interoperability with similar databases, and software tools for data exploration and analysis. The OBIS secretariat is hosted by Rutgers University, Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences. [Copied, then edited from http://www.iobis.org/about/

384

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

385

Knowledge exchange Research grant proposals now include  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Edinburgh. Traditionally, geophysicists use seismic exploration to find new oil and gas fields. But MTEM a new method to prospect for oil and gas deep beneath the ground. NERC-funded PhD student David Wright-out sells for $275 million In June 2007, Norwegian oil giant Petroleum Geo-Services (PGS) bought Scotland

Brierley, Andrew

386

Cryogenic treatment of gas  

SciTech Connect

Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

387

Expansion of the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

unconventional resources. Furthermore, infrastructure additions related to imports of natural gas, including ... Office of Oil and Gas, September 2009 11

388

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all fuels including electricity and syngas will be used forGas Electricity Biomass Syngas Space Heating Coal Oil Gas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Climate change in the sea: the implications of increasing the carbon dioxide inputs to the surface ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oceans are estimated to be absorbing one-third of the fossil fuel carbon released into the atmosphere, a process that is expected to change ocean carbon chemistry. I will present data from the Washington coast showing ocean pH declines and changes to the shell chemistry of bivalves. I will discuss implications of carbon cycle changes for marine species, including insights from a coastal area where I have worked for more than 24 years. I will summarize what we know to date about this process of “ocean acidification”.

Pfister, Cathy [University of Chicago

2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

390

Ocean tide energy converter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tide motor energy source includes a tidal piston with a valved chamber. The piston drives a hydraulic ram to generate electrical power through a pressure accumulator and hydraulic motor. The ram can be locked hydraulically to enable the tidal piston to be held fixed at a desired elevation and the valves in the chamber permit it to be filled with water or air. The piston with its chamber filled with air at its low tide position and then released for controlled ascent while submerged acts as a submerged float for driving the ram upwardly while the tide runs in during one phase of its operation. The piston with its chamber filled with water while locked at its highest position as the tide begins to run out, and then released to fall under control, acts as a weight suspended in air after the water level drops below the piston for driving the ram downwardly during the second phase of its operation. The rising and falling motion of the tidal piston is used as the energy source.

Rainey, D.E.

1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

391

On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,circulation of the Indian Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers, andthe figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig. 2 Pacific Ocean

Reid, Joseph L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Deployment, release and recovery of ocean riser pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ocean thermal energy conversion facility includes a long pipe assembly which is supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. Cold water flows to the facility from deep in the ocean. The pipe assembly comprises an elongate pipe construction and a weight connected to the lower end of the construction by a line of selected length. A floatation collar is connected to the construction at its upper end to cause the construction to have positive buoyancy and a center of buoyancy closer to the upper end of the construction than its center of mass. The weight renders the entire pipe assembly negatively buoyant. In the event that support of the pipe assembly should be lost, as by release of the assembly from the facility hull in an emergency, the assembly sinks to the ocean floor where it is moored by the weight. The pipe construction floats submerged above the ocean floor in a substantially vertical attitude which facilitates recovery of the assembly.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA); Wetmore, Sherman B. (Westminster, CA); McNary, James F. (Santa Ana, CA)

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

393

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth, Space Sciences » Earth, Space Sciences » Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate change and projecting the impacts of high-latitude change on regions throughout the globe. Get Expertise Phil Jones COSIM Email Matthew Hecht COSIM Email Elizabeth Hunke COSIM Email Mat Maltrud COSIM Email Bill Lipscomb COSIM Email Scott Elliott COSIM Email Todd Ringler COSIM Email We are also developing a set of next-generation ocean and ice models with variable resolution horizontal grids to focus resolution on regions of interest or regions where specific processes (like eddies) need to be resolved. Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the

394

Ocean - Regional Planning Efforts | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Efforts Regional Planning Efforts Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Marine planning is a science-based process that provides transparent information about ocean use and guarantees the public and stakeholders a voice early on in decisions affecting the uses of the marine environment. It is an inclusive, bottom-up approach that gives the Federal Government, States, and Tribes, with input from local communities, stakeholders, and the public, the ability to make informed decisions on how best to optimize the use of and protect the ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes. Under the National Ocean Policy, the United States is subdivided into nine regional planning areas. Within each region, Federal, State, and Tribal

395

Horizontal stirring in the global ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

Hernández-Carrasco, I; Hernández-García, E; Turiel, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Natural gas annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Natural Gas Annual Update - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

398

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

399

The Effects of Mesoscale Ocean–Atmosphere Coupling on the Large-Scale Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale variation in wind stress due to ocean–atmosphere interaction within the atmospheric boundary layer alters the temporal and spatial scale of Ekman pumping driving the double-gyre circulation of the ocean. A high-resolution ...

Andrew Mc C. Hogg; William K. Dewar; Pavel Berloff; Sergey Kravtsov; David K. Hutchinson

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Mechanisms Governing Interannual Variability of Upper-Ocean Temperature in a Global Ocean Hindcast Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interannual variability in upper-ocean (0–400 m) temperature and governing mechanisms for the period 1968–97 are quantified from a global ocean hindcast simulation driven by atmospheric reanalysis and satellite data products. The ...

Scott C. Doney; Steve Yeager; Gokhan Danabasoglu; William G. Large; James C. McWilliams

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Seasonal Variations of Upper Ocean Transport from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean via Indonesian Straits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal variations of upper-ocean mass transport between the Pacific and Indian Oceans via the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) are examined using numerical experiments with a 1½-layer, reduced-gravity model forced with specific climatological ...

James T. Potemra

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

On the Ocean’s Large-Scale Circulation near the Limit of No Vertical Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By convention, the ocean’s large-scale circulation is assumed to be a thermohaline overturning driven by the addition and extraction of buoyancy at the surface and vertical mixing in the interior. Previous work suggests that the overturning ...

J. R. Toggweiler; B. Samuels

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Global Climate and Ocean Circulation on an Aquaplanet Ocean–Atmosphere General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A low-resolution coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model (OAGCM) is used to study the characteristics of the large-scale ocean circulation and its climatic impacts in a series of global coupled aquaplanet experiments. Three ...

Robin S. Smith; Clotilde Dubois; Jochem Marotzke

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 155 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 155 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS AMAZON DEEP-SEA FAN Dr. Roger D. Flood Co of Canada P.O. Box 1006 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Canada B2Y4A2 Dr. Adam Klaus Staff Scientist, Leg l55 Ocean and handling. D I S C L A I M E R This publication was prepared by the Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

405

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) 2014.02.01 - 2014.10.15 Lead Scientist : Allen Goldstein Description In areas where biogenic emissions are oxidized in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants such as SO2, NOx and black carbon, it has become increasingly apparent that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is substantially enhanced. Research is urgently needed to elucidate fundamental processes of natural

406

Application of microturbines to control emissions from associated gas  

SciTech Connect

A system for controlling the emission of associated gas produced from a reservoir. In an embodiment, the system comprises a gas compressor including a gas inlet in fluid communication with an associated gas source and a gas outlet. The gas compressor adjusts the pressure of the associated gas to produce a pressure-regulated associated gas. In addition, the system comprises a gas cleaner including a gas inlet in fluid communication with the outlet of the gas compressor, a fuel gas outlet, and a waste product outlet. The gas cleaner separates at least a portion of the sulfur and the water from the associated gas to produce a fuel gas. Further, the system comprises a gas turbine including a fuel gas inlet in fluid communication with the fuel gas outlet of the gas cleaner and an air inlet. Still further, the system comprises a choke in fluid communication with the air inlet.

Schmidt, Darren D.

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

407

FEASIBILITY OF LARGE-SCALE OCEAN CO2 SEQUESTRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past year has been one of continued high productivity and technical innovation for research conducted under support of this contract. We report here on the successful completion of development of a deep-ocean laser Raman spectrometer, and the use of this novel system for direct in situ measurement of the dissolution rate of CO{sub 2} from a N{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} gas mixture at 300m ocean depth. We have carried out the deepest ever ocean CO{sub 2} injection experiment at 3960m depth, and have observed the behavior of the plume of low pH/high CO{sub 2} water emanating from this source. This was made possible by the design, construction, and operation of a novel flume to contain the liquid CO{sub 2} and to force flow in a controlled manner over the liquid CO{sub 2} surface. In carrying out this experiment we observed for the first time the extraordinarily rapid hydration kinetics of CO{sub 2} with water at high pressure. This initial observation was later confirmed in a carefully controlled series of acid and CO{sub 2} injection studies at varying depths. In carrying out this research we are aware of the environmental concerns, and we have been in the forefront of identifying the challenges resulting from the far greater quantities of CO{sub 2} being passively absorbed from the atmosphere. This quantity now is approximately 1 million metric tons CO{sub 2} per hour, and reasonable projections for the 21st century project ocean pH changes of 0.3 or more by mid-century. The PIs have played a key role in organizing a major international meeting on this topic, and on reporting the results. We are now engaged in developing the novel techniques required to investigate this problem.

Peter G. Brewer; James Barry

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Gas exploration and oceanography beyond the shelf break  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas exploration and oceanography beyond the shelf break Ã?. Thiem1 , J. Berntsen1,2 , G. Alendal2 cause problems for installations needed for exploration of the gas field. Bergen Ocean Model (BOM) has for Computational Science, University of Bergen, Norway 3 Norsk Hydro, Oil & Energy, Research Center, Bergen, Norway

Thiem, Ã?yvind

409

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS GALICIA BANK Gilbert Boillot Edward L of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

410

Sequestration of CO2 by Ocean Fertilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation for NETL Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 SEQUESTRATION OF CO 2 BY OCEAN FERTILIZATION Authors: Dr. Michael Markels, Jr. (Markels@greenseaventure.com...

411

Strong wind forcing of the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high wind speeds in tropical cyclones. Nature, 422, 279-283.response of the tropical cyclone and the ocean. Journal ofinteraction theory for tropical cyclones: Part i : steady-

Zedler, Sarah E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

FOAM:The Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Models Performance User Resources Publications History Developer's Page FOAM The Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model cup2.jpeg (48474 bytes) Image made by Johan Kellum with Vis5D...

413

NIST Aids the National Oceanic and Atmospheric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ocean Service, Mote Marine Laboratory, Dolphin Quest ... US Fish and Wildlife Service, South Carolina ... blood mercury levels to health parameters in ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

414

Subduction over the Southern Indian Ocean in a High-Resolution Atmosphere–Ocean Coupled Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the subduction of the Subantarctic Mode Water in the Indian Ocean in an ocean–atmosphere coupled model in which the ocean component is eddy permitting. The purpose is to assess how sensitive the simulated mode water is to the ...

Mei-Man Lee; A. J. George Nurser; I. Stevens; Jean-Baptiste Sallée

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A Reanalysis of Ocean Climate Using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) reanalysis of ocean climate variability. In the assimilation, a model forecast produced by an ocean general circulation model with an average resolution of 0.25° × 0.4° × 40 levels is ...

James A. Carton; Benjamin S. Giese

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Development of an electrical resistivity cone for the detection of gas hydrates in marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas hydrates are formed when, under certain pressure and temperature conditions, gas molecules become encaged by hydrogenbonded oxygen atoms, forming a solid, ice-like crystalline substance. They have been found all over the world in both onshore and offshore environments, as well as in permafrost and tropical regions. The presence of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments are of concern to geotechnical engineers for several reasons, including: (1) their effect on the load bearing properties of ocean sediments, and (2) the effect that their dissociation has on the engineering properties of ocean sediments. The recovery of intact, in-situ samples of gas hydrates can be difficult due to their dependence on pressure and temperature conditions. The development of an electrical resistivity cone for the detection of gas hydrates in marine sediments would be ideal because: (1) there is a dramatic contrast between the electrical properties of gas hydrates and ocean sediments; (2) the resistivity module could be incorporated with standard cone penetrometer testing equipment; and (3) it could allow the in-situ detection of gas hydrates without dramatically affecting the surrounding temperature and pressure conditions. The objectives of this study were to design, fabricate and test an electrical resistivity cone using a two-electrode and four-electrode configuration. The laboratory testing program consisted of pushing the cone through a three-layer soil profile in which the central layer (target layer) consisted of simulated gas hydrates. The target layer thickness varied from 1 to 6 inches (2.5 to 15 cm) and the "hydrate" content varied from 10% to 100% by volume. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of the cone for use in the detection of thin resistive layers and randomly dispersed resistive nodules. The laboratory test results indicated that the four-electrode configuration may be more appropriate for the detection of both thin resistive layers and random resistive nodules. Layers as thin as 1 inch (2.5 cm) and containing as little as 10% "hydrate" nodules were successfully detected using this configuration.

McClelland, Martha Ann

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Gas separation membrane module assembly  

SciTech Connect

A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

Wynn, Nicholas P (Palo Alto, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

419

Dense gas-compatible enzymes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An enzymatic reaction system including a modified enzyme, and a dense gas system; modified enzymes; and methods of reacting modified enzymes in a dense gas system or liquid carbon dioxide.

Kao, Fu-jung (Dracut, MA); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Sawan, Samuel P. (Tyngsborough, MA); Sivils, L. Dale (Jupiter, FL); Spall, W. Dale (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

420

Gas Utility Pipeline Tax (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All gas utilities, including any entity that owns, manages, operates, leases, or controls a pipeline for the purpose of transporting natural gas in the state for sale or compensation, as well as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

An Ensemble Ocean Data Assimilation System for Seasonal Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ensemble ocean data assimilation system, developed for the Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA), is described. The new system is called PEODAS, the POAMA Ensemble Ocean Data Assimilation System. PEODAS is an approximate ...

Yonghong Yin; Oscar Alves; Peter R. Oke

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effects of Penetrative Radiation on the Upper Tropical Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of penetrative radiation on the upper tropical ocean circulation have been investigated with an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with attenuation depths derived from remotely sensed ocean color data. The OGCM is a reduced ...

Raghu Murtugudde; James Beauchamp; Charles R. McClain; Marlon Lewis; Antonio J. Busalacchi

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Response of Quasigeostrophic Oceanic Vortices to Tropical Cyclone Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of quasigeostrophic (QG) oceanic vortices to tropical cyclone (TC) forcing is investigated using an isopycnic ocean model. Idealized oceanic currents and wind fields derived from observational data acquired during Hurricane Katrina ...

Benjamin Jaimes; Lynn K. Shay; George R. Halliwell

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power distribution over the ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 35,of wind speed over the ocean, J. Appl. Meteorol. , 25,and heat flux over the open ocean in gale force winds, J.

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionR. E. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion.of sewage effluent in an ocean current. Inst. of Tech. ,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Effects of atmospheric inorganic nitrogen deposition on ocean biogeochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to decadal global forcing for ocean and sea-ice models: Theorganic nitrogen to the oceans, Nature, 376, 243 – 246.trace species to the world ocean, Global Biogeochem. Cycles,

Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Moore, J. Keith; Zender, Charles S; Luo, Chao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

High Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z.I. , 2004. Southern ocean iron enrichment experiment:in the surface global ocean based on Moderate-Resolutionof Geophysical Research-Oceans 110 (C7). Bé, A.W.H. ,

Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Molecular diversity and adaptations of microorganisms from the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the North Pacific ocean. ISME J. 3:1374-1386. DeLong, E.microbial assemblages in the ocean's interior. Science 311:J. 4:159-170. Schlitzer, R. 2010. Ocean Data View. [http://

Eloe, Emiley Ansley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Ocean Dynamics, Thermocline Adjustment, and Regulation of Tropical SST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of tropical Pacific ocean dynamics in regulating the ocean response to thermodynamic forcing is investigated using an ocean general circulation model (GCM) coupled to a model of the atmospheric mixed layer. It is found that the basin ...

Richard Seager; Ragu Murtugudde

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evaluation of HOAPS-3 Ocean Surface Freshwater Flux Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, latent heat flux and precipitation over the global ocean surface can be determined from microwave satellite data as a basis for estimating the related fields of the ocean surface freshwater flux. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and ...

Axel Andersson; Christian Klepp; Karsten Fennig; Stephan Bakan; Hartmut Grassl; Jörg Schulz

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Effects of variable wind stress on ocean heat content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean heat content change (ocean heat uptake) has an important role in variability of the Earth's heat balance. The understanding of which methods and physical processes control ocean heat uptake needs improvement in order ...

Klima, Kelly

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Slow Instabilities in Tropical Ocean Basin–Global Atmosphere Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of ocean boundaries on instability in coupled ocean-natmosphere models is determined. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated for coupled systems featuring an ocean basin bounded zonally by a flat continent. The atmosphere is ...

Anthony C. Hirst

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Volunteer Observing Ship and Future Ocean Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widespread and sustained in situ ocean measurements are essential to an improved understanding of the state of the ocean and its role in global change. Merchant marine vessels can play a major role in ocean monitoring, yet apart from routine ...

Thomas Rossby; Gerold Siedler; Walter Zenk

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

435

Gas supplies of interstate natural gas pipeline companies, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The publication provides information on the total reserves, production, and deliverability capabilities of the 90 interstate pipeline companies. The gas supplies of interstate pipeline companies consist of the certificated, dedicated, recoverable, salable natural gas available from domestic in-the-ground reserves; gas purchased under contracts with other interstate pipeline companies; domestically produced coal gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and synthetic natural gas (SNG); and imported natural gas and LNG. The domestic in-the-ground reserves consist of company-owned reserves including natural gas in underground storage, reserves dedicated to or warranted under contracts with independent producers, and supplemental or short-term supplies purchased from independent producers and intrastate pipeline companies. To avoid duplicate reporting of domestic in-the-ground reserves, the volumes of gas under contract agreement between jurisdictional pipelines have been excluded in summarizing State and national reserves. Volumes contracted under agreements with foreign suppliers include pipeline imports from Canada and Mexico. 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

436

Wind Stress Measurements from the Open Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic inertial dissipation system was used during three cruises of the RRS Discovery in the Southern Ocean to obtain a large dataset of open ocean wind stress estimates. The wind speed varied from near calm to 26 m s?1, and the sea-air ...

Margaret Yelland; Peter K. Taylor

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Upper Ocean Response to a Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper ocean response to a moving hurricane is studied using historical air-sea data and a three-dimensional numerical ocean model. Sea surface temperature (SST) response is emphasized. The model has a surface mixed-layer (ML) that entrains ...

James F. Price

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 153 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA by the Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international of the National Science Foundation, the participating agencies, Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., Texas A&M

439

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 138 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling Program Foundation, the participating agencies, Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., Texas A&M University

440

Statistical mechanics and ocean circulation Rick Salmon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical mechanics and ocean circulation Rick Salmon Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD equilibrium statistical mechanics based upon the conservation of energy and potential enstrophy to the mass. The equilibrium state resembles the buoyancy structure actually observed. Key words: statistical mechanics, ocean

Salmon, Rick

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Internal Variability of Indian Ocean SST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 40-yr integration of an eddy-resolving numerical model of the tropical Indian Ocean is analyzed to quantify the interannual variability that is caused by the internal variability of ocean dynamics. It is found that along the equator in the ...

Markus Jochum; Raghu Murtugudde

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Parallelization of the Princeton Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the parallel implementation of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) using message passing. Domain decomposition techniques are used for the horizontal discretization whereas in the vertical direction each column per grid point is ... Keywords: domain decomposition, message passing, princeton ocean model

L. A. Boukas; N. Th. Mimikou; Nikolaos M. Missirlis; G. L. Mellor; A. Lascaratos; G. Korres

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A Comparative Analysis of Upper-Ocean Heat Content Variability from an Ensemble of Operational Ocean Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean heat content (HC) is one of the key indicators of climate variability and also provides ocean memory critical for seasonal and decadal predictions. The availability of multiple operational ocean analyses (ORAs) now routinely produced around ...

Yan Xue; Magdalena A. Balmaseda; Tim Boyer; Nicolas Ferry; Simon Good; Ichiro Ishikawa; Arun Kumar; Michele Rienecker; Anthony J. Rosati; Yonghong Yin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Leading Modes of the Upper-Ocean Temperature Interannual Variability along the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean in NCEP GODAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the authors analyze the physical mechanisms of interannual variability of the upper-ocean temperature anomaly (OTA) in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, using ocean reanalysis from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)...

Zeng-Zhen Hu; Arun Kumar; Bohua Huang; Jieshun Zhu

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Development and application of ocean color algorithms for estimating particulate organic carbon in the Southern Ocean from satellite observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and C. R. McClain (1998), Ocean color chlorophyll algorithmsand C. R. McClain (1998), Ocean color chlorophyll algorithmsand M. Culver (2000), Ocean color chlorophyll a algorithms

Allison, David Benjamin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Employing Satellite-Derived Sea Ice Concentration to Constrain Upper-Ocean Temperature in a Global Ocean GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of Southern Ocean sea ice simulations in a global ocean general circulation model (GCM) depends decisively on the simulated upper-ocean temperature. This is confirmed by assimilating satellite-derived sea ice concentration to ...

Achim Stössel

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Ocean Motion International LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Motion International LLC Ocean Motion International LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Motion International LLC Place Saulsbury, Tennessee Zip 38067 Sector Ocean Product Marine energy technology firm developing ocean/ wave powered generators. Coordinates 35.052242°, -89.083299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.052242,"lon":-89.083299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

Clean Cities: Ocean State Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ocean State Clean Cities Coalition Ocean State Clean Cities Coalition The Ocean State Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Ocean State Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Wendy Lucht 401-874-2792 wlucht@uri.edu Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Wendy Lucht Photo of Wendy Lucht Wendy Lucht has worked as the Ocean State Clean Cities coordinator at the University of Rhode Island (URI) since 2008 but has worked at URI since 1999. Lucht is working to make Rhode Island the first state certified by Project Get Ready, an initiative preparing cities and states for the arrival of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). As part of this effort, Lucht is serving as chair of the fleet-acquisition committee working on

450

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft Programmatic Environ-Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistant Secre-

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania...

452

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

453

Trajectory Design and Implementation for Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Based on Ocean Model Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Based on OceanAUVs) • Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Evolving ocean

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: SKIP govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: SKIP Pre-campaign Measurements Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: SKIP Pre-campaign Measurements 2013.03.15 - 2015.12.31 Lead Scientist : Heath Powers For data sets, see below. Description The Self-Kontained Instrument Platform (SKIP) container is being deployed at the T3 GOAmazon site containing a basic set of meteorological and radiometric instrumentation including: SMET, SKYRAD, GRNRAD, and ceilometer (all ARM instruments), an ozone monitor, and a nitric Oxide/nitrogen

455

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN Activity of Aerosols Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN Activity of Aerosols 2014.01.01 - 2014.12.31 Lead Scientist : Jian Wang Description Aerosol indirect effects, which represent the impact of aerosols on climate through influencing the properties of clouds, remain one of the main uncertainties in climate predictions (IPCC, 2007). Reducing this large uncertainty requires both improved understanding and representation of aerosol properties and processes in climate models, including the cloud

456

Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, October-December 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported on developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual design activity of the two industry teams that are designing offshore OTEC pilot plants that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway in which tests of a different kind of ocean-energy device, a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber, are being planned. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1982.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, January-March 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual and preliminary design activity of industry teams that are designing a shelf-mounted offshore OTEC pilot plant that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway to evaluate and test the Pneumatic Wave-Energy Conversion System (PWECS), an ocean-energy device consisting of a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1983.

Not Available

1983-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

EIA - All Natural Gas Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Natural Gas Analysis All Natural Gas Analysis 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) U.S Natural Gas Imports and Exports: 2009 This report provides an overview of U.S. international natural gas trade in 2009. Natural gas import and export data, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) data, are provided through the year 2009 in Tables SR1-SR9. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 9/28/2010, Html format)

459

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focus of GH exploration and production studies in northernoil and gas exploration and production activities; includingGas hydrate exploration and production activities will be

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Table 6.4 Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

What is the total working gas capacity in underground natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

462

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia Science Accelerator has expanded its suite of collections to include ScienceCinema, which contains videos produced by the U.S....

463

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22, 2013 - 1:14pm Addthis Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean

464

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22, 2013 - 1:14pm Addthis Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean

465

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents current data on the consumption, disposition, production, prices, storage, import and export of natural gas in the United States. Also included are operating and financial data for major interstate natural gas pipeline companies plus data on fillings, ceiling prices, and transportation under the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. A feature article, entitled Main Line Natural Gas Sales to Industrial Users, 1981, is included. Highlights of this month's publication are: Marketed production of natural gas during 1982 continued its downward trend compared to 1981, with November production of 1511 Bcf compared to 1583 Bcf for November 1981; total natural gas consumption also declined when compared to 1981; as of November 1982, working gas in underground storage was running ahead of a similar period in 1981 by 109 Bcf (3.4 percent); the average wellhead price of natural gas continued to rise in 1982; and applications for determination of maximum lawful prices under the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) showed a decrease from October to November, principally for Section 103 classification wells (new onshore production wells).

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

An assessment of research and development leadership in ocean energy technologies  

SciTech Connect

Japan is clearly the leader in ocean energy technologies. The United Kingdom also has had many ocean energy research projects, but unlike Japan, most of the British projects have not progressed from the feasibility study stage to the demonstration stage. Federally funded ocean energy research in the US was stopped because it was perceived the technologies could not compete with conventional sources of fuel. Despite the probable small market for ocean energy technologies, the short sighted viewpoint of the US government regarding funding of these technologies may be harmful to US economic competitiveness. The technologies may have important uses in other applications, such as offshore construction and oil and gas drilling. Discontinuing the research and development of these technologies may cause the US to lose knowledge and miss market opportunities. If the US wishes to maintain its knowledge base and a market presence for ocean energy technologies, it may wish to consider entering into a cooperative agreement with Japan and/or the United Kingdom. Cooperative agreements are beneficial not only for technology transfer but also for cost-sharing.

Bruch, V.L.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

The National Centers for Environmental Prediction: Operational Climate, Ocean, and Weather Prediction for the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Meteorological Center is being restructured to serve a broader mission, which includes operational climate and ocean prediction as well as short-range weather prediction. Its successor organization is called the National Centers for ...

Ronald D. McPherson

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Petroleum > Analysis > Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) ...

469

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Impacts

470

2012 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Message from the Secretary Fueling our Nation's economy by making the most of America's natural gas and oil resources continues to be an important part of our Nation's overall strategy for energy security and a clean energy economy. The Department continues its work toward safe and responsible · development of fossil fuels, while giving American families and communities high confidence that air and water quality, and public health and safety will not be compromised. The EPACT Section 999 program (including the NETL Complementary Research program) coordinates with DOE's ongoing natural gas research and development program within Fossil Energy. The natural gas program is the locus of the Department of Energy's (DOE) natural gas R&D work and is focused on a collaborative interagency effort with the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of the Interior. A federal R&D plan is being developed for this collaboration, focusing on high priority recommendations of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee to safely and prudently develop the Nation's unconventional sale gas and tight oil resources. Each agency will focus on specific core research competencies. In the 2012 Annual Plan, and in light of the interagency collaborative work being carried out in DOE's natural gas R&D program onshore, we will focus on supporting the implementation of the priority collaborative research and development initiative. Offshore, we will deepen the collaboration and coordination with the DOl Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement. A number of initiatives, analyses, and recommendations underpin the 2012 Annual Plan. These include coordination with the high priority work being carried out by DOE, EPA, and DOl related to recommendations from the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board regarding shale gas production, insights from our work with the DOl's Ocean Energy Safety Advisory Committee, recommendations from the DOE Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee and recommendations

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Gas intrusion into SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Underground Storage Technology Dept.; Giles, H.N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Strategic Petroleum Reserve

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

473

Flue gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

475

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

476

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

477

THE ECONOMICAL PRODUCTION OF ALCOHOL FUELS FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS. Includes quarterly technical progress report No.25 from 10/01/1997-12/31/1997, and quarterly technical progress report No.26 from 01/01/1998-03/31/1998  

SciTech Connect

This project was divided into two parts. One part evaluated possible catalysts for producing higher-alcohols (C{sub 2} to C{sub 5+}) as fuel additives. The other part provided guidance by looking both at the economics of mixed-alcohol production from coal-derived syngas and the effect of higher alcohol addition on gasoline octane and engine performance. The catalysts studied for higher-alcohol synthesis were molybdenum sulfides promoted with potassium. The best catalysts produced alcohols at a rate of 200 g/kg of catalyst/h. Higher-alcohol selectivity was over 40%. The hydrocarbon by-product was less than 20%. These catalysts met established success criteria. The economics for mixed alcohols produced from coal were poor compared to mixed alcohols produced from natural gas. Syngas from natural gas was always less expensive than syngas from coal. Engine tests showed that mixed alcohols added to gasoline significantly improved fuel quality. Mixed-alcohols as produced by our catalysts enhanced gasoline octane and decreased engine emissions. Mixed-alcohol addition gave better results than adding individual alcohols as had been done in the 1980's when some refiners added methanol or ethanol to gasoline.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

THE ECONOMICAL PRODUCTION OF ALCOHOL FUELS FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS. Includes quarterly technical progress report No.25 from 10/01/1997-12/31/1997, and quarterly technical progress report No.26 from 01/01/1998-03/31/1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was divided into two parts. One part evaluated possible catalysts for producing higher-alcohols (C{sub 2} to C{sub 5+}) as fuel additives. The other part provided guidance by looking both at the economics of mixed-alcohol production from coal-derived syngas and the effect of higher alcohol addition on gasoline octane and engine performance. The catalysts studied for higher-alcohol synthesis were molybdenum sulfides promoted with potassium. The best catalysts produced alcohols at a rate of 200 g/kg of catalyst/h. Higher-alcohol selectivity was over 40%. The hydrocarbon by-product was less than 20%. These catalysts met established success criteria. The economics for mixed alcohols produced from coal were poor compared to mixed alcohols produced from natural gas. Syngas from natural gas was always less expensive than syngas from coal. Engine tests showed that mixed alcohols added to gasoline significantly improved fuel quality. Mixed-alcohols as produced by our catalysts enhanced gasoline octane and decreased engine emissions. Mixed-alcohol addition gave better results than adding individual alcohols as had been done in the 1980's when some refiners added methanol or ethanol to gasoline.

None

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion, or OTEC is a technology that extracts power from the ocean's natural thermal gradient. This technology is being pursued by researchers from many nations; in the United States, OTEC research is funded by the US Department of Energy's Ocean Energy Technology program. The program's goal is to develop the technology so that industry can make a competent assessment of its potential -- either as an alternative or as a supplement to conventional energy sources. Federally funded research in components and systems will help OTEC to the threshold of commercialization. This publication provides an overview of the OTEC technology. 47 refs., 25 figs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Natural Gas Electric Power Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas ocean including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural gas monthly, July 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have prepared this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to describe the effects of offshore oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Beaufort and Chukchi seas. This EIS analyzes a range of management alternatives to assist NMFS and BOEM in carrying out their statutory responsibilities to authorize or

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean) Data from CDIAC  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The idea for CARINA developed at a workshop (CO2 in the northern North Atlantic) that was held at the HANSE-Wissenschaftskolleg (HANSE Institute for Advanced Study) in Delmenhorst, Germany from June 9 to 11, 1999. While the main scientific focus is the North Atlantic, some data from the South Atlantic have been included in the project, along with data from the Arctic Ocean. Data sets go back to 1972, and more than 100 are currently available. The data are also being used in conjunction with other projects and research groups, such as the Atlantic Ocean Carbon Synthesis Group. See the inventory of data at http://store.pangaea.de/Projects/CARBOOCEAN/carina/data_inventory.htm See a detailed table of information on the cruises at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/CARINA/Carina_table.html and also provides access to data files. The CARBOOCEAN data portal provides a specialized interface for CARINA data, a reference list for historic carbon data, and password protected access to the "Data Underway Warehouse.".

484

Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydropower and Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products

485

Physics of greenhouse effect and convection in warm Oceans  

SciTech Connect

Sea surface temperatures (SST) in roughly 50% of the tropical Pacific Ocean is warm enough (SST > 300 K) to permit deep convection. This paper examines the effects of deep convection on the climatological mean vertical distributions of water vapor and its greenhouse effect over such warm oceans. The study also examines the link between SST, vertical distribution of water vapor, and its greenhouse effect in the tropical oceans. The radiation model calculations do not include the effects of clouds. The data are grouped into nonconvective and convective categories using SST as an index for convective activity. On average, convective regions are more humid, trap significantly more longwave radiation, and emit more radiation to the sea surface. The greenhouse effect in regions of convection operates as per classical ideas, that is, as the SST increases, the atmosphere traps the excess longwave energy emitted by the surface and reradiates it locally back to the ocean surface. The important departure from the classical picture is that the net (up minus down) fluxes at the surface and at the top-of-the atmosphere decrease with an increase in SST; that is, the surface and the surface-troposphere column lose the ability to radiate the excess energy to space. The cause of this upper greenhouse effect at the surface is the rapid increase in the lower-troposphere humidity with SST; that of the column is due to a combination of increase in humidity in the entire column and increase in the lapse rate within the lower troposphere. The increase in the vertical distribution of humidity far exceeds that which can be attributed to the temperature dependence of saturation vapor pressure; that is, the tropospheric relative humidity is larger in convective regions. The positive coupling between SST and the radiative warming of the surface by the water vapor greenhouse effect is also shown to exist on interannual time scales. 35 refs., 17 figs. 4 tabs.

Inamdar, A.K.; Ramanathan, V. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Circulation of Tritium in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The input of bomb tritium into the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere waters has demonstrated the spread of a tracer in three dimensions in the North Pacific Ocean. Subsurface tritium maxima in middle and low latitudes clearly show the importance ...

Rana A. Fine; Joseph L. Reid; H. Göte Östlund

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Ocean Radiant Heating. Part I: Optical Influences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer calculations are used to quantify the effects of physical and biological processes on variations in the transmission of solar radiation through the upper ocean. Results indicate that net irradiance at 10 cm and 5 m can vary by ...

J. Carter Ohlmann; David A. Siegel; Curtis D. Mobley

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Velocity Probability Density Functions for Oceanic Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probability density functions (PDFs) of daily velocities from subsurface floats deployed in the North Atlantic and equatorial Atlantic Oceans are examined. In general, the PDFs are approximately Gaussian for small velocities, but with significant ...

Annalisa Bracco; J. H. LaCasce; Antonello Provenzale

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

An Investigation of Explosively Deepening Oceanic Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The explosively deepening oceanic cyclone or “bomb,” one which has central pressure falls of 12 mb (12 h)?1 or greater, has been studied using composites constructed from North Atlantic and Pacific weather ship rawinsonde data during the period ...

Eric Rogers; Lance F. Bosart

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Wavelet Transforms and Ocean Current Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently advanced approach of wavelet transforms is applied to the analysis of ocean currents. The conventional analyses of time series in the frequency domain can be readily generalized to the frequency.and time domain using wavelet ...

Paul C. Liu; Gerald S. Miller

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Variability of Southern Ocean Jets Near Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of jets with topography in the Southern Ocean is investigated using 19 years of altimetry data. In particular, the “jet jumping” mode of variability, by which two or more jets passing close to the same topographic feature show ...

Christopher C. Chapman; Rosemary Morrow

492

Ocean Renewable Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Company Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Place Portland, Maine Zip 4101 Sector Ocean, Renewable Energy Product Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC was founded in 2004 for the purpose of generating reliable, competitive, emission-free electricity from the energy resources of the oceans. Coordinates 45.511795°, -122.675629° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.511795,"lon":-122.675629,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

493

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Address PO Box 1206 Place Kailua Zip 96734-1206 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 1973 Number of employees 28 Phone number 808.259.8871 Website http://www.makai.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Deep Water Pipelines This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

494

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 170 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany Cypionka Microbiologist Institut für Chemie und Biologie Des Meeres (ICBM) Carl von Ossietzky Universität

495

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 197 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche.edu Marcel Regelous Petrologist Abteilung Geochemie Max-Planck-Institüt für Chemie Johannes J-Becherweg 27

496

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 176 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany Geochemist Institut für Chemie und Biologie des Meeres (ICBM) Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg

497

Ocean Boundary Mixing during Ekman Layer Arrest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a water parcel comes into contact with an ocean boundary, energy is dissipated within the boundary layer with some fraction directed into vertical mixing. In a stratified flow this increases the potential energy associated with the density ...

Scott A. Condie

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Ocean Energy Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Company LLC Address 505 Fifth Ave 800 Place Des Moines Zip 50309-2426 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2011 Phone number (515) 246-1500 Region United States...

499

Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Ltd Address 3 Casement Square Place Cobh Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 00353-21-4816779 Website http:www.oceanenergy.ie Region Ireland LinkedIn...

500

The Thermal Structure of the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The salient feature of the oceanic thermal structure is a remarkably shallow thermocline, especially in the Tropics and subtropics. What factors determine its depth? Theories for the deep thermohaline circulation provide an answer that depends on ...

Giulio Boccaletti; Ronald C. Pacanowski; S. George; H. Philander; Alexey V. Fedorov

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z