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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Carbon Geography: The Political Economy of Congressional Support for Legislation Intended to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Production  

SciTech Connect

Over the last five years, the U.S Congress has voted on several pieces of legislation intended to sharply reduce the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions. Given that climate change is a world public bad, standard economic logic would predict that the United States would ?free ride? and wait for other nations to reduce their emissions. Within the Congress, there are clear patterns to who votes in favor of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. This paper presents a political economy analysis of the determinants of ?pro-green? votes on such legislation. Conservatives consistently vote against such legislation. Controlling for a Representative’s ideology, representatives from richer districts and districts with a lower per-capita carbon dioxide footprint are more likely to vote in favor of climate change mitigation legislation. Representatives from districts where industrial emissions represent a larger share of greenhouse gas emissions are more likely to vote no.

Cragg, Michael; Zhou, Yuyu; Gurney, Kevin R.; Kahn, Matthew

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Major Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Natural Gas Transportation Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Major Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Corridors from the Southwest | From Canada | From Rocky Mountain Area | Details about Transportation Corridors The national natural gas delivery network is intricate and expansive, but most of the major transportation routes can be broadly categorized into 11 distinct corridors or flow patterns. 5 major routes extend from the producing areas of the Southwest 4 routes enter the United States from Canada 2 originate in the Rocky Mountain area. A summary of the major corridors and links to details about each corridor are provided below. Corridors from the Southwest Region

3

In the wake of the Newtown tragedy, Washington is preparing for what may be a major legislative battle over gun control and policies to combat gun violence.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battle over gun control and policies to combat gun violence. Research into the causes and correlates of gun violence will undoubtedly play a major role in legislative debates. To contribute to this discussion and showcase the work of Yale scholars and national innovators on issues relating to gun violence

4

Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas Shales Using Production Data Razi Identification of infill drilling locations has been challenging with mixed results in gas shales. Natural fractures are the main source of permeability in gas shales. Natural fracture patterns in shale has a random

Mohaghegh, Shahab

5

Examples from the atlas of major Appalachian Gas Plays  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this contract are to produce a panted atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays and to compile a machine-readable database of reservoir data. The Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC or the Consortium), a partnership of the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, and the departments of Geology and Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering at West Virginia University (WVU), agrees with the need to classify gas reservoirs by geologic plays. During meetings with industry representatives, the small independents in the basin emphasized that one of their prime needs was to place each producing reservoir within a stratigraphic framework subdivided by environment of deposition to enable them to develop exploration and development strategies. The text for eight of the 31 play descriptions has been completed, drafting of illustrations for these plays is underway (or complete for some plays), and the review process is ongoing.

Patchen, D.G.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Nuttall, B.C.; Smosna, R.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Evaluating incentives in the tax legislation applicable to the South African oil, petroleum and gas industry / Moolman A.M.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The oil and gas sector holds several advantages for South Africa: direct benefits include providing growth in the country’s economy by optimising available oil and… (more)

Moolman, Anneke Maré.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Thailand's gas line underway: coating a major achievement  

SciTech Connect

Using primarily local personnel and materials, Bredero Price International's Thai pipe-coating plant has prepared some 374 miles of 34 and 28-in. pipe for service in the Gulf of Thailand gas-pipeline project. The enamel-coating shop cleaned, primed and coated all the pipe with coal-tar enamel, glass-fiber mat, felt, and a kraft-paper outer wrap; the cement-coating facility then added a concrete-weight coating to the portion of the pipe earmarked for offshore duty. Scheduled for a 1981 completion, the pipeline will initially carry 250 million CF/day to power-generating plants in Bangpakong and South Bangkok; the volume transported will eventually reach 500 million CF/day when addition offshore production is tied in to the line and an offshore compressor station added.

Hale, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Emissions of Major Aromatic Voc as Landfill Gas from Urban Landfill Sites in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, concentrations of major aromatic VOCs were determined from landfill gas (LFG) at a total of five...?1 (WJ in wintertime). The LFG flux values of aromatic VOC, when compared to the contribution of n...

Ki-Hyun Kim; Sung Ok Baek; Ye-Jin Choi…

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Turtle Bayou - 1936 to 1983: case history of a major gas field in south Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

Turtle Bayou field, located in the middle Miocene trend in S. Louisiana, is nearing the end of a productive life which spans over 30 yr. Discovered by Shell Oil Co. in 1949 after unsuccessful attempts by 2 other majors, the field is a typical, low relief, moderately faulted Gulf Coast structure, probably associated with deep salt movement. The productive interval includes 22 separate gas-bearing sands in a regressive sequence of sands and shales from approx. 6500 to 12,000 ft. Now estimated to have contained ca 1.2 trillion scf of gas in place, cumulative production through 1982 was 702 billion scf. Cumulative condensate-gas ratio has been 20 bbl/million. Recovery mechanisms in individual reservoirs include strong bottom water drive, partial edgewater drive, and pressure depletion. Recovery efficiencies in major reservoirs range from 40 to 75% of original gas in place.

Cronquist, C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

EIA - AEO2010 - Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Legislation and Regulations Legislation and Regulations Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Legislation and Regulations Introduction The Reference case projections in AEO2010 generally assume that current laws and regulations affecting the energy sector remain unchanged throughout the projection period (including the implication that laws which include sunset dates do, in fact, become ineffective at the time of those sunset dates). The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards—or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require regulations for which the implementing agency will exercise major discretion, or require appropriation of funds that are not provided or specified in the legislation itself—are not reflected in the Reference case projections. However, sensitivity cases that incorporate alternative assumptions about the future of existing policies subject to periodic updates also are included. The Federal and State laws and regulations included in AEO2010 are based on those in effect as of the end of October 2009. In addition, at the request of the Administration and Congress, EIA has regularly examined the potential implications of proposed legislation in Service Reports (see EIA Service Reports released since January 2009).

11

A legislator`s guide to municipal solid waste management  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this guide is to allow individual state legislators to gain a better understanding of municipal solid waste (MSW) management issues in general, and examine the applicability of these concerns to their state. This guide incorporates a discussion of MSW management issues and a comprehensive overview of the components of an integrated solid waste management system. Major MSW topics discussed include current management issues affecting states, federal activities, and state laws and local activities. Solid waste characteristics and management approaches are also detailed.

Starkey, D.; Hill, K.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Turtle Bayou--1936 to 1983--case history of a major gas field in South Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

Turtle Bayou Field, located in the middle Miocene trend in South Louisiana, is nearing the end of a productive life which spans over 30 years. Discovered by Shell Oil Company in 1949 after unsuccessful attempts by two other majors, the field is a typical, low relief, moderately faulted Gulf Coast structure, probably associated with deep salt movement. The productive interval includes 22 separate gas-bearing sands in a regressive sequence of sands and shales from approximately 6500 to 12,000 feet. Now estimated to have contained about 1.2 trillion standard cubic feet of gas in place, cumulative production through 1982 was 702 billion standard cubic feet. Cumulative condensate-gas ratio has been 20 barrels per million. Recovery mechanisms in individual reservoirs include strong bottom water drive, partial edgewater drive, and pressure depletion. Recovery efficiencies in major reservoirs range from 40 to 75 percent of original gas in place. On decline since 1973, it is anticipated the field will be essentially depleted in the next five years.

Cronquist, C.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Selected State Legislation and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 156 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Basis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories. Included for categories represented in the AEO residential sector forecast. a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 9.8 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking. b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEET for central air conditioners and heat

14

Selected State Legislation and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook U. S. Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 173 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Ba sis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories. Included for categories represented in the AEO residential sector forecast. a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 9.8 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking. b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEET for central air conditioners and heat

15

Turtle Bayou 1936-1983: case history of a major gas field in south Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

Turtle Bayou field, located in the middle Miocene trend in south Louisiana, is nearing the end of a productive life spanning more than 30 years. Discovered by Shell Oil Co. in 1949 after unsuccessful attempts by two other companies, the field is a typical, low-relief, moderately faulted U.S. Gulf Coast structure, probably associated with deep salt movement. The productive interval includes 22 separate gas-bearing sands in a regressive sequence of sands and shales from approximately 6,500 to 12,000 ft (1980 to 3660 m). Now estimated to have contained about 1.2 trillion scf (34 X 10/sup 9/ std m/sup 3/) of gas in place, cumulative production through 1982 was 702 billion scf (20 X 10/sup 9/ std m/sup 3/). Cumulative condensate/gas ration (CGR) has been 20 bbl/MMcf (110 X 10/sup -6/ m/sup 3//m/sup 3/. Recovery mechanisms in individual reservoirs include strong bottomwater drive, partial edgewater drive, and pressure depletion. Recovery efficiencies in major reservoirs range form 40 to 83% of original gas in place (OGIP). On decline since 1973, it is anticipated the field will be essentially depleted in the next 5 years.

Cronquist, C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Selected State Legislation and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

170 170 Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Basis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories. Included for categories represented in the AEO residential sector forecast. a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 9.8 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking. b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEET for central air conditioners and heat pumps, increasing to 13 SEER in 2006. Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking.

17

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maritime Security Act of 2002 Amendments to the Deepwater Port Act Maritime Security Act of 2002 Amendments to the Deepwater Port Act Legislation and Regulations. The Maritime Security Act of 2002 Amendments to the Deepwater Port Act The Maritime Security Act of 2002, signed into law in November 2002, amended the Deepwater Port Act of 1974 to include offshore natural gas facilities. The legislation transferred jurisdiction for offshore natural gas facilities from the FERC to the Maritime Administration and the U.S. Coast Guard, both of which were at that time under the U.S. Department of Transportation. (The Coast Guard has since been moved to the Department of Homeland Security.) The amendments in the Maritime Security Act of 2002 lowered the regulatory hurdles faced by potential developers of offshore LNG receiving terminals. Placing them under Coast Guard jurisdiction both streamlined the permitting process and relaxed regulatory requirements. Owners of offshore LNG terminals are allowed proprietary access to their own terminal capacity, removing what had once been a major stumbling block for potential developers of new LNG facilities. The Hackberry Decision, discussed below, has the same impact on onshore LNG facilities under FERC jurisdiction.

18

Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Chapter 56 Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource Unitization: Compulsory unitization legislation enables a majority of producers on an oil or gas field resource, congestion exter- nality, minimum oil/gas ratio, monopsony power, pipeline transportation, no

Garousi, Vahid

19

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Legislation & Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

leg_reg.gif (4810 bytes) leg_reg.gif (4810 bytes) Introduction Because analyses by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) are required to be policy-neutral, the projections in this Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 1998. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation and sections of existing legislation for which funds have not been appropriated are not reflected in the projections. Federal legislation incorporated in the projections includes the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, which adds 4.3 cents per gallon to the Federal tax on highway fuels [1]; the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987; the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90); the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT); the Outer Continental Shelf Deep Water Royalty Relief Act of 1995; and the Tax Payer Relief Act of 1997. AEO99 also incorporates regulatory actions of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), including Orders 888 and 889, which provide open access to interstate transmission lines in electricity markets, and other FERC actions to foster more efficient natural gas markets. State plans for the restructuring of the electricity industry and State renewable portfolio standards are incorporated as enacted.

20

Public Service Commission and Natural Gas Safety Standards (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes the state Public Service Commission, which has regulatory authority over the electric, gas, water, and telecommunications utilities. Section 386.572 of this legislation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Key Federal Key Federal Legislation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Key Federal Legislation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Key Federal Legislation The information below includes a brief chronology and summaries of key federal legislation related to alternative fuels and vehicles, air quality,

22

From Contracts to Compliance? An Early Look at Implementation Under China's New Labor Legislation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008, three new primary labor laws took effect in China that together represent the first major retooling of its labor legislation in fifteen years: the Labor Contract Law, the Labor Dispute Mediation and Arbitration Law, and the Employment...

Harper Ho, Virginia E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Natural gas 1994: Issues and trends  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry in 1993 and early 1994 (Chapter 1), focusing on the overall ability to deliver gas under the new regulatory mandates of Order 636. In addition, the report highlights a range of issues affecting the industry, including: restructuring under Order 636 (Chapter 2); adjustments in natural gas contracting (Chapter 3); increased use of underground storage (Chapter 4); effects of the new market on the financial performance of the industry (Chapter 5); continued impacts of major regulatory and legislative changes on the natural gas market (Appendix A).

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Legislative Affairs Team | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legislative Affairs Team Legislative Affairs Team Legislative Affairs Team The mission of Legislative Affairs is working in close coordination with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Congressional Affairs, the Chief Financial Officer, and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's) budget office to serve as the primary liaison between EERE technology offices and congressional authorizing committees, as well as other committees and offices. Legislative Affairs also provides corporate guidance on congressional interaction and strategic advice on legislation relevant to EERE. Why it Matters We lead EERE interactions with Congress, including preparing and staffing EERE leadership and program offices for congressional briefings and hearings, in addition to educating members of Congress and their staff

25

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

was 20 percent warmer than normal (See Temperature Map) (See Deviations Map). Other Market Trends: EIA Releases a Summary of Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 -...

26

Federal / State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Issues Federal and State Blending Restrictions Action by ASTM NCWM to address higher ethanol blends Federal State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for Introduction of...

27

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

28

Legislating Biofuels in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Legislating Biofuels in the United States Wendy Clark National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado, USA 2008 SAE Biofuels Specifications and Performance Symposium July 7-9, 2008, Paris NREL PR-540 Legislate Biofuels? · Plentiful U.S. biomass resources: energy crops, agricultural and forestry residues

29

LOUISIANA LEGISLATIVE AUDITOR STEVE J. THERIOT, CPA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOUISIANA LEGISLATIVE AUDITOR STEVE J. THERIOT, CPA April 9, 2009 Mr. James L. Bates, Director: The Office of the Legislative Auditor performs an annual single audit of the basic financial statements the LSU System entering into energy efficiency contracts that were contrary to state law. One of those

Harms, Kyle E.

30

Legislative Assistant for Science Legislative Assistant for Emergency Preparedness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOR ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH PO Box 3000, Boulder, Colorado, 80307-3000 303 497-2106 Phone · 303 497-2100 Fax. Major hurricane impacts are not confined to coastal communities -- heavy rainfall and flooding often

31

Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool February 27, 2014 - 5:59pm Addthis The Bioenergy KDF Legislative Library aims to help...

32

Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements to Automobile Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Feebates: A Legislative...

33

Energy Savings Performance Contracting Legislation Data and Other...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Energy Savings Performance Contracting Legislation Data and Other Resources Energy Savings Performance Contracting Legislation Data and Other Resources These tools provide data and...

34

Retrofit Legislation at the Urban Level  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrofit Legislation at the Urban Level Retrofit Legislation at the Urban Level In March, the city of Berkeley, California, passed new legislation that should serve as a model for local policies intended to keep energy dollars within the community while protecting the environment. The Commercial Energy Conservation Ordinance (CECO) is based on a similar ordinance that has been law since 1989 in San Francisco, Berkeley's neighbor across the Bay. San Francisco is currently the only other city in the world to have this type of legislation. As part of the Berkeley Municipal Code, CECO requires commercial buildings to undergo energy conservation retrofits when they are sold or substantially renovated. CECO was designed with the participation of LBL's Kristin Heinemeier, who also works with the Berkeley

35

Molecular Gas in the Powerful Radio Galaxies 3C~31 and 3C~264: Major or Minor Mergers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the detection of $^{12}$CO~($1 \\to 0$) and $^{12}$CO~($2 \\to 1$) emission from the central regions ($\\lesssim 5$--$10 {\\rm kpc}$) of the two powerful radio galaxies 3C~31 and 3C~264. Their individual CO emission exhibits a double-horned line profile that is characteristic of an inclined rotating disk with a central depression at the rising part of its rotation curve. The inferred disk or ring distributions of the molecular gas is consistent with the observed presence of dust disks or rings detected optically in the cores of both galaxies. For a CO to H$_2$ conversion factor similar to that of our Galaxy, the corresponding total mass in molecular hydrogen gas is $(1.3 \\pm 0.2) \\times 10^9 {\\rm M_{\\odot}}$ in 3C~31 and $(0.31 \\pm 0.06) \\times 10^9 {\\rm M_{\\odot}}$ in 3C~264. Despite their relatively large molecular-gas masses and other peculiarities, both 3C~31 and 3C~264, as well as many other powerful radio galaxies in the (revised) 3C catalog, are known to lie within the fundamental plane of normal elliptical galaxies. We reason that if their gas originates from the mergers of two gas-rich disk galaxies, as has been invoked to explain the molecular gas in other radio galaxies, then both 3C~31 and 3C~264 must have merged a long time (a few billion years or more) ago but their remnant elliptical galaxies only recently (last tens of millions of years or less) become active in radio. Instead, we argue that the cannibalism of gas-rich galaxies provides a simpler explanation for the origin of molecular gas in the elliptical hosts of radio galaxies. Given the transient nature of their observed disturbances, these galaxies probably become active in radio soon after the accretion event when sufficient molecular gas agglomerates in their nuclei.

J. Lim; S. Leon; F. Combes; Dinh-V-Trung

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Legislative Directive: EISA 2007, Subtitle B: Lighting Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Legislative Directive: EISA 2007, Subtitle B: Lighting Energy Efficiency, Sec. 321: Lighting Energy Efficiency

37

Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legislation, Regulation and Energy Efficiency Legislation, Regulation and Energy Efficiency Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation and Energy Efficiency The Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation and Energy Efficiency (GC-71) provides legal support and advice on legislative matters throughout the Department. It participates in the development of DOE views on pending legislation, drafts DOE legislative proposals and supporting documents, obtains interagency clearances from the Office of Management and Budget, and prepares, coordinates, and reviews bill comments to Congressional committees. The office also provides legal counsel and rulemaking support to programs throughout DOE on administrative requirements for developing DOE rules, directives, and other generally

38

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1995 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1996 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1996 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Regulation of Natural Gas (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation provides for the protection of public and private interests with regards to natural gas production, prohibits waste, and compels ratable production to enable owners of gas in a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Navy's Section 2922a Legislation Success Stories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—features U.S. Department of Navy success stories in relation to Section 2922a legislation, which involves contracts for energy or fuel for military installations.

42

Legislative seminars ..............2 Pavement conference..............2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Legislative seminars ..............2 · Pavement conference..............2 · Bike center conference .................4 A monthly report on transportation research, education, and outreach activities at the University of Minnesota April 2009 Pricing continued on page 2 Inside Conference continued on page 4

Minnesota, University of

43

Instructor: Ann Jablon Boston University Washington Legislative Internship Program Home Telephone Number (301) 654-5111  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/11 The Legislative Process How a bill becomes a law - the intricacies. U.S. House - protection of majority rights vs. U.S. Senate - and minority rights; The Rules Committee vs. Unanimous Consent Readings: How Congress. Midterm Due! Monday, 3/4 Campaigns and Elections A discussion of issues including the role of PACs, soft

Goldberg, Bennett

44

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Legislation and Regulations Legislation and Regulations Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Legislation and Regulations Because analyses by EIA are required to be policy-neutral, the projections in AEO2008 are based on Federal and State laws and regulations in effect on or before December 31, 2007. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations or appropriation of funds that are not provided or specified in the legislation itself-are not reflected in the projections. Throughout 2007, however, at the request of the Administration and Congress, EIA has regularly examined the potential implications of proposed legislation in Service Reports (see "EIA Service Reports on Proposed Legislation Released Since January 2007").

45

Legislative Directive: EPACT 2005, Subtitle A: Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Legislative Directive: EPACT 2005, Subtitle A: Energy Efficiency, Sec. 911: Energy Efficiency, Sec. 912: Next Generation Lighting Initiative

46

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Legislation & Regulations Legislation & Regulations Nitrogen Oxide Emission Caps Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions and Diesel Fuel Quality Standards FERC Order 2000 Banning or Reducing the Use of MTBE in Gasoline Updates on State Renewable Portfolio Standards and Renewable Energy Mandates Proposed Changes to RFG Oxygen Standard FERC Order 637 Proposed Limits on Benzene in Gasoline Royalty Rules Low-Emission Vehicle Program Tier 2 Vehicle Emissions and Gasoline Sulfur Standards Appliance Efficiency Standards Petroleum Reserves Introduction Because analyses by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) are required to be policy-neutral, the projections in this Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 2000. The potential impacts of pending or

47

The Texas Legislative Process: An agricultural perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of MASTER OF AGRICULTURE August, 1991 Department of Agricultural Education Agricultural Development THE TEXAS LEGISLATIVE PROCESS: AN AGRICULTURAL PERSPECTIVE A Professional Paper hy TODD E. GREEN Approved as to style and content by: Don R. Herring... LEGISLATURE THE SENATE The Texas Senate is composed of thirty-one members elected for four-year staggered terms. The Senate is presided over by the Lieutenant Governor, who is elected by the voters of Texas for a term of four years. The duties...

Green, Todd E.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

48

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Legislation & Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

leg_reg.gif (4810 bytes) Climate Change Action Plan Comprehensive Electricity Competition Act Tier 2 Vehicle Emissions and Gasoline Sulfur Standards California Ban of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Low-Emission Vehicle Program Introduction Because analyses by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) are required to be policy-neutral, the projections in this Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 1999. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards and sections of existing legislation for which funds have not been appropriated are not reflected in the projections. Federal legislation incorporated in the projections includes the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, which adds 4.3 cents per gallon to the Federal tax on highway fuels [1]; the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987; the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90); the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT); the Outer Continental Shelf Deep Water Royalty Relief Act of 1995; the Tax Payer Relief Act of 1997; and the Federal Highway Bill of 1998, which includes an extension of the ethanol tax credit. AEO2000 assumes the continuation of the ethanol tax credit through 2020.

49

Report of the Committee on Legislation and Regulatory Reform  

SciTech Connect

The report of the Committee on Legislation and Regulatory Reform covers legislative developments in the first session and early second session of the 102nd Congress. This Congress has been especially active on energy matters. The Persian Gulf War, the release of the President's National Energy Strategy (NES), and other factors created the impetus for consideration of comprehensive energy legislation. The report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the comprehensive energy legislation pending before the Congress. The second part describes pending environmental legislation. The third part of the report describes miscellaneous Congressional activity that should be of interest.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Source Review New Source Review Legislation and Regulations. New Source Review On August 27, 2003, the EPA issued a final rule defining certain power plant and industrial facility activities as “routine maintenance, repair and replacement,” which are not subject to new source review (NSR) under CAAA90. As stated by the EPA, “these changes provide a category of equipment replacement activities that are not subject to Major NSR requirements under the routine maintenance, repair and replacement (RMRR) exclusion” [28]. Essentially this means that power plants and industrial facilities engaging in RMRR activities will not be required to obtain State or EPA approval for those activities and will not have to install the “best available” emissions control technologies that might be required if NSR were triggered.

51

Compiling RES Legislation for Kazakhstan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compiling RES Legislation for Kazakhstan Compiling RES Legislation for Kazakhstan Jump to: navigation, search Name Compiling RES Legislation for Kazakhstan Agency/Company /Organization Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership, United Nations Development Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.reeep.org/127/laws. Country Kazakhstan UN Region Central Asia References Compiling RES Legislation for Kazakhstan[1] Compiling RES Legislation for Kazakhstan Potential of renewable energy sources usage in the Republic of Kazakhstan Report on Benefits of RES to Energy Sector in Kazakhstan (Kyoto) References ↑ "Compiling RES Legislation for Kazakhstan" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compiling_RES_Legislation_for_Kazakhstan&oldid=328567"

52

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states,...

53

Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation April 20, 2010 - 3:45pm Addthis Statement of Dr. James Markowsky, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation, S. 1856, S. 1134, and other Draft Legislative Text. Thank you Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to meet with you this morning to discuss carbon capture and storage (CCS) legislation before the Committee. While this hearing is focused specifically on S. 1856, a bill to amend the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to clarify policies regarding ownership of pore space, introduced by Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY); S.1134, the Responsible Use

54

Contacts for the Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency Contacts for the Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation & Energy Efficiency (GC-71) Daniel Cohen, Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, & Energy Efficiency 202-586-9523 daniel.cohen@hq.doe.gov Catherine Goshe, Attorney-Adviser 202-586-7053 Preeti Chaudhari, Attorney-Adviser 202-586-8078 Tina Ro, Attorney-Adviser 202-287-5975 Steve Duarte, Attorney-Adviser 202-586-2951 Dorothy Hamid, Legislative Librarian 202-586-2886 Cece Williams, Paralegal 202-586-2902 Francine Pinto, Deputy Assistant General Counsel for Appliance Standards 202-586-7432 Eric Stas, Attorney-Adviser 202-586-5827 Michael Kido, Attorney-Adviser

55

Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation April 20, 2010 - 3:45pm Addthis Statement of Dr. James Markowsky, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation, S. 1856, S. 1134, and other Draft Legislative Text. Thank you Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to meet with you this morning to discuss carbon capture and storage (CCS) legislation before the Committee. While this hearing is focused specifically on S. 1856, a bill to amend the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to clarify policies regarding ownership of pore space, introduced by Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY); S.1134, the Responsible Use

56

BETO Announces Launch of the Bioenergy KDF Legislative Library  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Bioenergy Technologies Office is pleased to announce the release of a new Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (Bioenergy KDF) resource: the Legislative Library.

57

State Solar Legislative Enactments in the SSEC Region. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

An extensive compilation of all solar legislation identified through September 1980, was prepared. Here, the actual copies of the bills are presented where available by state. (MHR)

Fenner, M.F.; Bailey, B.L.; Brun, R.A. (comps.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energy Savings Performance Contracting Legislation Data and Other Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Savings Performance Contracting Legislation Data and Other Resources provides data and information on Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) legislation across the 50 United States and five U.S. territories as well as state-specific resources and references regarding ESPCs.

59

State solar legislative enactments in the SSEC region  

SciTech Connect

Solar legislation designed to accelerate and the practical application of renewable energy resources in the southern states is identified and compiled. A summary of all applicable legislation by category and state is provided. Selected 1981 laws are presented in the appendix. (MHR)

Fenner, M.F. (comp.)

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Legislation and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Legislation and Regulations Legislation and Regulations Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Introduction Because analyses by the EIA are required to be policy-neutral, the projections in this AEO2005 generally are based on Federal and State laws and regulations in effect on or before October 31, 2004. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards—or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require funds or implementing regulations that have not been provided or specified—are not reflected in the projections. Examples of Federal and State legislation incorporated in the projections include the following: The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90), which include new standards for motor gasoline and diesel fuel and for heavy-duty vehicle emissions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EIA - Smart Grid Legislative and Regulatory Policies and Case Studies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Full report (4.0 mb) Full report (4.0 mb) Attachment A - U.S. State legislative and regulatory policies (2.0 mb) Attachment B - U.S. smart grid case studies (1.6 mb) Attachment C - International smart grid activities (0.6 mb) Maps below summarize smart grid legislation & regulation: U.S. smart meter penetration by State, 2010. Advanced metering legislation & regulation. Advanced metering legislation & regulation. Smart Grid Legislative and Regulatory Policies and Case Studies Release date: December 12, 2011 In recent years, a number of U.S. states have adopted or are considering smart grid related laws, regulations, and voluntary or mandatory requirements. At the same time, the number of smart grid pilot projects has been increasing rapidly. Recent activity includes the deployment of smart

62

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Extension of Deep Shelf Royalty Relief to Existing Leases Extension of Deep Shelf Royalty Relief to Existing Leases Legislation and Regulations. Extension of Deep Shelf Royalty Relief to Existing Leases The Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior [4] in March 2003 proposed a new rule that would extend to existing leases the same royalty relief that currently is provided for newly acquired leases, for natural gas production from wells drilled to deep vertical depth (below the “mudline”) in the Outer Continental Shelf. Since March 2001, the MMS has provided royalty relief for production from wells drilled to 15,000 feet total vertical depth in newly acquired leases in the shallow waters (less than 200 meters of water depth) of the shelf. Royalty payments to the Federal Government are suspended for the first 20 billion cubic feet of such “deep shelf” production from wells beginning production within the first 5 years of a lease. The purpose of the new rule is to encourage more exploration in the deep shelf play [5], which has significant potential but presents substantial technical difficulties. Of the 10.5 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered resources in the deep shelf (as estimated by the MMS), about 6.3 trillion cubic feet is under existing leases. The proposed new rule would have granted relief for wells drilled after March 26, 2003. Leases currently eligible for royalty relief under the old rule may substitute the deep gas incentive of the new rule.

63

Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Nebraska Public Power District

64

Atomic Energy Act and Related Legislation. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information related to the Atomic Energy Act and related legislation. Sections are presented pertaining to legislative history and statutes, implementing regulations, and updates.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy Actions: October 2008 to May 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy Actions: October 2008 to May 2010 Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.demandresponsesmartgrid.org/Resources/Documents/State%20Policy%20S Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/demand-response-smart-grid-state-legi Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Enabling Legislation This report reviews the implementation of utility efficiency programs in the United States at both the state and federal levels. In addition, the updated report catalogues regulatory commission action, independent of

66

India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Agency/Company /Organization Government of India Sector Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.envfor.nic.in/legis Country India UN Region South-Eastern Asia References India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife[1] Overview "Category Name Water Pollution Air Pollution Environment Protection Coastal Regulation Zone Delegation of Powers Eco-marks Scheme Eco-sensitive Zone Environmental Clearance - General Environmental Labs Environmental Standards Hazardous Substances Management Loss Of Ecology Noise Pollution Ozone Layer Depletion Water Pollution 2-T Oil Public Liability Insurance

67

Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements to Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements to Automobile Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Feebates: A Legislative Option to Encourage Continuous Improvements to Automobile Efficiency Agency/Company /Organization: Rocky Mountain Institute Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Best Practices Website: www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/T08-09_FeebatesLegislativeOption The purpose of this paper is to provide information about feebates. This paper discusses: what a feebate is, why Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) believes a feebate is a valuable tool, recent analysis that RMI had done on feebates, what the current status of the feebate is, and how the feebate could interact with existing laws.

68

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Legislation and Regulations. Introduction Because analyses by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) are required to be policy-neutral, the projections in this Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004) are based on Federal and State laws and regulations in effect on September 1, 2003. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards—or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require funds or implementing regulations that have not been provided or specified—are not reflected in the projections. Examples of Federal and State legislation incorporated in the projections include the following: The Energy Policy Conservation Act of 1975 The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987

69

Legislation to boost US technology takes protectionist turn in House  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Washington. Legislation to improve US competitiveness by helping industry to ex-ploit new technology is being attacked by companies it is ... to help because an amended version would exclude participa-tion by other countries.

Colin Macilwain

1993-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

70

Geothermal Industry Applauds Congressional Action on Tax Legislation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action on Tax Legislation January 1, 2013 - 4:11pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The Geothermal Energy Association applauds Congress for adopting today, as part of bi-partisan...

71

Situational Hitting: Strategic Lobbying in a Strategic Legislative Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are an important consideration in the delegation calculus. Epstein and O?Halloran (1999) developed a comprehensive transactions cost approach to the puzzle of legislative delegation applying an economic transactions cost framework to the delegation of power.... Subsequent studies of legislative delegation identify other political circumstances and contexts within which the delegation calculus changes. Huber and McCarty (2004) suggest that bureaucratic capacity can play a role in the delegation calculus...

Morin, Alexander

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

Regulatory and policy implications of Federal legislation on utility DSM programs  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews some potential consequences of recent Federal legislation to demand-side management (DSM) at utilities. The legislation discussed are the 1992 Energy Policy Act (EPAct), the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act, and FERC Order No. 636. Examples of specific activities regarding DSM in Pennsylvania are included for illustration. Each of the Federal laws under discussion is unique in terms of origin, goals, and focus. Nevertheless, they all focus on the regulated energy industries such that their effects tend to combine to force massive changes. In die regulated electric and natural gas industries, this synergy is compounding the complexity of management and, at least in the short term, contributing to increases in the cost of doing business. In the long term, these Federal initiatives are likely to lead to a massive reassessment of state-regulated energy sources in production and end use, and their environmental consequences. The overall effect of all three pieces of legislation is to increase competition among the state-regulated utilities. The differences between competitive and regulated industries are noted in a effort to explain the effect of inducing competition among energy utilities. This has particular relevance to utility-sponsored energy-efficiency programs such as DSM and other customer assistance activities. This paper has three objectives. First, it outlines the contents of the Federal legislation regarding utility DSM programs. Second, it explains some of the impacts of these laws and regulations on utility programs, particularly the likely effects of the emerging competitive utility market. Third, it seeks to understand where and how action will be needed to carry out many of the provisions of these laws in the most cost-effective manner.

Hopkins, M.E.F. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Griffiths, D. [Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, Harrisburg, PA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Air quality analysis of Phase I of the proposed oil backout legislation. [Lead abstract  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an air quality analysis of Phase I of the President's proposed legislation to reduce the use of oil and natural gas in electric utility power plants by approximately 1 x 10/sup 6/ barrels of oil per day. The report analyzes changes in sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions that would accompany the conversions. Local and regional impacts on ambient sulfur dioxide and sulfate concentrations are examined. Finally, the cost-effectiveness of certain control options and the effectiveness of converting the specified plants in reducing oil consumption without excessive environmental or cost impacts are discussed. Separate abstracts are prepared for the 6 chapters.

Streets, D.G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation contains provisions for facilities and service related to electricity, natural gas, water, heating, refrigeration, and street railways. The chapter addresses the construction and...

75

Integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With Climate Change legislation on the horizon, the need to integrate energy reduction initiatives with greenhouse gas reduction efforts is critical to manufactures competitiveness and financial strength going forward. MPC has developed...

Spates, C. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Conservation of Oil and Gas (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation prohibits the production, storage, or transportation of oil or gas in a manner, in an amount, or under conditions that constitute waste. Actions which may lead to the waste of oil...

77

Majority Dominance or Power-Sharing: Control of the Legislative Agenda in the Argentine Congress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caso de Fernando de la Rúa. ” Desarrollo Económico. Buenosbeen different if Fernando De La Rúa had not resigned to theUCR candidate Fernando De La Rua. Finally, after De la Rua’s

Ferretti, Natalia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Little study sees large growth in Asian natural gas market  

SciTech Connect

Power capacity additions in Asia will at least triple by 2010, and Arthur D. Little Inc. predicts natural gas can pick up a good 15 percent of that market. The study predicts Asia potentially will need 720 gigawatts of new power generation by 2010, of which 15 percent may be gas-based. This represents a market three times the size of the US market in the same period, and would require more than $1 trillion in investment to finance the power generation projects alone. Six forces are driving new market opportunities for natural gas in Asia, and have set the stage for major investments in Asian gas-based power generation. They are: New technologies; growing environmental pressures; privatization; alternative energy pricing; gas availability; and continued economic growth. Japan, South Korea and Taiwan already have large, well-established markets for both gas and power that provide minimal opportunities for foreign investment. But the rest of Asia - specifically, India, Pakistan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, the People's Republic of China, Thailand, Bangladesh and Myanmar - is still relatively undeveloped, the study said, and gas is emerging as an energy import substitute or export earner. The study found those countries will turn increased environmental awareness and concern into legislation as their economic prosperity grows, leading to a higher future value for natural gas relative to other fuels. Stricter emissions standards will favor gas over diesel, fuel oil and coal.

O'Driscoll, M.

1993-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

79

Legislation: H.B. 5524 (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legislation: H.B. 5524 (Michigan) Legislation: H.B. 5524 (Michigan) Legislation: H.B. 5524 (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Michigan Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This bill was part of a package of energy bills that enacted regulatory

80

Testimony to the United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works Legislative Hearing on America's Climate Security Act of 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testimony to the United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works Legislative Hearing Fellow Engineering Science and Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Good afternoon. Thank sector was responsible for 28% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2005 (USEPA, 2007a, table 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

How to find sponsors & supporters for energy codes legislation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FIND SPONSORS & SUPPORTERS FIND SPONSORS & SUPPORTERS FOR ENERGY CODES LEGISLATION PRESENTED BY JIM O"REILLY NORTHEAST ENERGY EFFICIENCY PARTNERSHIPS TO DOE ENERGY CODES 2011 SALT LAKE CITY, UT July 27, 2011 NORTHEAST ENERGY EFFICIENCY PARTNERSHIPS "Accelerating Energy Efficiency" 1 MISSION Accelerate the efficient use of energy in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic Regions APPROACH Overcome barriers to efficiency through Collaboration, Education & Advocacy VISION Transform the way we think about and use energy in the world around us. OUR OBJECTIVES  Provide you with some general points about how to identify and gain support from state legislators on building energy codes related bills  Relate an example from practical experiences of

82

Hardware and Software Design for a Large Gas Engine Detonation Simulator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Demands to meet legislative exhaust emission levels, provide fuel economy, and improve engine quality have been the major driving forces for engine control advancement [1].… (more)

Lowder, Tracy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Nordic voice ergonomic group: legislation and vocal health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research has revealed a number of factors which have a negative impact on voice function (e.g. activity noise background sound poor acoustics long duration of voice usage speaking distance). In these circumstances vocal loading increases potentially giving rise to voice disorders. Currently practical measures within society for the improvement of speakers' working conditions and the prevention of voice loading are not satisfactory. Voice experts from the five Nordic countries met in Reykjavik in May 2006 to inaugurate the Nordic Voice Ergonomic Group with the aim of investigating the current situation within voice ergonomics with a particular focus on sound?related problems. The group found that occupational safety and health legislation relating to speech communication in educational working environment differs between Nordic countries. Moreover this legislation does not specifically deal with speech communication or the risk of voice disorders. This presentation will report on the details of the current legislation and the Group's suggestions for legislative change which might prevent disturbance in speech communication and decrease the risk of vocal disorder as an occupational hazard.

Valdis Inigbjörg Jonsdottir

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Projected Impacts of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reduction Legislation on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;The Projected Impacts of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reduction Legislation on Electricity Prices on the projected prices of electricity and the use of electric energy in the state of Indiana. The analysis allowances and offsets, shifting production technology from coal-fired baseload resources to a combination

85

Texas Legislative and Irrigation Districts of the Rio Grande River Basin: A Map Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The title of this map series is Texas Legislative and Irrigation Districts of the Rio Grande River Basin. The series consists of nine (9) maps showing the boundaries of legislative districts and 32 water districts that deliver irrigation water...

Leigh, Eric; Fipps, G.

86

MAJORITY OPINION SIDDIQUI VS. SHALABI 27nd February 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAJORITY OPINION SIDDIQUI VS. SHALABI 27nd February 2013 "All Judicial authority of ASUCI shall shall not hold another ASUCI elective office during his/her term on the Legislative Council." Mr is an appointed and not elective position, Ms. Shalabi did not violate this section of the ASUCI Constitution

Loudon, Catherine

87

Legislative Update: State and Regional Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Initiatives Conference Call  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by US Fuel Cell Council on legislative updates to state and regional hydrogen and fuel cell representatives

88

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress. Volume 2, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This document is the second of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, various acts pertaining to low-level radioactive waste, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act, the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Export Licensing Statutes, and selected treaties, agreements, and executive orders. Other information provided pertains to Commissioner tenure, NRC appropriations, the Chief Financial Officers Act, information technology management reform, and Federal civil penalties.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Climate change legislation: what the Senate might do  

SciTech Connect

Two of the speakers who spoke at the Coal-Gen conference, Charlotte, NC, USA on 19 August discussed climate change legislation currently under consideration in the US Congress. The so-called Waxman-Markey bill passed the House in June and is currently being considered by the Senate. The title of Thomas Hewson's talk was 'Climate change is likely to pass' and Neal Cabral discussed 'Geography and region influence climate change politics'.

NONE

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

By E-Mail Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 19, 2012 June 19, 2012 By E-Mail Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency U.S. Department of Energy Office of the General Counsel 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Regulatory.Review@hq.doe.gov Re: Regulatory Burden RFI Dear Mr. Cohen: The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) respectfully submits the following comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on its Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012). AHAM represents manufacturers of major, portable and floor care home appliances, and suppliers to the industry. AHAM's more than 150 members employ tens of thousands of people in the U.S. and produce more than 95% of the household appliances shipped for sale within the

92

By E-Mail Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2011 1, 2011 By E-Mail Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency U.S. Department of Energy Office of the General Counsel 1000 Independence Ave., SW Room 6A245 Washington, D.C. 20585 Regulatory.Review@hq.doe.gov Re: Regulatory Burden RFI Dear Mr. Cohen: The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) respectfully submits the following comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on its Request for Information on reducing regulatory burden, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123 (Feb. 3, 2011). AHAM represents manufacturers of major, portable and floor care home appliances, and suppliers to the industry. AHAM's more than 150 members employ tens of thousands of people in the U.S. and produce more than 95% of the household appliances shipped for sale within the

93

By E-Mail Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 1, 2011 August 1, 2011 By E-Mail Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency U.S. Department of Energy Office of the General Counsel 1000 Independence Ave., SW Room 6A245 Washington, D.C. 20585 Regulatory.Review@hq.doe.gov Re: EO 13563 Preliminary Plan Dear Mr. Cohen: The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) respectfully submits the following comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on preliminary plan for retrospective analysis of existing rules, 76 Fed. Reg. 40646 (July 11, 2011). AHAM represents manufacturers of major, portable and floor care home appliances, and suppliers to the industry. AHAM's more than 150 members employ tens of thousands of people in the U.S. and produce more than 95% of the household appliances shipped for sale within the

94

Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation and Regulatory Law  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation and Regulatory Law Office of the General Counsel Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Re: Ex Parte Memorandum Dear Mr. Cohen: On Tuesday, May 4, 2010, Kit Kennedy and Kate Houren of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) initiated a telephone call with Daniel Cohen and Bryan Miller of the Department of Energy's Office of the General Council. During the call, NRDC advocated for the adoption of the consensus agreement, 1 and the parties discussed legal questions relating to the Department of Energy's ability to adopt the consensus

95

State solar legislative enactments in the SSEC region. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

An extensive compilation and review of all solar legislation identified in the Southern Solar Energy Center (SSEC) region are presented. The types of laws identified have been placed in eleven categories: income tax, property tax, sales/use tax, loan/grant, access/zoning, building standards, solar standards, research, state buildings, alcohol fuels (including gasohol), and other. In the individual state review sections, all laws identified for a state are briefly summarized and placed within a standard category. The SSEC region includes: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Virgin Islands, and West Virginia. (MHR)

Fenner, M.F.; Bailey, B.L.; Brun, R.A. (comps.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Low Emission Vehicle Program and Carbon Standard for Light-Duty Vehicles California Low Emission Vehicle Program and Carbon Standard for Light-Duty Vehicles Legislation and Regulations. California Low Emission Vehicle Program The Low Emission Vehicle Program (LEVP) was originally passed into legislation in 1990 in the State of California. It began as the implementation of a voluntary opt-in pilot program under the purview of CAAA90, which included a provision that other States could “opt in” to the California program to achieve lower emissions levels than would otherwise be achieved through CAAA90. The 1990 LEVP was an emissions-based policy, setting sales mandates for three categories of vehicles: low-emission vehicles (LEVs), ultra-low-emission vehicles (ULEVs), and zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs). The mandate required that ZEVs make up 2 percent of new vehicle sales in California by 1998, 5 percent by 2001, and 10 percent by 2003. At that time, the only vehicles certified as ZEVs by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) were battery-powered electric vehicles [1].

97

PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS --1 PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS --2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS -- 1 #12;PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS -- 2 Handbook for Undergraduate Psychology Majors......................................................................................................................................2 A. Psychology Program Goals and Purpose B. Declaration of Major C. History of Marquette University D. Facilities E. Graduate Program in Clinical Psychology 2. Department Faculty and Staff

Sanders, Matthew

98

Idaho IC 61-1701, Legislative Purposes and Findings for the Siting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legislative Purposes and Findings for the Siting of Certain Electrical Transmission Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - authorizing legislation fiscal Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEDERAL UPDATE Texas Sen. Hutchison... votes to approve previously passed Senate health care reform legislation and send the ... Source: Hulet, Randall G.- Department of Physics...

100

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hackberry Decision Hackberry Decision Legislation and Regulations. The Hackberry Decision In December 2002, the FERC terminated open access requirements for new onshore LNG terminals in the United States, placing them on an equal footing with offshore terminals regulated under provisions of the Maritime Security Act of 2002. The FERC ruling, which granted preliminary approval to the proposed Dynergy/Sempra LNG terminal in Hackberry, Louisiana, is referred to as the Hackberry Decision. It authorized Hackberry LNG (now Cameron LNG) to provide services to its affiliates under rates and terms mutually agreed upon (i.e., market-based), rather than under regulated cost-of-service rates, and exempted the company from having to provide open access service. In essence, from a regulatory perspective, LNG import facilities will be treated as supply sources rather than as part of the transportation chain.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State Air Emission Regulations State Air Emission Regulations Legislation and Regulations. State Air Emission Regulations Several States, primarily in the Northeast, have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the States and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected States include Connecticut, North Carolina, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, and Oregon. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and mercury from power plants. Table 2 shows emissions of NOx, SO2, and CO2 by electricity generators in the eight States and in the rest of the country. Comparable data on mercury emissions by State are not available.

102

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 Executive Order 13423, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): -- Requires Federal agencies to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas...

103

Major Demonstrations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Demonstrations Major Demonstrations Major Demonstrations A state-of-the-art integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant, Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station produces enough electricity to serve 75,000 homes. A state-of-the-art integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant, Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station produces enough electricity to serve 75,000 homes. The Office of Fossil Energy is co-funding large-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies to hasten their adoption into the commercial marketplace. Through the year 2030, electricity consumption in the United States is expected to grow by about 1 percent per year. The ability of coal-fired generation to help meet this demand could be limited by concerns over greenhouse gas emissions. While the Major Demonstrations performed to date

104

European Union legislation and the development of the electricity market in Slovenia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article is based on the analysis of the circumstances, occurred during the electricity market opening in the Republic of Slovenia, as a consequence of implementation of the EU legislation in the energy field. The market operation, the role of the ... Keywords: electricity market, energy sector, legislation, the structure of the electricity price

Viljem Pozeb; Tina Krope; Darko Goricanec

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A comparison of legislation about wine-making additives and processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of legislation about wine- making additives and processes Vashti Christina Galpin Assignment submitted in partial requirement for the Cape Wine Master Diploma February 2006 #12;Abstract between legislation about quality and that about oenological practices, regimes that limit additive use

Galpin, Vashti

106

Natural Gas for Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a time when the Government is exhorting the gas and other major industries concerned with ... and other major industries concerned with natural fuel resources to give a forward boost to coal mining by contracting an annual intake ...

1965-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards for Light Trucks Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards for Light Trucks Legislation and Regulations. Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards for Light Trucks The regulation of fuel economy for new light vehicles was established through the enactment of the Energy Policy Conservation Act of 1975. The regulation of light truck fuel economy was implemented in model year 1979. Increases in light truck CAFE standards continued to be made through the 1980s and 1990s, reaching 20.7 miles per gallon for model year 1996. Thereafter, Congress prohibited any further increases in fuel economy standards. Congress lifted the prohibition on new CAFE standards on December 18, 2001. On April 1, 2003, NHTSA published a final rule for increasing CAFE standards for light trucks (all pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles with gross vehicle weight rating less than 8,500 pounds). The new CAFE standard requires that the light trucks sold by a manufacturer have a minimum average fuel economy of 21.0 miles per gallon for model year 2005, 21.6 miles per gallon for model year 2006, and 22.2 miles per gallon for model year 2007. The new light truck CAFE standards are incorporated

108

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Policy Act of 2003 Energy Policy Act of 2003 Legislation and Regulations. The Energy Policy Act of 2003 The U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 6.EH, The Energy Policy Act of 2003 (EPACT03), on April 11, 2003. The Senate passed H.R. 6.EAS (the same bill it had passed in 2002) on July 31, 2003. A Conference Committee was convened to resolve differences between the two bills, and a conference report was approved and issued on November 17, 2003 [31]. The House approved the conference report on November 18, 2003, but a Senate vote on cloture failed, and further action has been delayed at least until January 2004. Consistent with the approach adopted in the AEO to include only Federal and State laws and regulations in effect, the various provisions of EPACT03 are not represented in the AEO2004 projections. This discussion focuses on selected provisions of the current version of EPACT03 that have, in EIAÂ’s estimation, significant potential to affect energy consumption and supply at the national level. Proposed provisions in the following areas are addressed:

109

Energy efficiency: major issues and policy recommendations  

SciTech Connect

The Advisory Committee on Energy Efficiency has investigated strategies for improving energy efficiency in all sectors of the economy - industrial, agricultural, residential, and commercial, and transportation - and has considered the contributions of local government and utility companies, as well as the state, in encouraging its efficient use. The state may exercise several policy options to encourage energy efficiency: information transfer, financial aids and incentives, and building conservation standards. The Committee believes that the major objectives for state legislative and administrative actions should be to facilitate the efforts of consumers to improve energy efficiency and to set an example of efficiency in its own buildings and operations. The state can realize these objectives with programs that: provide accurate and unbiased information on energy efficiency technologies and practices; provide consumers with information to evaluate products and vendor claims of efficiency and thereby to protect against consumer fraud; identify and remove institutional and legislative barriers to energy efficient practices; provide economic incentives to help meet the capital requirements to invest in energy efficiency technologies; and advance research, development, and demonstration of new technologies.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Quantifying greenhouse-gas emissions from atmospheric measurements: a critical reality check for climate legislation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for GHGs that have natural, anthropogenic, industrial...mole fractions of these gases, but also their isotopic...understanding of the natural cycles of these gases and verifying claims...mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCL) enable...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Impacts of Comprehensive Climate Legislation on the U.S. Economy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impacts of Comprehensive Climate Legislation on the U.S. Economy Impacts of Comprehensive Climate Legislation on the U.S. Economy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Impacts of Comprehensive Climate Legislation on the U.S. Economy Agency/Company /Organization: Johns Hopkins University and Center for Climate Strategies Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.climatestrategies.us/ewebeditpro/items/O25F23463.PDF Country: United States UN Region: Northern America References: Impacts of Comprehensive Climate Legislation on the U.S. Economy[1] Summary "This Annex provides brief descriptions of the 23 super options that are the basis of this study. To provide some context on the selection of the

112

Colorado - C.R.S. 24-65.1-101 - Legislative Declaration | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Colorado - C.R.S. 24-65.1-101 - Legislative DeclarationLegal Abstract This section outlines...

113

S98-1 Recycling Papers and Defining Plagiarism Legislative History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S98-1 Recycling Papers and Defining Plagiarism Legislative History: At its meeting of February 2 for the stated purpose of storing submitted work in a database and using the database solely for the intended

Gleixner, Stacy

114

Uniting Legislation with RFID Privacy-Enhancing Technologies Melanie R. Rieback, Bruno Crispo, Andrew S. Tanenbaum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response by modulating the request signal using one or more subcarrier frequencies. These RFID tags can do. Keywords: Radio frequency identification, security, privacy, data protection legislation, privacy- enhancing technologies. 1 Introduction Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology faces security

Tanenbaum, Andrew S.

115

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.1 National Legislation  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program Total Rebates Rebates Avg Rebate Total Rebates Rebates Avg Rebate Home Appliances (Thousand) ($ Million) ($) (Thousand) ($ Million) ($) Air Conditioners (Room) 28 1.8 65 3 0.3 111 Clothes Washers 480 52.8 110 78 11.2 143 Dishwashers 245 22.2 91 55 5.6 101 Freezers 22 2.0 94 3 0.7 266 Refrigerators 488 64.8 133 104 18.9 182 HVAC Air Conditioners (Central) 31 12.4 403 17 13.0 767 Boiler Reset Controls 0 0.0 100 0 0.0 0 Boilers (Gas) 3 1.8 632 1 0.4 500 Boilers (Oil) 2 0.9 425 1 0.5 403 Boilers (Propane) 0 0.0 214 0 0.0 300 Furnaces (Gas) 61 24.2 396 8 3.3 415 Furnaces (Oil) 0 0.2 379 0 0.1 394 Furnaces (Propane) 1 0.3 314 0 0.0 340 Heat Pumps (Air Source) 33 16.2 487 17 9.2 546 Heat Pumps (Ground Source) 2 1.5 912 0 0.0 1,207 Water Heaters Electric Heat Pump 3 0.9 278 1 0.2 322 Gas Storage 15 0.0 123 1 0.2 337 Gas Tankless 9 1.8 263

116

From Legislation to Implementation: An Evaluation of the Instructional Facilities Allotment Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FROM LEGISLATION TO IMPLEMENTATION: AN EVALUATION OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL FACILITIES ALLOTMENT POLICY A Dissertation by BRANDON HEATH CORE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...: Educational Administration Copyright 2013 Brandon Heath Core ii ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to advance our understanding of the original legislative intents of the Instructional Facilities Allotment (IFA) and to evaluate the IFA policy...

Core, Brandon Heath

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

31, 2012, Washington, DC Major assumption changes for AEO2013 Oil and Gas Working Group Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module DRAFT WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION DO NOT...

118

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors Map of Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors see related text enlarge see related text enlarge U.S. Regional Breakdown Map of U.S. Regional Breakout States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies Map of States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies

119

Trumping and Power Majorization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majorization is a basic concept in matrix theory that has found applications in numerous settings over the past century. Power majorization is a more specialized notion that has been studied in the theory of inequalities. On the other hand, the trumping relation has recently been considered in quantum information, specifically in entanglement theory. We explore the connections between trumping and power majorization. We prove an analogue of Rado's theorem for power majorization and consider a number of examples.

David W. Kribs; Rajesh Pereira; Sarah Plosker

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Strip Mining Legislation: The Tug of War Continues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the major coal companies. For instance, the Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Company (a subsidiary of the Gulf Oil Corporation...lacking as they do the money for pro-longed and costly court battles. In fact, Dunlap's basic criticism of the bill is that...

Luther J. Carter

1975-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1989  

SciTech Connect

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1989 is the thirteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 23 major energy companies (the FRS companies'') required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. It also traces key developments affecting the financial performance of major energy companies in 1989, as well as review of important trends.

Not Available

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cryogenic treatment of gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

123

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.1 National Legislation  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Phase Out Schedule of Halocarbons in the U.S. (1) Gas % By % By Chlorofluorocarbons 75% 1994 75% 1994 (CFCs) 100% 1996 (4) 100% 1996 Bromofluorocarbons 100% 1994 (4) 100% 1994 (Halons) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons 35.0% 2004 35% 2003 (HCFCs) 75.0% 2010 75% 2010 90.0% 2015 90% 2015 99.5% 2020 99.5% 2020 100% 2030 (4) 100% 2030 Hydrofluorocarbons N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. (HFCs) Note(s): Source(s): 1989 HCFC consumption + 2.8 % of 1989 CFC consumption 1996 N.A. N.A. 1) The phase out of halocarbons is consistent with Title VI of the Clean Air Act and is in accordance with the Montreal Protocol and Amendments. 2) The amount of gas produced and consumed in this year is established and defined as the base level. To meet basic domestic needs, levels of production are allowed to exceed the base level by up to 10%. 3) After this year, levels of production are no longer

124

Internships for Physics Majors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fermilab's IPM program offers ten-week summer internships to outstanding undergraduate physics majors. This program has been developed to familiarize students with opportunities at the frontiers of...

125

DOE to Send Proposed Yucca Mountain Legislation to Congress | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 4, 2006 - 10:03am April 4, 2006 - 10:03am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that on Wednesday, April 5, he will send to the U.S. Congress a legislative proposal to enhance the nation's ability to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Submission of this legislation fulfills a commitment contained in President Bush's Fiscal Year 2007 budget. "We need to ensure a strong and diversified energy mix to fuel our nation's economy, and nuclear power is an important component of that mix," Secretary Bodman said. "In order to expand our nuclear generating capacity, we need a safe, permanent, geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel at Yucca Mountain. This proposed legislation will help provide

126

Chronological History of Federal Energy-Efficient Product Procurement: Executive, Legislative and Regulatory Requirements, Actions and Mandates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document provides a chronological history of the legislative actions and executive orders that contribute to the current requirements for Federal energy-efficient product procurement.

127

for Undergraduate CHEMISTRY MAJORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Marketing, Consulting, Environmental Chemistry, Chemical Education, Chemical Engineering, ChemicalHANDBOOK for Undergraduate CHEMISTRY MAJORS DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY Fall 2010 #12;#12;TABLE OF CONTENTS A Career in Chemistry - What It Means ___________________________________________ 4 What do

Stuart, Steven J.

128

Undergraduate Major Advising Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Undergraduate Major Advising Handbook 2013-2014 San José State University College of Applied STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT ADVISING HANDBOOK Table of Contents Page Introduction Undergraduate Advising Worksheet....... . .13 The Emphases/Concentration in Kinesiology Adapted Physical

Su, Xiao

129

Undergraduate Major Advising Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Undergraduate Major Advising Handbook 2012-2013 San José State University College of Applied STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT ADVISING HANDBOOK Table of Contents Page Introduction Undergraduate Advising Worksheet....... 13 The Emphases/Concentration in Kinesiology Adapted Physical Activity

Su, Xiao

130

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HANDBOOK FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR Old Dominion University Department of Mechanical Engineering Batten College of Engineering and Technology Norfolk, Virginia 23529-0247 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS MECHANICAL ENGINEERING HANDBOOK

131

The Failure of Anti-Hacking Legislation: a Hong Kong Perspective Invited Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for ensuring the integrity of the Internet. For example, a young man, who successfully gained unautho- rised on Internet issues, and discusses why present computer- related legislation fails to attain its goal of anti-hacking. The paper gives a Hong Kong perspective to government's eort to curb intrusion of businesses on the Internet

Lau, W. H. Nynson

132

The Spread of Feed-In Tariff Legislation in Europe: A Diffusion of Innovation Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

test the primary model for state policy adoption - the integrated diffusion of innovation (DOI) model - in order to determine the extent to which this theoretical approach applies in an EU context. I use event history analysis to examine FiT legislation...

Keller, Aaron Jacob

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

133

Detailed Summary The present thesis contemplates terrorism, both the legislative reactions to it and its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY 346 Detailed Summary The present thesis contemplates terrorism, both the legislative rights is vital for the prevention of terrorism, encompassing state and non-state terrorism alike confronted with terrorism or similar extraordinary delinquency (e.g. organised crime). This thesis

van den Brink, Jeroen

134

Project Information Form Project Title Impact of Legislative Mandates on Transportation Workforce Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or organization) DOT $95,000 Total Project Cost $95,000 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 Start and EndProject Information Form Project Title Impact of Legislative Mandates on Transportation Workforce Dates August 1, 2014 to July 31, 2015 Brief Description of Research Project The transportation industry

California at Davis, University of

135

The University of Western Australia Submission to the Senate Education and Employment Legislation Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Western Australia Submission to the Senate Education and Employment Legislation Australia welcomes the opportunity to make the following submission to the Education and Employment Senate Bill (2014). The University of Western Australia (UWA) was founded more than 100 years ago as the state

Tobar, Michael

136

Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Environmental Environmental Science Enviro Express Kenworth LNG tractor. Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas As a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's broad effort to develop cleaner transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, this study examines advanced 2011 natural gas fueled trucks using liquefied natural gas (LNG) replacing older diesel fueled trucks. The trucks are used 6 days per week in regional city-to-landfill long hauls of incinerator waste with two fills per day. This is a workable fit for the limited range LNG trucks. Reduction of fuel costs and harmful emissions relative to the replaced trucks are significant. Introduction The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act legislation

137

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing natural gas, heat, water, sewerage, and street railway services to the public. The legislation addresses rates and services, exemptions, investigations, and records. Article 4 (58-5-400 et seq.) of this

138

REMEDIAT1NG AT MANUFACTURED GAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, comhusti- hle gas manufactured Pfrom coke, coal, and oil 1 served as the major gas- eous fuel for urban for the three primary gas production meth- ods: coal carbonization, carbureted water gas production, and oil gas, and metals. Tar resid- uals were produced from the vola- tiIe component of bituminous coals in coal

Peters, Catherine A.

139

Deregulation in Japanese gas industries : significance and problems of gas rate deregulation for large industrial customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the circumstances surrounding Japanese City gas industries have been changing drastically. On one hand, as energy suppliers, natural gas which has become major fuel resource for city gas, as public utilities, ...

Inoue, Masayuki

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Contract Major Report Form Name __________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract Major Report Form 12/1/94 Name __________________________ Degree __________________________ College __________________________ Descriptive title of contract major _______________________________________________ Current GAP is ___________ in ___________________ hours attempted. Summary of Proposed contract Major 1

Kostic, Milivoje M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Undergraduate Education DECLARATION OF MAJOR(S) / CHANGE OF ADVISOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Undergraduate Education DECLARATION OF MAJOR(S) / CHANGE OF ADVISOR For Liberal Arts Students Updated 7/31/2014 Please inform your previous advisor(s) of any major or advisor changes prior A MAJOR I am declaring a major in ________________________________________________ Major advisor

Dennett, Daniel

142

Get a major competitive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

courses in creativity, entrepreneurship, ethics and leadership. #12;It's like enrolling in a Collision that energy moves things forward. + #12;Many Majors. Innovation Academy students can choose from anyATIvITy In ACTIOn PrACTICum Focuses on the development of creative problem-solving strategies through the completion

Mazzotti, Frank

143

ADVERTISING MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADVERTISING MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST Name: ID#: Expected Graduation Date: Course Number and Title Waiver/Substitution Semester Units FOUNDATION (16 units required) ADVT 341 Advertising Principles & Practice (4) PLUS COMS 202 Rhetoric and the Public Sphere (4) OR RHET 216 Writing for Advertising (4) PLUS

Galles, David

144

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ... Applied Mathematics Biomedical Sciences Computer Science Undergraduate Research Internships and Cooperative Education (Co-op) (optional) Study Abroad WHY IMAGING SCIENCE Science: BS, MS, PhD Color Science: MS, PhD BS + MS/PhD Combos HUMAN VISION BIO- MEDICAL ASTRO- PHYSICS

Zanibbi, Richard

145

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993  

SciTech Connect

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Electric, Street Railway, and Gas Corporations (South Dakota) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric, Street Railway, and Gas Corporations (South Dakota) Electric, Street Railway, and Gas Corporations (South Dakota) Electric, Street Railway, and Gas Corporations (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Line Extension Analysis Provider South Dakota Public Utilities Commission This legislation contains provisions pertaining to a corporation formed for the purpose of constructing, maintaining and operating a street railway or railways; generating, transmitting or distributing electricity to be sold to or used by the public for heat, light or power manufacturing; or producing, supplying, or transporting natural or artificial gas. The

147

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider South Dakota Public Utilities Commission This legislation contains provisions for gas and electric utilities. As part of these regulations, electric utilities are required to file with the

148

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, October - December 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Financial News for Major Energy Companies Financial News for Major Energy Companies Twenty-two major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $4.6 billion during the fourth quarter of 2001 (Q401). The level of net income represented a 65-percent decline relative to the fourth quarter of 2000 (Q400) (Table 1). The majors' foreign upstream oil and natural gas production operations made the largest contribution to overall net income in Q401 at $2.0 billion (Table 1), with domestic upstream oil and natural gas production operations second at $1.8 billion, and worldwide downstream natural gas (i.e., those natural gas operations that occur between the wellhead and the consumer) and power operations third at $1.5 billion. The mergers of Chevron and Texaco, El Paso and

149

DOE to Send Proposed Yucca Mountain Legislation to Congress | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 6, 2007 - 10:28am March 6, 2007 - 10:28am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today he will send to the U.S. Congress a legislative proposal to enhance the nation's ability to manage and dispose of commercial spent nuclear fuel and Defense high-level radioactive waste. "This legislative proposal reflects the Administration's strong commitment to advancing the development of the Yucca Mountain repository, while seeking to provide stability, clarity and predictability in moving the project forward," Secretary Bodman said. "Nuclear power is a clean, reliable domestic source of energy that currently represents approximately 20 percent of the nation's energy supply. The Yucca Mountain repository is critical to the nation's current and future energy and national security

150

Solar PV Project Financing: Regulatory and Legislative Challenges for Third-Party PPA System Owners (Revised)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23 23 Revised February 2010 Solar PV Project Financing: Regulatory and Legislative Challenges for Third-Party PPA System Owners Katharine Kollins Duke University Bethany Speer and Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46723 Revised February 2010 Solar PV Project Financing: Regulatory and Legislative Challenges for Third-Party PPA System Owners Katharine Kollins Duke University Bethany Speer and Karlynn Cory

151

Renewable Energy Project Financing: Impacts of the Financial Crisis and Federal Legislation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

930 930 July 2009 Renewable Energy Project Financing: Impacts of the Financial Crisis and Federal Legislation Paul Schwabe, Karlynn Cory, and James Newcomb National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-44930 July 2009 Renewable Energy Project Financing: Impacts of the Financial Crisis and Federal Legislation Paul Schwabe, Karlynn Cory, and James Newcomb Prepared under Task No. SAO7.9B30 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

152

The Impact of Legislation House Bill 56 on Immigration Laws and Construction in Alabama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................. 19 2.7 Fiscal Impact of Unauthorized Immigration .................................................. 21 2.8 Anti-Illegal Immigration Legislation ............................................................. 25 2.9 Affected Areas... it proceeded to go into effect. The main provisions of the passed law are as follows: ? Allows local law enforcement to demand papers from anyone they deem to be in the country illegally.(ACLU, 2013) 2 ? Makes it a crime for undocumented immigrants...

Garcia, Jose

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

153

Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

155

From promise to peril: the evolution of antisemitic legislation in Romania during the second half of the nineteenth century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This antisemitism manifested itself in a complex web of legislation that prevented Jews living in Romania from obtaining political and civil rights as well as economic and educational opportunities....

Gross, Mary Terese

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

156

Major Program Offices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

101 101 Major Program Offices Doing Business with... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Environmental Management National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Science Gary G. Lyttek, Business Source Manager FY2010 DOE Procurement Base: $22.9B $1,556 $5,701 $9,523 $3,793 $2,304 $'s - Millions EE EM NNSA SC Other 2 Presentation for the DOE Small Business Conference EERE Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOA) May 2011 3 Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 4 * The mission and vision of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is to strengthen America's energy security, environmental quality and economic vitality in public-private partnerships that: * Enhance energy efficiency and productivity

157

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states, as well as eight associate states and 10 international affiliates (including seven Canadian provinces). Members participate in the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact

158

Shale Gas and Hydrofracturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in horizontal drilling technology and hydrofracturing allow natural gas to escape from shale formations following high pressure treatment, i.e. “fracking” with sand, water and chemicals. ... With fracking, natural gas prices have remained low at less than $2.50 per million BTU. ... Fracking chemicals, petrochemicals, and metals and radionuclides from source rock cause major environmental burdens if not properly treated or deep-injected. ...

Jerald L. Schnoor

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

Major Energy Producers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

206(92) 206(92) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 January 1994 Elk. I nergy Information dministration This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents McPherson Square Bookstore U.S. Government Printing Office 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20402 Washington, DC 20005 (202)783-3238 (202)653-2050 FAX (202)512-2233 FAX (202)376-5055 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., eastern time, M-F 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as

160

EFRC CMSNF Major Accomplishments  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) has been to develop a first-principles-based understanding of thermal transport in the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2, in the presence of defect microstructure associated with radiation environments. The overarching goal within this mission was to develop an experimentally validated multiscale modeling capability directed toward a predictive understanding of the impact of radiation and fission-product induced defects and microstructure on thermal transport in nuclear fuel. Implementation of the mission was accomplished by integrating the physics of thermal transport in crystalline solids with microstructure science under irradiation through multi institutional experimental and computational materials theory teams from Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Purdue University, the University of Florida, the University of Wisconsin, and the Colorado School of Mines. The Center’s research focused on five major areas: (i) The fundamental aspects of anharmonicity in UO2 crystals and its impact on thermal transport; (ii) The effects of radiation microstructure on thermal transport in UO2; (iii) The mechanisms of defect clustering in UO2 under irradiation; (iv) The effect of temperature and oxygen environment on the stoichiometry of UO2; and (v) The mechanisms of growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation. The Center has made important progress in each of these areas, as summarized below.

D. Hurley; Todd R. Allen

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Engineering Methane is a major component of shale gas. Recent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-added chemicals, (ii) efficient electricity generation through fuel cells, and (iii) methane storage for vehicles), and electrochemical oxidation of CH4 in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). In situ IR studies revealed that adsorbed-based catalysts involved decomposition of CH4 to surface carbon/coke and adsorbed hydrogen, followed

162

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control This legislation prohibits the waste of oil or gas and the pollution of water, air, or land. The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to implement regulations designed to prevent the waste of oil and gas, promote environmental stewardship, and regulate the exploration,

163

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Applications for Certificates for Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas Transmission Facilities (Ohio) Applications for Certificates for Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas Transmission Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider The Ohio Power Siting Board An applicant for a certificate to site a major electric power, gas, or natural gas transmission facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a reference for state and local governments and for the public. The applicant shall provide a statement explaining the need for the

165

PROPOSED PORTHOLE FOR ASTRONOMY MAJORS Information for Astronomy Majors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROPOSED PORTHOLE FOR ASTRONOMY MAJORS Information for Astronomy Majors The Astronomy Major sciences such as Astronomy, Physics, or Engineering. (Link to details on Astrophysics Concentration) The General Astronomy Concentration is intended for students who do not plan on research careers in astronomy

Richardson Jr., James E.

166

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For each major emission source identified in the previous step to evaluate greenhouse gas (GHG) emission profile, Federal agencies should review possible strategies for reducing GHG emissions and determine what assets may benefit from each strategy.

167

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Oil and Gas Production (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production (Missouri) Production (Missouri) Oil and Gas Production (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Missouri Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources A State Oil and Gas Council regulates and oversees oil and gas production in Missouri, and conducts a biennial review of relevant rules and regulations. The waste of oil and gas is prohibited. This legislation contains additional information about the permitting, establishment, and operation of oil and gas wells, while additional regulations address oil and gas drilling and production and well spacing and unitization

169

Natural catalytic activity in a marine shale for generating natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...natural catalytic activity in marine shales. Gas is generated at ambient temperatures...differences are in degree. Mowry shale generates gas compositions that are quite different...probably a major source of natural gas. Mowry shale generates gas at thermodynamic...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

171

Major Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Renovations Major Renovations Major Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis Project Phases for Major Renovations The major renovation process still follows the phases of project design and construction, from planning to operations and maintenance. More information on how to integrate renewable energy into the phases of design is discussed in the main portion of this Guide. Major renovations are more constricted in design choices than new construction, but can still offer a wide range of opportunities for integrating renewable energy technologies into the renovation process. During a major Federal building renovation, more design factors may be pre-determined, such as building site and orientation, but a whole building design approach can still offer the most economic and efficient options.

172

INTRACRANIAL INJURY AND MORTALITY ASSOCIATED WITH MOTORCYCLE-RELATED HOSPITALIZATIONS: DIFFERENCES IN INCIDENCE AND COSTS ON THE BASIS OF UNIVERSAL MOTORCYCLE HELMET USE LEGISLATION IN THE UNITED STATES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Intracranial Injury and Mortality Associated with Motorcycle-related Hospitalizations: Differences in Incidence and Costs on the Basis of Universal Motorcycle Helmet Use Legislation in the United… (more)

Parker, Brenda Marie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2008 3, 2008 Next Release: October 30, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 22) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week increased as a result of cold weather in some major gas consuming areas of the country, several ongoing pipeline maintenance projects, and the continuing production shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico region. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month contract (November 2008) increased on the week to $6.777 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) as of yesterday (October 22). The net weekly increase occurred during a week in which the price increased in three trading sessions. As of Friday, October 17, working gas in underground storage totaled

174

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace blowerto the annual electricity consumption of a major appliance.not account for the electricity consumption of the appliance

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James E.; McNeil, Michael; Lutz, Jim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Natural gas pipeline technology overview.  

SciTech Connect

The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Majorization-preserving quantum channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this report, we give a characterization to those quantum channels that preserve majorization relationship between quantum states. Some remarks are presented as well.

Lin Zhang

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Development &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipelinesk > Development & Expansion Pipelinesk > Development & Expansion About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipeline Development and Expansion Timing | Determining Market Interest | Expansion Options | Obtaining Approval | Prefiling Process | Approval | Construction | Commissioning Timing and Steps for a New Project An interstate natural gas pipeline construction or expansion project takes an average of about three years from the time it is first announced until the new pipe is placed in service. The project can take longer if it encounters major environmental obstacles or public opposition. A pipeline development or expansion project involves several steps: Determining demand/market interest

178

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Gas Leakage Detection Using Thermal Imaging Technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas leakage is one of the hazards that can cause major incidents to human injuries, fires as well as high impact on economic. To avoid such situation, a preventive inspection is paramount important. Since gas leakage is unseen by naked eyes due to the ... Keywords: gas leakage, image processing, infrared image

Mohd Shawal Jadin, Kamarul Hawari Ghazali

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Jeffery Greenblatt November 2013 For decades, California has used groundbreaking tools to collect and analyze emissions data from a variety of sources to establish a scientific basis for policy making. As its scope has expanded to include greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions, it has sought out similar tools to use to achieve the goals of legislation such as the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32). To support this effort, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model funded by the California Air Resources Board (ARB), to explore the impact of combinations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

182

Dept. of Psychology Majors Advising  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dept. of Psychology Majors Advising Summer 2011 Whether you are choosing courses or deciding on Psychology as your major, a faculty advisor can help you plan your degree and ensure you meet all.rockman@uwinnipeg.ca E-mail for an appt. Contact the Psychology Department Assistant for info

Martin, Jeff

183

@Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major. From the basic laws of physics to the resulting emergent behavior, physics studies what the universe is made of and how it works. As a Physics major that surrounds us, to the structure and evolution of the entire universe. We offer three degrees in Physics

Yoo, S. J. Ben

184

Education majors participate in Furman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's science education coordinator, was to celebrate scholarship and creative endeavors. After years of smallEducation majors participate in Furman Engaged Day! Five education majors presented their research an impressive list of over 220 poster displays in the Physical Activities Center, 50 oral presentations

185

Chapter 1 - Natural Gas Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is the most energy-efficient fossil fuel; it offers important energy-saving benefits when it is used instead of oil or coal. Although the primary use of natural gas is as a fuel, it is also a source of hydrocarbons for petrochemical feedstocks and a major source of elemental sulfur, an important industrial chemical. Its popularity as an energy source is expected to grow substantially in the future because natural gas can help achieve two important energy goals for the twenty-first century: providing the sustainable energy supplies and services needed for social and economic development and reducing adverse impacts on global climate and the environment in general. Natural gas consumption and trade have been growing steadily over the past two decades, and natural gas has strengthened its position in the world energy mix. Although natural gas demand declined in 2009, as a result of the economic slowdown, it is expected to resume growth in both emerging and traditional markets in the coming decades. Such increase in the near future will be driven because of additional demand in current uses, primarily power generation. There is yet little overlap between the use of natural gas and oil in all large markets. However, there are certain moves in the horizon, including the electrifying of transportation, that will push natural gas use to ever higher levels. This book gives the reader an introduction to natural gas by describing the origin and composition of natural gas, gas sources, phase behavior and properties, and transportation methods. Keywords: Absolute Open Flow, bulk modulus of elasticity, coal-bed methane, cricondenbar, cricondentherm, Expected Ultimate Recovery, gas deviation factor, higher heating value, Inflow Performance Relationship, kerogen, laminar flow, liquefied natural gas, primary thermogenic gas, pyrobitumen, secondary thermogenic gas, super-compressibility factor, thiol, Tubing Performance Curve, turbulent flow, unconventional gas resources, Wobbe Index, Wobbe Number.

Saeid Mokhatab; William A. Poe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

187

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

188

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

189

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

190

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

191

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

192

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

193

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

194

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

195

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

196

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

197

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

198

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

199

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

200

West Virginia University 1 Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

West Virginia University 1 Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Degrees Offered · Master of science in petroleum and natural gas engineering · Master of science in engineering with a major in petroleum and natural gas engineering · Doctor of philosophy in engineering with a major

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Financial News for Major Energy Producers, Third Quarter 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Release Date: January 5, 2011 Next Release Date: To Be Determined Report Sections: Corporate and Petroleum Net Income Worldwide Oil and Gas Production Operations Worldwide Refining/Marketing Operations Worldwide Petroleum Capital Expenditures Worldwide Downstream Natural Gas and Power, and Chemicals Operations Supplemental Figures Supplemental Tables Download this Report: Full Report in PDF-Format Past Issues in PDF-Format Additional Information FRS Home Financial Terms Glossary Contacts Notes: The "Financial News for Major Energy Producers" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy producers. "Major energy producers" are respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System). All U.S.-based respondent companies that

202

Innovative Nanocoatings Unlock the Potential for Major Energy and Cost  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanocoatings Unlock the Potential for Major Energy and Nanocoatings Unlock the Potential for Major Energy and Cost Savings for Airline Industry Innovative Nanocoatings Unlock the Potential for Major Energy and Cost Savings for Airline Industry July 17, 2012 - 3:33pm Addthis Erosion-resistant nanocoatings are making gas turbine engines more efficient, reducing cost and saving fuel. Erosion-resistant nanocoatings are making gas turbine engines more efficient, reducing cost and saving fuel. Bob Gemmer Technology Manager, Research and Development for the Advanced Manufacturing Office What does this mean for me? WIth help from DOE, one company has developed a nanocoating that has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of aircrafts and save the airline industry hundreds of millions of dollars in fuel costs annually.

203

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: May 22, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices increased in a majority of regions of the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 7-14).The Henry Hub spot price increased $0.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.51, the highest average price recorded at the Henry Hub in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also continued on an upward trend that has resulted in weekly price increases in 6 of the last 7 report weeks. The futures contract for June delivery increased 27.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to approximately $11.60. During the week ending Friday, May 9, estimated net injections of natural gas into underground storage totaled the largest volume to date

204

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 25, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 17, 2010) Natural gas prices continued their decline across much of the country for the week ended February 17. Even prices in the Northeast, which registered large increases during the previous week, fell as of yesterday. On the week, natural gas spot prices registered net decreases at almost all locations in the lower 48 States. The significant price increases for the week ended February 10 in the Northeast occurred in response to the two major snow storms that slammed the Mid-Atlantic and parts of the Northeast. However, with average temperatures this report week resembling historical normals, prices in the

205

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

206

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 2, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 25, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 18, natural gas spot prices fell at most markets across the lower 48 States. Although a majority of markets posted declines of as much as $1.36 per million Btu (MMBtu), selected western market locations posted relatively narrow gains on the week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.36 per MMBtu, or about 8 percent, averaging $3.99 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, August 25, falling below $4 per MMBtu for the first time since May 7. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.871 per

207

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward Verification of Emissions Control Compliance Speaker(s): Marc Fischer Date: April 29, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Local to international control of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will require systematic estimation of emissions and independent verification. California, the only state in the US with legislated controls on GHG emissions, is conducting research to enable emissions verification of the mandated emissions reductions (AB-32). The California Energy Commission supports the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project at LBNL. In collaboration with NOAA, CALGEM measures mixing ratios of all significant GHGs at two tall-towers and on aircraft in

208

Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Public Service Commission The Public Service Commission is responsible for regulating gas, electric, and water companies in the state. This legislation contains provisions for such companies, addressing planning and siting considerations for electric

209

EM Major Procurements | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Major Procurements EM Major Procurements Following is a listing of major procurement actions currently being competed by the Office of Environmental Management. Information...

210

Decision making in coastal fisheries conflict: the case of red drum and spotted seatrout legislation in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stricter Measures Called For The TPWD Increases Regulations on Red and Spotted Seatrout Illegal Netting 61 65 66 Drum TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) IV CASE FINDINGS (continued) The Opposition Increases The Legislative Process Economic Impact... of the controversial House B i 1 1 1000 in the Texas Legislature. H B. 1000 was signed into law in May, 1981 and prohibits the possession or transportation for the purpose of sale red drum or spotted seatrout taken from waters under the jurisdiction of the state...

Christian, Richard Travis

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Effect of Gas Sparging in Mammalian Cell Bioreactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the major problems in the operations of mammalian cell bioreactors is the detrimental effect of gas sparging. Since the most convenient way to oxygenate any bioreactor is by gas sparging, this adverse effect has ...

Wang, Daniel I.C.

212

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

213

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

214

Gas separation process  

SciTech Connect

The method for production of high purity hydrogen and high purity carbon monoxide from a mixed gas stream comprising these components together with carbon dioxide and a zero to a minor amount of one or more other gaseous contaminants is described comprising the steps of: (a) passing the mixed gas stream into and through a first bed of solid adsorbent capable of selectively adsorbing carbon dioxide and water while discharging from the bed a dry CO/sub 2/-freed effluent; (b) introducing the dry CO/sub 2/-freed effluent into a cryogenic environment for cooling the same therein under conditions effective for condensation of at least the major part of the carbon monoxide present in the dry CO/sub 2/-freed effluent; (c) withdrawing from the cryogenic environment carbon monoxide of high purity; (d) separately withdrawing from the cryogenic environment an uncondensed first gas stream product comprised of crude hydrogen and subjecting the first gas stream product to selective adsorption of non-hydrogen components therefrom in a second bed of solid absorbent, while recovering from the second bed the non-sorbed fraction as a product stream of essentially pure hydrogen; (e) purging the second solid adsorbent bed to desorb non-hydrogen components sorbed therein in step (d), and withdrawing from the bed a gas stream comprising the desorbed non-hydrogen components.

Nicholas, D.M.; Hopkins, J.A.; Roden, T.M.; Bushinsky, J.P.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

215

Dirichlet polynomials, Majorization, and Trumping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majorization and trumping are two partial orders which have proved useful in quantum information theory. We show some relations between these two partial orders and generalized Dirichlet polynomials, Mellin transforms, and completely monotone functions. These relations are used to prove a succinct generalization of Turgut's characterization of trumping.

Rajesh Pereira; Sarah Plosker

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

216

Summary of Curricula Major Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curricula provide the following opportunities for study: (1) Liberal arts and sciences: Curricula arts and sciences: Curricula in major fields leading to the Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance, or Bachelor of Music degree in applied arts and sciences. (3) Professional

Ponce, V. Miguel

217

I. Canada EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment I. CANADA SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by this resource study. Figure I-1 illustrates certain of the major shale gas and shale oil basins in

unknown authors

218

Major Communications Reports | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Major Communications Reports Major Communications Reports May 18, 2012 Green Button Data: More Power to You May 28, 2009 Major Communications Report May 28, 2009 May 7, 2009 Major...

219

GEOLOGIC ASSESSMENT OF DRILLING, COMPLETION, AND STIMULATION METHODS IN SELECTED GAS SHALE PLAYS WORLDWIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States regularly imports majority of the transportation oil, and several TCF of natural gas annually. Nevertheless, there is very large resource of natural gas in unconventional reservoirs, with over 2,200 TCF of natural gas in just...

Patel, Harsh Jay

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation Separation Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Gas separation unit operations represent major cost elements in gasification plants. The gas separation technology being supported in the DOE program promises significant reduction in cost of electricity, improved thermal efficiency, and superior environmental performance. Gasification-based energy conversion systems rely on two gas separation processes: (1) separation of oxygen from air for feed to oxygen-blown gasifiers; and (2) post-gasification separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide following (or along with) the shifting of gas composition when carbon dioxide capture is required or hydrogen is the desired product. Research efforts include development of advanced gas separation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

222

1 - Introduction to gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter provides an overview of the importance of gas turbines for the power generation and oil and gas sector and – in less detail – the aviation sector. Worldwide trends in power generation and electricity conversion processes and the role of gas turbines to minimise CO2 emissions are addressed. Gas turbines are essential and crucial to reduce emissions both in aviation and in power production. Technologies for improving gas turbine and system efficiency, through higher turbine inlet temperatures, improved materials, cooling methods and thermal barrier coatings are described. New thermodynamic approaches, including intercooling, water and steam injection and hybrid cycles are addressed. Major issues are also fuel and operational flexibility, reliability and availability, cost reduction and power density, especially for the offshore sector. Market trends have been sketched. In the coming decades, gas turbines will be one of the major technologies for CO2 emission reductions in the power generation, aviation, oil and gas exploration and transport sectors. This prognosis is based on their high current efficiency and further efficiency improvement potential, both for simple cycle as for combined-cycle applications.

A.J.A. Mom

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPING A TIGHT GAS SAND ADVISOR FOR COMPLETION AND STIMULATION IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS WORLDWIDE A Thesis by KIRILL BOGATCHEV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering DEVELOPING A TIGHT GAS SAND ADVISOR FOR COMPLETION AND STIMULATION IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS WORLDWIDE A Thesis by KIRILL...

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Accounting for Adsorbed gas and its effect on production bahavior of Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCOUNTING FOR ADSORBED GAS AND ITS EFFECT ON PRODUCTION BEHAVIOR OF SHALE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SALMAN AKRAM MENGAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ACCOUNTING FOR ADSORBED GAS AND ITS EFFECT ON PRODUCTION BEHAVIOR OF SHALE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SALMAN AKRAM MENGAL...

Mengal, Salman Akram

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

225

Production decline analysis of horizontal well in gas shale reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The major factor influencing the increase of natural gas use is the rise in its global demand. Due to the relentlessly increasing demand, there have… (more)

Adekoya, Folarin.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

High Detail Stationary Optimization Models for Gas Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 15, 2014 ... Abstract: Due to strict regulatory rules in combination with complex nonlinear physics, major gas network operators in Germany and Europe ...

Martin Schmidt

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

The doctoral thesis "Gender Quotas in Company Boards and Recruitment Effects" explores the legislative demand for gender balance in Norwegian public limited company (PLC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the legislative demand for gender balance in Norwegian public limited company (PLC) boards, and in particular article is based on a survey conducted in 2008. In the survey, all board members of PLC boards were

Løw, Erik

228

Modeling the CO2 Footprint of the U.S. Coal Mining Industry and the Potential Economic Costs of CO2 Legislation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The U.S. government is expected to develop a federal mandate which will aim tocurb CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. This legislation will most likely be… (more)

Aziz, AbdulMajeed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

230

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

231

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

232

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

233

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

234

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

235

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

236

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

237

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

238

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

239

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

240

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

242

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

243

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

244

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

246

Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity  

SciTech Connect

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust belt play is divided into two subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust-Mesozoic-cored structures and (2) A

Thomas Chidsey

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Lower prices and a report of another considerable net injection to stocks were featured in last week's gas markets. As of Friday, May 11, 2001, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.24 from the previous Friday to $4.25 per MMBtu. The NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.212 for the week to $4.278 per MMBtu. A record-setting 108 Bcf was added to natural gas stocks for the week ended May 4, 2001. The demand for cooling is still somewhat limited as mild temperatures prevailed around most of the country. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Prices Mid-week prices were at the lowest level since early August. Even with an end-of-the-week influence from the futures market that caused a slight upturn, spot prices at the major supply hubs were $0.25 to $0.65 cents per MMBtu lower on a week-to-week basis with Katy, Texas ending at $4.23; the Henry Hub, Louisiana at $4.25; Midcon, Oklahoma at $4.11; and Opal, Wyoming at $3.30. Prices at the Chicago and New York citygates were lower as well, registering $4.35 and $4.65 at week's end, off a respective $0.27 and $0.20 per MMBtu for the week. SoCal provided the only exception to the generally lower trend as demand increased because of warmer temperatures. Natural gas prices receded before temperatures did, though. The effect of unscheduled maintenance on the PG&E Gas Transmission system was imperceptible to PG&E's large-volume purchasers. By Friday, the PG&E customers were paying $3.51 less at $4.18 while SoCal's citygate price was only $0.47 lower at $11.92.

248

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, June 4. On the week (Wednesday, June 4-Wednesday, June 11), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 35 cents per MMBtu to $6.06. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 16 cents per MMBtu to $6.213. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 6, increased to 1,324 Bcf, which is 25.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.36 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (June 11) closing price of $32.17 per barrel, or $5.55 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas spot prices at many market locations in the Lower 48 States have declined for three consecutive trading days from Friday peaks as key market areas in the Midwest and the Eastern seaboard have experienced unseasonably cool weather. Although prices remain elevated, the slackened demand for natural gas for electric generation has contributed to prices generally softening across the board. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub dropped about 6 percent to $6.06 per MMBtu, while other pricing points on the Gulf Coast showed slightly greater declines and fell below the $6-mark. The overall easing of prices may reflect also the slightly improving storage picture as injections in 7 of the past 8 weeks have exceeded the 5-year average with a record net addition reported last Thursday. Although the storage refill season started slowly, injections have increased considerably, with at least one major interstate pipeline serving the Northeast, Tennessee Gas Pipeline, announcing restrictions to shippers due to injection nominations exceeding capacity. The spot price at Tennessee Gas Pipeline's Zone 6, which serves major citygates in New York and other Northeastern states, this week fell 47 cents per MMBtu to $6.30. In contrast to the East, prices in the West moved higher early in the week, as maintenance on El Paso Natural Gas in the San Juan Basin restricted deliveries from the region and a heat wave sparked buying at pricing locations in California and New Mexico. The spot price at the Southern California border surged 61 cents per MMBtu on Monday to $5.78, but has since dropped to $5.51, which is a net decline of 51 cents since Wednesday, June 4.

249

NGVs: Driving to the 21st Century. 17th National Natural Gas Vehicle Conference and Exhibition, October 3-5, 1999 [conference organizational literature and agenda  

SciTech Connect

By attending the conference, participants learn about new and planned OEM vehicle and engine technologies; studies comparing Diesel and gasoline emissions to natural gas; new state and federal legislation; and innovative marketing programs they can use to help sell their products and services.

None

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

250

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell for a third consecutive week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 10-17), as temperatures for most of the nation continued to be moderate to seasonal. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, for the smallest week-on-week decrease in the nation. Spot gas traded there yesterday (Wednesday, November 17) at $6.06 per MMBtu. Price declines at the majority of market locations ranged from around a dime to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the price for the near-month natural gas futures contract (for December delivery) fell by almost 40 cents on the week, settling yesterday at $7.283 per MMBtu. EIA reported that working gas inventories in underground storage were 3,321 Bcf as of Friday, November 12, which is 9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined for a fourth consecutive week, dropping $1.85 per barrel ($0.32 per MMBtu), or nearly 4 percent, from last Wednesday's level, to trade yesterday at $46.85 per barrel ($8.08 per MMBtu).

251

Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance Major I ­ Pre-professional (Medicine, Dentistry, Business, Law, Engineering) Major II ­ ACS Certified e.g. Graduate Study or Entry Level Chemistry Employment. Major III ­ Forensic Chemistry Major IV** ­ Biochemistry Option Chemistry Minor General Chemistry I & II

Schmitt, William R.

252

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 14, 2010) While natural gas spot prices inched lower at a number of market locations, prices at the majority of points in the lower 48 States increased since last Wednesday, April 7. Overall, spot prices in the lower 48 States varied between a 3-percent increase and a 3-percent decrease on the week. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, April 14, 7 cents higher than the preceding week, at $4.15 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.199 per

253

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 11, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 3, 2010) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, limiting demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices declined, with the biggest decreases occurring at markets in the Rocky Mountains and the Midcontinent. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.15 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by $0.10 on the week to $4.76 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 26, working gas in underground storage was

254

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2001 25, 2001 The industry stock build that began in April has continued into June as the latest weekly estimate indicates that more than 100 Bcf was again added to working gas storage levels. At the same time that natural gas stocks have been increasing, prices have been generally trending down. Prices at many major spot markets moved down most days last week and ended the week between 20 and 30 cents per MMBtu below Tuesday's prices. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (July) contract also ended the week down 25 cents from Tuesday's high of $3.981. Much of the country continued to enjoy moderate temperatures during last week, which saw the first day of summer (June 21) prices (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map).

255

Presidential rhetoric for legislative action: Lyndon B. Johnson and the Civil Rights Act of 1964  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 made major changes in the relationship between Anglo-Americans and African Americans in the United States. This important statute declared illegal a segregated society, and put into the books of law the rights promised...

Pauley, Garth E

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Washington Update -Congress Passes FY11 Spending Legislation April 15, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

John Boehner, and Majority Leader Harry Reid, agreed to at the midnight hour on Friday, April 8 of the government, science agencies are subject to small reductions, reflecting the restrained fiscal climate. Here's what made it into the bill: #12;· NOAA is prohibited from establishing or implementing a Climate

257

International oil and gas exploration and development activities  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of an ongoing series of quarterly publications that monitors discoveries of oil and natural gas in foreign countries and provides an analysis of the reserve additions that result. The report is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). It presents a summary of discoveries and reserve additions that result from recent international exploration and development activities. It is intended for use by petroleum industry analysts, various government agencies, and political leaders in the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy plans, policy, and legislation. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

259

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

260

Financial News for Major Energy Producers, Third Quarter 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Major for Major Energy Producers > Company List Financial News for Major Energy Producers, Third Quarter 2010 What is FRS? | Contacts | FRS Home Corporate and Petroleum Net Income Worldwide Oil and Gas Production Operations Worldwide Refining/Marketing Operations Worldwide Petroleum Capital Expenditures Worldwide Downstream Natural Gas and Power Operations, Supplemental Figures Supplemental Tables Download this Report: pdf icon Full Report in PDF-format pdf icon Past issues in PDF-format Additional Information FRS Home Financial Terms Glossary Contacts Company List for the Financial News for Major Energy Producers Links to the press releases of 21 companies are provided below, which is the number of companies that are included in this report. Only 20 of the companies are included in compilation of corporate revenue and corporate net income because the U.S. operations of BP are included in the results of the U.S. lines of business, but not in the foreign or corporate results because it is foreign based and does not report the overall revenues and net income of its U.S. affiliate.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

262

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

263

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

264

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

265

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

266

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

267

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

268

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

269

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

270

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

271

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

272

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

273

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

274

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

275

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

276

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

279

Small gas turbine technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small Gas Turbine Technology: Small gas turbine, in the power range up to 500 kW, requires a recuperated thermodynamic cycle to achieve an electrical efficiency of about 30%. This efficiency is the optimum, which is possible for a cycle pressure ratio of about 4–1. The cycle airflow is function of the power requirement. To increase the efficiency, in view to reduce the CO2 emission, it is mandatory to develop a more efficient thermodynamic cycle. Different thermodynamic cycles were examined and the final choice was made for an Intercooled, Recuperated cycle. The advantage of this cycle, for the same final electrical efficiency of about 35%, is the smaller cycle airflow, which is the most dimensional parameter for the important components as the heat exchanger recuperator and the combustion chamber. In parallel with the thermodynamic cycle it is necessary to develop the High Speed Alternator technology, integrated on the same shaft that the gas turbine rotating components, to achieve the constant efficiency at part loads, from 50% up to 100%, by the capacity to adjust the engine speed at the required load. To satisfy the stringent requirement in pollutant emissions of \\{NOx\\} and CO, the catalytic combustion system is the most efficient and this advance technology has to be proven. The major constraints for the small gas turbine technology development are the production cost and the maintenance cost of the unit. In the power range of 0–500 kW the gas turbine technology is in competition with small reciprocating engines, which are produced in large quantity for automotive industry, at a very low production cost.

Andre Romier

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, November 19, 2001 Monday, November 19, 2001 Last week, the NYMEX futures contract price for December delivery at the Henry Hub continued the generally downward trend that began in late October. The contract ended last week's trading at $2.637 per MMBtu-nearly 55 cents lower than the $3.183 recorded when it began as the near-month contract on October 30. Spot prices also experienced a similar pattern and reportedly declined well over $1.00 per MMBtu at most major market locations. The spot price at the Henry Hub on Friday hit its lowest level in more than two and a half years. The continued warmer-than-normal weather in most parts of the country appears to be a major contributing factor in the almost 3-week decline in natural gas prices. (Temperature Map) (Temperature Deviation Map) Another factor is the relatively high stocks that continued to increase in the second week of November. Working gas in storage now stands at its highest level since November 1998. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped by more than $2.00 per barrel on Thursday and ended the week at $18.05, or $3.11 per MMBtu-its lowest level in over 2 years.

282

The Challenge of Producing Oil and Gas in Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...institutions (Joides). The oil industry has drilled controlled...major unexplored frontier for oil and gas. The paper emphasizes...engineering geology natural gas offshore petroleum production 1977 06...1981 The challenge of producing oil and gas in deep water van Eek...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

284

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

285

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

286

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

287

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 29) 2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 29) Natural gas spot prices increased 10 to 60 cents per MMBtu at nearly all major trading locations in the Lower 48 States as space-heating demand remained strong amid very cold temperatures in critical gas-consuming markets. However, elevated prices of $40 per MMBtu and more in the Northeast eased closer to historical norms over the course of the week following at least a temporary reprieve from the extreme cold in the region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $0.53 per MMBtu, or 9 percent, to $6.27. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub fell approximately 24 cents per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, January 21) at $6.150. Natural gas in storage was 2,258 Bcf as of Friday, January 16, which is 9.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.91 per barrel or about 2.6 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $35.53 per barrel or $6.13 per MMBtu.

288

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) 10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 2-9) as a late season cold front moved into major gas-consuming regions of the country, bringing a reminder that the end of winter is still two weeks away. Spot prices climbed 17 to 76 cents per MMBtu at trading locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday. Price changes in the Northeast were at the higher end of the range, while trading in the West resulted in gains at the lower end. The Henry Hub spot price increased 38 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.99. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery gained 16.3 cents per MMBtu, settling at $6.880 on Wednesday, March 9. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, March 4, decreased to 1,474 Bcf, which is 25.7 percent above the 5-year (2000-2004) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded at near-record highs, rising $1.75 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $54.75 per barrel, or $9.44 per MMBtu.

289

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Natural gas from methane hydrate has the potential to play a major role in ensuring adequate future energy supplies in the US. The worldwide volume of gas in the hydrate state has been estimated to be approximately 1.5 x 10^16 m^3 (Makogon 1984). More than...

Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

291

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2001 7, 2001 With the return of above-average storage refill estimates for the third week of August and relatively widespread normal temperatures, prices moved down at most major markets last week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot market price ended the week down 46 cents per MMBtu at $2.77. On the futures market, the near-month (September) NYMEX contract ended trading on Friday at $2.706 per MMBtu-off close to $0.60 from the previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil remained at or above $27.20 per barrel each day last week and ended the week at $28.30 or $4.88 per MMBtu. Prices: Spot prices at most major market locations began the week down from the previous Friday, then trended up slightly at mid-week. However, following the release of the American Gas Association (AGA) weekly storage estimate on Wednesday for the previous week, prices moved down between 25 and 35 cents per MMBtu at key regional markets. Prices fell further in the Rockies, with most trading points there down a few cents either side of a half dollar. Spot gas at the Henry Hub traded at its lowest level since July 2 when it traded for $2.93 per MMBtu. Prices at other major markets all were below $3.00 at the end of the week. Some examples of these were: Katy in East Texas at $2.78 per MMBtu, Waha in West Texas at $2.71, and Midcontinent in Oklahoma at $2.65. The lowest prices reported were found in the Rockies where prices were mostly less than $2.20 per MMBtu.

292

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

294

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

federal minimum energy conservation standards. Thus, someEnergy Conservation Act (NAECA) legislation of 1987 established the initial minimum standards

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James E.; McNeil, Michael; Lutz, Jim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): Standard Relating to Solar Hot Water - Requires new Federal buildings, or Federal buildings undergoing major renovations, to meet at least 30 percent of hot water demand through the use of solar hot water heaters, if cost-effective. [Section 523] Federally-Procured Appliances with Standby Power - Requires all Federal agencies to procure appliances with standby power consumption of less than 1 watt, if available and cost-effective. [Section 524] Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, enacted December 19, 2007 Energy Reduction Goals for Federal Buildings - Amended reduction goals set by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, and

296

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, January - March 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Companies Twenty-four major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $13.9 billion on revenues of $198.3 billion during the first quarter of 2004 (Q104). The level of net income for Q104 was significantly higher than in the first quarter of 2003 (Q103), rising 18 percent (Table 1). The overall increase in net income was due primarily to slightly higher crude oil prices, higher foreign production of crude oil, and higher refinery throughput. Overall, the petroleum line of business (which includes both oil and natural gas production and petroleum refining/marketing) registered an 8-percent increase in net income between Q103 and Q104, as the 3-percent increase in oil and gas production net income was augmented by a 30-percent increase in refining/marketing net income.

297

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Global Natural Gas Market Trends, 2. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of major trends occurring in the natural gas industry and includes a concise look at the drivers behind recent rapid growth in gas usage and the challenges faced in meeting that growth. Topics covered include: an overview of Natural Gas including its history, the current market environment, and its future market potential; an analysis of the overarching trends that are driving a need for change in the Natural Gas industry; a description of new technologies being developed to increase production of Natural Gas; an evaluation of the potential of unconventional Natural Gas sources to supply the market; a review of new transportation methods to get Natural Gas from producing to consuming countries; a description of new storage technologies to support the increasing demand for peak gas; an analysis of the coming changes in global Natural Gas flows; an evaluation of new applications for Natural Gas and their impact on market sectors; and, an overview of Natural Gas trading concepts and recent changes in financial markets.

NONE

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

Major Communications Report March 24, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of March 24, 2009.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

STUDY ABROADFOR GOVERNMENT MAJORS DEPARTMENT OF GOVERNMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

many hours of elective (lower vs. upper division) credit do I have remaining in my major building your resume now. CREDIT Obtain core, major, or elective credits that count toward your degree

John, Lizy Kurian

302

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x The pipeline runs PRODIGAL gene predictions on all genomes, runs pan-reciprocal BLAST, and...

303

Mozambique becomes a major coking coal exporter?  

SciTech Connect

In addition to its potential role as a major international supplier of coking coal, Mozambique will also become a major source of power generation for southern Africa. 3 figs.

Ruffini, A.

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Major Communications Report May 5, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of May 5, 2009.

305

Major Communications Report February 23, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of February 23,...

306

Major Communications Report April 17, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of April 17, 2009.

307

Major Communications Report May 28, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of May 28, 2009.

308

Major Communications Report May 7, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of May 7, 2009.

309

Major Communications Report April 28, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of April 28, 2009.

310

Major Communications Report April 30, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of April 30, 2009.

311

major-projects | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Gasification Projects News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

312

Annual Real Natural Gas Prices by Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Major regulatory reforms at the Federal level began at the end of the 1970s with the passage of the Natural Gas Policy Act, and have affected most phases of the industry and markets Over time the movement to a more competitive model led to lower prices starting around 1983, which was accentuated by the drop in world oil prices in 1986 Gas consumers in all sectors seem to have benefited, on average, from a more competitive marketplace However, several factors have come together recently that have pushed spot gas prices up sharply and which are expected to reverse the downward trend in in real gas prices for the next year or so: U.S. gas production has been relatively flat. Expected demand is high under normal weather assumptions. Gas storage levels are below normal.

313

Major/Conce ntration Advisor Grad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Name TITLE Major/Conce ntration Advisor Grad Abhishek Sharma Computer Science g Addie Evans. Hamid Shahnasser g #12;Name TITLE Major/Conce ntration Advisor Grad Bita Nosratieh Convexity of Domains Mathematics Dr. Alex Schuster g #12;Name TITLE Major/Conce ntration Advisor Grad David Newstrom The Role

314

Major/Concen tration Advisor Grad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Name TITLE Major/Concen tration Advisor Grad Archer, H. M., Sekercioglu, C. H. Mendenhall, C. Carmen R. Domingo g #12;Name TITLE Major/Concen tration Advisor Grad Henry Hunter Confirmation Major/Concen tration Advisor Grad Meghan Bishop DIet and food webs of the California red-legged frog

315

Committee on Educational Policy MAJOR QUALIFICATION POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Committee on Educational Policy MAJOR QUALIFICATION POLICY CEP encourages all undergraduate to formalize these guidelines by implementing a policy that restricts qualification to one or more majors. CEP of the major qualifications policy on other undergraduate programs; · discuss the potential effects

California at Santa Cruz, University of

316

MARKETING MAJOR (Integrated Marketing Communications Specialization)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MARKETING MAJOR (Integrated Marketing Communications Specialization) UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS & Organizational Behavior MKT 370: Marketing Minimum grade of C required for Marketing, IMC majors MGT 405 for Marketing, IMC majors MKT 371: Consumer & Buyer Behavior MKT 370 with a C MKT 373: Integrated Marketing

Ponce, V. Miguel

317

Energy Department, ArcelorMittal Partnership Boosts Efficiency of Major  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department, ArcelorMittal Partnership Boosts Efficiency of Department, ArcelorMittal Partnership Boosts Efficiency of Major Steel Manufacturing Plant Energy Department, ArcelorMittal Partnership Boosts Efficiency of Major Steel Manufacturing Plant December 17, 2012 - 2:14pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Today, Senior Advisor in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Gil Sperling, joined local officials and company representatives for the ribbon cutting ceremony and tour of the ArcelorMittal steel manufacturing plant in East Chicago, Indiana. ArcelorMittal unveiled a new, energy recovery and reuse boiler that recycles waste gas generated through its ironmaking process and uses it to generate electricity to help power the plant. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ArcelorMittal $31.6 million for

318

The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR WATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH GAJDICA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR MATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH...

Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Modelling of automobile shredder residue recycling in the Japanese legislative context  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract End-of-life vehicles (ELVs) represent one of the most important waste flows in Japan and 3.58 million was processed only in fiscal year 2008. In an attempt to reduce waste originating from ELVs, the Japanese Government introduced the ELV Recycling Law in 2002. Automobile shredder residue (ASR) recycling is essential to achieving the goals of the ELV Recycling Law and represents a major concern for the Japanese vehicle recycling industry. This paper proposes the tactical ASR recycling planning model, which can be used to assist Japanese vehicle recyclers to improve their profitability and ASR recycling efficiency. A numerical study is conducted in order to illustrate the potentials and applicability of the proposed modelling approach, and to gain insights into the performances of the Japanese vehicle recycling system and into the influence of the ELV Recycling Law. Sensitivity analyses demonstrate and validate the approach and its potentials. ELV Recycling Law influence is found to be crucial for the decision making on ASR recycling, as the 20% increase in valid recycling quota will cause approximately 50% decrease in the quantity of disposed ASR. We show that the stringent ASR recycling quota is easily attainable and present many interesting insights.

Vladimir Simic; Branka Dimitrijevic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Major Contract Solicitations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Major Contract Solicitations Major Contract Solicitations Welcome to the DOE Headquarters major solicitation page. The following is a listing of major active solicitations. Contained within each solicitation link can be found draft and final solicitations, questions and answers, attachments and all other associated documentation necessary for potential offerors to participate along with contact information. Issuance of Special Notice - Operations and Maintenance Support Services for the iManage Program Aviation Management Green Leases Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Real Estate Approvals Documents and Publications Facilities and Infrastructure Federal Advisory Committee Management Freedom of Information Act Financial Assistance Information Systems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Second Major U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Major U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued Second Major U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued Second Major U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued July 10, 2007 - 2:54pm Addthis Report Evaluates the Emissions, Energy, and Economic Implications of Stabilizing Greenhouse Gas Concentrations WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of the second in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment (S&A) reports. Coordinated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this S&A 2.1 report is titled "Scenarios of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Atmospheric Concentrations, and Review of Integrated Scenario Development and Application," and provides a new long-term, global reference for greenhouse gas stabilization scenarios and an evaluation of

322

and legislative branches of the United States Government. A fellowship awarded under this subsection shall be for a period of not more than 1 year.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in effect under section 204 (c). The Secretary shall make available to the Board such information, personnel, or beneficiary (as determined by the Secretary) of, any grant or contract under section 205 [33 USCS � 1124and legislative branches of the United States Government. A fellowship awarded under

323

Legislative Proposals to Control Carbon Emissions through Cap and Towards the end of 2007 the Climate Change Bill was introduced into the House of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Legislative Proposals to Control Carbon Emissions through Cap and Trade Towards the end of 2007 · efficiency of energy use · carbon pricing through economic mechanisms (taxation or emissions trading through measures aimed at producing reductions in carbon emissions, or otherwise at removing carbon from

Martin, Ralph R.

324

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Southwest Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Southwest Region Southwest Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Southwest Region Overview | Export Transportation | Intrastate | Connection to Gulf of Mexico | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Most of the major onshore interstate natural gas pipeline companies (see Table below) operating in the Southwest Region (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas) are primarily exporters of the region's natural gas production to other parts of the country and Mexico, while an extensive Gulf of Mexico and intrastate natural gas pipeline network is the main conduit for deliveries within the region. More than 56,000 miles of natural gas pipeline on more than 66 intrastate natural gas pipeline systems (including offshore-to-onshore and offshore Gulf of Mexico pipelines) deliver natural gas to the region's local natural gas distribution companies and municipalities and to the many large industrial and electric power facilities located in the region.

326

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 2, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 25, 2011) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand at electric power plants in order to meet air-conditioning needs. Prices moved higher at most trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Southeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.21 to $4.36 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased as the weather outlook suggested higher weather-related consumption for the remaining days of May. The futures contract for June

327

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: March 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 18, 2009) Warmer temperatures moved into major population centers this report week, signaling the imminent end of winter and the corresponding reduction in demand related to space heating. Spot prices continued to decline, with the biggest decreases west of the Mississippi River. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.75. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased as temperatures climbed higher this week. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by 11 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.68, the lowest close for a near-month contract in about 6½ years.

328

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, to Wednesday, April 23) 16, to Wednesday, April 23) Released: April 24, 2008 Next release: May 1, 2008 · Spot prices at all market locations (outside the Rocky Mountain Region) are trading above $9 per million Btu (MMBtu), with a majority of the points registering prices in excess of $10 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 24) at $10.781 MMBtu, continuing the trend of week-over-week increases for the fifth consecutive week. · Natural gas in storage was 1,285 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 18, which is 1.9 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $4.48 per barrel on the week to $119.28 per barrel or $20.57 per MMBtu.

329

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20, 2008 20, 2008 Next Release: December 4, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, November 19, 2008) Wintry weather moved into major population centers in the Lower 48 States this report week, boosting demand related to space heating from the Midcontinent to the eastern half of the country. Prices increased throughout the country, with the biggest increases in the Midcontinent. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.11 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.76. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased for the report week as the second week of the heating season began. The futures contract for December delivery increased by 34 cents per

330

March Natural Gas Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

'PGTI[+PHQTOCVKQP#FOKPKUVTCVKQP0CVWTCN)CU/QPVJN[/CTEJ 'PGTI[+PHQTOCVKQP#FOKPKUVTCVKQP0CVWTCN)CU/QPVJN[/CTEJ EIA Corrects Errors in Its Drilling Activity Estimates Series William Trapmann and Phil Shambaugh Introduction The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status. They are assessed directly for trends, as well as in combination with other measures to assess the productivity and profitability of upstream industry operations. They are a major reference point for policymakers at both the Federal and State level. Users in the private sector include financial

331

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 31, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 23, 2011) Colder weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices moved higher at all trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.33 to $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased significantly as the weather outlook suggested higher consumption for the remaining days of March. The futures contract for April delivery

332

The Natural Gas Competition and Regulation Act of 1998 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Competition and Regulation Act of 1998 Competition and Regulation Act of 1998 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Georgia Applies to States or Provinces Georgia Name The Natural Gas Competition and Regulation Act of 1998 (Georgia) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Generating Facility Rate-Making, Industry Recruitment/Support Affected Technologies Natural Gas Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Georgia Public Service Commission Primary Website http://searuc.org/gas/ngdereg.asp Applicable Jurisdiction Statewide Information Source http://www.legis.ga.gov/Legislation/20012002/6491.pdf Summary The Natural Gas Competition and Deregulation Act's stated intent and

333

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, January 28, 2002 Monday, January 28, 2002 Natural gas prices generally declined last week as mild temperatures continued in most of the country and working gas storage stocks remain at very high levels. Spot prices at most major markets that serve the eastern two-thirds of the country ended the week down from the previous Friday with weather forecasts for the past weekend calling for daytime temperatures to be in the mid 50s to the low 60s in an area stretching from Chicago to Boston. At the Henry Hub prices moved down 9 cents on Friday to end at $2.04 per MMBtu--$0.25 below the previous Friday. The National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6- to 10-day forecast is calling for above normal temperatures to continue through this week in most areas east of the Mississippi River. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) At the NYMEX futures market, the February contract continued to trend down as it ended the week trading at $2.037 per MMBtu-off almost $0.20 from previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained almost $1.80 per barrel reaching $19.80 on Friday or about $3.40 per MMBtu.

334

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 1) 25 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 1) Since Wednesday, August 17, changes to natural gas spot prices were mixed, decreasing in major consuming areas in the Northeast and Midwest, while increasing at most markets in the Rocky Mountains, California, and West Texas regions. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 2 cents to $10 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 24), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery settled at $9.984 per MMBtu, increasing about 59 cents or more than 6 percent since Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,575 Bcf as of August 19, which is 5.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.81 per barrel, or about 6 percent, on the week to a record high price of $67.10 per barrel, or $11.57 per MMBtu.

335

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) 23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) Natural gas spot and futures prices trended down for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 15-22). The cold front that moved into major gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast for the weekend and lingered into the first part of this week had minimal impact on prices. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price fell 24 cents for the week to $3.38 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the near-month contract (June delivery) declined for 5 straight trading sessions before recording a small increase of $0.064 per MMBtu in May 22 trading, to settle at $3.459. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which had held at or above $28 per barrel since last Thursday, fell nearly $1 on Tuesday, May 21, following the American Petroleum Institute's announcement of an unexpected build in crude oil stocks of 5.5 million barrels for the week ended Friday, May 17. For the week (May 15-22), the WTI price was down $0.99, at $27.01 per barrel, or $4.66 per MMBtu.

336

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thursday June 20, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 27) Thursday June 20, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 27) Natural gas spot prices registered gains of a dime or less at most major trading locations this week (Wednesday-Wednesday) as weather-driven demand combined with increasing oil prices to reverse a declining trend in prices. The upward price movement followed 6 weeks of declining prices until a low last Thursday, June 12, when prices at some trading locations along the Gulf Coast dipped just below $3.00 per MMBtu. Futures prices rose late last week after reaching similar lows. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery settled Wednesday, June 19, at $3.314 per MMBtu, an increase of 26 cents for the week. EIA's estimate of total working gas inventories for the week ended June 14 was 2,096 Bcf with implied net injections of 81 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil recovered this week to trade at close to $26 per barrel on Monday, June 17. On Wednesday, the WTI crude oil price closed at $25.57 per barrel, or $4.41 per MMBtu.

337

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 3) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 3) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 19-26), as a large volume of production continued to be shut in from the recent major hurricanes and cool temperatures added space-heating demand in many regions of the country. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.15 per MMBtu, or about 8.5 percent, to $14.67. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 49 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, October 26) at $14.04. A steady pace of injections into underground storage has continued despite offshore production shut-ins of almost 5.6 billion cubic feet (Bcf) a day, indicating substantial demand loss in the wake of the hurricanes and amid the high-price environment. The volume of natural gas in storage was 3,139 Bcf as of Friday, October 21, which is 2.8 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.26 per barrel or about 2 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $60.85, or $10.49 per MMBtu.

338

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2001 23, 2001 Another mid-summer week of relatively mild temperatures in many of the nation's major gas consuming market regions and a large estimate of net injections of working gas into storage put downward pressure on spot and futures prices. Some parts of New England saw high temperatures only in the 70s for several days last week, while highs in the 80s stretched down the mid-Atlantic region as far as northern Georgia and well into the Midwest. On the West Coast, highs rarely exceeded 80 degrees, with a number of locations reporting highs in the 60s. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Spot prices declined for the week in nearly all markets, with spot gas at the Henry Hub trading at $2.95 per MMBtu on Friday, down $0.21 from the previous Friday. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery fell even more, ending the week down $0.295 per MMBtu at $2.955-the first sub-$3 settlement for a near-month contract since April 11 of last year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell four days in a row and traded on Wednesday and Thursday below $25 per barrel before recovering Friday to $25.60 per barrel, or $4.41 per MMBtu. This, too, is the first time since last April that WTI has fallen below $25 per barrel, and is the second week in a row of losses of $1 or more per barrel.

339

Reduced Energy Consumption through the Development of Fuel-Flexible Gas Turbines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Gas turbines—heat engines that use high-temperature and high-pressure gas as the combustible fuel—are used extensively throughout U.S. industry to power industrial processes. The majority of...

340

Major Normal Fault | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Major Normal Fault Major Normal Fault Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Major Normal Fault Dictionary.png Major Normal Fault: Normal faults are structures in which the hanging wall is down dropped along the fault plane relative to the foot wall. They are the predominant type of structure in extensional tectonic environments, but are commonly encountered in a number of geologic settings. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Major Disruptions in the TOSCA Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major disruption has been studied in detail on the TOSCA tokamak with the use of approximate helical coils. The m=3, n=2 and m=5, n=3 modes have been clearly observed for the first time before a major disruption. The amplitude of the m=2, n=1 mode at the rational surface is about 4% and the m=3, n=2 mode amplitude ? 4.5% before a major disruption. When the m=2, n=1 and m=3, n=2 approximate helical coils are energized with large coil currents, a major disruption occurs.

K. M. McGuire and D. C. Robinson

1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge Full Document and Summary Versions are available for...

343

Major Demonstrations | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Demonstrations Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Clean Coal Power Initiative Power Plant Improvement Initiative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program FutureGen For...

344

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Regulations CH contact-handled CMTS Central Mercury Treatment System COG central off-gas CWA Clean Water Act of 1972 D&D deactivation, decontamination and decommissioning DARA...

346

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations...

347

PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application | Department of...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application More...

348

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Real-TIme Raman Gas Composition Analyzer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyzer Analyzer Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research partners interested in implementing United States Provisional Patent Application entitled "Gas Sensing System Employing Raman Scattering". Disclosed in this application is a gas analyzing sensor that characterizes gaseous fuel, exhaust gases, or other process gas streams. The sensor reports concentrations of all majority gases at better than 0.3% accuracy in 1 second or less, and can be used for real-time gas analysis and system control. The sensor relies on novel techniques to enhance usually weak spontaneous Raman emissions from sample gases, enabling the application of Raman spectroscopy to rapid gas analysis. No commercially available sensor or sensing

350

Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA``) and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy`s Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry`s behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

Rowland, P.J. [Rowland (P.) Associates (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Assessing water and environmental impacts of oil and gas projects in Nigeria.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oil and gas development projects are major sources of social and environmental problems particularly in oil-rich developing countries like Nigeria. Yet, data paucity hinders our… (more)

Anifowose, Babatunde A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

EXPLORATION ACTIVITY WORKSHEET MAJOR & CAREER EXPLORATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of activity or process you should explore to bring you closer to your academic goals. NameEXPLORATION ACTIVITY WORKSHEET MAJOR & CAREER EXPLORATION Purpose: The exploration activity is designed for students to "explore" opportunities at UM as they relate to student success, majors, careers

Milchberg, Howard

353

Astronomy Major www.physicsandastronomy.pitt.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astronomy Major www.physicsandastronomy.pitt.edu Revised: 03/2013 The University of Pittsburgh's internationally recognized Department of Physics and Astronomy has been an important leader at the frontier, chemistry, engineering, and computer science. Required courses for the Astronomy major The BA in astronomy

Jiang, Huiqiang

354

What is required for a Philosophy Major?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHILOSOPHY What is required for a Philosophy Major? at Northern Kentucky University For students who entered the University in 2011. The major in philosophy requires a total of at least thirty (30/PHI 280 Classical and Medieval Philosophy (fall) · PHI 355 Socrates and Plato (spring 2014) History II

Acosta, Charles A.

355

What is required for a Philosophy Major?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHILOSOPHY What is required for a Philosophy Major? at Northern Kentucky University For students who entered the University before 2011. The major in philosophy requires a total of at least thirty or PHI 265 Logic (every semester) · PHI 180 or PHI 280 Classical and Medieval Philosophy (fall) · PHI 185

Acosta, Charles A.

356

What is required for a Philosophy Major?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHILOSOPHY What is required for a Philosophy Major? at Northern Kentucky University For students who entered the University in 2012. The major in philosophy requires a total of at least thirty (30) · PHI 280 Classical and Medieval Philosophy (offered fall) · PHI 285 Modern and Contemporary Philosophy

Acosta, Charles A.

357

What is required for a Philosophy Major?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHILOSOPHY What is required for a Philosophy Major? at Northern Kentucky University For students who entered the University in (or after) 2013. The major in philosophy requires a total of at least (every semester) · PHI 280 Classical and Medieval Philosophy (offered fall) · PHI 285 Modern

Acosta, Charles A.

358

Economics Major? Need Money for School?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics Major? Need Money for School? Then Apply for a: The Economics Department will award two scholarships, each in the amount of $750 this Spring 2014 to students majoring in Economics at San Francisco. First - a retired member of the Economics faculty. Both graduate and undergraduate students

359

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) 24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) Since Wednesday, August 16, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations with the exception of a few locations in the Northeast. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 17 cents to $7.19 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 23), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery settled at $6.875 per MMBtu, increasing about 11 cents or about 2 percent since Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,857 Bcf as of August 18, which is 13.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 19 cents per barrel, or about 0.3 percent, on the week to $71.45 per barrel, or $12.32 per MMBtu. Prices: Despite the lower cooling load across much of the Lower 48 States and a diminished threat from Tropical Storm Debby, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations on the week. The increases, however, were moderate, as they were mostly limited to less than 15 cents per MMBtu. With the exception of the southern United States, power loads have been steadily diminishing in the past couple of weeks. Gas demand for electric power generation was much lower compared with the week ending August 5, when the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) reported record-high weekly electricity demand, leading to the 12 Bcf net withdrawal for the storage week ended August 4, 2006. On a regional basis, market locations in East Texas recorded the largest increases since Wednesday, August 16, averaging 18 cents per MMBtu, followed by Louisiana (16 cents per MMBtu). Most locations along the Gulf Coast recorded increases between 3 and 18 cents, while major consuming areas in the Midwest recorded an average increase of 14 cents per MMBtu. Despite the general increases this week, a few market locations in the Northeast recorded decreases since last Wednesday, the largest one of which was the 10-cent decrease at the Dracut, MA, trading point. Even with the overall increases in recent weeks, as of August 23, 2006, spot prices at market locations in the Lower 48 States are 17 to 30 percent lower than last year's levels.

360

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

362

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

363

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

364

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

365

1 - An Overview of Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The gas turbine is a power plant that produces a great amount of energy depending on its size and weight. The gas turbine has found increasing service in the past 60 years in the power industry among both utilities and merchant plants as well as the petrochemical industry throughout the world. The utilization of gas turbine exhaust gases, for steam generation or the heating of other heat transfer mediums, or the use of cooling or heating buildings or parts of cities is not a new concept and is currently being exploited to its full potential. The aerospace engines have been leaders in most of the technology in the gas turbine. The design criteria for these engines were high reliability, high performance, with many starts and flexible operation throughout the flight envelope. The industrial gas turbine has always emphasized long life and this conservative approach has resulted in the industrial gas turbine in many aspects giving up high performance for rugged operation. The gas turbine produces various pollutants in the combustion of the gases in the combustor. These include smoke, unburnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxides of nitrogen. The gas turbine is a power plant that produces a great amount of energy depending on its size and weight. It has found increasing service in the past 60 years in the power industry among both utilities and merchant plants, as well as in the petrochemical industry. Its compactness, low weight and multiple fuel application make it a natural power plant for offshore platforms. Today there are gas turbines that run on natural gas, diesel fuel, naphtha, methane, crude, low-BTU gases, vaporized fuel oils and biomass gases. The last 20 years have seen a large growth in gas turbine technology, spearheaded by the growth in materials technology, new coatings, new cooling schemes and combined cycle power plants. This chapter presents an overview of the development of modern gas turbines and gas turbine design considerations. The six categories of simple-cycle gas turbines (frame type heavy-duty; aircraft-derivative; industrial-type; small; vehicular; and micro) are described. The major gas turbine components (compressors; regenerators/recuperators; fuel type; and combustors) are outlined. A gas turbine produces various pollutants in the combustion of the gases in the combustor and the potential environmental impact of gas turbines is considered. The two different types of combustor (diffusion; dry low NOx, (DLN) or dry low emission (DLE)), the different methods to arrange combustors on a gas turbine, and axial-flow and radial-inflow turbines are described. Developments in materials and coatings are outlined.

Meherwan P. Boyce

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Title Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59745 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., Victor H. Franco, Stephen Meyers, James E. McMahon, Michael A. McNeil, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-59745 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This paper presents analysis of the life-cycle costs for individual households and the aggregate energy and economic impacts from potential energy efficiency improvements in U.S. residential furnaces. Most homes in the US are heated by a central furnace attached to ducts for distributing heated air and fueled by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace blower is significant, comparable to the annual electricity consumption of a major appliance. Since the same blower unit is also used during the summer to circulate cooled air in centrally air conditioned homes, electricity savings occur year round. Estimates are provided of the potential electricity savings from more efficient fans and motors. Current regulations require new residential gas-fired furnaces (not including mobile home furnaces) to meet or exceed 78% annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE), but in fact nearly all furnaces sold are at 80% AFUE or higher. The possibilities for higher fuel efficiency fall into two groups: more efficient non-condensing furnaces (81% AFUE) and condensing furnaces (90-96% AFUE). There are also options to increase the efficiency of the furnace blower. This paper reports the projected national energy and economic impacts of requiring higher efficiency furnaces in the future. Energy savings vary with climate, with the result that condensing furnaces offer larger energy savings in colder climates. The range of impacts for a statistical sample of households and the percent of households with net savings in life cycle cost are shown. Gas furnaces are somewhat unusual in that the technology does not easily permit incremental change to the AFUE above 80%. Achieving significant energy savings requires use of condensing technology, which yields a large efficiency gain (to 90% or higher AFUE), but has a higher cost. With respect to electricity efficiency design options, the ECM has a negative effect on the average LCC. The current extra cost of this technology more than offsets the sizable electricity savings.

367

Opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from households in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to mitigate climate threats should not exclude the household as the household is a major driver of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its consumption...2) emissions from kerosene combustion for lighting

O. Adeoti; S. O. Osho

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has given rise to a major new research consortium to promote advanced technology for low-impact oil and gas drilling...

369

Re-evaluation of the lifetimes of the major CFCs and CH3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re-evaluation of the lifetimes of the major CFCs and CH3 CCl3 using atmospheric trends* M. Rigby, R interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended

370

Organization Industry Majors Positions Info Sessions Job Fair Application Process/Interviews Baker Hughes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Gas Service Company All Engineering majors, Engineering Technology, Geology, Mathematics, Physics Services Civil Engineering, Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, Petroleum Engineering Full Time, Part Hughes Oilfield Service Company Internships, Full Time Sept 23, 8:30 PM Wood Center C/D Yes See job

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

371

Major Contract Solicitation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Solicitation | National Nuclear Security Administration Solicitation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Major Contract Solicitation Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Major Contract Solicitation Major Contract Solicitation Pantex Plant Wind Farm Acquisition Y-12 National Security Complex, Pantex Plant, with Option for

372

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 ii This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 iii The Financial Reporting System, 1977-1993 diskette is available from the Energy Information Administration.

373

The Bhopal gas tragedy: could it have happened in a developed country?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Bhopal gas tragedy occurred in December 1984 wherein approximately 41 tonnes of deadly MIC was released in the dead of night. It caused the death of over 3000 people and continued life-long misery for over 300,000 with certain genetic defects passed on to the next generation. It happened in a plant operated by a multinational, Union Carbide Corporation, in a developing country, India. The tragedy has changed the chemical process industry (CPI) forever. The results have been new legislation with better enforcement, enhancement in process safety, development of inherently safer plants, harsher court judgements, pro-active media and NGOs, rights-conscious public, and a CPI management willing to invest in safety related equipment and training. These have already resulted in savings of several hundred lives and over a billion dollars in accident damages [Kletz, T. (1998a). Process plants: a handbook of inherently safer designs. London: Taylor & Francis. Sutton, I. Chemical Engineering, 106(5), (1999). 114]. However, thousands did not have to die for the world to realise the disaster potential of CPI. The question that still remains is whether such an accident could have happened in a developed country. The answer is ‘yes’, as a number of major accidents in the developed countries since 1984, such as the Piper Alpha oil platform fire (1988, 167 killed), the Zeebrugge ferry disaster (1987, 167 killed), Phillips petroleum fire and explosion (1989, 23 killed), the Challenger disaster (1986, 7 killed), Esso Australia Longford explosion (1998, 2 killed) have demonstrated. One or more of the following are the primary reasons for such disasters: The indifferent attitude of the management towards safety, the lax enforcement of the existing regulations by the regulatory bodies as well as unusual delays in the judicial systems. Such conditions can happen regardless of the level of development in a country. Hence, the Bhopal gas tragedy could have happened in a developed country too, albeit with a lower probability. This paper is concerned with the possibility and not with the probability value. It also points out that further significant advances in process safety will occur with fundamental research into the causes of accidents and with a move towards inherently safer design.

J.P. Gupta

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Raman gas analyzer for determining the composition of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a prototype of a Raman gas analyzer designed for measuring the composition of natural gas. Operation of the gas analyzer was tested on a real natural gas. We show that our Raman gas analyzer prototype...

M. A. Buldakov; B. V. Korolev; I. I. Matrosov…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

377

Definition: Reduced Major Outages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outages Outages Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Major Outages A major outage is defined using the beta method, per IEEE Std 1366-2003 (IEEE Power Engineering Society 2004). The monetary benefit of reducing major outages is based on the VOS of each customer class. The VOS parameter represents the total cost of a power outage per MWh. This cost includes the value of unserved energy, lost productivity, collateral damage, the value of penalties and performance-based rates. Functions that lead to this benefit can mitigate major outages by allowing the system to be reconfigured on the fly to help restore service to as many customers as possible, enable a quicker response in the restoration effort, or mitigate the impact of an outage through islanding or alternative power supply.[1]

378

Operating a Major Electric Utility Today  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...times of major load outages, and pro-vide support in times of transmission outages. In economic terms...ex-tra-high-voltage transmission (Fig. 3), was...of vital utility data both within and...transmission lines, circuit interrupters...

Theodore J. Nagel

1978-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

380

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2006 7, 2006 DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas Resources Research to Help Unlock Nation's Largest Growing Source of Natural Gas WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of two cost-shared research and development projects targeting America's major source of natural gas: low-permeability or "tight" gas formations. Tight gas is the largest of three so-called unconventional gas resources?the other two being coalbed methane (natural gas) and gas shales. Production of unconventional gas in the United States represents about 40 percent of the Nation's total gas output in 2004, but could grow to 50 percent by 2030 if advanced technologies are developed and implemented. The constraints on producing tight gas are due to the impermeable nature of the reservoir rocks, small reservoir compartments, abnormal (high or low) pressures, difficulty in predicting natural fractures that aid gas flow rates, and need to predict and avoid reservoirs that produce large volumes of water.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 16) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 16) Both natural gas spot and futures prices fell significantly over the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 1-8), as temperatures in most major gas-consuming areas of the nation were above normal most days, with differences reaching double digits in the past several days in many locations east of the Mississippi River. The Henry Hub spot price fell 79 cents per MMBtu, or nearly 12 percent, since last Wednesday (December 1) trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 8) at $5.98. The NYMEX futures contract for January 2005 delivery declined by a similar amount for the week (73 cents per MMBtu), settling yesterday) at $6.683 per MMBtu, or about 10 percent less than last Wednesday's settlement price ($7.413). EIA reported that inventories were 3,211 Bcf as of Friday, December 3, which is 12 percent greater than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell by over $3 per barrel for the second week in a row, declining in 4 of 5 trading days and ending the week down $3.60 per barrel ($0.62 per MMBtu), at yesterday's price of $41.96 ($7.23). Since reaching its record-high spot price of $56.37 per barrel on October 26, the WTI spot price has declined in 5 of the 6 ensuing weeks, with yesterday's price representing a nearly26 percent drop in value.

382

NACo Legislative Conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National Association of Counties (NACo) is hosting its annual conference in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 21-25, 2015.

383

Cleanrooms, Codes, and Legislation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the nature of the processes carried out by many high-technology industries, specifically with regard to the hazards inherent in these processes, some control is necessary to protect the work force, the ...

M. Kozicki; S. Hoenig; P. Robinson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Library legislation in Zambia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation investigates and justifies the need for a public library law in Zambia to lay the foundation for the provision and development of public… (more)

Kantumoya, Albert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

Jason M. Keith

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Geothermal Energy: An Emerging Major Resource  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...being delivered to a turbine. Field trials at...California. [Pacific Gas and Electricl 979...perpetuating the useful life of the sys-tem...steam to drive power turbines is expected to be...problem, since noxious gases are often a by-product...attractive. The remaining problems require...

Allen L. Hammond

1972-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Operating a Major Electric Utility Today  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to the bulk of the remaining issues; it is fundamental...on the quality of life. The advocates of...in the quality of life be-cause of rising...such as oil and gas. At present, the...moved through the turbine; an adequate means...condenser where the remaining heat is removed and...

Theodore J. Nagel

1978-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Natural Gas: Dry Wells Yield Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two ... Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two natural ...

1969-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

390

Chris Smith Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chris Smith Chris Smith Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Natural Gas Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Power Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives March 28, 2012 Chairman Whitfield, Ranking Member Rush, and Members of the subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) perspective on two legislative proposals - the discussion drafts of the "Strategic Energy Production Act of 2012" and the "Gasoline Regulations Act of 2012." We share the concern of the Members regarding the burden that the rising price of gasoline places on U.S. families and businesses. For decades, volatile energy prices have threatened economic security for millions of American households. That volatility has hit consumers hard

391

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

392

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

393

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

394

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

395

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

396

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

397

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

398

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

399

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

400

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

402

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

403

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

404

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

405

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

406

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

407

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

408

Greenhouse Gas Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Greenhouse Gas Basics October 7, 2013 - 10:01am Addthis Federal agencies must understand key terms and management basics to successfully manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect." This process keeps the planet habitable. International research has linked human activities to a rapid increase in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere, contributing to major shifts in the global climate. Graphic of the top half of earth depicting current arctic sea ice. A red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Current arctic sea ice is shown roughly 50% smaller than the 1979 depiction.

409

127 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through a regional interstate representative pipeline network, for both a peak (December through March) and off-peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. Natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of the supply options available to bring gas to market centers within each of the NGTDM regions (Figure 9). The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into four general categories. They relate to (1) structural components of the model, (2) capacity expansion and pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) Arctic pipelines, and (4) imports and exports. A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth

Key Assumptions

410

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Second Quarter 2005 Second Quarter 2005 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-five major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $23.0 billion on revenues of $276.1 billion during the second quarter of 2005 (Q205). The level of net income for Q205 was 38 percent higher than in the second quarter of 2004 (Q204) (Table 1). Net income for Q205 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil

411

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Third Quarter 2005 Third Quarter 2005 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one 1 major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $26.0 billion on revenues of $295.1 billion during the third quarter of 2005 (Q305). The level of net income for Q305 was 69 percent higher than in the third quarter of 2004 (Q304) (Table 1). Net income for Q305 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil and

412

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

First Quarter 2006 First Quarter 2006 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $24.1 billion on revenues of $276.6 billion during the first quarter of 2006 (Q106). The level of net income for Q106 was 23 percent higher than in the first quarter of 2005 (Q105) (Table 1). Net income for Q106 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil and

413

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 5) 9, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 5) Spot prices in most regional markets ended the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 21-28) lower, despite severe cold in the Northeast beginning Friday (January 23) and continuing through the weekend. As a result, prices in the Northeast market proved the major exception to the downward trend, as cash prices moved up sharply at most locations in the region. At the Henry Hub, the spot price was 23 cents per MMBtu lower on the week, or about 4 percent, ending with yesterday's (Wednesday, January 28) level of $6.04. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery showed a modest gain of nearly 6 cents on its final day of trading, closing out at $5.775 per MMBtu. The contract for March delivery assumes the near-month position beginning today (Thursday, January 29). The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories were 2,063 Bcf as of Friday, January 23, which is 8.6 percent greater than the previous 5-year (1999-2003) average. West Texas Intermediate crude oil on the spot market fell $1.90 per barrel, or $0.26 per MMBtu, since last Wednesday (January 21), ending trading yesterday at $33.63 per barrel, or $5.80 per MMBtu.

414

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 13) March 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 13) Spot prices at many major markets declined significantly from last Wednesday's (February 26) levels as temperatures moderated somewhat over the weekend and again on Tuesday and Wednesday (March 5-6). The spot price at the Henry Hub declined $2.55 per MMBtu from last Wednesday's level, despite peaking for the week at $10.65 on Friday, to end trading yesterday (Wednesday, March 6) at $7.81. The NYMEX futures contract for April delivery began trading as the near-month contract on Thursday, February 27, and promptly surged to its all-time high to date of $8.101 per MMBtu on Friday, before settling yesterday at $7.021. Natural gas stocks fell to 838 Bcf as of February 28, which is nearly 42 percent below the 5-year average. As of yesterday, the WTI spot price had dropped $1.10 per barrel (or $0.19 per MMBtu) from its price-spike level of $37.96 per barrel last Wednesday, to $36.86 per barrel, or $6.36 per MMBtu.

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 25, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 2) September 25, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 2) Spot prices fluctuated mildly during the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 17-24), with the majority of changes in either direction limited to a nickel or less. For the week, prices generally were lower than last Wednesday. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 2 cents on the week, ending trading yesterday (September 24) at $4.59 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery ended the week down by $0.054 per MMBtu from the previous Wednesday (September 17), settling at $4.588 per MMBtu, as a significant one-day decline of 17 cents on Thursday (September 18) was not offset by four straight trading sessions with small increases. EIA reported that working gas inventories were 2,688 Bcf as of Friday, September 19, which is 3.3 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. In oil markets, yesterday's announcement by the OPEC oil cartel of a production quota cut of 900,000 barrels per day sent crude oil and heating oil futures contract prices up sharply. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil accrued its entire increase for the week in yesterday's trading, as it gained $1.19 to $28.19 per barrel, or about $4.86 per MMBtu.

416

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 25, 2002 April 25, 2002 The spot price of natural gas moved up most days since last Wednesday, April 17, as prices at the Henry Hub reached $3.63 per MMBtu on Tuesday - the highest price since April 3, 2002. The recent period of both warmer-than-normal weather east of the Rockies and colder-than-normal temperatures in the West resulted in above normal weather-related demand. The upward price trend reversed itself at all major market locations yesterday (4/24/02), as prices declined generally between 10 to 15 cents per MMBtu with prices at the Henry Hub declining 10 cents to $3.53. On the NYMEX, the settlement price for May delivery, which had increased almost every day since April 16, peaked on Tuesday, then declined sharply in yesterday's trading-moving down over 17 cents-to settle at $3.419 per MMBtu. Net additions to storage were estimated to have been 69 Bcf in the third week of April, well above the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas (WTI) crude oil increased to $26.28 per barrel, or $4.47 per MMBtu.

417

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2001 8, 2001 Prices ended the week up slightly from where they started as a brief heat wave in the eastern half of the country caused a rise in prices (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) that was somewhat undone by the return of moderate temperatures and the report of another hefty stock build. On a Friday-to-Friday basis, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.25 to $3.88 per MMBtu compared with an increase of $0.23 to $0.33 at other major supply points in the eastern half of the country. In the same time period, the near-month (July delivery) futures contract was up less than 6 cents to $3.979 per MMBtu as of Friday, June 15, 2001. Prices in California rose substantially last Monday after coming off high inventory flow orders (OFOs) but ended the week close to or lower than the previous week due to another round of OFOs. For the past 7 weeks, weekly storage injections neared or exceeded 100 Bcf, bringing stocks to within less than a 1 percent difference from average levels. The string of record-breaking stock builds appears attributable to moderate spring temperatures and reduced cooling demand by natural-gas-fired electricity generation.

418

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 26) 19, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 26) Spot and futures prices fell for the second straight week, as generally mild temperatures continued to prevail in most major market areas and storage injections exceeded 100 Bcf for a third straight week. At the Henry Hub, the spot price fell by 52 cents per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, June 11-19), or almost 9 percent, to $5.54 per MMBtu. The settlement price for the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery declined by $0.632 on the week, closing yesterday (June 18) at $5.581 per MMBtu-a decline of 10 percent. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage was 1,438 Bcf as of Friday, June 13, which is about 22 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell in 4 of 5 trading days, ending the week down by almost $2 per barrel, at $30.28, or $5.22 per MMBtu.

419

Chapter Nine - Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins by reviewing the processing of natural gas to meet gas sales contract specifications. It then describes acid gas limitations for pipelines and gas plants, before detailing the most common acid gas removal processes, such as solid-bed, chemical solvent processes, physical solvent processes, direct conversion processes, distillation process, and gas permeation processes. The chapter discusses the selection of the appropriate removal process for a given situation, and it provides a detailed design procedure for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process. The chapter ends by supplying a sample design for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Gas analysis is applied to exploration at the Lightn~gD ock geothe~aflie ld, which has no surface manifestations, to exploration by drilling, and to monitoring Cerro Prieto - a producing field. It is assumed that reservoir fluids have a different gas chemistry than local groundwater, and that gas chemistry can be interpreted as a three source system, magmatic, crustal, and meteoric, modified by processes of boiling, mixing, and condensation. We show that gas analyses can delineate the location of major structures that serve as fluid conduits, map fluid flow

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

422

Enhanced membrane gas separations  

SciTech Connect

An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

Prasad, R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

423

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the natural gas potential of the Devonian Age shales of Kentucky. For this, the study: (1) compiles the latest geologic and reservoir data to establish the gas in-place; (2) analyzes and models the dominant gas production mechanisms; and (3) examines alternative well stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering the in-place gas. The major findings of the study include the following: (1) The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Lower and Upper Huron, Rhinestreet, and Cleveland intervals) in Kentucky is estimated to range from 9 to 23 trillion cubic feet (Tcf). (2) The gas in-place for the Devonian shales in eastern Kentucky is 82 Tcf. About one half of this amount is found in the Big Sandy gas field and its immediate extensions. The remainder is located in the less naturally fractured, but organically rich area to the west of the Big Sandy. (3) The highly fractured shales in the Big Sandy area in southeast Kentucky and the more shallow shales of eastern Kentucky respond well to small-scale stimulation. New, larger-scale stimulation technology will be required for the less fractured, anisotropic Devonian shales in the rest of the state. 44 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Sedwick, K.B.; Thompson, K.B.; Wicks, D.E.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Revised 2/2012 PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Revised 2/2012 PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (Effective August 2012) Name: ID#: First Semester FOUNDATION COURSES (20 units): PSYC-101 General Psychology PSYC-260 Psychological Statistics PSYC-270 Biological Psychology RHET 203 Writing in Psychology (or RHET 301) PSYC-265 Research Design ONE DIVERSITY

Galles, David

425

HEALTH AND SAFETY PROCEDURES -Major Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH AND SAFETY PROCEDURES - Major Projects HEALTH & SAFETY UNIT SPRING 2006 #12;CONTENTS of this document is to provide the University with a summary of the principle activities in construction projects the reliance on physical controls and use of personnel protective equipment. The procedures that consider

426

The Political Science Major Johns Hopkins University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Political Science Major Johns Hopkins University The Department The programs of the Political Science department are designed to help students attain a deeper understanding of politics in its various dimensions. The department encourages students to become sophisticated theoretically and to study politics

Niebur, Ernst

427

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The information and analyses in Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers is intended to provide a critical review, and promote an understanding, of the possible motivations and apparent consequences of investment decisions made by some of the largest corporations in the energy industry.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Dance Major Handbook 2013-14  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UMass Dance Major Handbook 2013-14 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction1 Choreography Crew Workshops Semester Activity Requirements Grade Point Average Physical and Mental Conditioning #12;1. INTRODUCTION Welcome to the University of Massachusetts at Amherst Dance Program! This handbook

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

429

Sustainability Studies at WWU Minor and Major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability Studies at WWU ­ Minor and Major Schematic Concept Draft October 13, 2008 Sustainability Faculty and Advisement: WWU Sustainability Academy WWW SUSTAINABILITY MINOR -- 30 Credits A. Sustainability Literacy, (4 Credits) B Sustainability research skills (9 Credits) C. Research and seminars

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

430

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

431

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

432

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

433

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Gas Turbine Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a cycle process of a gas turbine, the compressor load, as well as ... from the expansion of the hot pressurized flue gas. Either turbine, compressor and driven assembly are joined by ... shaft is thus divided,...

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Gas-Turbine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This book focuses on the design of regenerators for high-performance regenerative gas turbines. The ways in which gas-turbine regenerators can be designed for high system performance can be understood by studying...

Douglas Stephen Beck; David Gordon Wilson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

439

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

440

Natural Gas in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a recent meeting of the Institution of Gas Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe ... Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe Gas Council, stated that an intensive, large-scale search for ...

1953-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

442

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Chapter 10 - The Transformation of the German Gas Supply Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Natural gas is the second largest energy source in Germany, and its market share will continue to increase. This chapter describes the historical development of the German gas industry, discusses current issues of importance in German gas policy, and outlines the industrial organization and profiles of the major gas utilities. Today, the German gas industry can be divided into two groups: the gas supply industry and the rest of the gas industry. The gas market in Germany has developed on three levels: natural gas production and import, pipeline business and distribution, and end user supply. Germany's energy policy, as a part of economic policy, is oriented to free market principles. The future of the German gas market is very promising. The share of natural gas is growing as a part of primary energy supply, as well as in power generation, substituting coal and oil, and electricity in the heat market. With regard to the effects of liberalization, it can be said that a one-to-one transposition of international experience to the German gas industry will not be possible, due to the different historical, economical, and political factors at work.

Lutz Mez

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation Timothy A. Davis Survey 2. The ATLAS3D CARMA Survey 3. Kinematic Misalignments 4. Origin of the molecular gas The ATLAS3D is to determine how (major and minor) mergers, gas, star formation and feedback affect the transformation

Bureau, Martin

446

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storage rack, a wall mounted cylinder rack, anchored to a fixed bench top, vented gas cabinet, or other

447

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

448

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

449

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Third Quarter Report 1999  

SciTech Connect

The second quarter 1997 Quarterly Report of Natural Gas Imports and Exports featured a Quarterly Focus report on cross-border natural gas trade between the United States and Mexico. This Quarterly Focus article is a follow-up to the 1997 report. This report revisits and updates the status of some of the pipeline projects discussed in 1997, and examines a number of other planned cross-border pipeline facilities which were proposed subsequent to our 1997 report. A few of the existing and proposed pipelines are bidirectional and thus have the capability of serving either Mexico, or the United States, depending on market conditions and gas supply availability. These new projects, if completed, would greatly enhance the pipeline infrastructure on the U.S.-Mexico border and would increase gas pipeline throughput capacity for cross-border trade by more than 1 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. The Quarterly Focus is comprised of five sections. Section I includes the introduction as well as a brief historic overview of U.S./Mexican natural gas trade; a discussion of Mexico's energy regulatory structure; and a review of trade agreements and a 1992 legislative change which allows for her cross-border gas trade in North America. Section II looks at initiatives that have been taken by the Mexican Government since 1995to open its energy markets to greater competition and privatization. Section III reviews Mexican gas demand forecasts and looks at future opportunities for U.S. gas producers to supplement Mexico's indigenous supplies in order to meet the anticipated rapid growth in demand. Section IV examines the U.S.-Mexico natural gas trade in recent years. It also looks specifically at monthly import and export volumes and prices and identifies short-term trends in this trade. Finally, Section V reviews the existing and planned cross-border gas pipeline infrastructure. The section also specifically describes six planned pipelines intended to expand this pipeline network and their planned in-service dates.

none

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

File:EIA-tight-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

tight-gas.pdf tight-gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 2.04 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Sources U.S. Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-06-06 Extent National Countries United States UN Region Northern America File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:44, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:44, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (2.04 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload You cannot overwrite this file.

453

Natural Gas Reforming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

454

Fuel: Bargain Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council has done well to agree on low prices for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The ... for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The price finally agreed is both much less than the two companies wanted and much less than ...

1968-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

Gas Cylinders: Proper Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

456

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

457

Static gas expansion cooler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thailand gas project now operational  

SciTech Connect

Now operational, Phase 1 of Thailand's first major natural gas system comprises one of the world's longest (264 miles) offshore gas lines. Built for the Petroleum Authority of Thailand (PTT), this system delivers gas from the Erawan field in the Gulf of Thailand to two electrical power plants near Bangkok, operated by the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). The project required laying about 360 miles of pipeline, 34-in., 0.625 in.-thick API-5LX-60 pipe offshore and 28-in., 0.406 in.-thick API-5LX-60 onshore. The offshore pipe received a coal-tar coating, a 3.5-5.0 in. concrete coating, and zinc sacrificial-anode bracelets. The onshore line was coated with the same coal-tar enamel and, where necessary, with concrete up to 4.5 in. thick. Because EGAT's two power plants are the system's only customers, no more pipeline will be constructed until deliveries, currently averaging about 100 million CF/day, reach the 250 million CF/day level. The project's second phase will include additional pipelines as well as an onshore distribution network to industrial customers.

Horner, C.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas major legislative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

462

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

463

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

464

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

465

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

466

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

467

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

468

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

469

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

470

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

471

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

472

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

473

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

474

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

475

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

476

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

477

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

478

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

479

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

480

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

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481

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

482

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

483

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

484

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

485

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

486

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

487

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2001 1, 2001 From Friday, June 1 to Friday, June 8, cash prices fell again, as cooler-than-normal temperatures prevailed from midweek on in the northern half of the nation as well as in some areas along the Gulf of Mexico (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Price declines in cash markets ranged from pennies to over $1.00 per MMBtu, with most points down 9-15 cents. At the Henry Hub, the price fell 8 cents to $3.63 per MMBtu. The near-month (July delivery) futures contract lost less than 1 cent for the week, settling on Friday, June 8 at $3.922 per MMBtu. Once again, weekly storage injections topped 100 Bcf, approaching or exceeding regional records for the report week. Prices: It was a week of contrasting price movements in cash markets. Spot prices responded on Monday to demand-increasing weather extremes (hot weather in Texas and the Gulf Coast; near-winter temperatures in the Rockies) with increases of 20 cents or more at most locations. Further gains of a nickel to a dime occurred on Tuesday as Tropical Storm Allison headed for landfall in the western Gulf. However, gains began to erode Wednesday with the American Gas Association's (AGA) announcement of storage injections of 117 Bcf. Spot prices continued to trend down for the rest of the week. Allison was no threat to production assets, and her heavy rains and persistent cloud cover over much of east Texas, Louisiana, and southern Arkansas eased utility demand significantly. Price drops were most pronounced in California, where moderate temperatures and adequate electricity supplies obliterated early-week gains. Both PG&E and SOCAL issued high-inventory operational flow orders (OFO) on Friday. On SOCAL, prices were down nearly $6 from their Tuesday highs to $3.54 per MMBtu on Friday. This is the first time since May 2000 that the SOCAL price was less than at the Henry Hub. At Rockies price points, where the effects of warming temperatures, lack of demand in California, and major pipeline maintenance projects had gas backing up throughout the region, prices fell under $2.00 per MMBtu at several locations for the first time since early November 1999. The average spot price in the Rockies on Friday was $1.76 per MMBtu.

488

aml documents/undergrad MAJOR-10 REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.A. ECONOMICS MAJOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aml documents/undergrad MAJOR-10 April 2011 REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.A. ECONOMICS MAJOR UNIVERSITY credit for Econ 2010/2020 and Econ 1000. choose one Track 1 Transfer 6hrs. of Principles of Micro and Macro Economics to C.U. OR Track 2 Econ 2010 Prin. of Microeconomics AND Econ 2020 Prin

Stowell, Michael

489

Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

44-NO. 62 44-NO. 62 3-29-79 PAGES 18633-18921 E THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 1979 € 18722 NOTICES [ 31 25-01-MI COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 'ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ABROAD OF MAJOR FEDERAL ACTIONS Executive Order 12144; Implementing and Explanotory Documents MARCH 21, 1979. AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of t h e F'resi- dent. ACTION: Information Only: Publica- tion of Implementing Documents Con- cerning Executive Order 12114. SUMMARY: O n January 4, 1979, t h e President signed Executive Order 12114, Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions (44 FR 1957 (Jan. 9, 1979)). The Council has re- ceived numerous requests for t h e im- plementing and explanatory docu- ments. I n order efficiently to respond to such public requests. t

490

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 ii To download the Financial Reporting System 1977-1995 data files, access the Energy Information Center's FTP site, at ftp: //ftp.eia.doe.gov or access the Energy Information Administration's Home Page at http://www.eia.doe.gov.

491

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 January 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1996 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information

492

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 January 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1997 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information Administration's

493

Major Energy Electric Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Services Electric Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Major Energy Electric Services Place New York Utility Id 56504 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location NPCC ISO NY Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0967/kWh Commercial: $0.1070/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Major_Energy_Electric_Services&oldid=411033" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

494

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Major Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 CBECS data are used to answer basic questions about the commercial buildings sector, such as: What types are there? How large are they? How old are they? and Where are they? Results from the 2003 CBECS show that: The commercial buildings sector is not dominated by a single building type. Office buildings, the most common type of commercial building, account for 17 percent of buildings, floorspace, and energy consumed. Commercial buildings range widely in size and smaller buildings are much more numerous than larger buildings. The smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) account for 53 percent of buildings, but consume only 11 percent of total energy. The largest buildings (those larger than 500,000 square feet)

495

No more gas from Egypt? Modeling offshore discoveries and import uncertainty of natural gas in Israel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Israel depends on natural gas imports from Egypt for about 40% of its domestic needs, with the remaining met from domestic production. Gas supplies from Egypt have been erratic since their initiation: disruptions have increased after the 2011 revolution in Egypt and have been further ignited by public discontent. Despite these developments, Israeli policy makers have viewed the Egyptian gas deal as a positive factor in preserving peace with Egypt and have had no better alternatives than relying upon it. This has changed, however, after recent discoveries of three major offshore fields that are expected to satisfy domestic demand for an indefinite period and to provide gas for exports. We use an extended global CGE modeling framework that incorporates multiple households and factor ownership to investigate the effects of reduced gas imports from Egypt and the evolvement of domestic gas production as an alternative. In case of reduced gas imports from Egypt, the Israeli economy would slightly retract mainly due to lower production in energy intensive sectors. Poor households would be the most negatively affected, due to the strongest relative decline in income and the strongest increase of their consumer price index. In the case of increasing domestic gas production, Israeli GDP and domestic absorption would rise by about 0.2% and 0.4%, respectively. Poor households would be more positively affected than rich ones due to their composition of factor income and their higher expenditure shares for energy intensive commodities.

Khalid Siddig; Harald Grethe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

497

Genealogy of major U.S. refiners  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of major U.S. refiners of major U.S. refiners 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Amoco SOHIO BP ARCO Mapco Williams Clark Refining 1/89 12/98 4/00 3/98 Orion Diamond Shamrock Ultramar k 12/96 7/03 Ultramar Diamond Shamrock (UDS) Total North America UDS 9/97 Valero Salomon (Basis) Valero Williams BP BP b BP-Husky Refining LLC (jv) Husky Huntway 5/97 6/01 9/05 Valero Premcor g Valero Valero Valero 12/01 7/94 e 12/98 f Carlyle Group y Coastal 3/03 d 12/88 a 6/01 o Sun Company Sunoco v 7/07 i 4/08 c 5/04 h Pacific Refining (jv) 12/88 r El Paso 1/04 w 10/98 m 6/00 n 9/89 t 8/94 u See notes, footnotes, and source notes below. PBF Energy 6/10 p 12/10 q 3/11 x 10/11 j 9/00 l 1/01 s Genealogy of major U.S. refiners (continued) 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

498

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

499

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

500

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...