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1

Hutchins LFG Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hutchins LFG Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hutchins LFG Biomass Facility Facility Hutchins LFG Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dallas County,...

2

Franklin County Sanitary Landfill - Landfill Gas (LFG) to Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) - Project  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY LANDFILL - LANDFILL GAS (LFG) TO LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS (LNG) - PROJECT January/February 2005 Prepared for: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Table of Contents Page BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................1 SUMMARY OF EFFORT PERFORMED ......................................................................................2 Task 2B.1 - Literature Search and Contacts Made...................................................................2 Task 2B.2 - LFG Resource/Resource Collection System - Project Phase One.......................3 Conclusion.................................................................................................................................5

3

LFG Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LFG Technologies LFG Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name LFG Technologies Place Fairport, New York Zip 14450 Product New York-based developer and provider of landfill gas and anaerobic digestion equipment and turnkey solutions. Coordinates 43.10106°, -77.441914° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.10106,"lon":-77.441914,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

TEMPORAL VARIATION OF LFG EMISSION FROM DIFFERENT TYPES OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). This reduction of the landfill gas (LFG) emissions requires the ability to measure low methane emissions methane emissions were observed only near the landfill gas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

5

Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Facility Johnston LFG (MA RPS Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Rhode Island Coordinates 41.5800945°, -71.4774291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5800945,"lon":-71.4774291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Emerging technologies for the management and utilization of landfill gas. Final report, August 1994-August 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives information on emerging technologies that are considered to be commercially available (Tier 1), currently undergoing research and development (Tier 2), or considered as potentially applicable (Tier 3), for the management of landfill gas (LFG) emissions or for the utilization of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from LFG. The emerging technologies that are considered to be Tier 1 are: (1) phosphoric acid fuel cells, (2) processes for converting CH4 from LFG to compressed LFG for vehicle fuel or other fuel uses, and (3) use of LFG as a fuel source for leachate evaporation systems. The Tier 2 technologies covered in the report are: (1) operation of landfills as anaerobic bioreactors, (2) operation of landfills are aerobic bioreactors, (3) production of ethanol from LFG, (4) production of commercial CO2 from LFG, and (5) use of LFG to provide fuel for heat and CO2 enhancement in greenhouses. Tier 3 technologies, considered as potentially applicable for LFG. include Stirling and Organic Rankine Cycle engines.

Roe, S.; Reisman, J.; Strait, R.; Doorn, M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP combined heat and power dBA A-weighted decibel DOE U.S. Department of Energy (also called the Department) EA environmental assessment EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency MW megawatt NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards

8

LFG recovery from a surface collection system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a settlement agreement with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources to remediate the overfilling of their Phase II Landfill, the City of Ann Arbor (City), Michigan, was required to construct a cap which included a surface gas collection system. In 1992, the City became interested in exploring how effectively this system could collect LFG for use with electrical generators. The City of Ann Arbor began to research options for utilizing landfill gas generated at their municipal landfill as an energy resource in 1985. After the passage of Michigan Public Act 2 in 1989 which allowed Michigan`s two largest electric utilities to purchase at least 120 megawatts (MW) of electricity form waste-to-energy facilities at a higher price than from conventional sources, such a project became more feasible. In July 1992, the City entered into an {open_quotes}Agreement of Understanding{close_quotes} with Detroit Edison, the City`s electric supplier, and Landfill Energy Systems (LES), a company experienced in landfill gas to energy projects, to assist in analyzing the feasibility of a project for Ann Arbor. SCS Engineers (SCS) was retained by the City to perform a desktop study of the Landfill`s potential LFG production. The results of the study indicated that there may be enough gas to yield 1600 kilowatts (kW) of generation capacity through the year 2000.

Konkle, D.L. [Municipal Energy Coordinator, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gaunthier, S.P.; Seager, C.M. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Total Incentive: $2 million (combined production and capacity incentives) Fixed Base + Capacity Incentive: varies, limited to the total maximum incentive of $2 million minus the applicable performance incentive Program Info Funding Source RPS surcharge; NYPA Expiration Date 01/31/2013 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Fixed Base Incentive: varies Capacity Incentive: varies Production Incentive: $0.025/kWh production payment for new systems for up

10

Landfill Gas: From Rubbish to Resource  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The prospects of using landfill gas (LFG) as a high-grade fuel...Kyoto Protocols, and energy prices, are discussed. Adsorption cycles suggested in the late 1980s by Sircar and co-workers for treating LFG are revi...

Kent S. Knaebel; Herbert E. Reinhold

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Domestic Anaerobic Digesters Linked with Sustainable Sanitation in Rural China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Domestic Anaerobic Digesters Linked with Sustainable Sanitation in Rural China ... (3) A key technology that may permit a switch from solid fuels to cleaner gaseous fuels in rural China is anaerobic digestion, where organic human and animal wastes are digested under anaerobic conditions generating biogas, composed primarily of methane (CH4), which can be sequestered and burned for cooking, heating, and lighting. ...

Radhika Dhingra; Erick R. Christensen; Yang Liu; Bo Zhong; Chang-Fu Wu; Michael G. Yost; Justin V. Remais

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

12

Enhancing landfill gas recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The landfilling of municipal solid waste (MSW) may cause potential environmental impacts like global warming (GW), soil contaminations, and groundwater pollution. The degradation of MSW in anaerobic circumstances generates methane emissions, and can hence contribute the GW. As the GW is nowadays considered as one of the most serious environmental threats, the mitigation of methane emissions should obviously be aimed at on every landfill site where methane generation occurs. In this study, the treatment and utilization options for the generated LFG at case landfills which are located next to each other are examined. The yearly GHG emission balances are estimated for three different gas management scenarios. The first scenario is the combined heat and power (CHP) production with a gas engine. The second scenario is the combination of heat generation for the asphalt production process in the summer and district heat production by a water boiler in the winter. The third scenario is the LFG upgrading to biomethane. The estimation results illustrate that the LFG collection efficiency affects strongly on the magnitudes of GHG emissions. According to the results, the CHP production gives the highest GHG emission savings and is hence recommended as a gas utilization option for case landfills. Furthermore, aspects related to the case landfills' extraction are discussed.

Antti Niskanen; Hanna Vrri; Jouni Havukainen; Ville Uusitalo; Mika Horttanainen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Emissions of Major Aromatic Voc as Landfill Gas from Urban Landfill Sites in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, concentrations of major aromatic VOCs were determined from landfill gas (LFG) at a total of five...?1 (WJ in wintertime). The LFG flux values of aromatic VOC, when compared to the contribution of n...

Ki-Hyun Kim; Sung Ok Baek; Ye-Jin Choi

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual landfill gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gas emissions and potential aqueous... Transfer Stations (MTS); Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Landfill Gas (LFG): Geographic Wormation Systems (GIS... . Landfills generate gas...

15

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

16

Towards data-intensive testing of a broad-coverage LFG grammar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, broad-coverage LFG grammars for English, French and German have been developed with this platform (ButtTowards data-intensive testing of a broad-coverage LFG grammar Jonas Kuhn This paper addresses and optimizing a broad-coverage grammar of German). 1 A method of TArget Speci cation and regression TEsting

Reyle, Uwe

17

Bioenergy recovery from landfill gas: A case study in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas (LFG) utilization which means a synergy...3/h and the methane concentration was above 90%. The process and optimization of the pilot-scale test were also reported in the paper. The product gas was of...

Wei Wang; Yuxiang Luo; Zhou Deng

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Occupational Safety at Landfill Sites - Hazards and Pollution Due to Landfill Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas is formed on a large scale ... of methane gas which escapes every year from landfill sites in the Federal Republic of Germany ... about 2.5 million standard cubic metres. Landfill gas (LFG) with its ...

Volkmar Wilhelm

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Estimation of Landfill Gas Generation Rate and Gas Permeability Field of Refuse Using Inverse Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill methane must be captured to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases; moreover it can be used as an alternative energy source. However, despite the widespread use of landfill gas (LFG) collection systems for...

Yoojin Jung; Paul Imhoff; Stefan Finsterle

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic filter ufaf-subsurface Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and power application. All four DG systems were operated on-site using either landfill gas or anaerobic... . Common opportunity fuels are anaerobic digester gas, landfill gas,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The influence of air inflow on CH4 composition ratio in landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When landfill gas is collected, air inflow into the landfill...4 productivity. The decline of CH4 content in landfill gas (LFG) negatively affects energy projects. We...2 was an effective indicator of air inflow ...

Seung-Kyu Chun

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The landfill gas activity of the IEA bioenergy agreement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable source of useful energy. Its world wide annual energy potential is in the range of a few hundred TWh. Today it is only marginally exploited. LFG is also an important contributor to the atmospheres CH4-content, it can be estimated to contribute about 25% of the methane coming from anthropogenic sources. In comparison to many other sources of methane emissions such as peat bogs, rice paddies, termites and sheep, landfills can be considered to be point sources, i.e. they are stationary and of limited extension. For this reason landfill gas (LFG) utilisation is one of the most cost effective ways to combat the greenhouse effect. The aim of the IEA activity on LFG is to promote information exchange and co-operation between national programmes in order to promote the proliferation of landfill gas utilisation. During the period 19921994 the LFG activity has had six participating countries: Canada, Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Sweden, UK and USA. In the past three-year period, the activity has been mainly directed towards establishing networks and obtaining an over-view of data related to LFG in the member countries. Numerous contacts have been established and perhaps of most importance for the future of the activity are the links towards organisations involved in the development of landfill technology, such as ISWA and SWANA. The gathering and evaluation of data within the LFG area from the member countries has resulted in a number of documents that are to be published within the near future. These documents cover information on LFG utilisation, landfill research, landfill gas potentials, landfill emission assessment and also non-technical barriers to LFG utilisation.

A Lagerkvist

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Structure and Dynamics of Anaerobic Bacterial Aggregates in a Gas-Lift Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Consequently, the mechanical strength of aggregates is affected...Such mechanical effects by gas bubbles arising within biofilms...shearing forces, cell lysis, gas production, etc.) may...W. F. Kossen. 1980. Gas production by immobilized...

H. H. Beeftink; P. Staugaard

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R., E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Quantitative Methods for the Gas Chromatographic Characterization of Acidic Fermentation By-Products of Anaerobic Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......250 C. The nitrogen carrier gas flow rate...incubated in a water bath at 50...deionized water and 0.5...as above. Gas Chromatographic...ml/min nitrogen and the injector...showed low solubility in water, especially...Overall, the gas chromatographic......

Thomas E. Bohannon; Gerald Manius; Francisco Mamaril; Lan-Fun Li Wen

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Modified landfill gas generation rate model of first-order kinetics and two-stage reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This investigation was carried out to establish a new domestic landfill gas (LFG) generation rate model that takes...L 0), the reaction rate constant in the first stage (K 1), and ...

Jiajun Chen; Hao Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Modeling and simulation of landfill gas production from pretreated MSW landfill simulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cumulative landfill gas (LFG) production and its rate ... simulated for pretreated municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill using four models namely first order exponential ... . Considering the behavior of the p...

Rasool Bux Mahar; Abdul Razaque Sahito

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Anaerobic and Aerobic Hydrogen Gas Formation by the Blue-Green Alga Anabaena cylindrica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as high in heterocyst cells (2.3 units/mg of protein) as in vegetative cells (1.1 units/mg of...isolating heterocyst cells is described. Biological hydrogen gas formation is under...potential source of fuel, and hence there is...

Arlene Daday; Rosalea A. Platz; Geoffrey D. Smith

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

El-Fadel, Mutasem, E-mail: mfadel@aub.edu.lb [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Meteorological parameters as an important factor on the energy recovery of landfill gas in landfills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of meteorological factors on the composition and the energy recovery of the landfill gas (LFG) were evaluated in this study. Landfill gas data consisting of methane carbon dioxide and oxygen content as well as LFG temperature were collected from April 2009 to March 2010 along with meteorological data. The data set were first used to visualize the similarity by using self-organizing maps and to calculate correlation factors. Then the data was used with ANN to further analyze the impacts of meteorological factors. In both analysis it is seen that the most important meteorological parameter effective on LFG energy content is soil temperatures. Furthermore ANN was found to be successful in explaining variations of methane content and temperature of LFG with correlation coefficients of 0.706 and 0.984 respectively. ANN was proved itself to be a useful tool for estimating energy recovery of the landfill gas.

?brahim Uyanik; Bestamin zkaya; Selami Demir; Mehmet akmakci

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Potential of Wastewater-Treating Anaerobic Granules for Biomethanation of Synthesis Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This includes the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction for increasing the H2/CO ratio followed by nickel-catalyzed methanation of CO and CO2 into methane and water (reactions of Fischer?Tropsch (nCO + (2n+1)H2 ? CnH(2n+2) + nH2O) and Sabatier (CO2 + 4H2 ? CH4 + 2H2O)). ... Such higher specific conversion potential may have allowed for a higher volumetric conversion potential as well, which may have resulted in a faster depletion of the dissolved CO, and in turn improved the gas?liquid mass transfer rate. ... Results are reported of mixed-culture studies employing the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum for converting CO to CO2 and H2 by the water gas shift reaction and 2 methanogens, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanosarcina barkeri, for converting CO2 and H2 to CH4. Results are presented for triculture operation in 2 types of reactors, the packed bubble column and the trickle-bed reactor. ...

Serge R. Guiot; Ruxandra Cimpoia; Gal Carayon

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

32

Integrated Combined Heat and Power/Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Landfill Gas to Power Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Landfill gas (LFG), composed largely of methane and carbon dioxide, is used in over 450 operational projects in 43 states. These projects convert a large source of greenhouse gases into a fuel that...

33

Production of methane gas from organic fraction municipal solid waste (OFMSW) via anaerobic process: application methodology for the Malaysian condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid waste management in Malaysia is confronted with many problems, including low collection coverage, irregular collection services, inadequate equipment used for waste collection, crude open dumping and burning without air and water pollution control systems, inadequate legal provisions and resource constraints. These problems have various effects on the development of the solid waste management system in Malaysia. Anaerobic digestion has been suggested as an alternative method for removing high concentrations of organic waste. In this study, two types of anaerobic digesters which are Simulated Landfill Bioreactor (SLBR) and Anaerobic Solid-Liquid (ASL) reactor were proposed. The reactors were operated at a temperature 60C, analysed for biogas production and volatile fatty acid.

Irnis Azura Zakarya; Ismail Abustan; Norli Ismail; Mohd Suffian Yusoff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Waste-to-wheel analysis of anaerobic-digestion-based renewable natural gas pathways with the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, manure management accounted for 2,356 Gg or 107 billion standard cubic ft of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions in the United States, equivalent to 0.5% of U.S. natural gas (NG) consumption. Owing to the high global warming potential of methane, capturing and utilizing this methane source could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The extent of that reduction depends on several factors - most notably, how much of this manure-based methane can be captured, how much GHG is produced in the course of converting it to vehicular fuel, and how much GHG was produced by the fossil fuel it might displace. A life-cycle analysis was conducted to quantify these factors and, in so doing, assess the impact of converting methane from animal manure into renewable NG (RNG) and utilizing the gas in vehicles. Several manure-based RNG pathways were characterized in the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model, and their fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions were compared to petroleum-based pathways as well as to conventional fossil NG pathways. Results show that despite increased total energy use, both fossil fuel use and GHG emissions decline for most RNG pathways as compared with fossil NG and petroleum. However, GHG emissions for RNG pathways are highly dependent on the specifics of the reference case, as well as on the process energy emissions and methane conversion factors assumed for the RNG pathways. The most critical factors are the share of flared controllable CH{sub 4} and the quantity of CH{sub 4} lost during NG extraction in the reference case, the magnitude of N{sub 2}O lost in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and in AD residue, and the amount of carbon sequestered in AD residue. In many cases, data for these parameters are limited and uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed to gain a better understanding of the range and magnitude of environmental benefits from converting animal manure to RNG via AD.

Han, J.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

Landfill Gas Conversion to LNG and LCO{sub 2}. Phase II Final Report for January 25, 1999 - April 30, 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work on the development of a process to produce LNG (liquefied methane) for heavy vehicle use from landfill gas (LFG) using Acrion's CO{sub 2} wash process for contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery.

Brown, W. R.; Cook, W. J.; Siwajek, L. A.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

36

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH4 flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.1880.014, 0.2240.012 and 0.2370.008lCH4/m2hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24l/m2hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.060.89l/m2hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.422.46l/m2hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L0) values in the range of 19.8102.6m3/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

Mutasem El-Fadel; Layale Abi-Esber; Samer Salhab

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic 2-methylnaphthalene degradation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

provides a general overview of anaero- Summary: that can be degraded by bacteria. Biogas: the gas produced by anaerobic bacteria in the anaerobic digestion... at Virginia...

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic carbon degradation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;13 degradable (E... monitoring system for the anaerobic process, based on headspace gas chromatography. Submitted. Paper III Boe... on the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1...

39

Anaerobic Digestion Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:07pm Addthis Anaerobic digestion is a common technology in today's agriculture, municipal waste, and brewing industries. It uses bacteria to break down waste organic materials into methane and other gases, which can be used to produce electricity or heat. Methane and Anaerobic Bacteria Methane is a gas that contains molecules of methane with one atom of carbon and four atoms of hydrogen (CH4). It is the major component of the natural gas used in many homes for cooking and heating. It is odorless, colorless, and yields about 1,000 British thermal units (Btu) [252 kilocalories (kcal)] of heat energy per cubic foot (0.028 cubic meters) when burned. Natural gas is a fossil fuel that was created eons ago by the anaerobic

40

Application of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel for refuse trucks in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

truck operations. The purpose of this thesis is to develop a methodology that can be used to evaluate the use of LFG generated at landfills as a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel source for refuse trucks in Texas. The methodology simulates the gas...

Gokhale, Bhushan

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Use of Combusted Natural Gas to Cultivate the Anaerobic Bacterial Flora from the Cecum Contents of Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of an inert gas generator, the gas-to-air...of the inert gas generator. A small compressor...pressure of 250 mm water gauge (WG). By...of changes in the atmospheric pressure. With...temperature ofthe cooling water in the cooling jacket...of the inert gas generator. Parts: 1, stopcock...

J. P. Koopman; J. P. Van Oeveren; F. G. J. Janssen

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Anaerobic Digestion of Algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...would be desirable to remove the algae from the lagoon effluent. Under...anaerobic digestion. Digestion of algae to provide a source of fuel is an attractive possibility...through the anaerobic digestion of algae to produce methane. Energy is...

C. G. Golueke; W. J. Oswald; H. B. Gotaas

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

List of Anaerobic Digestion Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 285 Anaerobic Digestion Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 285) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Job Stimulus Program (Ohio) Industry Recruitment/Support Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic process effects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

based on headspace gas chromatography. Submitted. Paper III Boe... . 12;12;4 2. The biogas process Anaerobic digestion is a multi-step biological process where... . The...

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic conditions improve Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

online VFA monitoring system is presented, as well as the methods for improving biogas production... monitoring system for the anaerobic process, based on headspace gas...

47

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic degradation processes Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and control Summary: monitoring system for the anaerobic process, based on headspace gas chromatography. Submitted. Paper III Boe... . 12;12;4 2. The biogas process...

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic toluene degraders Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in a two-phase partitioning... as a model VMS, from aerobic and anaerobic waste gas streams were ... Source: Deshusses, Marc - Department of Chemical and Environmental...

49

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

John R. Gallagher

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To utilize landfill gas for power generation using carbonate fuel cells, the LFG must be cleaned up to remove sulfur and chlorine compounds. This not only benefits the operation of the fuel cell, but also benefits the environment by preventing the emission of these contaminants to the atmosphere. Commercial technologies for gas processing are generally economical in relatively large sizes (3 MMSCFD or larger), and may not achieve the low levels of contaminants required. To address the issue of LFG clean-up for fuel cell application, a process was developed utilizing commercially available technology. A pilot-scale test facility utilizing this process was built at a landfill site in Anoka, Minnesota using the EPRI fuel cell test facility used for coal gas testing. The pilot plant was tested for 1000 hours, processing 970,000 SCF (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of landfill gas. Testing indicated that the process could achieve the following concentrations of contaminants in the clean gas: Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppm (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv if any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm (average) Sulfur Dioxide. The paper describes the LFG composition for bulk and trace compounds; evaluation of various methods to clean landfill gas; design of a LFG cleanup system; field test of pilot-scale gas cleanup process; fuel cell testing on simulated landfill gas; single cell testing on landfill gas contaminants and post test analysis; and design and economic analyses of a full scale gas cleanup system.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Study of Two Stages Anaerobic Digestion Application and Suitable Bio-Film as an Effort to Improve Bio-Gas Productivity from Jatropha Curcas Linn Capsule Husk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The conversion program from kerosene to LPG in Indonesia has positive impact on saving budget of fuel subsidized. However, the program does not only depend on LPG supply from overseas but also inadvisable related to the LPG availability in the world. Bio-gas is renewable energy which categorized as modern cooking oil. This gaseous bio- fuel is feasible in Indonesia due to plenty of bio-gas resources such as bio-mass and waste, simple technology, supporting tropical climate on bio-gas process, no food competition on material supply, minimizing global warming, reducing water pollution and producing organic fertilizer. Some series of study are conducted on dried Jatropha curcas Linn. capsule husk (JCL-CH) as bio-gas feedstock. The objective of the study is to create technology for managing JCL integrally according to bio-refinery principle. This paper will present two studies, JCL-CH performance in single stage digester compared with two stages digester in laboratory and palm fiber compared with glass wool as bio-film/bio-carrier in methanogenesis reactor. The studies were conducted in Research Laboratory PT. Bumimas Ekapersada, Bekasi, West Java from March until May 2012. A liter of glass bottle as digester, arranged in Randomized Complete Design, three replications per treatment placed in 32C water bath. The bio-gas feedstock was put continuously with Organic Loading Rate OLR or concentration 1: 12 in single stage compared with 1: 12 and 1: 8 in two stages. The observed parameters were pH, temperature, bio-gas volume, methane concentration, volatile solid and acetic acid concentration. Bio-gas volume was measured by water displacement method and methane concentration was measured by gas chromatography. T-test was used for statistical analysis. The studies showed that two stages digester more efficient since it can increase methane concentration and bio-gas volume/gram VS. The bio-gas volume increase 63.83% in OLR 1: 8. Glass wool was more effective as bio-film carrier compared with palm fiber.

Praptiningsih G. Adinurani; Tony Liwang; Salafudin; Leopold O. Nelwan; Yosephianus Sakri; Satriyo K. Wahono; Roy Hendroko

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Anaerobic thermophilic culture system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Wiegel, Jurgen K. W. (Gottingen, DE)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Effect of Siloxanes Contained in Natural Gas on the Operation of a Residential Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) Many facilities exist worldwide that use biomethane (biogas or LFG) for the production of power or electricity, and concerns about global warming are likely to encourage their further capture and utilization. ... Because of the challenges siloxanes present to the beneficial use of biomethane, they have attracted the attention of researchers in the renewable energy area. ... (14) Regeneration involves burning the off-gas, which releases silica particulates into the atmosphere and consumes biomethane to operate the incinerators. ...

Nitin Nair; Arjun Vas; Tongyu Zhu; Wenjing Sun; Jorge Gutierrez; Jack Chen; Fokion Egolfopoulos; Theodore T. Tsotsis

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

54

Commercialization of Anaerobic Contact Process for Anaerobic Digestion of Algae.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The commercialization of anaerobic contact process for the digestion of algal biomass has been shown to be feasible on a technical and economic basis. The (more)

Andlay, Gunjan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae in lower respiratory tract specimens by anaerobic culture technique.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dard C02-enriched aerobic culture technique. These investi- gators suggest that the increased recovery of S. pneumoniae from respiratory...Laboratories) anaerobic system, whereas previous investi- gators used either a GasPak jar (BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville...

R K Baesman; C L Strand

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Contribution of Anaerobic Digesters to Emissions Mitigation and Electricity Generation Under U.S. Climate Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock husbandry in the U.S. significantly contributes to many environmental problems, including the release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Anaerobic digesters (ADs) break down organic wastes using bacteria ...

Zaks, David P. M.

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute anaerobic interval Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology 19 THE JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL ZOOLOGY 213:405-416 (1980) Anaerobic Metabolism, Gas Exchange, and Acid-Base Summary: THE JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL ZOOLOGY 213:405-416...

58

Trichloroethene Removal From Waste Gases in Anaerobic Biotrickling Filters Through Reductive Dechlorination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reductive dechlorination of PCE. Environ. Sci. Technol 2003,588. Kim, J. O. Gaseous TCE and PCE removal by an activatedTsotsis, T. T. Degradation of PCE in an anaerobic waste gas

Popat, Sudeep Chandrakant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

CX-002891: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Construction of conversion facility for landfill gas (LFG) to compressed natural gas (CNG) and a CNG dispensing station at the existing Seminole Road Landfill. LFG is...

60

Analysis, anaerobic treatment and ozonation of wool scouring wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wool scouring effluents (WSE) were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS), and then exposed to anaerobic biological treatment using laboratory scale fixed-bed filters. This resulted in a nearly 50% reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD). Ozonation of the effluent from the biological step led to an even further decrease in total organic carbon (TOC). The fatty acid content of the WSE was affected by both biological treatment and ozonation. Finally, steroids in the WSE underwent reduction reactions when exposed to the anaerobic biological treatment.

Monteverdi, A.; Rindone, B.; Sorlini, C. (Univ. di Milano (Italy)); Andreoni, V. (Univ. di Torino (Italy)); Rozzi, A. (Inst. di Ingegneria Sanitaria del Politechnico di Milano (Italy))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Halophytic microalgae as a feedstock for anaerobic digestion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic digestion can be employed to produce methane biogas from residual microalgae biomass derived from either a lipid based biofuel process or wastewater treatment. There is interest in using halophytic microalgae for biofuel production due to their potential robustness in large-scale open pond production. The anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae biomass would however be challenging due to the high salinities not typically experienced in anaerobic digestion scenarios. Halophytic microalgae biomass as a potential substrate feedstock for anaerobic digestion would have salinities in excess of 3.5%, which is typically found in marine environments. To investigate the anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae issue the first stage of the reported study focuses on the changes undertaken in the bacterial community associated with the anaerobic digestion of piggery effluent under increasing saline conditions, with the aim of establishing a saline tolerant anaerobic digestion inoculum capable of digesting feedstocks under high salinity conditions. Favourable results from this inoculum development study allowed the investigation of anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae. The reported results demonstrate that a saline tolerant inoculum was maintained. Subsequent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of the resulting halophytic bacterial community showed several halophytic methanogens. The inoculum was used to digest the halophytic microalgae. The resulting gas data showed that biogas production of 35853mL/g of volatile solids (VS) with a methane content of 544.3% methane was achieved at 7% salinity. The volume of biogas produced on a wet weight microalgae biomass basis was 12226 and 17525mL/g of halophytic microalgae biomass respectively (742.8wt.% moisture content). The conversion of carbon in the feedstock to methane achieved an efficiency of 26.4% and 46.6% at 3.4% and 7% salinity respectively. A halo-tolerant anaerobic digestion microbial community could be further optimized to complete the loop with nutrient recycle required with the production of halophytic microalgae based biofuels and potentially, hypersaline wastewater treatment applications.

Andrew Ward; Andy Ball; David Lewis

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Powering Microturbines With...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

be operated using LFG or other waste fuels, such as oilfield flare gas and wastewater treatment plant Several LFG microturbine projects have come on line recently, demonstrating...

63

Impact of Siloxane Impurities on the Performance of an Engine Operating on Renewable Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of Siloxane Impurities on the Performance of an Engine Operating on Renewable Natural Gas ... Biogas from sludge biodegradation in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) and landfill gas (LFG) generated from the decomposition of solid waste in landfills are both promising renewable fuels, as they contain a large fraction of methane, 4070% by volume, the rest being CO2, together with smaller amounts of other gases like O2, N2, and Ar. ... In these studies two Honda EU2000i gasoline electric generators were utilized. ...

Nitin Nair; Xianwei Zhang; Jorge Gutierrez; Jack Chen; Fokion Egolfopoulos; Theodore Tsotsis

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

64

Performance of an Internal Combustion Engine Operating on Landfill Gas and the Effect of Syngas Addition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance of an Internal Combustion Engine Operating on Landfill Gas and the Effect of Syngas Addition ... The performance of a four-stroke Honda GC160E spark ignition (SI) internal combustion (IC) engine operating on landfill gas (LFG) was investigated, as well as the impact of H2 and CO (syngas) addition on emissions and engine efficiency. ... In addition, variation across both the syngas content (up to 15%) and the ratio of H2 to CO in the syngas (H2/CO = 0.5, 1, and 2) were tested. ...

McKenzie P. Kohn; Jechan Lee; Matthew L. Basinger; Marco J. Castaldi

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Anaerobic Digestion of Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pursuing alternative and renewable energy has become imperative from both practical and ethical standpoints production is just one of the many renewable energy alternatives out there. Defined as the digestion of Anaerobic Digestion 3.1. Municipal Waste Management 3.2. Climate Change Mitigation 3.2.1. Untreated

Iglesia, Enrique

66

Anaerobic bacteria from hypersaline environments.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...saline habitats such as solar salterns, which may...organic carbon and energy sources. The anaerobic...Lake Assal (East Africa), Na+ 27 28 OLLIVIER...bacterium (47) from a solar saltern (Haloanaerobacter...diversity of carbon and energy sources used by currently...

B Ollivier; P Caumette; J L Garcia; R A Mah

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Characteristics of vegetation and its relationship with landfill gas in closed landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An investigation was carried out to elucidate landfill gas (LFG) and the vegetation characteristics in closed landfill. The results indicate that the stabilization process of the landfill is an important factor influencing the components of landfill gases. The coverage, height and species of vegetation increase with the closed time of landfill. Fourteen species were observed in the investigated cells, dominated by Phragmites australis, an invasive perennial plant. The concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide from vegetated cover soil were lower than those from non-vegetated cover soil.

Chai Xiaoli; Zhao Xin; Lou Ziyang; Takayuki Shimaoka; Hirofumi Nakayama; Cao Xianyan; Zhao Youcai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Anaerobic utilization of essential oils bydenitrifying bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plant volatile organic compounds are a major carbonsource in nature. We studied the degradability ofthese substances by anaerobic microorganisms inenrichment cultures with representative essential oilsas organ...

Jens Harder

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

EA-1624: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

624: Final Environmental Assessment 624: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1624: Final Environmental Assessment Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities This environmental assessment evaluates the potential impacts from the construction and operation of a centralized anaerobic digester facility to process municipal wastewater sludge into energy and to utilize landfill gas (LFG) to produce up to 3.18 Megawatts (MW) of renewable electric power, to be located in Auburn, New York. DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008) More Documents & Publications EA-1624: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1779: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1779: Final Environmental Assessment

70

Biomethane production by anaerobic digestion of organic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is a biological process that takes place naturally when bacteria break down organic matter in environments with or without oxygen. Controlled anaerobic digestion of organic waste in enclosed landfill will generate methane. Almost any organic material can be processed with AD, including waste paper and cardboard (of a grade that is too low to recycle because of food contamination), grass clippings, leftover food, industrial effluents, sewage and animal waste. AD produces biogas which is comprised of around 60% methane (CH4) and 40% carbon dioxide (CO2). This biogas can be used to generate heat or electricity and/or can be used as a vehicular fuel. If the intended use is for power generation the biogas must be scrubbed to remove a number of impurities. After conditioning the biogas can be used for onsite power generation, to heat homes or can be added to the national natural gas grid. In recent years several research groups have shown the possibility of upgrading the biogas for biomethane production [1]. This study will show the feasibility of integrating anaerobic digestion plant with onsite polymeric membrane purification system for conditioned biomethane production.

A. Molino; F. Nanna; Y. Ding; B. Bikson; G. Braccio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Metal-modified and vertically aligned carbon nanotube sensors array for landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) layers were synthesized on Fe-coated low-cost alumina substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology. A miniaturized CNT-based gas sensor array was developed for monitoring landfill gas (LFG) at a temperature of 150??C. The sensor array was composed of 4 sensing elements with unmodified CNT, and CNT loaded with 5?nm nominally thick sputtered nanoclusters of platinum (Pt), ruthenium (Ru) and silver (Ag). Chemical analysis of multicomponent gas mixtures constituted of CO2, CH4, H2, NH3, CO and NO2 has been performed by the array sensor responses and pattern recognition based on principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA results demonstrate that the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor array is able to discriminate the NO2 presence in the multicomponent mixture LFG. The NO2 gas detection in the mixture LFG was proved to be very sensitive, e.g.: the CNT:Ru sensor shows a relative change in the resistance of 1.50% and 0.55% for NO2 concentrations of 3.3?ppm and 330?ppb dispersed in the LFG, respectively, with a wide NO2 gas concentration range measured from 0.33 to 3.3?ppm, at the sensor temperature of 150??C. The morphology and structure of the CNT networks have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. A forest-like nanostructure of vertically aligned CNT bundles in the multi-walled form appeared with a height of about 10 ?m and a single-tube diameter varying in the range of 5?35?nm. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectroscopy D-peak and G-peak indicates the presence of disorder and defects in the CNT networks. The size of the metal (Pt, Ru, Ag) nanoclusters decorating the CNT top surface varies in the range of 5?50?nm. Functional characterization based on electrical charge transfer sensing mechanisms in the metal-modified CNT-chemoresistor array demonstrates high sensitivity by providing minimal sub-ppm level detection, e.g., download up to 100?ppb NO2, at the sensor temperature of 150??C. The gas sensitivity of the CNT sensor array depends on operating temperature, showing a lower optimal temperature of maximum sensitivity for the metal-decorated CNT sensors compared to unmodified CNT sensors. Results indicate that the recovery mechanisms in the CNT chemiresistors can be altered by a rapid heating pulse from room temperature to about 110??C. A comparison of the NO2 gas sensitivity for the chemiresistors based on disorderly networked CNTs and vertically aligned CNTs is also reported. Cross-sensitivity towards relative humidity of the CNT sensors array is investigated. Finally, the sensing properties of the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor arrays are promising to monitor gas events in the LFG for practical applications with low power consumption and moderate sensor temperature.

M Penza; R Rossi; M Alvisi; E Serra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Impact of using high-density polyethylene geomembrane layer as landfill intermediate cover on landfill gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Clay is widely used as a traditional cover material for landfills. As clay becomes increasingly costly and scarce, and it also reduces the storage capacity of landfills, alternative materials with low hydraulic conductivity are employed. In developing countries such as China, landfill gas (LFG) is usually extracted for utilization during filling stage, therefore, the intermediate covering system is an important part in a landfill. In this study, a field test of LFG extraction was implemented under the condition of using high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane layer as the only intermediate cover on the landfill. Results showed that after welding the HDPE geomembranes together to form a whole airtight layer upon a larger area of landfill, the gas flow in the general pipe increased 25% comparing with the design that the HDPE geomembranes were not welded together, which means that the gas extraction ability improved. However as the heat isolation capacity of the HDPE geomembrane layer is low, the gas generation ability of a shallow landfill is likely to be weakened in cold weather. Although using HDPE geomembrane layer as intermediate cover is acceptable in practice, the management and maintenance of it needs to be investigated in order to guarantee its effective operation for a long term.

Zezhi Chen; Huijuan Gong; Mengqun Zhang; Weili Wu; Yu Liu; Jin Feng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

LANDFILL GAS CONVERSION TO LNG AND LCO{sub 2}. PHASE 1, FINAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 1998-FEBRUARY 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process designs and economics were developed to produce LNG and liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from landfill gas (LFG) using the Acrion CO{sub 2} wash process. The patented Acrion CO{sub 2} wash process uses liquid CO{sub 2} to absorb contaminants from the LFG. The process steps are compression, drying, CO{sub 2} wash contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery, residual CO{sub 2} removal and methane liquefaction. Three flowsheets were developed using different residual CO{sub 2} removal schemes. These included physical solvent absorption (methanol), membranes and molecular sieves. The capital and operating costs of the flowsheets were very similar. The LNG production cost was around ten cents per gallon. In parallel with process flowsheet development, the business aspects of an eventual commercial project have been explored. The process was found to have significant potential commercial application. The business plan effort investigated the economics of LNG transportation, fueling, vehicle conversion, and markets. The commercial value of liquid CO{sub 2} was also investigated. This Phase 1 work, March 1998 through February 1999, was funded under Brookhaven National laboratory contract 725089 under the research program entitled ``Liquefied Natural Gas as a Heavy Vehicle Fuel.'' The Phase 2 effort will develop flowsheets for the following: (1) CO{sub 2} and pipeline gas production, with the pipeline methane being liquefied at a peak shaving site, (2) sewage digester gas as an alternate feedstock to LFG and (3) the use of mixed refrigerants for process cooling. Phase 2 will also study the modification of Acrion's process demonstration unit for the production of LNG and a market site for LNG production.

COOK,W.J.; NEYMAN,M.; SIWAJEK,L.A.; BROWN,W.R.; VAN HAUWAERT,P.M.; CURREN,E.D.

1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

74

Diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils with and without landfill gas recovery systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Aerobic CH4 oxidation plays an important role in mitigating CH4 release from landfills to the atmosphere. Therefore, in this study, oxidation activity and community of methanotrophs were investigated in a subtropical landfill. Among the three sites investigated, the highest CH4 concentration was detected in the landfill cover soil of the site (A) without a landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, although the refuse in the site had been deposited for a longer time (?1415 years) compared to the other two sites (?611 years) where a LFG recovery system was applied. In April and September, the higher CH4 flux was detected in site A with 72.4 and 51.7gm?2d?1, respectively, compared to the other sites. The abundance of methanotrophs assessed by quantification of pmoA varied with location and season. A linear relationship was observed between the abundance of methanotrophs and CH4 concentrations in the landfill cover soils (R=0.827, P<0.001). The key factors influencing the methanotrophic diversity in the landfill cover soils were pH, the water content and the CH4 concentration in the soil, of which pH was the most important factor. Type I methanotrophs, including Methylococcus, Methylosarcina, Methylomicrobium and Methylobacter, and type II methanotrophs (Methylocystis) were all detected in the landfill cover soils, with Methylocystis and Methylosarcina being the dominant genera. Methylocystis was abundant in the slightly acidic landfill cover soil, especially in September, and represented more than 89% of the total terminal-restriction fragment abundance. These findings indicated that the LFG recovery system, as well as physical and chemical parameters, affected the diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils.

Yao Su; Xuan Zhang; Fang-Fang Xia; Qi-Qi Zhang; Jiao-Yan Kong; Jing Wang; Ruo He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Kinetic modeling and experimentation of anaerobic digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic digesters convert organic waste (agricultural and food waste, animal or human manure, and other organic waste), into energy (in the form of biogas or electricity). An added benefit to bio-digestion is a leftover ...

Rea, Jonathan (Jonathan E.)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Siting Requirements for Anaerobic Lagoons (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute provides regulations for required distances between anaerobic lagoons and residences or public use areas. The separation distances may be waived or reduced with the agreement of the...

77

Electricity Production from Anaerobic Digestion of Household Organic Waste in Ontario: Techno-Economic and GHG Emission Analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electricity Production from Anaerobic Digestion of Household Organic Waste in Ontario: Techno-Economic and GHG Emission Analyses ... The life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and economics of electricity generation through anaerobic digestion (AD) of household source-separated organic waste (HSSOW) are investigated within the FiT program. ... AD can potentially provide considerable GHG emission reductions (up to 1 t CO2eq/t HSSOW) at relatively low to moderate cost (-$35 to 160/t CO2eq) by displacing fossil electricity and preventing the emission of landfill gas. ...

David Sanscartier; Heather L. MacLean; Bradley Saville

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

78

Catalytically upgraded landfill gas as a cost-effective alternative for fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential use of landfill gas as feeding fuel for the so-called molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) imposes the need for new upgrading technologies in order to meet the much tougher feed gas specifications of this type of fuel cells in comparison to gas engines. Nevertheless, MCFC has slightly lower purity demands than low temperature fuel cells. This paper outlines the idea of a new catalytic purification process for landfill gas conditioning, which may be supposed to be more competitive than state-of-the-art technologies and summarises some lab-scale results. This catalytic process transforms harmful landfill gas minor compounds into products that can be easily removed from the gas stream by a subsequent adsorption step. The optimal process temperature was found to be in the range 250400C. After a catalyst screening, two materials were identified, which have the ability to remove all harmful minor compounds from landfill gas. The first material was a commercial alumina that showed a high activity towards the removal of organic silicon compounds. The alumina protects both a subsequent catalyst for the removal of other organic minor compounds and the fuel cell. Due to gradual deactivation caused by silica deposition, the activated alumina needs to be periodically replaced. The second material was a commercial V2O5/TiO2-based catalyst that exhibited a high activity for the total oxidation of a broad spectrum of other harmful organic minor compounds into a simpler compound class acid gases (HCl, HF and SO2), which can be easily removed by absorption with, e.g. alkalised alumina. The encouraging results obtained allow the scale-up of this LFG conditioning process to test it under real LFG conditions.

W. Urban; H. Lohmann; J.I. Salazar Gmez

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

New York's 29th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LAC Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics First Wind (Formerly UPC Wind) (New York) Geotherm, Inc. LFG Technologies Smart Solar Inc Solar Sentry Corporation The Center for Advanced...

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic acid-resistant bacterium Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantification of Methanogenic Groups in Anaerobic... February 1994 The microbial community structure of anaerobic biological reactors was evaluated by using... ,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantification of Methanogenic Groups in Anaerobic... February 1994 The microbial community structure of anaerobic biological reactors was evaluated by using... ,...

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic bacterium anaerocellum Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantification of Methanogenic Groups in Anaerobic... February 1994 The microbial community structure of anaerobic biological reactors was evaluated by using... ,...

83

Diversity of Anaerobic Microbes in Spacecraft Assembly Clean Rooms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...anaerobic bacteria were preferentially enriched under the cultural conditions used, making...study bacterial population dynamics during uranium reduction and reoxidation. Appl. Environ...cultivation-based analyses. The results reveal that highly diverse anaerobic bacterial populations...

Alexander Probst; Parag Vaishampayan; Shariff Osman; Christine Moissl-Eichinger; Gary L. Andersen; Kasthuri Venkateswaran

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

84

Biochemistry and Evolution of Anaerobic Energy Metabolism in Eukaryotes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...this review is to survey energy metabolism-with...the light or in the dark (425), if needed...perspective, anaerobic energy metabolism in eukaryotes...eukaryotes than other surveys might imply (15...involved in anaerobic energy metabolism in eukaryotes...

Mikls Mller; Marek Mentel; Jaap J. van Hellemond; Katrin Henze; Christian Woehle; Sven B. Gould; Re-Young Yu; Mark van der Giezen; Aloysius G. M. Tielens; William F. Martin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

NONE

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

86

Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal for a mid-size city  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with wastewater sludge, wood ash, coal ash, lime-kiln dust, and/or limestone quarry dust to improve the profile systems [Block & Goldstein 2000]. Anaerobic composting is not well used in the U.S until now [Goldstein of the process, the methane gas ("cleaner energy") and harvesting materials from MSW to #12;either recycle

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

87

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

88

Anaerobic treatment of gasifier effluents. Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed during the quarter ending December 30, 1981. The major efforts have been directed toward the continued acclimation of two anaerobic treatment systems, start up of a third anaerobic treatment system, GC/MS characterization of the coal gasification wastewater, data acquisition for determination of distribution coefficients for the extraction of phenol from the wastewater using MIBK, and preliminary design of a solvent extraction system for wastewater pretreatment. The progress of these efforts are depicted in the Gannt Chart, along with project expenditures for the above contract, and are presented in detail in the following sections.

Cross, W.H.; Chian, E.S.K.; Pohland, F.G.; Giabbai, M.; Harper, S.R.; Kharkar, S.; Cheng, S.S.; Shuey, P.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions using various thermal systems in a landfill site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from an uncontrolled landfill site filled with Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) are compared with those from controlled sites in which collected Landfill Gases (LFG) are utilised by various technologies. These technologies include flaring, conventional electricity generation technologies such as Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) and Gas Turbine (GT) and an emerging technology, Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC). The results show that SOFC is the best option for reducing the GHG emissions among the studied technologies. In the case when SOFC is used, GHG emissions from the controlled site are reduced by 63% compared to the uncontrolled site. This case has a specific lifetime GHG emission of 2.38 tonnes CO2 .eq/MWh when only electricity is produced and 1.12 tonnes CO2.eq/MWh for a cogeneration application.

C. Ozgur Colpan; Ibrahim Dincer; Feridun Hamdullahpur

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

PRINCIPLES CONCERNING THE ISOLATION OF ANAEROBES STUDIES IN PATHOGENIC ANAEROBES. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...L. 1902 Ueber die Garung der Cellulose. Ibid., 81, 226. OMELIANSKY, W. L. 1904 Ueber die Trennung der Wasserstoff und Methan- gaihrung der Cellulose. Ibid. 11, 369, 703. PFUHL, E. 1907 Die Zuchtung anaerober Bakterien in Leberbouillon...

Hilda Hempl Heller

1921-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Anaerobic biodegradation of cyanide under methanogenic conditions.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cyanide analysis for many wastes. In the presence of...and nitrile polymer industries generate over three...cyanide-con- taining waste annually (31). Treatment...copper and zinc plating wastes on sludge digestion...Treatment of coal gasification wastewater with anaerobic...

R D Fallon; D A Cooper; R Speece; M Henson

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar April 16, 2013 1:00PM MDT Webinar This free webinar will be held on April 16, 2013, from 1-2:15 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. It will provide information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi Community's anaerobic digester project. Implementing Anaerobic Digestion in San Jose's Integrated Processing Infrastructure This presentation will provide background on San Jose, California's, leading-edge program using the nation's first commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system to process commercial organics from more than 8,000 businesses in the city. Phase one of the Zero Waste

93

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Renewable portfolio standards in the 30 states and District of Columbia with current mandates 3. Renewable portfolio standards in the 30 states and District of Columbia with current mandates State Target Qualifying renewables Qualifying other (thermal, efficiency, nonrenewable distributed generation, etc.) Compliance mechanisms AZ 15% by 2025 Solar, wind, biomass, hydropower, landfill gas (LFG), anaerobic digestion built after January 1, 1997 Direct use of solar heat, ground-source heat pumps, and renewable-fueled combined heat and power (CHP), cogeneration, and fuel cells Credit trading is allowed, with some bundling restrictions. Includes distributed generation requirement, starting at 5% of target in 2007, growing to 30% in 2012 and beyond. CA 33% by 2020 Solar, wind, biomass, geothermal, LFG and municipal solid waste (MSW), small hydro, biodiesel, anaerobic digestion, and marine Energy storage Credit trading is allowed, with some restrictions. Renewable energy credit prices are capped at $50 per megawatthour.

94

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Renewable portfolio standards in the 30 states and District of Columbia with current mandates 3. Renewable portfolio standards in the 30 states and District of Columbia with current mandates State Target Qualifying renewables Qualifying other (thermal, efficiency, nonrenewable distributed generation, etc.) Compliance mechanisms AZ 15% by 2025 Solar, wind, biomass, hydropower, landfill gas (LFG), anaerobic digestion built after January 1, 1997 Direct use of solar heat, ground-source heat pumps, and renewable-fueled combined heat and power (CHP), cogeneration, and fuel cells Credit trading is allowed, with some bundling restrictions. Includes distributed generation requirement, starting at 5% of target in 2007, growing to 30% in 2012 and beyond. CA 33% by 2020 Solar, wind, biomass, geothermal, LFG and municipal solid waste (MSW), small hydro, biodiesel, anaerobic digestion, and marine Energy storage Credit trading is allowed, with some restrictions. Renewable energy credit prices are capped at $50 per megawatthour.

95

Biogas production and feasibility of energy recovery systems for anaerobic treatment of wool-scouring effluent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of anaerobic digestion to produce biogas at a small wool-scouring facility in the United States was examined. The facility will process 90,800kg (200,000 pounds) of greasy wool per year at maximum capacity. Biochemical methane potential experiments showed that anaerobic biodegradation of organic constituents in wool-scouring effluent (WSE) ranged from 17 to 75% on a chemical oxygen demand (COD) basis and produced 0.100.39L methane per gram of WSE COD added. Microbial inhibition was observed when initial WSE concentrations exceeded 1000mg COD/L. A laboratory-scale continuous reactor operated at organic loading rates of 100200mg COD/L/day produced biogas with an average methane content of 75% and provided 7278% removal of total WSECOD. Life cycle costing predicted that the best alternative for energy recovery at a small wool-scouring facility was to offset natural gas used to heat water for wool-scouring with biogas. Economic feasibility should increase with increasing COD removal, increasing natural gas price, and increasing cost to discharge to the municipal wastewater treatment works. The key anaerobic treatment design challenge will be to maximize WSE organic loading rates while minimizing microbial inhibition.

Erika J. Schoen; David M. Bagley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Low dimensional model of heart rhythm dynamics as a tool for diagnosing the anaerobic threshold  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report preliminary results on describing the dependence of the heart rhythm variability on the stress level by using qualitative, low dimensional models. The reconstruction of macroscopic heart models yielding cardio cycles (RR-intervals) duration was based on actual clinical data. Our results show that the coefficients of the low dimensional models are sensitive to metabolic changes. In particular, at the transition between aerobic and aerobic-anaerobic metabolism, there are pronounced extrema in the functional dependence of the coefficients on the stress level. This strong sensitivity can be used to design an easy indirect method for determining the anaerobic threshold. This method could replace costly and invasive traditional methods such as gas analysis and blood tests. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Anosov, O.L. [Institute of Physiology, Charite Humboldt-University at Berlin, Berlin, D-10117 (Germany)] [Regional. Cardio Center, Vladimir, (Russia); Butkovskii, O.Y. [Vladimir State Technical University, 87, Gorki St., Vladimir, 600026 (Russia); Kadtke, J. [Institute for Pure and Applied Physical Science University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0360 (United States); Kravtsov, Y.A. [Space Research Institute of RAS, 84/32 Profsoyuznaja St., Moscow, 117810 (Russia); Protopopescu, V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6364 (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Anaerobic bioflocculation of wool scouring effluent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two-stage anaerobic bioflocculation process (ABP) successfully flocculated a high grease (> 15 g/l) wool scouring effluent (WSE). During 110 days of continuous operation, a two-stage laboratory process removed between 70 and 90% grease and 6086% COD at a combined hydraulic residence time (HRT) of 410 days. Grease removal was more difficult with low grease (<10 g/l) WSE. At a HRT of 3 days a single-stage ABP removed 40 and 44% grease at 20 and 37C, respectively. Methane production and volatile fatty acids consumption were negligible. Most of the grease was removed by flocculation as a result of anaerobic bacterial activity. The supernatant was successfully treated by an aerobic activated sludge process reducing grease concentration from about 1.5 to less than 0.1 g/l in the final effluent at an HRT of 3 days.

Wipa Lapsirikul; Ralf Cord-Ruwisch; Goen Ho

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Degradation of Triclosan under Aerobic, Anoxic, and Anaerobic Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Triclosan (2, 4, 4?-trichloro-2? ... consumables. Aerobic and anaerobic enrichment cultures tolerating triclosan were developed and 77 bacterial strains tolerating triclosan at different levels were isolated from...

Prajeesh Gangadharan Puthiya Veetil

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic betaproteobacterium georgfuchsia...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic ultramicrobacteria belonging...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of bacterial... belonged to the -, -, and -Proteobacteria, the Actinobacteria, and the CFB groups. The only uncultured... this group are facultatively or obligately anaerobic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Anaerobic Digestion Optimization for Enhanced Renewable Biomethane Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The scope of this research project was to operate suspended growth, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) anaerobic digesters at the bench-scale level to evaluate improved (more)

Stover, Ted Ross

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste for energy production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study was carried out in order to evaluate the performance of anaerobic reactors treating OFMSW (organic fraction of municipal solid waste), especially in terms (more)

Nayono, Satoto Endar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Directed Evolution of a Cellodextrin Transporter for Improved Biofuel Production Under Anaerobic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Directed Evolution of a Cellodextrin Transporter for Improved Biofuel Production Under Anaerobic that anaerobic biofuel production could be significantly improved via directed evolution of a sugar transporter: cellodextrin transporter; cellobiose utilization; cellulosic biofuel; anaerobic fermentation; directed

Zhao, Huimin

104

Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

Frank J. Hartz; Rob Taylor; Grant Davies

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

106

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestor methanothrix Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The main factors that affect the economic viability of anaerobic digestors... of the biogas and the energy required to heat the digestor). Anaerobic digestors are normally...

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digesters current Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion usa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion performance Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically digested cattle Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion heat Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digesters treating Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digester treating Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic thermophilic digestion Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digester performance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic biosurfactant production Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(1990) Received 25th January Summary: ). High Solids Anaerobic Fermentation for Biogas and Compost Production. Biomass 16, 173-182. Owen, W... Reactor for Anaerobic...

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion model Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

organic waste, converting... of anaerobic bacteria, these compounds decompose to yield a biogas that comprises of methane (CH.) and carbon... not processed anaerobically. The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic acidification broth Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

broth produced in the biomass... is expected to undergo anaerobic digestion to produce biogas. This biogas will serve as the primary source... be produced during the anaerobic...

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic bacteria thermoanaerobacter Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

organic waste, converting... of anaerobic bacteria, these compounds decompose to yield a biogas that comprises of methane (CH.) and carbon... not processed anaerobically. The...

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic selenate-respiring bacteria Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

organic waste, converting... of anaerobic bacteria, these compounds decompose to yield a biogas that comprises of methane (CH.) and carbon... not processed anaerobically. The...

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic laboratory conditions Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from pasturelands that received biosolids (anaerobic and aerobiclime stabilized... (Hale et al., 2000), indicating modest degradation in anaerobic sediments. Leachate from a...

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline anaerobic respiration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Effects of Benthic Organic Matter Quality on Aerobic and Anaerobic Sediment Metabolism in West Falmouth Harbor Summary: , respectively. Anaerobic respiration...

126

Fermentation and Anaerobic Respiration by Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodopseudomonas capsulata  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...anaero- bic, dark conditions are...widespread than the survey indicated. With...of anaerobic, dark growth. Growth...sole carbon and energy source. No accessory...no anaerobic, dark growth of R...oxi- dized by energy-yielding reactions...assistance. The strain survey was performed...

J. E. Schultz; P. F. Weaver

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hill Air Force Base Landfill Gas to Energy Biogas Caseoperators control leachate, landfill gas emissions, odors,USDepartmentofState 2006). Landfill gas (LFG) is created by

Borglin, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic granular sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sludge Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic granular sludge...

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sludge digestion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

digestion Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic sludge digestion...

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sludge digester Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

digester Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic sludge digester...

131

Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas 907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE and USDA to provide funding to Western Plains Energy, LLC (WPE) to construct, purchase equipment, and operate a new Biogas Anaerobic Digester at WPE's existing Ethanol Facility, located at 3022 County Road 18, Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas. The proposed facility will include a receiving building, digester, and related infrastructure. Based on the analysis in USDA's Final EA and FONSI, DOE has determined that DOE's proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human or natural environment.

133

Design of an anaerobic digester in Quebec, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.In response to the future Quebec, Canada regulations prohibiting landfilling of organic matter by 2020, EBI, a waste management company located near Montreal is considering constructing an anaerobic digester. This thesis ...

Bouaziz, Alexandre N. (Alexandre Nathanel)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar was held April 16, 2013, and provided information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi...

135

Biochemistry and Evolution of Anaerobic Energy Metabolism in Eukaryotes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Evolution of Anaerobic Energy Metabolism in Eukaryotes...Rockefeller University, New York, New York, USA b Department...ATP synthesis (energy metabolism) in...Marcel Dekker Inc, New York, NY. 344. Mulder...Carbohydrate and energy metabolism of Tritrichomonas...

Mikls Mller; Marek Mentel; Jaap J. van Hellemond; Katrin Henze; Christian Woehle; Sven B. Gould; Re-Young Yu; Mark van der Giezen; Aloysius G. M. Tielens; William F. Martin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

PAFC fed by biogas produced by the anaerobic fermentation of the waste waters of a beet-sugar refinery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beet-washing waters of a beet-sugar refinery carry a high COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand), and their conditioning to meet legal constraints before disposal considerably contributes to the operation costs of the refinery. Their fermentation in an anaerobic digestor could instead produce readily disposable non-polluting waters, fertilizers and biogas, useful to feed a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) heat and power generator system. A real refinery case is considered in this work, where the electrical characteristics V = V(I) of a laboratory PAFC stack, fueled with a dry simulated reforming gas (having the same H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} content as the biogas obtainable by the above said anaerobic digestion), are determined. The encouraging results show that a possible market niche for fuel cells, in the food-industry waste partial recovery and residual disposal, deserves attention.

Ascoli, A.; Elias, G. [Univ. Diegli Studi di Milano (Italy); Bigoni, L. [CISE Tecnologie Innovative S.p.A., Segrate (Italy); Giachero, R. [Du Pont Pharma Italia, Firenze (Italy)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Innovative wastewater treatment using reversing anaerobic upflow system (RAUS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anaerobic processes are widely popular in the treatment of a variety of industrial wastewaters since the development of such high rate treatment processes like upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic filter, and the fluidized-bed process. In order to devise a low cost/high technology system so that it would provide an economical solution to environmentally sound pollution control, the Reversing Anaerobic Upflow System (RAUS) was developed. The system consists of two anaerobic reactors connected to each other. At the beginning, one reactor is fed upwards with wastewater while the other acts as a settling tank. After a set interval of time, the flow is reversed such that the second reactor is fed with wastewater and the first one acts as the settler. This particular feeding pattern had shown improved settling characteristics and granulation of methanogenic biomass from research carried out at the Hannover University with different wastewaters. The biological reaction vessels to which wastewater is introduced intermittently functions basically as a sludge blanket type reactor although the costly integrated settling devices present in a typical UASB system are avoided. The RAUS combines three principle reactor configurations: (1) conventional with sludge recycling; (2) fill and draw or sequential batch, inflow maintained constant during feeding; (3) upflow anaerobic sludge blanket. A pilot scale RAUS was operated for 400 days using distillery wastewater consisting of molasses slop and bottle washing water mixed in the ratio 1:1. This paper discusses the results of pilot scale experiments.

Basu, S.K. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Environmental Engineering Div.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Sequential anaerobic/anaerobic digestion for enhanced sludge stabilization: comparison of the process performance for mixed and waste sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion has been demonstrated as a promising alternative for enhanced sludge stabilization. In this paper, a feasibility ... the sequential digestion applied to real waste activated...

M. Concetta Tomei; Nicola Antonello Carozza

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A renewable energy plan for the Oak Grove Sanitary Landfill In Winder, Georgia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Oak Grove Sanitary Landfill in Winder, Georgia is already refining its landfill gas (LFG) and sending it through the natural gas pipeline. This is more (more)

Hambrick, Tracy L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Methane Production Quantification and Energy Estimation for Bangalore Municipal Solid Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfills are considered as cornerstone of solid waste management. Landfill gas (LFG) and leachate are principal outputs ... from landfills. Methane, occupying significant volume of landfill gas, has considerable...

A. Kumar; R. Dand; P. Lakshmikanthan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

CX-008274: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laboratory Construction of processing plant for landfill gas (LFG) to compressed natural gas (CNG) and a CNG dispensing station at the Seminole Road Landfill. CX-008274.pdf More...

143

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Construction of processing plant for landfill gas (LFG) to compressed natural gas (CNG) and a CNG dispensing station at the Seminole Road Landfill. Steven Richardson...

144

Enrichment and optimization of anaerobic bacterial mixed culture for conversion of syngas to ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main aim of the present study was to enrich anaerobic mixed bacterial culture capable of producing ethanol from synthesis gas fermentation. Screening of thirteen anaerobic strains together with enrichment protocol helped to develop an efficient mixed culture capable of utilizing syngas for ethanol production. Physiological and operational parameters were optimized for enhanced ethanol production. The optimized value of operational parameters i.e. initial media pH, incubation temperature, initial syngas pressure, and agitation speed were 6.00.1, 37C, 2kgcm?2 and 100rpm respectively. Under these conditions ethanol and acetic acid production by the selected mixed culture were 1.54gL?1 and 0.8gL?1 respectively. Furthermore, up-scaling studies in semi-continuous fermentation mode further enhanced ethanol and acetic acid production up to 2.2gL?1 and 0.9gL?1 respectively. Mixed culture TERI SA1 was efficient for ethanol production by syngas fermentation.

Ashish Singla; Dipti Verma; Banwari Lal; Priyangshu M. Sarma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Intermediate-scale high-solids anaerobic digestion system operational development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. Operation of the anaerobic digestion process at high solids reduces the level of process water and thereby the size and capital costs for the digester system. In addition, by virtue of the lack of available water, the microbial catalysts are more productive in feedstock polymer hydrolysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. Information gained from laboratory-scale digester research was used to develop die intermediate-scale digester system. This system represents a 50-fold scale-up of the original digester system and includes continuous feed addition and computer monitoring and control. During the first 1.15 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements -- which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using the NREL high-solids digester design -- are detailed in this report.

Rivard, C.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Limiting factors and microbial organometallic transformations in anaerobic subsurface environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial communities from subsurface materials were analyzed for microbial community-particle size relationships, effects of arsenic and mercury compounds on microbial community structure, and limiting factors influencing mercury volatilization under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The microbial communities showed strong relationships to particle size and size distribution. Major differences were found in relation to aerobic and anaerobic populations and for aerobic populations between the largest and smallest fractions. Under aerobic conditions, a significant increase in low nutrient responsive microbes occurred. After exposure to four metal compounds (phenylmercuric acetate (PMA), mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}), phenylarsonic acid (PAA), and sodium arsenate (Na{sub 2}AsO{sub 4})) major changes in populations occurred. Previous exposure to these metals increased the aerobic and anaerobic populations of GS-9, indicating an adaptive response. In GS-20, previous exposure to all four compounds caused a decrease in both the aerobic and anaerobic populations. The effect was most pronounced in sediments treated with PMA or HgCl{sub 2}. Limiting nutritional factors for the volatilization of mercury under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were identified in control and PMA impacted samples from GS-9 and GS-20.

Klein, D.A.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Anaerobic codigestion of dairy manure and food manufacturing waste for renewable energy generation in New York State.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Anaerobic digestion is a microbiological process that converts biodegradable organic material into biogas, consisting primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. Anaerobic digestion technologies have been (more)

Wu, Yen-Chin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidogenic anaerobic reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: anaerobic digestion in the inlet of the pre-treatment zone of a plug-flow biogas reactor for biomass... -flow anaerobic reactor for domestic organic waste treatment...

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic biogas reactors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biogas reactors Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic biogas reactors Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Anaerobic Co-digestion of...

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic carbon metabolism Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Two-Phase Production of H2CH4 Mixtures An anaerobic digestion process to produce hydrogen and methane (CH4) in Summary: Two-Phase Production of H2CH4 Mixtures An anaerobic...

151

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sulfide oxidation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

marsh microbial mat geochemistry Summary: 1, p. 114-160. KAMP A., STIEF P. & SCHULZ-VOGT H.N. (2006).- Anaerobic sulfide oxidation... to facultative anaerobic spirochetes may...

152

Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecovation Inc (formerly AnAerobics) Place Victor, New York Zip 14564 Product The company build and operate organic waste management systems. Coordinates 38.15924°, -81.034233° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.15924,"lon":-81.034233,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

153

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Community-Scale Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters (text version) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters (text version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters," originally presented on April 16, 2013. Operator: The broadcast is now starting. All attendees are in listen-only mode. Sarah Busche: Good afternoon, everyone, and welcome to today's webinar sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. I'm Sarah Busche, and I'm here with Devin Egan, and we're broadcasting live from a very snowy National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Thank you so much for joining us today. We're going to give folks a few minutes to call in and log on, but while we wait Devin will go over some logistics, and then we'll get started with

154

The Impacts of Triclosan on Anaerobic Community Structures, Function, and Antimicrobial Resistance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Impacts of Triclosan on Anaerobic Community Structures, Function, and Antimicrobial Resistance ... Triclosan is a widespread antimicrobial agent that accumulates in anaerobic digesters used to treat the residual solids generated at municipal wastewater treatment plants; there is very little information, however, about how triclosan impacts microbial communities in anaerobic digesters. ... We investigated how triclosan impacts the community structure, function and antimicrobial resistance genes in lab-scale anaerobic digesters. ...

Patrick J. McNamara; Timothy M. LaPara; Paige J. Novak

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters (text version)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters," originally presented on April 16, 2013.

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic potency test Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

describing mineralization, nitrification... diffusive constraints due to aggregate size. With increasing anaerobic volume, the effective nitrification Source: Technion, Israel...

157

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic feiii-reducer rhodoferax Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and agricultural wastewater, includ- ing methanogenic anaerobic digestion, biological hydro- gen production... material in industrial and agricultural wastewater Methanogenic...

158

Engineered microorganisms capable of producing target compounds under anaerobic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention is generally provides recombinant microorganisms comprising engineered metabolic pathways capable of producing C3-C5 alcohols under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The invention further provides ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes which have been mutated or modified to increase their NADH-dependent activity or to switch the cofactor preference from NADPH to NADH and are expressed in the modified microorganisms. In addition, the invention provides isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes expressed in modified microorganisms. Also provided are methods of producing beneficial metabolites under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by contacting a suitable substrate with the modified microorganisms of the present invention.

Buelter, Thomas (Denver, CO); Meinhold, Peter (Denver, CO); Feldman, Reid M. Renny (San Francisco, CA); Hawkins, Andrew C. (Parker, CO); Urano, Jun (Irvine, CA); Bastian, Sabine (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Frances (La Canada, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

159

Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste?recycling Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Food waste?recycling (FWR) wastewater was evaluated as feedstock for two?stage anaerobic digestion at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The FWR wastewater tested contained high concentrations of organic materials and had chemical oxygen demand (COD) >130 g/L and volatile solids (VS) >55 g/L. Two identical two?stage anaerobic digesters were operated to investigate the performance at six HRTs ranging from 1025 days. In the acidogenic reactor the total carbohydrate reduction efficiency and volatile fatty acid production dramatically decreased when acidogenic HRT was wastewater as feedstock.

Gyuseong Han; Seung Gu Shin; Juntaek Lim; Minho Jo; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Evaluation of landfill gas production and emissions in a MSW large-scale Experimental Cell in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas (LFG) emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are an important environmental concern in Brazil due to the existence of several uncontrolled disposal sites. A program of laboratory and field tests was conducted to investigate gas generation in and emission from an Experimental Cell with a 36,659-ton capacity in Recife/PE Brazil. This investigation involved waste characterisation, gas production and emission monitoring, and geotechnical and biological evaluations and was performed using three types of final cover layers. The results obtained in this study showed that waste decomposes 45 times faster in a tropical wet climate than predicted by traditional first-order models using default parameters. This fact must be included when considering the techniques and economics of projects developed in tropical climate countries. The design of the final cover layer and its geotechnical and biological behaviour proved to have an important role in minimising gas emissions to the atmosphere. Capillary and methanotrophic final cover layers presented lower CH4 flux rates than the conventional layer.

Felipe Juc Maciel; Jos Fernando Thom Juc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Biochemistry and Evolution of Anaerobic Energy Metabolism in Eukaryotes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contribution to energy metabolism...unicellular green algae, the situation...a possible biofuel under certain...aerobically, the alga respires oxygen...of anaerobic energy metabolism...conserving energy, for example, via the alternative oxidase (AOX...eukaryotic algae appearing slightly...

Mikls Mller; Marek Mentel; Jaap J. van Hellemond; Katrin Henze; Christian Woehle; Sven B. Gould; Re-Young Yu; Mark van der Giezen; Aloysius G. M. Tielens; William F. Martin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Anaerobic Co-Digestion on Dairies in Washington State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as food-processing wastes) to increase biogas productivity, improve digester performance, and increase in manure and other feedstock to methane-rich biogas, a source of renewable energy (US-EPA 2006) (Figure 1-EPA 2005; US-EPA 2008). In addition to biogas, AD generates fiber and Figure 1. Overview of anaerobic

Collins, Gary S.

163

Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria: Unique Microorganisms with Exceptional Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...review-article Reviews Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing...compartmentalized cell plan and archaeon-like...wall. Here we review our current knowledge...resembles the standard cytoplasmic compartment...compartmentalized cell plan and archaeon-like...wall. Here we review our current knowledge...resembles the standard cytoplasmic compartment...

Laura van Niftrik; Mike S. M. Jetten

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for the biogeochemical cycles and for the sustainable...the Introduction, the general strategy of anaerobes...oxidation via the TCA cycle to PHB synthesis, which...and A2 (351). Some general stress-related proteins...role of BadM as a more general regulatory protein is...

Manuel Carmona; Mara Teresa Zamarro; Blas Blzquez; Gonzalo Durante-Rodrguez; Javier F. Jurez; J. Andrs Valderrama; Mara J. L. Barragn; Jos Luis Garca; Eduardo Daz

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Sorption and Degradation of Fipronil in Flooded Anaerobic Rice Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sorption and Degradation of Fipronil in Flooded Anaerobic Rice Soils ... The data predicted that fipronil was subject to rapid, reductive degradation or immediate sorption to the soil and any sorbed fipronil desorbed was reductively degraded. ... The reductive metabolite, fipronil sulfide, accumulated over the 184 day duration of the experiment and sorbed rapidly to the soil, where it accumulated and did not appear to degrade. ...

Gregory Doran; Philip Eberbach; Stuart Helliwell

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

166

Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume E T H A N L . G R O S S M A N , * , L U I Landfill, OK, provides an excellent natural laboratory for the study of anaerobicprocessesimpactinglandfill enrichment indicated that 80-90% of the original landfill methane was oxidized over the 210-m transect. First

Grossman, Ethan L.

167

Landfill Gas Sequestration in Kansas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Road Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26505-0880 304-285-4132 Heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov David newell Principal Investigator Kansas Geological Survey 1930 Constant Avenue Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-2183 dnewall@kgs.uk.edu LandfiLL Gas sequestration in Kansas Background Municipal solid waste landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States, accounting for about 34 percent of these emissions in 2004. Most methane (CH 4 ) generated in landfills and open dumps by anaerobic decomposition of the organic material in solid-waste-disposal landfills is either vented to the atmosphere or converted to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) by flaring. The gas consists of about 50 percent methane (CH 4 ), the primary component of natural gas, about 50 percent carbon dioxide (CO

168

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters This webinar was held April 16, 2013, and provided information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi Community's (FCPC) anaerobic digester project. Download the presentations below, watch the webinar (WMV 125 MB), or view the text version. Find more CommRE webinars. Implementing Anaerobic Digestion in San Jose's Integrated Processing Infrastructure This presentation provided background on San Jose, California's, leading-edge program using the nation's first commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system to process commercial organics

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing landfill performance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and WTE waste management options... Transfer Stations (MTS); Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Landfill Gas (LFG): Geographic Wormation Systems (GIS... . Care has been taken to...

170

Studies of siloxane decomposition in biomethane combustion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biogas, which is produced from sludge biodegradation in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), and landfill gas (LFG), which is generated from solid waste in landfills, are (more)

Jalali, Mir Aydin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Anaerobic batch co-digestion of Spartina alterniflora and potato  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential of mesophilic anaerobic batch digestion for the treatment of Spartina alterniflora, an invasive species widely distributed along Chinese coastlines, through co-digestion with readily biodegradable organics has been assessed. The accumulative biogas yield from S. alterniflora alone was 251 ml/g Total Solid (TS) (at 35C), at TS of 6%, co-digestion with 80% of S. alterniflora and 20% of potato representing 6% of TS, gave a biogas yield of 383 ml/g TS (at 35C). This is an increase of 52.5% compared with that obtained from digestion of pure S. alterniflora. In conclusion, using readily biodegradable potato as co-substrate of S. alterniflora can increase its anaerobic digestibility and biogas yield.

Jihong Li; Shiguan Yang; Zheng Zheng; Huamin Song; Zhuo Meng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Mechanisms in anaerobic bioflocculation of wool scouring effluent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The emulsified grease in wool scouring effluent (WSE) was demonstrably removed by bioflocculation under anaerobic conditions. The addition of anaerobic bacteria from biogas digestion to WSE resulted in grease reduction of 6080% from the supernatant. Since no significant net grease (supernatant plus sludge) reduction was observed in this system, the grease emulsion from the liquid phase is simply settled by gravity into the sludge phase. However, sterilized sludge did not cause this effect, indicating that bacterial metabolic activity was responsible for the bioflocculation. It was also found that such microbes can successfully survive and multiply in WSE, as a result, the development of a continuous process is possible. The process required a short gentle mixing period of approx. 15 min enable the the sludge to completely contact with WSE, and a longer settling period of 24 days to provide an appropriate time for the microbes to destabilize wool grease emulsion and settle to the sludge phase.

Wipa Lapsirikul; Goen Ho; Ralf Cord-Ruwisch

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Improving Anaerobic Codigestion of Corn Stover Using Sodium Hydroxide Pretreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lignin of the corn stover was measured according to the Laboratory Analytical Procedures (LAP) established by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). ... The methane yield per gram of corn stover is an important parameter to estimate the net energy production of the corn stover digestion. ... This means that NaOH pretreatment is an effective way to obtain higher net energy production through anaerobic codigestion of corn stover. ...

Zhaoyang You; Taoyuan Wei; Jay J. Cheng

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

174

Metagenome of an Anaerobic Microbial Community Decomposing Poplar Wood Chips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study describes the composition and metabolic potential of a lignocellulosic biomass degrading community that decays poplar wood chips under anaerobic conditions. We examined the community that developed on poplar biomass in a non-aerated bioreactor over the course of a year, with no microbial inoculation other than the naturally occurring organisms on the woody material. The composition of this community contrasts in important ways with biomass-degrading communities associated with higher organisms, which have evolved over millions of years into a symbiotic relationship. Both mammalian and insect hosts provide partial size reduction, chemical treatments (low or high pH environments), and complex enzymatic 'secretomes' that improve microbial access to cell wall polymers. We hypothesized that in order to efficiently degrade coarse untreated biomass, a spontaneously assembled free-living community must both employ alternative strategies, such as enzymatic lignin depolymerization, for accessing hemicellulose and cellulose and have a much broader metabolic potential than host-associated communities. This would suggest that such a community would make a valuable resource for finding new catalytic functions involved in biomass decomposition and gaining new insight into the poorly understood process of anaerobic lignin depolymerization. Therefore, in addition to determining the major players in this community, our work specifically aimed at identifying functions potentially involved in the depolymerization of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and to assign specific roles to the prevalent community members in the collaborative process of biomass decomposition. A bacterium similar to Magnetospirillum was identified among the dominant community members, which could play a key role in the anaerobic breakdown of aromatic compounds. We suggest that these compounds are released from the lignin fraction in poplar hardwood during the decay process, which would point to lignin-modification or depolymerization under anaerobic conditions.

van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Li, L. L.; Malfatti, S. A.; Monteleone, D.; Donohoe, B. S.; Ding, S. Y.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Tringe, S. G.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic protein-degrading hyperthermophilic...  

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protein-degrading hyperthermophilic Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic protein-degrading hyperthermophilic Page: << < 1 2 3...

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic work capacity Sample Search Results  

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This publication provides a general overview of anaero- Summary: lost some of its biogas production potential. Anaerobic digesters work best when the digestion pro... at...

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic mixed microflora Sample Search...  

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Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic energy release Sample Search...  

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publication provides a general overview of anaero- Summary: Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source produced through the anaerobic... at...

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic chloroethene-dehalogenating activity...  

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Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic continuously stirred Sample Search...  

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or thermophilic... ;12;Abstract Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while... offering environmental benefits. Dairy...

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181

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion concept Sample Search...  

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to methane. The anaerobic digestion consortium was introduced to high... M, and a biogas composition of 55%-60% methane. INTRODUCTION Economic evaluations of ... Source:...

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic waste water Sample Search Results  

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Recovery Jun Wei LIM... waste. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; food waste; brown water; biogas; co-digestion INTRODUCTION... of brown water and food ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion technology Sample Search...  

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technology on livestock farms... dioxide (EPA AgStar 2006). Benefits and Challenges of Biogas Technology Anaerobic digestion can convert... digester. Resources which ... Source:...

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic hydrogen producing Sample Search...  

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a small percentage of hydrogen sulfide, water vapor, carbon... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source produced through the anaerobic... are...

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic psychrophilic enrichment Sample...  

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Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion program Sample Search...  

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Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management ... Source: Liskiewicz,...

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic closed digester Sample Search...  

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to methane. The anaerobic digestion consortium was introduced to high... M, and a biogas composition of 55%-60% methane. INTRODUCTION Economic evaluations of ... Source:...

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic reactor systems Sample Search...  

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Sources of organic matter... -processing wastes, and industrial wastes. A typical biogas system consists of manure collection, anaerobic digestion... and carbon credits. The...

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic stirred sequencing-batch Sample...  

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Implementation of Summary: ;12;Abstract Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while... offering environmental benefits. Dairy...

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic fitness markers Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Implementation of Summary: ;12;Abstract Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while... offering environmental benefits. Dairy...

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically digested sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic ... Source: Liskiewicz, Maciej - Institut fr...

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically corroding iron Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This publication provides a general overview of anaero- Summary: . Scrubbing the biogas with iron-impregnated wood chips has been used in anaerobic digesters in municipal......

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion role Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Implementation of Summary: ;12;Abstract Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while... offering environmental benefits. Dairy...

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic mesophilic granular Sample Search...  

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Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic chlorophenol-degrading community...  

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Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic conditions model Sample Search...  

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Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic interval training Sample Search...  

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Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

198

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic soil slurry Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aberystwyth Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry Summary: scenarios. In fact, anaerobic digestion of animal...

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic fixed bed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Implementation of Summary: ;12;Abstract Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while... offering environmental benefits. Dairy...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic thermophilic biogas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biogas Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic thermophilic biogas Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Institute for Renewable Energy Ltd...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic aggregates determined Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Environment & Resources Online monitoring and control Summary: determines the biogas yield. Anaerobic substrate input is often measured in term of total chemical oxygen......

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic thermophiles annual Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Implementation of Summary: ;12;Abstract Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while... offering environmental benefits. Dairy...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digester sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic ... Source: Liskiewicz, Maciej - Institut fr...

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic reactor star Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

overview of anaero- Summary: dioxide (EPA AgStar 2006). Benefits and Challenges of Biogas Technology Anaerobic digestion can convert... at Virginia Tech. Most of the discussion...

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic contact reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Implementation of Summary: ;12;Abstract Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while... offering environmental benefits. Dairy...

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically growing xylose-utilizing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically digested municipal Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This publication provides a general overview of anaero- Summary: . Scrubbing the biogas with iron-impregnated wood chips has been used in anaerobic digesters in municipal......

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic bacterial community Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic baffled reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

210

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community- A Case Study  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Presented by Jason Rieth, Industrial Construction Executive at Miron Construction at the April 16, 2013, Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters CommRE Webinar.

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic gac reactor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobe ammoniakoxidation von Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Otto-Von-Guericke-UniVersitat Magdeburg, UniVersitatsplatz 2, D-39106 Magdeburg, Germany... acid (MA) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was investigated. The Ce(IV)...

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic thermophiles progress Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

due to various... returns from energy and byproduct sales. Keywords: Anaerobic digestion, biogas, cooperatives, carbon Source: Laughlin, Robert B. - Department of Physics, Stanford...

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic thermophilic bacteria Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MICROBIOLOGY, Apr. 1994, p. 1241-1248 0099-22409404.00+0 Summary: . 1991. Acetate oxidation in a thermophilic anaerobic sewage-sludge digestor: the importance of non... -...

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic feiii reduction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OCt. 1986, p. 751-757 0099-224086100751-0702.000 Summary: ) reduction in sediments incubated under anaerobic conditions and depth profiles of oxalate-extractable...

216

Analysis of Genes Involved in Anaerobic Growth in Porphyromonas Gingivalis and Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Porphyromonas gingivalis is an oral Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium implicated in periodontal disease, a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that is correlated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and (more)

Kumarasinghe, Dilini Sanjeevi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic bioreactor landfills Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D... from a Full Scale Anaerobic Digester Supernatant at the City of Penticton Advanced Wastewater Treatment Source: Laval, Bernard - Department of Civil Engineering, University...

218

Anaerobic/aerobic conditions and biostimulation for enhanced chlorophenols degradation in biocathode microbial fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anaerobic/aerobic conditions affected bacterial community composition and the subsequent chlorophenols (CPs) degradation in biocathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Bacterial communities acclimated with either ......

Liping Huang; Yinghong Shi; Ning Wang; Yuesheng Dong

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Treatment program of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) (Quebec, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Program for processing of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) provides financial assistance to municipalities and the private sector for the installation of...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic biodegradation potential Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(VS) could be stabilized during three months of batch... , pyrolysis, and biological gaSification by anaerobic digestion have been in vestigated. Due to the very......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic arsenite oxidation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

incorporation into authigenic pyrite, Bengal Basin sediment, Bangladesh Summary: oxide (HFO) were prepared in an anaerobic chamber (3% H297%N2) using oxygen-free solutions....

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic fungus piromyces Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

acetic... acid concentrations and (2) prolonged anaerobic continuous cultivation without pH control, in which Source: Wagner, Andreas - Department of Biochemistry, Universitt...

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobe acetobacterium dehalogenans Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Needs for Evaluating the Summary: , and compost) could retain previously-trapped pollutants even under anaerobic conditions. The results indicated... that permanent retention...

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic upflow column Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

were hermetically sealed. Only the filter was heated... , pyrolysis, and biological gaSification by anaerobic digestion have been in vestigated. Due to the very... heterogeneous...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic conditions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical treatment steps on the waste streams produced... incineration or co-frring), pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion, or methanation. From a water pollution control... , centrate...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically induced small Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical treatment steps on the waste streams produced... incineration or co-frring), pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion, or methanation. From a water pollution control... , centrate...

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic benzene communities Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical treatment steps on the waste streams produced... incineration or co-frring), pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion, or methanation. From a water pollution control... , centrate...

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic ammonia oxidation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical treatment steps on the waste streams produced... incineration or co-frring), pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion, or methanation. From a water pollution control... , centrate...

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic benzoate degradation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Idaho Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 9 Column Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material Summary: the...

230

Investigation of microalgae cultivation and anaerobic codigestion of algae and sewage sludge for wastewater treatment facilities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The main goals of this research are to investigate the anaerobic digestibility of algae and to investigate the effects of growth media on the growth (more)

Wang, Meng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic aquifer column Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic aquifer column Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biodegradation 11: 107116, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic...

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic benzene degradation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic benzene degradation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biodegradation 11: 107116, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic...

233

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic microbial degradation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Biodegradation 11: 107116, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Summary: . 107 Anaerobic benzene degradation Derek R. Lovley Department of...

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic enrichment culture Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

temperature under aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions in enrichment cultures from northern soils. Appl... Controlled Release of Nitrate and Sulfate to Enhance Anaerobic ......

235

Phase equilibrium conditions for simulated landfill gas hydrate formation in aqueous solutions of tetrabutylammonium nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrate phase equilibrium conditions for the simulated landfill gas (LFG) of methane and carbon dioxide (50mol% methane, 50mol% carbon dioxide) were investigated with the pressure range of (1.90 to 13.83)MPa and temperature range of (280.0 to 288.3)K at (0.050, 0.170, 0.340, and 0.394) mass fraction (w) of tetrabutylammonium nitrate (TBANO3). The phase boundary between liquidvaporhydrate (LVH) phases and liquidvapor (LV) phases was determined by employing an isochoric pressure-search method. The phase equilibrium data measured showed that TBANO3 appeared a remarkable promotion effect at w TBANO 3 =0.394, corresponding to TBANO326H2O, but inhibition effect at w TBANO 3 =(0.050, or 0.170) on the semiclathrate hydrate formation. In addition, the application of TBANO3 at 0.340 mass fraction, corresponding to TBANO332H2O, displayed promotion effect at lower pressures (below 6.38MPa) and inhibition effect at higher pressures (above 6.38MPa).

Ling-Li Shi; De-Qing Liang; Dong-Liang Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Presented by Jason Rieth, P.E., LEED AP BD + C Industrial Construction Executive Miron Construction Co., Inc. 715.841.4029 | jason.rieth@miron-construction.com * Overview of the FCPC Renewable Generation Facility

237

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM waste (FW) and their mixture (MW) in batch digesters was evaluated under mesophilic conditions. BW waste. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; food waste; brown water; biogas; co-digestion INTRODUCTION

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

238

Batch Test for Assessing the Mineralization of 14C-Radiolabeled Compounds under Realistic Anaerobic Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmentally realistic concentrations of test chemicals were incubated with anaerobic digester sludge in sealed vessels at 35 C. ... Major anoxic environments include anaerobic digesters, septic tanks, organically enriched sediments, flooded soils, and landfills. ... Another rolled piece of copper screen was inserted into this end, and a pea-size piece of quartz wool was inserted into both ends. ...

Barbara A. Nuck; Thomas W. Federle

1996-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Anaerobic Migrating Blanket Reactor Treatment of Low-Strength Wastewater at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic Migrating Blanket Reactor Treatment of Low-Strength Wastewater at Low Temperatures Largus anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) was studied for the treatment of low- strength soluble wastewater milk substrate as a synthetic wastewater at low temperatures (15 and 20 °C). The concentration

Angenent, Lars T.

240

Design and study of a risk management criterion for an unstable anaerobic wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design and study of a risk management criterion for an unstable anaerobic wastewater treatment an unstable biological process used for wastewater treat- ment. This anaerobic digestion ecosystem can have popular bioprocess (Angelidaki et al., 2003) that treats wastewater and at the same time produces energy

Bernard, Olivier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater anal- ysis and estimation schemes for specific growth rates for an anaerobic wastewater treatment the organic and inorganic materials) of municipal or industrial wastewater often needs to be highly reduced

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

242

Effect of Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions on Chlorophenol Sorption in Wetland Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions on Chlorophenol Sorption in Wetland Soils Elisa D by the physical and chemicalSorption of four chlorophenols (CPs) was studied in ten wetland properties- Much research on organic pollutant sorption has dem-bated under aerobic or anaerobic conditions

Florida, University of

243

Sequential anaerobic-aerobic degradation of indigenous PCBs in a contaminated soil matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many industrial locations, including the US Department of Energy`s, have identified needs for treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes and remediation of PCB-contaminated sites. Biodegradation of PCBs is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of PCB-contaminated soils and sludges; however, a practicable remediation technology has not yet been demonstrated. A biological treatment technology is likely to consist of an anaerobic fermentation step in which PCB dechlorination takes place producing PCBs with fewer chlorines. These products are then more susceptible to aerobic mineralization. In laboratory experiments, soil slurry bioreactors inoculated with microorganisms extracted from PCB-contaminated sediments from the Hudson River and Woods Pond have been used to obtain anaerobic dechlorination of PCBs in soil slurry reactors. The anaerobic dechlorination was followed by qualitative estimation of the effect of aerobic fermentation of the dechlorination products based on literature data. The sequential anaerobic-(simulated) aerobic treatment constituted an improvement compared anaerobic treatment alone.

Klasson, K.T.; Reeves, M.E.; Evans, B.S.; Dudley, C.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

IEA-Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFP-06 IEA- Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas-Bioenergy, Task 37- Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas", via samarbejde, informationsudveksling, fælles analyser. biogas fra anaerob udrådning (AD) som en integreret gylle og affalds behandlings teknologi. Arbejdet

246

Simultaneous Nitrite-Dependent Anaerobic Methane and Ammonium Oxidation Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of global greenhouse gas emissions from waste: conclusions and strategies from the Intergovernmental...Stenstrom 2005. Greenhouse gas production: a comparison...detection of all bacteria: development and evaluation of a...classification genetics growth & development metabolism Bioreactors...

Francisca A. Luesken; Jaime Snchez; Theo A. van Alen; Janeth Sanabria; Huub J. M. Op den Camp; Mike S. M. Jetten; Boran Kartal

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

247

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC GROWTH OF BACILLUS MOJAVENSIS STRAIN JF-2 FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCTION FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our work focuses on the use of microorganisms to recover petroleum hydrocarbons that remain entrapped after current recovery technologies reach their economic limit. Capillary forces between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are largely responsible for trapping the hydrocarbons in the pores of the rock and large reductions in the interfacial tension between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (1-3, 10, 11). Microorganisms produce a variety of biosurfactants (4), several of which generate the ultra low interfacial tensions needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (4, 5, 8). In particular, the lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 reduces the interfacial tension between hydrocarbon and aqueous phases to very low levels (<0.016 mN/m) (8) (9). B. mojavensis JF-2 grows under the environmental conditions found in many oil reservoirs, i. e., anaerobic, NaCl concentrations up to 80 g l{sup -1}, and temperatures up to 45 C (6, 7), making it ideally suited for in situ applications. However, anaerobic growth of B. mojavensis JF-2 was inconsistent and difficult to replicate, which limited its use for in situ applications. Our initial studies revealed that enzymatic digests, such as Proteose Peptone, were required for anaerobic growth of Bacillus mojavensis JF-2. Subsequent purification of the growth-enhancing factor in Proteose Peptone resulted in the identification of the growth-enhancing factor as DNA or deoxyribonucleosides. The addition of salmon sperm DNA, herring sperm DNA, E. coli DNA or synthetic DNA (single or double stranded) to Medium E all supported anaerobic growth of JF-2. Further, we found that JF-2 required all four deoxyribonucleosides (deoxyadeonosine, deoxyguanosine, deoxycytidine and thymidine) for growth under strict anaerobic conditions. The requirement for the deoxyribonucleosides did not occur under aerobic growth conditions. DNA was not used as a sole energy source; sucrose was required for anaerobic growth and biosurfactant production in DNA-supplemented Medium E. In addition to DNA or deoxyribonucleosides, nitrate, amino acids and vitamins were all required for anaerobic growth of JF-2. Bacillus mojavensisT (ABO21191), Bacillus mojavensis, strain ROB2 also required DNA or deoxyribonucleosides for anaerobic growth. The improved anaerobic growth of Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 was a prerequisite for studies that will lead to improved anaerobic biosurfactant production.

M.J. McInerney; M. Folmsbee; D. Nagle

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Perdido LF-Gase to Electricity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

E E S S O N S L E A R N E D : C H A L L E N G E S A N D S U C C E S S E S Perdido LF-Gas to Electricity Escambia County, Florida Background  Perdido LF Gas-to-Energy Project (1997-2008)  Direct Use by Paper Mill (IP)  LFG piped from Perdido Landfill to IP Direct Use of LFG  Landfill Gas fueled IP boiler  Project developed and managed by 3 rd party vendor  Vendor managed the gas wellfield  County received minimum compensation from vendor for Gas Rights  Vendor received compensation from IP for fuel used Project Issues  Demand for LFG at IP for fuel fell off  LFG compliance at Perdido LF not a priority for vendor  Surface and boundary emissions increased  Vendor reluctant to implement additional control measures  Contract grey areas Rebirth of LFG Beneficial Reuse

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digester gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Physics, Stanford University Collection: Physics 6 Managing Manure with Biogas Recovery Systems Summary: emissions and capture biogas--a useful source of energy....

250

Effect of different gas releasing methods on anaerobic fermentative hydrogen production in batch cultures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Decreasing hydrogen partial pressure can not only increase the activity of the hydrogen enzyme but also decrease the products inhibition, so it is an appropriate method to enhance the fermentative hydrogen production

Sheng Chang; Jianzheng Li; Feng Liu; Ze Yu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Anaerobic and Aerobic Hydrogen Gas Formation by the Blue-Green Alga Anabaena cylindrica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and in air, by the blue- green alga Anabaena cylindrica. The alga had not been previously adapted...consideration as a potential source of fuel, and hence there is considerable...known for many years that green algae such as Scenedesmus can evolve...

Arlene Daday; Rosalea A. Platz; Geoffrey D. Smith

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Application of dried anaerobic digested sewage sludge as phenol biosorbent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Untreated anaerobically digested sewage sludge was used for the first time as a biosorbent for removing phenol from aqueous solution. Results showed that adsorption capacity was influenced by the pH of the aqueous solution with an observed maximum phenol removal at pH around 6-8. The adsorption equilibrium of phenolic compounds was obtained after almost two hours with an adsorption of approximately 90% of the phenolic compounds. A sorbent concentration of 1.8 g/L was found to insure the best removal percentage and the best sorbent capacity. Both Langmuir and Freundlich models have provided reasonable fittings for the data of phenol adsorption. The experimental data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the intraparticle diffusion model. The values of change in Gibbs free energy (?G), enthalpy (?H) and entropy (?S) were calculated. The thermodynamic study of adsorption process showed that the process was exothermic in nature.

Alaa H. Hawari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Anaerobic Digestion in California Dairies: Electricty Generation or Biomethane Upgrading.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??California is worldwide one of the major Green House Gas emitter due to a large use of fossil fuels in power generation and transportation. The (more)

Bandini, Francesco

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Floodplain Assessment for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Floodplain Assessment for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility at the University of California, Davis in Yolo County, California, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy website.

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion held Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anaerobic digestion held Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: 1 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook: NYS On-farm...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic biological reactors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Environment & Resources Online monitoring and control Summary: . 12;12;4 2. The biogas process Anaerobic digestion is a multi-step biological process where... H drop (<6)...

257

Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel Cell Integration at Biorefineries  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Biomass Program perspective on anaerobic digestion and fuel cell integratin at biorefineries. Presented by Brian Duff, DOE Biomass Program, at the NREL/DOE Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop held June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado.

258

Enrichment and hydrogen production by marine anaerobic hydrogen-producing microflora  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acid, alkali, heat-shock, KNO3 and control pretreatment methods applied to anaerobic sludge were evaluated for their ability to selectively enrich the marine hydrogen-producing mixed microflora. Seawater culture ...

JinLing Cai; GuangCe Wang; YanChuan Li; DaLing Zhu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic dark culture Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

about 93% of the RCs are in the Qa... -illumination under continuous light or by a flash series given to dark-adapted cells in anaerobic conditions, two... Fast oxidation of...

260

Start-up of a thermophilic upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor with mesophilic granular sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fast start-up of thermophilic upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors was achieved at ... 55 and 64 C, using mesophilic granular sludge as inoculum and fatty acid mixtures as ... temperature optima for aceto...

Jules B. van Lier; Katja C. F. Grolle

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic reductive precipitation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Environmental Microbiology (2002) 4(9), 510-516 Multip,le influences of nitrate on uranium solubility Summary: that the addition of acetate, to stimulate anaerobic respiration,...

262

Experimental evaluation of anaerobic digestion for coffee wastewater treatment and its biomethane recovery potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of anaerobic digestion (AD) as an eco-friendly technology for coffee wastewater (CWW) management. First, we have characterized the CWW and found that...

A. Beyene; D. Yemane; T. Addis

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic 1-alkene metabolism Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

activity and tlie pattern of oxygen debt in the West African caecilian... ;BENNETT AND WAKE-METABOLISM IN A CAECILIAN 767 its energetic production is anaerobic, or 7.3 times as...

264

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The incidence and significance of anaerobic bacteria in the equine uterus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that anaerobic bacteria may participate in inflammatory processes of the equine uterus (Kenney 1978a, Reynolds 1978, Ricketts 1981, Brook 1984). Elliott et al. (1971) conducted a study to obtain uterine cultures under anaerobic conditions but failed to obtain... not definitively been proven whether the normal equine uterine environment is sterile (Peterson et al. 1969, Hughes 1978) or if bacteria may normally be present in the non-inflamed uterus (Farrelly and Mullaney 1964, Kenney 1978a, Samuel et al. 1979). Knudsen...

Bolinger, Dean Roger

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

266

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

Xun, Luying

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

List of Landfill Gas Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 377 Landfill Gas Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 377) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric

268

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

Treatment of wool scouring effluent using anaerobic biological and chemical flocculation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most widely used treatment of wool scouring effluent (WSE) in Australia is lagooning (anaerobic and aerobic). As the pressure to devise a more environmentally acceptable treatment method increases there is a need to study alternative, efficient biological treatment systems for WSE. In this study, laboratory and pilot-scale anaerobic biological and chemical flocculation treatment processes were investigated for removing the pollutants (mainly wool grease) from WSE. Anaerobic biological treatment utilises the natural microbial flora to destabilise and bioflocculate the WSE resulting in the settling of wool grease from the bulk liquid. Batch trials showed a grease reduction by anaerobic bioflocculation of between 30% (pilot scale) and 50% (laboratory scale) over 8 days. However, the destabilisation of the wool grease emulsion after only 23 days resulted in a total grease reduction of >80% after addition of a polymeric flocculant. A laboratory anaerobic bioflocculation-chemical flocculation process gave promising results by removing >90% grease at hydraulic retention times of 12 days. In the pilot-scale the same process resulted in up to 80% grease removal efficiency. The results of this study indicate that anaerobic biological and chemical treatment of WSE is a promising alternative treatment system compared to other chemical or natural (lagooning) treatment systems. Our approach suggests adding a flocculant to aid the separation of biologically coagulated grease from the bulk liquid. A final low-level aerobic polishing step will be necessary to meet effluent disposal guidelines

T.I. Mercz; R. Cord-Ruwisch

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria: Unique Microorganisms with Exceptional Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...membrane to the outer membrane to drive a number of outer membrane receptors...nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas via nitrite and ammonium. Environ...ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. ASM News 67 :456-463. 49. Kuypers...associated with global nitrogen gas production. Environ. Microbiol...

Laura van Niftrik; Mike S. M. Jetten

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Dennis Papadias and Shabbir Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Presented at the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, CO June 11-13, 2012 Biogas is the product of anaerobic decomposition of organic waste Municipal solid wastes (MSW)  For every 1 million tons of MSW: - 432,000 cubic feet per day of landfill gas (LFG) for a period of 20 years - 1 MW of electricity 1 Sewage sludge/waste water (WWTP or ADG)  A typical WWTP processes 100 gallons per day (GD) for every person served - 1 cubic foot of digester gas can be produced per 100 gallons of wastewater  100 kW of electricity 1 can be generated from 4.5 MGD of waste water Agricultural waste (i.e. dairy waste)  About 70-100 ft 3 /day of digester gas is produced

272

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

273

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

274

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

275

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

276

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

277

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

278

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

279

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

280

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

282

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

283

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

284

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

285

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

286

Nitrification of centrate from dewatering of anaerobically digested sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrification of anaerobically digested sludge centrate was studied in bench-scale suspended growth and fixed film enhanced suspended growth systems at temperatures of 10.5-28.5C and pH values of 6.0-9.1. Nitrification followed zero-order kinetics in both systems, and ammonia removals in excess of 99% were observed. The temperature dependency of the suspended growth nitrification rate observed under not fully acclimated biomass conditions at pH between 6.8 and 8.5, was expressed as kT = k20?T-20where k20 and ? were found to be 0.34 mg NH3-N/MLVSS-d and 1.033, respectively. The nitrification rate in the fixed film enhanced suspended growth system involving styrofoam pads ranged from 0.11 to 0.13 mg NH3-N/mg MLVSS-d at temperatures of 21.5-25C and pH values of 7.8-8.6. The process contained suspended solids in the range of 10-20 mg/l.

M. Kawsar Ali; C.G. Marquez; J. Fillos; V. Diyamandoglu; L.A. Carrio

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

288

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

289

Anaerobic bioflocculation of wool scouring effluent: the influence of non-ionic surfactant on efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wool scouring effluent (WSE) contains high concentrations of wool grease emulsified by non-ionic surfactants (nonylphenol polyethoxylates NPEO). The short-term treatment (17 days) of this effluent with anaerobic bacteria resulted in partial grease flocculation. However the efficiency of this process varied largely (30% to 80%) with the source of wool scouring effluent used. The concentration of free surfactant, rather than total surfactant, was found to be the likely reason for the variation in efficiency. In order to elucidate the mechanisms of anaerobic biological flocculation a detailed surfactant analysis was performed. This revealed that anaerobic microbes (taken from sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant) had an ability to partially degrade NPEO by shortening the hydrophilic ethoxylate chain causing coagulation and subsequent flocculation of wool grease from the liquor.

Wipa Charles; Goen Ho; Ralf Cord-Ruwisch

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Substrate-Level Phosphorylation Is the Primary Source of Energy Conservation during Anaerobic Respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Source of Energy Conservation during Anaerobic...anaerobic energy conservation strategy. Phenotypic...amount of the ATP pool is used to generate...acid per liter in water and was neutralized...means of energy conservation used by MR-1 during...balance internal redox pools but also to prevent...

Kristopher A. Hunt; Jeffrey M. Flynn; Beln Naranjo; Indraneel D. Shikhare; Jeffrey A. Gralnick

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

Identification and Isolation of Anaerobic, Syntrophic Phthalate Isomer-Degrading Microbes from Methanogenic Sludges Treating Wastewater from Terephthalate Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Electron balance was calculated...Anaerobic pre-treatment of petrochemical...terephthalic acid wastewater. Water Sci...treatment of wastewater at low temperatures...Anaerobic treatment of a petrochemical wastewater from a terephthalic acid plant. Water Sci...Sunderland, Mass. 34 Tasaki...

Yan-Ling Qiu; Yuji Sekiguchi; Hiroyuki Imachi; Yoichi Kamagata; I-Cheng Tseng; Sheng-Shung Cheng; Akiyoshi Ohashi; Hideki Harada

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Anaerobic methanotrophy and the rise of atmospheric oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...around 29mM of sulphate, which is often well mixed by fauna into a bioturbation zone...hydrothermal (F V) plus metamorphism/geothermal reductants (F M), following an argument...oil and gas seeps in deepwater Gulf of Mexico. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 64, 233-246...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Evaluation of a sequential aerobic??anaerobic treatment of municipal solid waste in a bioreactor landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sequential aerobic-anaerobic bioreactor landfill was operated and monitored over a period of 184 days. The bioreactor was filled with 120 kg of organic fraction of Municipal Solid Waste. Leachate recirculation was applied. The results showed rapid degradation of organic matter with rapid settlement during the aerobic period. The initial COD and BOD5 were reduced from 46,500 and 41,500 mg/L to 9000 and 6000 mg/L, respectively, within one month. The SO42? concentration, during the anaerobic period, was decreased from 1500 mg/L to 250 mg/L. The sequential treatment had positive effects on nitrification and denitrification efficiencies.

Aris Nikolaou; Apostolos Giannis; Evangelos Gidarakos

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

295

Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang [Department of Animal Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Yebo, E-mail: li.851@osu.edu [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

297

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

298

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

299

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

300

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

302

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

303

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

304

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

305

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

306

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

307

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

308

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

309

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

310

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

311

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

313

BioGas Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioGas Energy Inc BioGas Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name BioGas Energy Inc Address 4509 Interlake Ave N # 222 Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98103 Sector Biomass Product Makes anaerobic digesters that convert manure into methane for fuel Website http://www.biogas-energy.com/s Coordinates 47.6163159°, -122.3463563° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.6163159,"lon":-122.3463563,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

314

Effect of a liquid multi-vitamin-mineral supplement on anaerobic exercise performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to determine if supplementation with a liquid multi-vitamin/mineral would improve anaerobic exercise performance. Fourteen resistance-trained men performed a 30-second cycle sprint and one set of squat exercise on 2...

Fry, Andrew C.; Bloomer, Richard J.; Falvo, Michael J.; Moore, Chris A.; Schilling, Brian K.; Weiss, Lawrence W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Complete Genome Sequence of the Anaerobic Halophilic Alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus JW/NM-WN-LFT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The genome of the anaerobic halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophiles consists of one chromosome and two plasmids.The present study is the first to report the completely sequenced genome of polyextremophile and the harboring genes harboring genes associated with roles in regulation of intracellular osmotic pressure, pH homeostasis, and thermophilic stability.

Mesbah, Noha [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wiegel, Juergen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Anaerobic methane oxidation in metalliferous hydrothermal sediments: influence on carbon flux and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic methane oxidation in metalliferous hydrothermal sediments: influence on carbon flux significant sink that regulates methane flux from sediments into the oceans and atmosphere. Here we examine mesophilic to thermophilic AOM in hydro- thermal sediments recovered from the Middle Valley vent field

Girguis, Peter R.

317

A systemic approach for dimensioning and designing anaerobic bio-digestion/energy generation biomass supply networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic bio-digestion/energy generation complexes using animal waste raw materials represent an important component of renewable energy initiatives and policies worldwide, and are significant contributors to broaden sustainability efforts. In such projects bio-power feasibility depends heavily on generation complex access to biomass which is of costly transportation. As a result, an important component of renewable energy planning is the optimization of a logistics system to guarantee low-cost access to animal waste. This access is a function of local characteristics including number and geographic location of organic waste sources, operating and maintenance costs of the generation facility, energy prices, and marginal contribution of biomass collected and delivered to the anaerobic bio-digestion unit. Because biomass exhibits high transportation costs per unit of energy ultimately generated, and because different types of biomass have different biogas-generating properties, design of the supply logistics system can be the determinant factor towards economic viability of energy generation from an anaerobic bio-digestion plant. Indeed, to address this problem it is helpful to consider the farms, the logistics system, the anaerobic bio-digestion plant, and the generation plant as subsystems in an integrated system. Additionally, the existence of an outlet for manure may allow farmers to significantly raise boundaries of one constraint they face, namely disposing of animal waste, therefore permitting increases in farm production capacity. This paper suggests and outlines a systematic methodology to address the design of such systems.

Joo Neiva de Figueiredo; Srgio Fernando Mayerle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The viscoelastic behaviour of raw and anaerobic digested sludge: strong similarities with soft-glassy materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The viscoelastic behaviour of raw and anaerobic digested sludge: strong similarities with soft confronted with a dramatically increasing flow of sewage sludge. To improve treatment efficiency, process reliable flow properties to simulate the process, this work is an attempt to approach sludge rheological

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

319

Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for treatment in EU, followed by spreading on land, which accounted for 37% of the sewage sludge produced allow recycling of nutrients. Hence, bioprocessed sewage sludge application on agricultural soilRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N

320

Reducing the Anaerobic Digestion Model N1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant treating winery effluent wastewater Carlos García-Diéguez 1 , Olivier Bernard 2 , Enrique Roca 1, * 1 USC ­ PRODES for winery effluent wastewater. A new reduced stoichiometric matrix was identified and the kinetic parameters

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from of different integrated low-cost wastewater treatment systems, comprising one ABR as first treatment step filter and a vertical flow constructed wetland. A mixture of septage and domestic wastewater was used

Richner, Heinz

322

ivestock and poultry operations frequently use anaerobic lagoons as liquid waste storage and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, The Texas A&M University System. #12;Pumping Pumping from the lagoon should be conducted annually, at least the designed life of sludge storage, frequent agitation and pumping may be necessary. In addition, solidsL ivestock and poultry operations frequently use anaerobic lagoons as liquid waste storage

Mukhtar, Saqib

323

Column Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Column Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material bioremediation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) at the Hanford site in south- central Washington state. Benzoate in south- central Washington state has been a defense materials pro- duction complex since 1943. Carbon

Semprini, Lewis

324

Starvation Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Grown in Anaerobic Nitrogen- or Carbon-Limited Chemostat Cultures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Pringle. 1980. Reserve carbohydrate metabolism...Ethanol around the world: rapid growth in...starvation can induce energy deprivation and loss...protectant rather than reserve carbohydrate. Antonie...ATP content, and reserve carbohydrates and...starvation requires energy and, under anaerobic...

Elisabeth Thomsson; Lena Gustafsson; Christer Larsson

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

326

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

327

Method for measuring dissolved hydrogen in anaerobic ecosystems: application to the rumen.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of gas in the gas bubble, as determined by gas chromatography, by the volume of the gas bubble. To assess the accuracy...However, at this ionic strength (0.22 mol-liter-1...sediments, thick sewage sludge). Byrearrangement...

J A Robinson; R F Strayer; J M Tiedje

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

329

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

330

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

331

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

332

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

333

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

334

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

335

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

336

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

337

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

338

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

339

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

340

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

342

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

343

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

346

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

Quantification of Gordona amarae Strains in Foaming Activated Sludge and Anaerobic Digester Systems with Oligonucleotide Hybridization Probes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hierarchic classification system, Actinobacteria...hybridization probes for studies of ruminal microbial...pseudomonads. A taxonomic study. . Stratton H...ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. . Wheeler D. Rule A. . Zheng...microbial ecology studies. . Quantification...anaerobic digester systems with oligonucleotide...

M. Fiorella de los Reyes; Francis L. de los Reyes III; Mark Hernandez; Lutgarde Raskin

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Ultrasonic sludge disintegration for enhanced methane production in anaerobic digestion: effects of sludge hydrolysis efficiency and hydraulic retention time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrolysis of waste activated sludge (WAS) has been regarded as the rate limiting step of anaerobic sludge digestion. Therefore, in this study, the ... effect of ultrasound and hydraulic residence time during sludge

Dong-Jin Kim; Jonghak Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Bio-energy recovery from high-solid organic substrates by dry anaerobic bio-conversion processes: a review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry anaerobic bio-conversion (D-AnBioC) of high-solid organic ... involved in bioreactor designing; (3) present factors influencing the bio-conversion efficiency; (4) discuss the microbiology of ... existing comm...

Obuli P. Karthikeyan; C. Visvanathan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Biological hydrogen production by anaerobic digestion of food waste and sewage sludge treated using various pretreatment technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to enhance the efficiency of anaerobic co-digestion with sewage sludge using pretreatment technologies and food waste. We studied the effects of various pretreatment methods (thermal...

Seungjin Kim; Kwangkeun Choi; Jong-Oh Kim; Jinwook Chung

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Biology, ecology, and biotechnological applications of anaerobic bacteria adapted to environmental stresses in temperature, pH, salinity, or substrates.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...liquors from the pulp and paper industry and oil shale rock refining wastes from the synfuel industry. Effective biodegradation of these wastes may require salt-tolerant...anaerobic bacteria. Coal gasification and waste treatment. The...

S E Lowe; M K Jain; J G Zeikus

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Mechanically versus electro-magnetically braked cycle ergometer: performance and energy cost of the Wingate Anaerobic Test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance and metabolic profiles of the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) were compared between a mechanically resisted (ME) and an electro-magnetically braked (EE) cycle ergometer. Fifteen healthy subjects (24....

D. Micklewright; A. Alkhatib; R. Beneke

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

354

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

355

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

356

andradionuclide mixed wastes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Steam -> Electr. & Heat Av 50 Range 47-80 Landfill Gas MSW or Mixed residual waste LFG Biogas -> Electr. (and Heat) 100 Solid Recovered Fuel Sorted Biomass Energy Plants...

357

The renewable energy contribution from waste across Europe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas MSW or Mixed residual waste LFG Biogas -> Electr. (and Heat) 100 Solid Recovered Fuel Sorted Digestion Source separated biomass fraction or Sorted bio-fraction of MSW AD Biogas -> Electr. & Heat 100

358

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

359

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both up-flow and down-flow of fluid at rates that range between 0.5 to 214 cm/yr and 2-162 cm/yr, respectively. The fluid flow system at the mound and background sites are coupled having opposite polarities that oscillate episodically between 14 days to {approx}4 months. Stability calculations suggest that despite bottom water temperature fluctuations, of up to {approx}3 C, the Bush Hill gas hydrate mound is presently stable, as also corroborated by the time-lapse video camera images that did not detect change in the gas hydrate mound. As long as methane (and other hydrocarbon) continues advecting at the observed rates the mound would remain stable. The {_}{sup 13}C-DIC data suggest that crude oil instead of methane serves as the primary electron-donor and metabolic substrate for anaerobic sulfate reduction. The oil-dominated environment at Bush Hill shields some of the methane bubbles from being oxidized both anaerobically in the sediment and aerobically in the water column. Consequently, the methane flux across the seafloor is higher at Bush hill than at non-oil rich seafloor gas hydrate regions, such as at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia. The methane flux across the ocean/atmosphere interface is as well higher. Modeling the methane flux across this interface at three bubble plumes provides values that range from 180-2000 {_}mol/m{sup 2} day; extrapolating it over the Gulf of Mexico basin utilizing satellite data is in progress.

Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Citrus essential oils and their influence on the anaerobic digestion process: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Citrus waste accounts for more than half of the whole fruit when processed for juice extraction. Among valorisation possibilities, anaerobic digestion for methane generation appears to be the most technically feasible and environmentally friendly alternative. However, citrus essential oils can inhibit this biological process. In this paper, the characteristics of citrus essential oils, as well as the mechanisms of their antimicrobial effects and potential adaptation mechanisms are reviewed. Previous studies of anaerobic digestion of citrus waste under different conditions are presented; however, some controversy exists regarding the limiting dosage of limonene for a stable process (24192mg of citrus essential oil per liter of digester and day). Successful strategies to avoid process inhibition by citrus essential oils are based either on recovery or removal of the limonene, by extraction or fungal pre-treatment respectively.

B. Ruiz; X. Flotats

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The metagenome of an anaerobic microbial community decomposing poplar wood chips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study describes the composition and metabolic potential of a lignocellulosic biomass degrading community that decays poplar wood chips under anaerobic conditions. We examined the community that developed on poplar biomass in a non-aerated bioreactor over the course of a year, with no microbial inoculation other than the naturally occurring organisms on the woody material. The composition of this community contrasts in important ways with biomass-degrading communities associated with higher organisms, which have evolved over millions of years into a symbiotic relationship. Both mammalian and insect hosts provide partial size reduction, chemical treatments (low or high pH environments), and complex enzymatic 'secretomes' that improve microbial access to cell wall polymers. We hypothesized that in order to efficiently degrade coarse untreated biomass, a spontaneously assembled free-living community must both employ alternative strategies, such as enzymatic lignin depolymerization, for accessing hemicellulose and cellulose and have a much broader metabolic potential than host-associated communities. This would suggest that such a community would make a valuable resource for finding new catalytic functions involved in biomass decomposition and gaining new insight into the poorly understood process of anaerobic lignin depolymerization. Therefore, in addition to determining the major players in this community, our work specifically aimed at identifying functions potentially involved in the depolymerization of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and to assign specific roles to the prevalent community members in the collaborative process of biomass decomposition. A bacterium similar to Magnetospirillum was identified among the dominant community members, which could play a key role in the anaerobic breakdown of aromatic compounds. We suggest that these compounds are released from the lignin fraction in poplar hardwood during the decay process, which would point to lignin-modification or depolymerization under anaerobic conditions.

van der Lelie D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Li, L.-L.; Malfatti, S. A.; Monteleone, D.; Donohoe, B. S.; Ding, S.-Y.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Tringe, S. G.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term (< 6 months) and long-term (> 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Mechanism of degradation of wool wax in the anaerobic treatment of woolscouring wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of the anaerobic digestion of a woolscouring wastewater treatment and some considerations about the anaerobic degradation mechanisms of wool wax, are presented. A 57 live anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was operated with woolscouring effluent. When organic load varied from 3 to 5 kg COD/m3 d, COD and grease removal ranged from 40 to 55% and 50 to 65%, respectively. With centrifuged effluent, COD removal was 45% to 60%. A 300 m3 ABR was built and operated during two years based on the previous laboratory results. COD removal was between 45% to 18% with organic load of 3 to 10 kg COD/m3 d. With centrifuged effluent, COD efficiencies ranged between 72% and 47%. No inhibition by long chain fatty acids was observed. Considering the results of grease content determination and TLC analysis in both reactors, it could be assumed that wool wax is hydrolyzed forming sterols and free fatty acids and that free fatty acids are degraded while sterols are accumulated in the sludge.

Soledad Gutirrez; Alberto Hernndez; Mara Vias

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Anaerobic conversion of microalgal biomass to sustainable energy carriers A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review discusses anaerobic production of methane, hydrogen, ethanol, butanol and electricity from microalgal biomass. The amenability of microalgal biomass to these bioenergy conversion processes is compared with other aquatic and terrestrial biomass sources. The highest energy yields (kJg?1drywt. microalgal biomass) reported in the literature have been 14.8 as ethanol, 14.4 as methane, 6.6 as butanol and 1.2 as hydrogen. The highest power density reported from microalgal biomass in microbial fuel cells has been 980mWm?2. Sequential production of different energy carriers increases attainable energy yields, but also increases investment and maintenance costs. Microalgal biomass is a promising feedstock for anaerobic energy conversion processes, especially for methanogenic digestion and ethanol fermentation. The reviewed studies have mainly been based on laboratory scale experiments and thus scale-up of anaerobic utilization of microalgal biomass for production of energy carriers is now timely and required for cost-effectiveness comparisons.

Aino-Maija Lakaniemi; Olli H. Tuovinen; Jaakko A. Puhakka

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

368

Evaluating fugacity models for trace components in landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fugacity approach was evaluated to reconcile loadings of vinyl chloride (chloroethene), benzene, 1,3-butadiene and trichloroethylene in waste with concentrations observed in landfill gas monitoring studies. An evaluative environment derived from fictitious but realistic properties such as volume, composition, and temperature, constructed with data from the Brogborough landfill (UK) test cells was used to test a fugacity approach to generating the source term for use in landfill gas risk assessment models (e.g. GasSim). SOILVE, a dynamic Level II model adapted here for landfills, showed greatest utility for benzene and 1,3-butadiene, modelled under anaerobic conditions over a 10year simulation. Modelled concentrations of these components (95?300?gm?3; 43?gm?3) fell within measured ranges observed in gas from landfills (24?300180?000?gm?3; 2070?gm?3). This study highlights the need (i) for representative and time-referenced biotransformation data; (ii) to evaluate the partitioning characteristics of organic matter within waste systems and (iii) for a better understanding of the role that gas extraction rate (flux) plays in producing trace component concentrations in landfill gas.

Sophie Shafi; Andrew Sweetman; Rupert L. Hough; Richard Smith; Alan Rosevear; Simon J.T. Pollard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

Macroscopic Biofilms in Fracture-Dominated Sediment That Anaerobically Oxidize Methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resistivity values caused by high gas hydrate saturation in the fractures (41...fractures partially filled with gas hydrate and feeding methane upwards toward...collected as a part of the National Gas Hydrate Program cruise 01 (NGHP01) in...

B. R. Briggs; J. W. Pohlman; M. Torres; M. Riedel; E. L. Brodie; F. S. Colwell

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

Biogeochemical and Molecular Signatures of Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Marine Sediment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bacteria is present in gas-hydrate-rich sediment. Laboratory...consisted of very fine sand, silt, and clay, and...we found that special gas hydrate conditions (very low...oxidation above marine gas hydrate. . S. J. Burns Carbon...

Trine R. Thomsen; Kai Finster; Niels B. Ramsing

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Impacts of Ethanol on Anaerobic Production of Tert-Butyl Alcohol (TBA) from Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) in Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project title: Impacts of Ethanol on Anaerobic Production oftert-butanol (TBA). As ethanol is being promoted as ainvestigate the effect of ethanol release on existing MTBE

Scow, K M; MacKay, Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Development of monitoring and control technology based on trace gas monitoring. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace gases are generated by many biological reactions. During anaerobic decomposition, trace levels of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) gases are produced. It was shown previously that these trace gases are intrinsically related to the biochemical reactions occurring and, therefore, offer promise for on-line process monitoring and control. This work was designed to test how effectively hydrogen and CO could be to monitor high-rate anaerobic systems that has significant mass transfer and complex hydraulics. An experimental program was designed to examine the behavior of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system under steady state and in response to organic loading perturbations. The responses of trace gases CO and H{sub 2} were tracked using an on-line, real-time gas-monitoring system linked to a computer-controlled data acquisition package. Data on conventional process parameters such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were concurrently collected. Monitoring of conventional process indicators (i.e., pH, VFA, gas production) and trace gas (H{sub 2} and CO) indicators was conducted using a matrix of nine different steady-state OLRs (4-23 kg COD/m{sup 3} -d) and system HRTs (0.5 to 2.5 days) was performed to determine any correlation among the indicators. Of OLR, HRT, and influent COD, only OLR had any significant influence on the process indicators examined. All parameters except methane increased with increases in OLR; methane decreased with increased OLR. The OLR and gas production rate (GP) were observed to be linearly correlated.

Liebowitz, B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Anaerobic digestion of glycerol and co-digestion of glycerol and pig manure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential of glycerol obtained from transesterification of waste cooking oil as a main carbon source for biogas production was investigated. The glycerol was highly contaminated with oils and fats and was pretreated with sulfuric acid. Using a carbon source of glucose as a control, we compared biogas production from the acid-treated glycerol in a synthetic medium and the acid-treated glycerol mixed with pig manure. The anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with supplement in a synthetic medium was found to be satisfactory at organic loading rates (OLR) between 1.3, 1.6 and 2.6g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L?1 d?1. The maximum methane yield of 0.32L at Standard temperature and pressure (STP) g?1 COD removal was achieved at an OLR of 1.6g CODL?1 d?1 and the methane content was 54% on an average. At a higher organic loading rate of 5.4g CODL?1 d?1, the propionic acid to acetic acid ratio was higher than the critical threshold limit for metabolic imbalance. Anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with pig manure was also investigated at the COD ratio of 80:20 (glycerol:pig manure). The anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with pig manure was found to be satisfactory at organic loading rates between 1.3, 1.7, 2.9 and 5.0g CODL?1 d?1 in terms of COD reduction (>80%) and methane content of (62% on an average). However, the biogas production rate was found to significantly decrease at the highest load. The maximum methane yield of 0.24L STPg?1 COD removal was achieved at an OLR of 1.3g CODL?1 d?1.

Sasikarn Nuchdang; Chantaraporn Phalakornkule

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Contribution of Anaerobic Digesters to Emissions Mitigation and Electricity Generation Under U.S. Climate Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anaerobic digesters (ADs) can produce renewable energy from livestock manure, prevent the release of methane, and reduce air and water pollution, and digested manure can be applied to crops as a fertilizer. ... Comprehensive inclusion of the GHG mitigation benefits and low-carbon energy generation of AD projects within a federal climate and energy policy would further enhance prospects for new projects. ... Arthurson, V.Closing the Global Energy and Nutrient Cycles through Application of Biogas Residue to Agricultural Land - Potential Benefits and Drawbacks Energies 2009, 2 ( 2) 226 242 ...

David P. M. Zaks; Niven Winchester; Christopher J. Kucharik; Carol C. Barford; Sergey Paltsev; John M. Reilly

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion to Increase the Net Energy Balance of Corn Grain Ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion to Increase the Net Energy Balance of Corn Grain Ethanol ... However, the calculation did not include the energetic costs to physically replace the evaporator with the integrated digester system (this will be a relatively small fraction of the energy input because the percentage of energy input per unit of ethanol energy output for construction of the entire conventional dry mill is 0.2% (4)); the improved quality in animal feed (DDG vs DDGS); nor the available waste heat from circumventing thin stillage evaporation. ...

Matthew T. Agler; Marcelo L. Garcia; Eric S. Lee; Martha Schlicher; Largus T. Angenent

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

379

Anaerobic fermentation of rice straw and chicken manure to carboxylic acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biomass (Lynd et al., 2002). Carboxylic acids (C2? C7) are produced from anaerobic fermentation. Because they have a high market value, these acids can be recovered and sold. Alternatively, they can be converted to methane (biogas) or chemicals (e... conditions, both of which contribute heavily to production costs. Zhang and Zhang (1999) studied biogasification of rice straw to produce biogas (CH4 (50%)); however, methane is a low-value product. 1.6 The MixAlco Process An alternative to SSF...

Agbogbo, Frank Kwesi

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

Investigation of possible alternate end products of anaerobic metabolism in the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accumulated due to anoxia in the fish was lactate. Succinate and alanine showed slight or no accumulation with t1me. Alanine actually showed reduced pool size due to anox1a and hypoxia as compared to 1n vitro aerobic tissue pool-size. Even though in vivo... anaerobic tissues showed only slightly elevated and time constant lactate concentrat1ons compared to 1n vitro aerob1c tissue, a C tracer ind1cated accumulation and an efflux 14 w1th1n the lactate pool. Total act1vity decreased with t1me. There- fore...

Trant, John Miller

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Coupling between H+ transport and anaerobic glycolysis in turtle urinary bladder: effect of inhibitors of H+ ATPase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coupling between H+ transport (JH) and anaerobic glycolysis was examined in vitro in an anaerobic preparation of turtle urinary bladder. JH was measured as the short-circuit current after Na+ transport was abolished with ouabain and by pH stat titration. The media were gassed with N2 and 1% CO2 (PO2 less than 0.5 mm Hg) and contained 10 mM glucose. Under these conditions, JH was not inhibited by 3 mM serosal (S) cyanide or by 0.1 mM mucosal (M) dinitrophenol. Control anaerobic lactate production (Jlac) of 47 bladders was plotted as a function of simultaneously measured JH. The slope of Jlac on JH was 0.58

Steinmetz, P.R.; Husted, R.F.; Mueller, A.; Beauwens, R.

1981-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

385

Decomposition of Fresh and Anaerobically Digested Plant Biomass in Soil1 K. K. MOORHEAD, D. A, GRAETZ, AND K. R. REDDY2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information deals with land ap- plication of anaerobically digested sewage sludge, and on- ly limited data such as plant biomass, sewage sludge, or animal wastes is used to generate CH4 and stabilized organic waste, or preferably utilized, in an environmentally safe manner. Disposal of the anaerobically digested sludge by land

Florida, University of

386

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

387

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

388

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

389

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

390

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

391

Optimization of solid state anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW by digestate recirculation: A new approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Dry anaerobic digestion (AD) of OFMSW was optimized in order to produce biogas avoiding the use of solid inoculum. Doing so the dry AD was performed irrigating the solid waste with liquid digestate (flow rate of 1:1.181:0.9 w/w waste/digestate; 21d of hydraulic retention time HRT) in order to remove fermentation products inhibiting AD process. Results indicated that a high hydrolysis rate of organic matter (OM) and partial biogas production were obtained directly during the dry AD. Hydrolysate OM was removed from digester by the percolate flow and it was subsequently used to feed a liquid anaerobic digester. During dry AD a total loss of 36.9% of total solids was recorded. Methane balance indicated that 18.4% of potential methane can be produced during dry AD and 49.7% by the percolate. Nevertheless results obtained for liquid AD digestion indicated that only 20.4% and 25.7% of potential producible methane was generated by adopting 15 and 20days of HRT, probably due to the AD inhibition due to high presence of toxic ammonia forms in the liquid medium.

Pognani Michele; DImporzano Giuliana; Minetti Carlo; Scotti Sergio; Adani Fabrizio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Mathematical modeling of the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate bioegradation on actinide speciation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodegradation of natural and anthropogenic chelating agents directly and indirectly affects the speciation, and, hence, the mobility of actinides in subsurface environments. We combined mathematical modeling with laboratory experimentation to investigate the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide [Np(IV/V), Pu(IV)] speciation. Under aerobic conditions, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) biodegradation rates were strongly influenced by the actinide concentration. Actinide-chelate complexation reduced the relative abundance of available growth substrate in solution and actinide species present or released during chelate degradation were toxic to the organisms. Aerobic bio-utilization of the chelates as electron-donor substrates directly affected actinide speciation by releasing the radionuclides from complexed form into solution, where their fate was controlled by inorganic ligands in the system. Actinide speciation was also indirectly affected by pH changes caused by organic biodegradation. The two concurrent processes of organic biodegradation and actinide aqueous chemistry were accurately linked and described using CCBATCH, a computer model developed at Northwestern University to investigate the dynamics of coupled biological and chemical reactions in mixed waste subsurface environments. CCBATCH was then used to simulate the fate of Np during anaerobic citrate biodegradation. The modeling studies suggested that, under some conditions, chelate degradation can increase Np(IV) solubility due to carbonate complexation in closed aqueous systems.

Banaszak, J.E.; VanBriesen, J.; Rittmann, B.E.; Reed, D.T.

1998-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Anaerobic biprocessing of low rank coals. Final technical report, September 12, 1990--August 10, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal solubilization under aerobic conditions results in oxygenated coal product which, in turn, makes the coal poorer fuel than the starting material. A novel approach has been made in this project is to remove oxygen from coal by reductive decarboxylation. In Wyodak subbituminous coal the major oxygen functionality is carboxylic groups which exist predominantly as carboxylate anions strongly chelating metal cations like Ca{sup 2+} and forming strong macromolecular crosslinks which contribute in large measure to network polymer structure. Removal of the carboxylic groups at ambient temperature by anaerobic organisms would unravel the macromoleculer network, resulting in smaller coal macromolecules with increased H/C ratio which has better fuel value and better processing prospects. These studies described here sought to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. Efforts were made to establish anaerobic microbial consortia having decarboxylating ability, decarboxylate coal with the adapted microbial consortia, isolate the organisms, and characterize the biotreated coal products. Production of CO{sup 2} was used as the primary indicator for possible coal decarboxylation.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.

1993-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

394

A network design model for biomass to energy supply chains with anaerobic digestion systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Development and implementation of renewable energy systems, as a part of the solution to the worldwide increasing energy consumption, have been considered as emerging areas to offer an alternative to the traditional energy systems with limited fossil fuel resources and to challenge environmental problems caused by them. Biomass is one of the alternative energy resources and agricultural, animal and industrial organic wastes can be treated as biomass feedstock in biomass to energy conversion systems. This study aims to develop an effective supply chain network design model for the production of biogas through anaerobic digestion of biomass. In this regard, a mixed integer linear programming model is developed to determine the most appropriate locations for the biogas plants and biomass storages. Besides the strategic decisions such as determining the numbers, capacities and locations of biogas plants and biomass storages, the biomass supply and product distribution decisions can also be made by this model. Mainly, waste biomass is considered as feedstock to be digested in anaerobic digestion facilities. To explore the viability of the proposed model, computational experiments are performed on a real-world problem. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis is performed to account for the uncertainties in the input data to the decision problem.

?ebnem Y?lmaz Balaman; Hasan Selim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Flux analysis of the human proximal colon using anaerobic digestion model 1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The colon can be regarded as an anaerobic digestive compartment within the gastro intestinal tract (GIT). An in silico model simulating the fluxes in the human proximal colon was developed on basis of the anaerobic digestion model 1 (ADM1), which is traditionally used to model waste conversion to biogas. Model calibration was conducted using data from invitro fermentation of the proximal colon (TIM-2), and, amongst others, supplemented with the bio kinetics of prebiotic galactooligosaccharides (GOS) fermentation. The impact of water and solutes absorption by the host was also included. Hydrolysis constants of carbohydrates and proteins were estimated based on total short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and ammonia production invitro. Model validation was established using an independent dataset of a different invitro model: an invitro three-stage continuous culture system. The in silico model was shown to provide quantitative insight in the microbial community structure in terms of functional groups, and the substrate and product fluxes between these groups as well as the host, as a function of the substrate composition, pH and the solids residence time (SRT). The model confirms the experimental observation that methanogens are washed out at low pH or low SRT-values. The in silico model is proposed as useful tool in the design of experimental setups for invitro experiments by giving insight in fermentation processes in the proximal human colon.

Anne Marieke Motelica-Wagenaar; Arjen Nauta; Ellen G.H.M. van den Heuvel; Robbert Kleerebezem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Authors: Matthew T. Reagan and George J. Moridis Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates 2008, Vancouver, British Columbia, July 9-12, 2008 (http://www.icgh.org [external site]) Abstract: Paleoceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating past global climate. The implication is that global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate is the main culprit for a sequence of rapid global warming affects that occurred during the late Quaternary period. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed coupled thermo-hydrological-chemical simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor, and assessed the potential for methane release into the ecosystem. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and the effects of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that while many deep hydrate deposits are indeed stable during periods of rapid ocean temperature changes, shallow deposits (such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico) can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant carbon fluxes over a period of decades. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane and the formation of carbonates) to sequester the released carbon. This model will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic naphthalene degradation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(2000) 8 : 594607 DOI 10.1007s100400000095 Legacies from three former manufactured-gas plants Summary: coal tar, the manufactured-gas plant structures that remain today have...

398

Raman gas analyzer for determining the composition of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a prototype of a Raman gas analyzer designed for measuring the composition of natural gas. Operation of the gas analyzer was tested on a real natural gas. We show that our Raman gas analyzer prototype...

M. A. Buldakov; B. V. Korolev; I. I. Matrosov

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM DIFFERENT CARBON SOURCES USING ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED AND WETOXIDISED MANURE AS NUTRIENT AND WATER SUPPLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasses, great interest has arisen in production of biofuels. The idea of combining biogas and bioethanol and water in industry is a rather expensive medium. The remaining liquid after the biogas process is waste to pollution of ground waters. Furthermore the biogas process does not kill all pathogens. Anaerobically

402

Biology, ecology, and biotechnological applications of anaerobic bacteria adapted to environmental stresses in temperature, pH, salinity, or substrates.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathogens which would otherwise reduce the usefulness of the resulting...Soil, wastewater, subsurface water Acetobacterium woodii, Butyribacterium...Soil, wastewater, subsurface water Desulfomonile tiedjei, Methanosarcina...with extremes in pH. Anaerobes make up about half of the microorganisms...

S E Lowe; M K Jain; J G Zeikus

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Natural Gas: Dry Wells Yield Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two ... Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two natural ...

1969-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

405

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

406

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

407

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

408

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

409

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

410

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

411

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

412

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

413

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

414

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

415

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

416

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

417

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

418

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

419

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

420

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of5 of5 RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number DE-EE0000139 GF0-10-604 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA CompUance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: cx, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings, publication, and distribution;

422

A model of anaerobic digestion for biogas production using Abel equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a nonlinear mathematical model for the study of anaerobic digestion processes. We decompose the original system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations into subsystems. For these subsystems we prove existence of lower and upper solutions in reverse order for one of the va\\-ria\\-bles. The upper and lower solutions are constructed in analytical form. Furthermore, the upper solutions of subsystem for feeding bacteria are related with solutions of Abel equations of the first kind. Using numerical and theoretical arguments we examine how to obtain upper and lower solutions approximated to the numerical solution of the system. In this work we establish special techniques of lower-upper solution, which includes reverse order for non monotone systems, in contrast to the techniques used by H.L. Smith and P. Waltman on their monograph.

Primitivo B. Acosta-Humnez; Maximiliano Machado-Higuera; Alexander V. Sinitsyn

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

Biotransformation of monoterpenes, bile acids, and other isoprenoids in anaerobic ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isoprenoic compounds play a major part in the global carbon cycle. Biosynthesis and mineralization by aerobic bacteria have been intensively studied. This review describes our knowledge on the anaerobic metabolism of isoprenoids, mainly by denitrifying and fermentative bacteria. Nitrate-reducing ?-Proteobacteria were isolated on monoterpenes as sole carbon source and electron donor. Thauera spp. were obtained on the oxygen-containing monoterpenes linalool, menthol, and eucalyptol. Several strains of Alcaligenes defragrans were isolated on unsaturated monoterpenes as growth substrates. A novel denitrifying ?-Proteobacterium, strain 72Chol, mineralizes cholesterol completely to carbon dioxide. Physiological studies showed the presence of several oxidative pathways in these microorganisms. Investigations by organic geochemists indicate possible contributions of anaerobes to early diagenetic processes. One example, the formation of p-cymene from monoterpenes, could indeed be detected in methanogenic enrichment cultures. In man, cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol. During their enterohepatic circulation, bile acids are biotransformed by the intestinal microflora into a variety of metabolites. Known bacterial biotransformations of conjugated bile acids include: deconjugation, oxidation of hydroxy groups at C-3, C-7 and C-12 with formation of oxo bile acids and reduction of these oxo groups to either ?- or ?-configuration. Quantitatively, the most important bacterial biotransformation is the 7?-dehydroxylation of CA and CDCA yielding deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid, respectively. The 7?-dehydroxylation of CA occurs via a novel six-step biochemical pathway. The genes encoding several enzymes that either transport bile acids or catalyze various reactions in the 7?-dehydroxylation pathway of Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708 have been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized.

P.B. Hylemon; J. Harder

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Chapter Nine - Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins by reviewing the processing of natural gas to meet gas sales contract specifications. It then describes acid gas limitations for pipelines and gas plants, before detailing the most common acid gas removal processes, such as solid-bed, chemical solvent processes, physical solvent processes, direct conversion processes, distillation process, and gas permeation processes. The chapter discusses the selection of the appropriate removal process for a given situation, and it provides a detailed design procedure for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process. The chapter ends by supplying a sample design for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

426

Enhanced membrane gas separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

Prasad, R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

Microbial gas generation under expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository was investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosics (various types of paper) and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, neoprene, hypalon, and leaded hypalon) was examined. The rate of gas production from cellulose biodegradation in inundated samples incubated for 1,228 days at 30 C was biphasic, with an initial rapid rate up to approximately 600 days incubation, followed by a slower rate. The rate of total gas production in anaerobic samples containing mixed inoculum was as follows: 0.002 mL/g cellulose/day without nutrients; 0.004 mL/g cellulose/day with nutrients; and 0.01 mL/g cellulose/day in the presence of excess nitrate. Carbon dioxide production proceeded at a rate of 0.009 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in anaerobic samples without nutrients, 0.05 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the presence of nutrients, and 0.2 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day with excess nitrate. Adding nutrients and excess nitrate stimulated denitrification, as evidenced by the accumulation of N{sub 2}O in the headspace (200 {micro}mol/g cellulose). The addition of the potential backfill bentonite increased the rate of CO{sub 2} production to 0.3 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in anaerobic samples with excess nitrate. Analysis of the solution showed that lactic, acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids were produced due to cellulose degradation. Samples incubated under anaerobic humid conditions for 415 days produced CO{sub 2} at a rate of 0.2 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the absence of nutrients, and 1 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the presence of bentonite and nutrients. There was no evidence of biodegradation of electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Giles, M.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

429

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

430

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

431

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Gas Turbine Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a cycle process of a gas turbine, the compressor load, as well as ... from the expansion of the hot pressurized flue gas. Either turbine, compressor and driven assembly are joined by ... shaft is thus divided,...

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Gas-Turbine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This book focuses on the design of regenerators for high-performance regenerative gas turbines. The ways in which gas-turbine regenerators can be designed for high system performance can be understood by studying...

Douglas Stephen Beck; David Gordon Wilson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

437

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

438

Natural Gas in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a recent meeting of the Institution of Gas Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe ... Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe Gas Council, stated that an intensive, large-scale search for ...

1953-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

439

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

440

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage rack, a wall mounted cylinder rack, anchored to a fixed bench top, vented gas cabinet, or other

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

445

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

446

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Natural Gas Reforming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

449

Fuel: Bargain Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council has done well to agree on low prices for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The ... for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The price finally agreed is both much less than the two companies wanted and much less than ...

1968-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

Gas Cylinders: Proper Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

451

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

452

Static gas expansion cooler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

454

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

455

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

456

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

457

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

458

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

459

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

460

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

462

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

463

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

464

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

465

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

466

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

467

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

468

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

469

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

470

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

471

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

472

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

473

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

474

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

475

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

476

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

477

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

478

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

479

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

480

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas lfg anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

482

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

483

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

484

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...

485

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

486

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

487

Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of thermal pretreated sludge: Role of microbial community structure and correlation with process performances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermal hydrolysis pretreatment coupled with Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion (TAD) for Waste Activated Sludge (WAS) treatment is a promising combination to improve biodegradation kinetics during stabilization. However, to date there is a limited knowledge of the anaerobic biomass composition and its impact on TAD process performances. In this study, the structure and dynamics of the microbial communities selected in two semi-continuous anaerobic digesters, fed with untreated and thermal pretreated sludge, were investigated. The systems were operated for 250 days at different organic loading rate. 16S rRNA gene clonal analysis and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) analyses allowed us to identify the majority of bacterial and archaeal populations. Proteolytic Coprothermobacter spp. and hydrogenotrophic Methanothermobacter spp. living in strict syntrophic association were found to dominate in TAD process. The establishment of a syntrophic proteolytic pathway was favoured by the high temperature of the process and enhanced by the thermal pretreatment of the feeding sludge. Proteolytic activity, alone or with thermal pretreatment, occurred during TAD as proven by increasing concentration of soluble ammonia and soluble COD (sCOD) during the process. However, the availability of a readily biodegradable substrate due to pretreatment allowed to significant sCOD removals (more than 55%) corresponding to higher biogas production in the reactor fed with thermal pretreated sludge. Microbial population dynamics analysed by FISH showed that Coprothermobacter and Methanothermobacter immediately established a stable syntrophic association in the reactor fed with pretreated sludge in line with the overall improved TAD performances observed under these conditions.

M.C. Gagliano; C.M. Braguglia; A. Gianico; G. Mininni; K. Nakamura; S. Rossetti

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Overcoming the anaerobic hurdle in phenotypic microarrays: Generation andvisualization of growth curve data for Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growing anaerobic microorganisms in phenotypic microarrays (PM) and 96-well microtiter plates is an emerging technology that allows high throughput survey of the growth and physiology and/or phenotype of cultivable microorganisms. For non-model bacteria, a method for phenotypic analysis is invaluable, not only to serve as a starting point for further evaluation, but also to provide a broad understanding of the physiology of an uncharacterized wild-type organism or the physiology/phenotype of a newly created mutant of that organism. Given recent advances in genetic characterization and targeted mutations to elucidate genetic networks and metabolic pathways, high-throughput methods for determining phenotypic differences are essential. Here we outline challenges presented in studying the physiology and phenotype of a sulfate reducing anaerobic delta proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Modifications of the commercially available OmniLog(TM) system (Hayward, CA) for experimental setup, and configuration, as well as considerations in PM data analysis are presented. Also highlighted here is data viewing software that enables users to view and compare multiple PM data sets. The PM method promises to be a valuable strategy in our systems biology approach to D. vulgaris studies and is readily applicable to other anaerobic and aerobic bacteria.

Borglin, Sharon E; Joyner, Dominique; Jacobsen, Janet; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hazen, Terry C.

2008-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

489

Impact of ArcA loss in Shewanella oneidensis revealed by comparative proteomics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression on the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.

Yuan, Jie; Wei, Buyun; Lipton, Mary S.; Gao, Haichun

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

491

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

492

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

493

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

494

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

495

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

496

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

497

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

498

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks.

Chanakya, H.N. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)], E-mail: chanakya@astra.iisc.ernet.in; Sharma, Isha [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Ramachandra, T.V. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

499

Anaerobic digestion of wool scouring wastewater in a digester operated semi-continuously for biomass retention  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An anaerobic digester, operated semi-continuously in order to retain high concentrations of biomass in the digester, was used to treat wool scouring wastewater. At a space load of 99 kg COD m?3 day ?1 (hydraulic retention time, 28 days) >56% of the COD and >47% of the grease were removed. At these efficiencies, this rate was estimated to be at least 253 times greater than that which would be achieved in a continuously stirred digester. Preliminary studies of enzymatic pretreatment of the scouring effluent showed that significantly improved treatment rates and/or efficiencies could be achievedi.e. >70% removal of both the COD and grease at a space load of 12 kg COD m?3 day?1. It is unlikely that any substancial levels of flocculation would develop in this system and it is expected that the moderate use of polyelectrolytes would be required to help maintain the VSS concentration in the reactor.

R.G. Cail; J.P. Barford; R. Lichacz

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Influence of bed materials on methanogenic characteristics and immobilized microbes in anaerobic digester  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports and discusses the effects of bed materials on the performance of methanogenic fluidized bed reactors with acetic acid as the sole organic substrate. Four bed materials (carbon filter, rock wool, loofah sponge and polyurethane foam) were evaluated and compared for their methanogenic characteristics and immobilized microbes. The present results indicated that the characteristics of the bed materials for immobilization had a significant influence on the methane production. The loofah sponge and polyurethane foam were suggested to be suitable for the bed material in anaerobic digestion. The best methane yield was obtained from the loofah reactor among the four kinds of bed materials. The main cellular morphologies present in the biofilms of the four different materials on the colonization were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The microphotographs indicated that the biofilm was primarily composed of coccus, diplococci-shaped Methanosarcina-like cells, long rods of Methanobacterium and coccobacillus of Methanobrevibacter-like bacteria. The morphologies observed from the microscopic analysis indicated that the different bed materials could provide specific conditions for the adherence of distinct microorganism types. Furthermore, a 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis was conducted to compare the immobilized archaeal population. The results of the 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis indicated that the major immobilized methanogens were Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosarcina mazei in all the bed materials. A similar clone distribution was observed with the loofah sponge and the carbon felt.

Yingnan Yang; Chika Tada; Md Shohidullah Miah; Kenichiro Tsukahara; Tatsuo Yagishita; Shigeki Sawayama

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z