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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Six-Burner Gas Range Top Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for a six-element gas range positioned under an exhaust-only canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Gas Underfired Broiler Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for a gas underfired broiler under a wall-mounted canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

3

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Two Gas Pressure Fryers Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements two gas pressure fryers under a wall-mounted canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Gas Combination Oven Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for a gas combination oven under an exhaust-only canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

5

Section B: KITCHEN APPLIANCES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Which of these cooking appliances do you have in your kitchen? (Mark all ... Natural gas from underground pipes . 01 Bottled gas (LPG or Propane) ...

6

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Six-Element Electric Range Top Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for a six-element electric range positioned under an exhaust-only canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the food service industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

Kitchen Botany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kitchen Botany Kitchen Botany Nature Bulletin No. 684 September 8, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist KITCHEN BOTANY The corner grocery store and the local fruit stand offer a variety of plant materials that can be grown and studied in the schoolroom or laboratory. At any time of year, fruit seeds and root vegetables of many kinds can be made to germinate, take root and thrive indoors. In addition to those from the orchards, home gardens and truck farms of this region, it is possible to grow seedlings of a number of tropical fruits. Most of the contents of this bulletin are taken from a recent article by Blair Coursen, published in Turtox News. A few simple supplies including flower pots, boxes or trays of garden soil are the only equipment needed. A school terrarium or leaky aquarium can be used to advantage. A good hand lens or microscope, though not essential, can show some of the finer details of roots, stems, leaves and developing seeds not visible to the naked eye.

8

Matsushita's Virtual Kitchen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Virtual Kitchen, a retail application set up in Japan to help people choose appliances and furnishings for the relatively small kitchen apartment ...

9

Evolution of domestic kitchen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Domestic kitchen area is the most important, most intensely used functional area in the apartment. With regard to laboratory nature of kitchen works, equipment and users of different age and physical fitness, kitchen is a potentially dangerous place. ... Keywords: domestic kitchen, ergonomics, socialization, technical progress

Jerzy Charytonowicz; Dzoana Latala

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Kitchen Knife Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kitchen Knife Safety 1) Use a good quality cutting board (flat and stable). 2) Use a kitchen towel underneath a cutting board so that it won't slip. Observe above: Warped and unbalanced cutting board vs. flat and well-anchored board. 3) Sharp knives are safer knives. Dull knives can skip, slide, snag, or get stuck while cutting, leaving you off balance. 4) Use the right knife for the job. a. Serrated knives are long and lean that help grip and saw through the crust of rustic breads without using too much strength. b. Paring knives are used for smaller foods, such as limes, cherry tomatoes or shallots, for better control and lighter weight (less chance of skipping off of a smaller cutting surface). c. Chef's knives (one of the most used in the kitchen) can be used for

11

Impacts of Imported Liquefied Natural Gas on Residential Appliance Components: Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating Equipment, Mobile Home Furnaces, Kitchen Ranges and Ovens,Heating Equipment, Mobile Home Furnaces, Kitchen Ranges and Ovens,

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Gas ranges: latest indoor pollution target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although a National Research Council study claims that unvented gas cooking and heating appliance are probably responsible for a large portions of the nitrogen dioxide exposures in the population, the data base for gas-stove emissions is actually too limited to be conclusive. The problem of indoor pollution more likely rests with the increased airtightness of houses rather than with gas combustion. In the last 5 years, the normal air flow in new houses has been reduced 80% through new insulation and building techniques designed to lower heating and cooling costs. Other elements contributing to indoor pollution are much more hazardous than gas combustion products: radon gas from the soil, formaldehyde for insulation and construction materials, and toxic chemicals from household aerosols and solvents.

O'Sullivan, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Section B: KITCHEN APPLIANCES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas from underground pipes..... 01 Propane (bottled gas ... APPLIANCES IN THIS HOUSING UNIT THAT MIGHT PROVIDE CLARIFICATION TO THE RESPONDENTS

15

Kitchen Stories: Sharing Recipes with the Living Cookbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cooking and eating. The replacement of specific kitchen tools by multi- functional kitchen aids has been

16

Kitchen of the future and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A kitchen is a place where food is prepared and education and communication activities relating to food are carried out. As it is a place that witnesses more activity when compared to the other parts of the house, there are many potential ubiquitous ... Keywords: computer-aided cooking, computer-augmented kitchen, home computing, kitchen of the future, remote instruction, ubiquitous computing

Itiro Siio; Reiko Hamada; Noyuri Mima

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM CODE NOTES Kitchen Exhaust  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for replacement air, minimizing the need for conditioned makeup air. In larger kitchens, fan energy is saved by reducing airflow when cooking activity is low. Two mandatory...

18

Section B: KITCHEN APPLIANCES - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Form EIA-457A (2001)--Household Questionnaire OMB No.: 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 6 Section B: KITCHEN APPLIANCES

19

Kitchen antics: humor in organizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humor is usually associated with trivial or non-rographics. serious banter', it is however a significant factor in the construction of a social reality. 'This thesis demonstrates this significance as it attempts to increase the ability to understand how humor is used and elects the organizational culture. This thesis is based on an stenographic study of a hotel kitchen. Humor is examined from the perspective of how it functions within a social context. Humor from this case study is classified according to a coding system developed within this study to reveal five types of organizational humor-cooperative, conformity, cyclic, distant and insurgent. The interplay between these humor types creates a humor culture within the organization, which is indicative of the organization's culture as a whole.

Lynch, Owen Hanley, 1972-

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector and monitor capable of measuring radioactive-gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude is described. The device is designed to have an ionization chamber sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel-plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel-plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization-chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

Anderson, D.F.

1981-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Tips: Kitchen Appliances | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Kitchen Appliances Tips: Kitchen Appliances Tips: Kitchen Appliances April 24, 2012 - 8:34pm Addthis ENERGY STAR® Refrigerators Are Cool! ENERGY STAR-qualified refrigerators are 20% more energy efficient than non-qualified models. Models with top-mounted freezers use 10-25% less energy than side-by-side or bottom-mount units. ENERGY STAR® Refrigerators Are Cool! ENERGY STAR-qualified refrigerators are 20% more energy efficient than non-qualified models. Models with top-mounted freezers use 10-25% less energy than side-by-side or bottom-mount units. You can save energy in your kitchen through more efficient use of your dishwasher, refrigerator and freezer, and other common appliances. Dishwashers Most of the energy used by a dishwasher is for water heating.

22

Energy-efficient lighting for kitchens and bathrooms  

SciTech Connect

This booklet intended for the consumer explains ways to make kitchen and bathroom lighting more energy efficient.

Baker, W.S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

High Solid Anaerobic Co-digestion Pilot Scale Experiment of Kitchen Waste and Cow-dung  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under mesophilic condition (37°C), a bench-scale experiment based on high solid anaerobic digestion process was conducted in a fed-batch single phase reactor. The result shows: (1) According to gas production and ph value change, there are mainly ... Keywords: Kitchen waste, Cow-dung, High solid, Anaerobic co-digestion, Pilotsate

Lei Feng; Yan Chen; Rundong Li; Jie Xu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Enabling nutrition-aware cooking in a smart kitchen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a smart kitchen that can enhance the traditional meal preparation and cooking process by raising awareness of the nutrition facts in food ingredients that go into a meal. The goal is to promote healthy cooking. Our smart kitchen is augmented ... Keywords: context-aware computing, home computing, interaction design, kitchen, nutrition, smart environments, ubiquitous computing

Pei-yu Chi; Jen-hao Chen; Hao-hua Chu; Bing-Yu Chen

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Commercial and institutional kitchen exhaust systems  

SciTech Connect

This article addresses design requirements for commercial and institutional kitchen exhaust systems. The topics of the article include design considerations, toilet exhaust, dishwasher exhaust, grease hood exhaust, codes and standards, design concerns, common problems, and fire suppression. A side bar on ducts, plenums and housings is also included.

McGuire, A.B. (McGuire Engineers, Chicago, IL (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment October 8, 2013 - 9:42am Addthis Commercial kitchen equipment represents a large set of water users in the non-residential sector. Water efficiency for commercial kitchen equipment is especially important because high volume applications typically use mostly hot water. Ensuring commercial kitchen equipment uses water efficiently affords both significant water and energy savings. Water-using commercial kitchen equipment include pre-rinse spray valves, wash tanks and sinks, commercial dishwashers, food steamers, steam kettles, commercial ice makers, and combination ovens (combination oven/steamer). Operation and Maintenance To maintain water efficiency in operations and maintenance, Federal

27

Comparison of emissions from selected commercial kitchen appliances and food products  

SciTech Connect

Effluents have been measured from various grease-producing cooking processes in an attempt to quantify the emissions that enter typical commercial kitchen exhaust hoods. The appliances tested include gas and electric versions of single-sided griddles, open-vat deep fat fryers, under-fired broilers, full size convection ovens, and six burner ranges. Food products include hamburger, chicken breast, fries, sausage pizza, and a spaghetti meal. Emission data were obtained for particles, grease vapor, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and hydrocarbons. Velocity and temperature fields were measured in the plume above each appliance. Results show that a large fraction of the grease emission is typically in vapor form. The broilers emit significantly more particles less than 2.5 {micro}m in size (PM 2.5) than the other appliances tested. Combustion by-products were measured for all gas appliances. Both the gas and electric broilers emitted significant amounts of CO when hamburgers were cooked. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were below detectable limits in all tests.

Kuehn, T.H.; Gerstler, W.D.; Pui, D.Y.H.; Ramsey, J.W.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ameren Illinois (Electric)- Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Incentives Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Ameren offers several programs targeted at grocery stores, convenience stores, refrigerated warehouses or spaces, and commercial kitchens. These programs are designed to improve the energy...

29

Energy Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? Knowing which kitchen appliances are most efficient can save you money this holiday season. Cooking is an important...

30

Guidelines for Designing Kitchen Appliances for the Elderly.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The number of elderly people in the United States is growing due to the baby boom. The life span of kitchen appliances is also growing… (more)

RAVEN, SUSAN

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range. Previous slide: Next slide: Back to first slide: ... (generally borne out so far ...

32

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Incentives Program Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Retail Supplier State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Other Maximum Rebate $600,000/year/facility. Incentives $1-$200,000: paid at 100% Incentives $200,000-$600,000: paid at 50% Program Info Expiration Date 05/31/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Steamers: $300-$450 Hot Holding Cabinet: $200-$500

33

Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (Not Optional)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kitchen Ventilation Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (not Optional) Brett C. Singer Residential Building Systems & Indoor Environment Groups Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Denver, CO April 30, 2013 Acknowledgements PROGRAM SUPPORT *U.S. Department of Energy - Building America Program *U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Indoor Environments Division *U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - Office of Healthy Homes & Lead Hazard Control *California Energy Commission - Public Interest Energy Research Program TECHNICAL CONTRIBUTIONS *Woody Delp, Tosh Hotchi, Melissa Lunden, Nasim Mullen, Chris Stratton, Doug Sullivan, Iain Walker Kitchen Ventilation Simplified PROBLEM: * Cooking burners & cooking produce odors, moisture

34

Energy Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia Energy Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia November 20, 2012 - 4:08pm Addthis Did you know that your dishwasher can be used as an oven in emergencies? | Photo courtesy of Chris Gunn, NREL. Did you know that your dishwasher can be used as an oven in emergencies? | Photo courtesy of Chris Gunn, NREL. Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? Knowing which kitchen appliances are most efficient can save you money this holiday season. Cooking is an important part of the holiday season. Food brings people together in ways many material gifts cannot. But with winter temperatures creeping in, electricity savings are something to keep in mind, especially

35

Waste heat from kitchen cuts hot water electricity 23%  

SciTech Connect

Heat recovered from the Hamburger Hamlet's kitchen in Bethesada, Maryland and used to pre-heat the million gallons of hot water used annually reduced hot water costs 23% and paid off the investment in 1.5 years. Potomac Electric initiated the installation of an air-to-water heat pump in the restaurant kitchen above the dishwasher at a cost of about $5300, with the restaurant obliged to reimburse the utility if performance was satisfactory. Outside water recirculates through storage tanks and the ceiling heat pump until it reaches the required 140/sup 0/F. The amount of electricity needed to bring the preheated water to that temperature was $3770 lower after the installation. Cooled air exhausted from the heat pump circulates throughout the kitchen.

Barber, J.

1984-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

36

KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR Referral (KSRG25FVMS*) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KSRG25FVMS*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR Referral (KSRG25FVMS*) September 13, 2011 DOE referred the matter of Whirlpool's KitchenAid refrigerator model KSRG25FVMS* to the U.S....

37

KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR Referral (KSRS25RV*) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR Referral (KSRS25RV*) September 6, 2011 DOE referred the matter of Whirlpool's KitchenAid refrigerator model KSRS25RV* to the U.S. Environmental...

38

Minimum Energy Ventilation for Fast Food Restaurant Kitchens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooking equipment exhaust systems have a significant impact on the energy consumption of fast food restaurants. This research investigated issues that relate to the energy performance of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and demonstrated that significant energy and cost savings can be achieved by reducing ventilation rates.

1996-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

Corrective action decision document, Second Gas Station, Tonopah test range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 403) has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-0360 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. The Second Gas Station CAS was formerly known as the Underground Diesel Tank Site, Sandia Environmental Restoration Site Number 118. The gas station was in use from approximately 1965 to 1980. The USTs were originally thought to be located 11 meters (m) (36 feet [ft]) east of the Old Light Duty Shop, Building 0360, and consisted of one gasoline UST (southern tank) and one diesel UST (northern tank) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The two associated fuel dispensary stations were located northeast (diesel) and southeast (gasoline) of Building 0360 (CAU 423). Presently the site is used as a parking lot, Building 0360 is used for mechanical repairs of vehicles.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

The Exchange, formerly the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), is a joint military activity and the U.S. Department of Defense?s (DOD) oldest and largest retailer. The Exchange is taking a leadership role in water efficiency improvements in their commercial kitchens by integrating water efficiency concepts into the organization?s overall sustainability plan and objectives.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kitchens are often forgotten when people kitchens are often forgotten when people begin to think about performing water audits. Kitchens can be out of sight, out of mind; a commercial kitchen, however, can consume large amounts of water and energy if inefficient appliances are installed. The Exchange, formerly the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), is taking a leadership role in water efficiency improvements in their commercial kitchens by integrating water efficiency concepts into the organization's overall sustainability plan and objectives. The Exchange is a joint military activity, the U.S. Department of Defense's (DOD) oldest and largest retailer. The Exchange provides merchandise and services to military personnel, operating more than 3,100 facilities FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

42

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

kitchens are often forgotten when people kitchens are often forgotten when people begin to think about performing water audits. Kitchens can be out of sight, out of mind; a commercial kitchen, however, can consume large amounts of water and energy if inefficient appliances are installed. The Exchange, formerly the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), is taking a leadership role in water efficiency improvements in their commercial kitchens by integrating water efficiency concepts into the organization's overall sustainability plan and objectives. The Exchange is a joint military activity, the U.S. Department of Defense's (DOD) oldest and largest retailer. The Exchange provides merchandise and services to military personnel, operating more than 3,100 facilities FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

43

Using Less Energy in the Kitchen on Thanksgiving | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Using Less Energy in the Kitchen on Thanksgiving Using Less Energy in the Kitchen on Thanksgiving Using Less Energy in the Kitchen on Thanksgiving November 16, 2012 - 1:36pm Addthis You can use less energy in your kitchen and still prepare the perfect Thanksgiving feast. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/YinYang You can use less energy in your kitchen and still prepare the perfect Thanksgiving feast. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/YinYang Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? You can save energy (and money) while doing your Thanksgiving cooking with these tips. Thanksgiving is a great time of year to bring friends and families together. It also means spending time in the kitchen to prepare the traditional Thanksgiving feast. If you're like me, you're always looking

44

How Do You Save Energy in the Kitchen? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in the Kitchen? in the Kitchen? How Do You Save Energy in the Kitchen? October 28, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Amy pointed you to a video Q&A session in which Energy Secretary Steven Chu answered some reader-submitted questions. One of the questions that Secretary Chu answered was about dishwashing. He confirmed that using a dishwasher does, in fact, save energy and water over washing dishes by hand. If you have a dishwasher, this is one simple way you can save energy in the kitchen. (And as Amy pointed out, it could be a reason to consider installing a dishwasher if you don't have one!) We all spend time in the kitchen, and the appliances and water we use there can drive up our utility bills, but smart choices can help keep your costs down. How do you save energy in the kitchen?

45

Kinect in the kitchen: testing depth camera interactions in practical home environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depth cameras have become a fixture of millions of living rooms thanks to the Microsoft Kinect. Yet to be seen is whether they can succeed as widely in other areas of the home. This research takes the Kinect into real-life kitchens, where touchless gestural ... Keywords: cooking, depth camera, gestures, home, joint selection, kinect, kitchen, push gesture, recipes

Galen Panger

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Ambient kitchen: designing situated services using a high fidelity prototyping environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ambient Kitchen is a high fidelity prototype for exploring the design of pervasive computing algorithms and applications for everyday environments. The environment integrates data projectors, cameras, RFID tags and readers, object mounted accelerometers, ... Keywords: kitchen tasks, multi-modal prompting, people with dementia, pervasive computing, prompting, sensor networks assistance in daily activities, ubiquitous computing

Patrick Olivier; Guangyou Xu; Andrew Monk; Jesse Hoey

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

How Do You Save Energy in the Kitchen? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Do You Save Energy in the Kitchen? How Do You Save Energy in the Kitchen? How Do You Save Energy in the Kitchen? October 28, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Amy pointed you to a video Q&A session in which Energy Secretary Steven Chu answered some reader-submitted questions. One of the questions that Secretary Chu answered was about dishwashing. He confirmed that using a dishwasher does, in fact, save energy and water over washing dishes by hand. If you have a dishwasher, this is one simple way you can save energy in the kitchen. (And as Amy pointed out, it could be a reason to consider installing a dishwasher if you don't have one!) We all spend time in the kitchen, and the appliances and water we use there can drive up our utility bills, but smart choices can help keep your costs down.

48

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 3, Water heaters, pool heaters, direct heating equipment, and mobile home furnaces  

SciTech Connect

This is Volume 3 in a series of documents on energy efficiency of consumer products. This volume discusses energy efficiency of water heaters. Water heaters are defined by NAECA as products that utilize oil, gas, or electricity to heat potable water for use outside the heater upon demand. These are major appliances, which use a large portion (18% on average) of total energy consumed per household (1). They differ from most other appliances in that they are usually installed in obscure locations as part of the plumbing and are ignored until they fail. Residential water heaters are capable of heating water up to 180{degrees}F, although the setpoints are usually set lower.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Long-range assessment of R and D policy for gas-related conversion technologies and unconventional natural gas resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the energy impacts on the US energy-economy system on a set of successful R and D programs. These programs are presumed to have led to the commercialization of innovative technologies that increase the US gaseous fuels resource base and promote the development of advanced natural gas conversion technologies for residential/commercial uses. The GRI and its principal subcontractor, TRW Incorporated, provided the detailed specifications of the energy conditions for both a Base Case and an R and D Policy Case. These conditions can be broadly categorized in terms of key energy resource price assumptions, energy resource availabilities, technology characterizations and market penetration guidelines for all energy technologies. Dale W. Jorgenson Associates (DJA) developed a set of demographic and economic projections including population, employment, and real GNP growth rates. The GRI and TRW staff provided the technology characterizations for most of the gas-related technologies and a number of other technologies. The data for the remaining technology characterizations were taken, for the most part, from Bhagat et al. This report presents the energy results from the BNL/DJA energy-economy system as executed under GRI specifications. It is intended to serve as a complement to the DJA report on the macro-economic consequences of these specifications. Certain assumption incorporated in the R and D and Base scenarios relating to market penetration were identified as particularly sensitive. In light of the uncertainty inherent in them, an additional set of sensitivity runs were requested by GRI and are presented in Appendix B.

Kydes, A.S.; Rabinowitz, J.

1980-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercSmallKitchensCoffeeRms | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercSmallKitchensCoffeeRms SPElectrtyUsePercSmallKitchensCoffeeRms Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Small kitchens / coffee rooms Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercSmallKitchensCoffeeRms" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1.08790487679 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 2.00386372221 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 3.87651698157 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1.65760139145 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 2.18690390846 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 3.6502647334 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 2.19286348568 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 2.23856397763 +

51

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeKitchens | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LargeKitchens LargeKitchens Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Large kitchens Pages using the property "Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeKitchens" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.763086941039 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.409356725146 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2.13953488372 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.383200490497 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3.38701556508 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.294507436313 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.177556818182 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0953379731147 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 +

52

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2SmallKitchensCoffeeRms |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SmallKitchensCoffeeRms SmallKitchensCoffeeRms Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Small kitchens / coffee rooms Pages using the property "Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2SmallKitchensCoffeeRms" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1.20677966102 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 1.46100917431 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 2.53105456775 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1.08639747349 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.910666666667 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 2.06390811368 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 3.29519450801 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 1.54234902764 +

53

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLargeKitchens | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercLargeKitchens SPElectrtyUsePercLargeKitchens Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Large kitchens Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLargeKitchens" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1.06788610412 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.620003623604 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 3.89960107186 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.586902877434 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 5.16783391945 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.520871109218 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.645617768363 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.25093035055 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 +

54

A Web-based user-oriented tool for universal kitchen design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic constraints to the professional design practice limit customized solutions to the very wealthy, and thus most of the kitchens in current development housing projects are still generic. With aging baby boomers and ...

Ma, Xiaoyi, 1975-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Projected Regional Impacts of Appliance Efficiency Standards for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating Equipment, Mobile Home Furnaces, Kitchen Ranges and Ovens,heating, dishwasher motor, domes dryer, gas range and gas oven

Koomey, J.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Long-Range Untethered Real-Time Live Gas Main Robotic Inspection System  

SciTech Connect

Under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) developed an untethered, wireless remote controlled inspection robot dubbed Explorer. The project entailed the design and prototyping of a wireless self-powered video-inspection robot capable of accessing live 6- and 8-inch diameter cast-iron and steel mains, while traversing turns and Ts and elbows under real-time control with live video feedback to an operator. The design is that of a segmented actively articulated and wheel-leg powered robot design, with fisheye imaging capability and self-powered battery storage and wireless real-time communication link. The prototype was functionally tested in an above ground pipe-network, in order to debug all mechanical, electrical and software subsystems, and develop the necessary deployment and retrieval, as well as obstacle-handling scripts. A pressurized natural gas test-section was used to certify it for operation in natural gas at up to 60 psig. Two subsequent live-main field-trials in both cast-iron and steel pipe, demonstrated its ability to be safely launched, operated and retrieved under real-world conditions. The system's ability to safely and repeatably exidrecover from angled and vertical launchers, traverse multi-thousand foot long pipe-sections, make T and varied-angle elbow-turns while wirelessly sending live video and handling command and control messages, was clearly demonstrated. Video-inspection was clearly shown to be a viable tool to understand the state of this critical buried infrastructure, irrespective of low- (cast-iron) or high-pressure (steel) conditions. This report covers the different aspects of specifications, requirements, design, prototyping, integration and testing and field-trialing of the Explorer platform.

Hagen Schempf; Daphne D'Zurko

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Conversion of Mixed Oxygenates Generated from Synthesis Gas to Fuel Range Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The growing dependence in the U.S. on foreign crude oil supplies and increased concerns regarding greenhouse gas emission has generated considerable interest in research to develop renewable and environmentally friendly liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels. One of the strategies for achieving this is to produce intermediate compounds such as alcohols and other simple oxygenates from biomass generated synthesis gas (mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and further convert them into liquid hydrocarbons. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of mixed oxygenates intermediate product compositions on the conversion step to produce hydrocarbon liquids. A typical mixed oxygenate stream is expected to contain water (around 50%), alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol (around 35%), and smaller quantities of oxygenates such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and ethyl acetate. However the ratio and the composition of the mixed oxygenate stream generated from synthesis gas vary significantly depending on the catalyst used and the process conditions. Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of methanol accompanied by chain growth is well understood under Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) like reaction conditions using an H-ZSM-5 zeolite as the catalyst6-8. Research has also been conducted to a limited extent in the past with higher alcohols, but not with other oxygenates present9-11. Also there has been little experimental investigation into mixtures containing substantial amounts of water. The latter is of particular interest because water separation from the hydrocarbon product would be less energy intensive than first removing it from the oxygenate intermediate stream prior to hydrocarbon synthesis, potentially reducing overall processing costs.

Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Lilga, Michael A.; Flake, Matthew D.

2012-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

58

Long range forecast of power demands on the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company system. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the results of an econometric forecast of peak and electric power demands for the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGandE) through the year 2003. The report describes the methodology, the results of the econometric estimations and associated summary statistics, the forecast assumptions, and the calculated forecasts of energy usage and peak demand. Separate models were estimated for summer and winter residential electricity usage in both Baltimore city and the non-city portion of the BGandE service area. Equations were also estimated for commercial energy usage, industrial usage, streetlighting, and for losses plus Company use. Non-econometric techniques were used to estimate future energy use by Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Sparrows Point plant in Baltimore County, Conrail, and the Baltimore Mass Transit Administration underground rail system. Models of peak demand for summer and winter were also estimated.

Estomin, S.L.; Kahal, M.I.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Baseline Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Removals for Forest, Range, and Agricultural Lands in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

Development of a new dynamic gas flow-control system in the pressure range of 1 Pa-133 Pa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new flow-control system (FCS-705) has been developed at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science. The system is intended for calibration of vacuum gauges in the pressure range of 1 Pa-133 Pa by comparison method. This paper describes some basic characteristics of the system including; (1) the design and construction of the system, (2) the generation of stable pressures in the chamber, (3) achieving high upstream pressure limit by installing a short duct in the by-pass pumping line, and (4) investigation of the gas flow regimes within the short duct.

Hong, S. S.; Chung, J. W. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Khan, Wakil [Pakistan Vacuum Society, street 17, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of Superior Sorbents for Separation of CO2 from Flue Gas at a Wide Temperature range during Coal Combustion  

SciTech Connect

A number basic sorbents based on CaO were synthesized, characterized with novel techniques and tested for sorption of CO{sub 2} and selected gas mixtures simulating flue gas from coal fired boilers. Our studies resulted in highly promising sorbents which demonstrated zero affinity for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and NO very low affinity for water, ultrahigh CO{sub 2} sorption capacities, and rapid sorption characteristics, CO{sub 2} sorption at a very wide temperature range, durability, and low synthesis cost. One of the 'key' characteristics of the proposed materials is the fact that we can control very accurately their basicity (optimum number of basic sites of the appropriate strength) which allows for the selective chemisorption of CO{sub 2} at a wide range of temperatures. These unique characteristics of this family of sorbents offer high promise for development of advanced industrial sorbents for the effective CO{sub 2} removal.

Panagiotis Smirniotis

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

How to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving How to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving November 23, 2011 - 11:41am Addthis This holiday season, we wanted to share some easy ways to reduce unnecessary energy use while still enjoying all of your family’s favorite dishes. | Image courtesy of Flickr user Jennuine Captures. This holiday season, we wanted to share some easy ways to reduce unnecessary energy use while still enjoying all of your family's favorite dishes. | Image courtesy of Flickr user Jennuine Captures. Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs Many of us will be thankful for a delicious home cooked dinner this Thursday. But did you know that cooking accounts for 4.5% of total energy

63

Beyond Salad: How to Save Energy in the Kitchen During the Summer |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beyond Salad: How to Save Energy in the Kitchen During the Summer Beyond Salad: How to Save Energy in the Kitchen During the Summer Beyond Salad: How to Save Energy in the Kitchen During the Summer August 16, 2010 - 10:51am Addthis Andrea Spikes Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory One day I ordered pizza delivery. Another day, I went out to eat (well, several days actually). Yet another day found me trolling the produce and canned veggie & fruit aisles of the supermarket to assemble an interesting salad. But sooner or later, I want to cook food: real food, in my home, made from scratch, using natural ingredients the way I prefer. Even when it's blistering hot outside, sometimes I still crave a good hot meal. But what's a home cook to do when you finally get tired of grilling but loathe the idea of turning on the oven? Well, there are some simple,

64

How to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving How to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving How to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving November 23, 2011 - 11:41am Addthis This holiday season, we wanted to share some easy ways to reduce unnecessary energy use while still enjoying all of your family’s favorite dishes. | Image courtesy of Flickr user Jennuine Captures. This holiday season, we wanted to share some easy ways to reduce unnecessary energy use while still enjoying all of your family's favorite dishes. | Image courtesy of Flickr user Jennuine Captures. Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs Many of us will be thankful for a delicious home cooked dinner this Thursday. But did you know that cooking accounts for 4.5% of total energy

65

There's a monster in my kitchen: using aversive feedback to motivate behaviour change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we argue that "persuasive technologies," developed to motivate behaviour change in users, have so far failed to exploit the established body of empirical research within behavioural science. We propose that persuasive technologies may benefit ... Keywords: behavioural psychology, connected kitchens, environmental awareness, negative reinforcement, persuasive technology

Ben Kirman; Conor Linehan; Shaun Lawson; Derek Foster; Mark Doughty

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Electric Combination Oven Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for an electric combination oven under an exhaust-only canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Electric Underfired Broiler Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for a three-foot electric underfired broiler positioned under an exhaust-only canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Two Electric Pressure Fryers Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for two electric pressure fryers under a wall-mounted canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens C to pollutants while using biogas for cooking was assessed following the methodology described by the US - National Research Council. Information of hazardous compounds and compositions of several biogas types were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

70

DEVELOPMENT OF SUPERIOR SORBENTS FOR SEPARATION OF CO2 FROM FLUE GAS AT A WIDE TEMPERATURE RANGE DURING COAL COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect

For this part of the project the studies focused on the development of novel sorbents for reducing the carbon dioxide emissions at high temperatures. Our studies focused on cesium doped CaO sorbents with respect to other major flue gas compounds in a wide temperature range. The thermo-gravimetric analysis of sorbents with loadings of CaO doped on 20 wt% cesium demonstrated high CO{sub 2} sorption uptakes (up to 66 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent). It is remarkable to note that zero adsorption affinity for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and NO at temperatures as high as 600 C was observed. For water vapor and nitrogen oxide we observed a positive effect for CO{sub 2} adsorption. In the presence of steam, the CO{sub 2} adsorption increased to the highest adsorption capacity of 77 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent. In the presence of nitrogen oxide, the final CO{sub 2} uptake remained same, but the rate of adsorption was higher at the initial stages (10%) than the case where no nitrogen oxide was fed.

Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

Performance Study on the Treatment of the vent gas of the Fermentation process of Compost by Biotrickling Filters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kitchen waste compositing plants emit odorous gas streams with sulfur-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-containing compounds and other hydrocarbons. A pilot-scale biotrickling filter with a space of… (more)

shih, ya-ru

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, September 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-004-0360, Underground Storage Tanks. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Field performance of a nephelometer in rural kitchens: effects of high humidity excursions and correlations to gravimetric analyses (Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology 2006)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for household energy in rural China: assessment from threeis particularly problematic for rural exposure assessmentparticle concentrations in rural Chinese kitchens for which

Fischer, Susan L; Koshland, Catherine P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Validation of a Long-Range Trajectory Model Using Gas Balloon Tracks from the Gordon Bennett Cup 95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 1995, 18 gas balloon teams competed at the Gordon Bennett Cup, a long-distance ballooning event. The landing positions, travel times of all teams, and detailed information on the tracks of four teams are available. A special version ...

Kathrin Baumann; Andreas Stohl

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a larger study of liquefied natural gas impacts on device performance and pollutant emissions for existing equipment in California, this report describes a cmoputer modeling study of a partially premixed flame issueing from a single cooktop burner port. The model consisted of a reactive computational fluid dynamics three-dimensional spatial grid and a 71-species chemical mechanism with propane combustion capability. Simulations were conducted with a simplified fuel mixture containing methane, ethane, and propane in proportions that yield properties similar to fuels distributed throughout much of California now and in recent years (baseline fuel), as well as with two variations of simulated liquefied natural gas blends. A variety of simulations were conducted with baseline fuel to explore the effect of several key parameters on pollutant formation and other flame characteristics. Simulations started with fuel and air issuing through the burner port, igniting, and continuing until the flame was steady with time. Conditions at this point were analyzed to understand fuel, secondary air and reaction product flows, regions of pollutant formation, and exhaust concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and formaldehyde. A sensitivity study was conducted, varying the inflow parameters of this baseline gs about real-world operating conditions. Flame properties responded as expected from reactive flow theory. In the simulation, carbon monoxide levels were influenced more by the mixture's inflow velocity than by the gas-to-air ratio in the mixture issuing from the inflow port. Additional simulations were executed at two inflow conditions - high heat release and medium heat release - to examine the impact of replacing the baseline gas with two mixtures representative of liquefied natural gas. Flame properties and pollutant generation rates were very similar among the three fuel mixtures.

Tonse, S. R.; Singer, B. C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

77

Kitchen Table Strategy: Home Inspectors Driving Demand for Home Energy Upgrades  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20/2012 20/2012 1 Benjamin Gromicko, InterNACHI "Kitchen Table" Strategy: Home Inspectors Driving Demand for Home Energy Upgrades 3/20/2012 2 Benjamin Gromicko, InterNACHI "Although the home performance industry's delivery of comprehensive energy and comfort improvements has been growing across the country, it continues to struggle in creating consumer attention and demand. Our industry's delivery timing is off. We are not yet engaging the homeowner at their sweet spot of making improvements -- right after they purchase a home! This is when they move most aggressively with all sorts of home improvement projects -- and, unfortunately, seldom with any concerns of energy use. I strongly believe the home inspection industry is in a prime position to educate new homeowners on the long-term

78

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Heat extraction and refrigeration (HEAR) system. Phase I final progress report. [Restaurant kitchens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing indicates that heat energy available to be recaptured grossly exceeds the capacity of the 1.5 ton medium temperature Freon 12 compressor being utilized. The unit produced 50 pounds of suction pressure with the damper (Figure 4) open and exceeded compressor operational limits with the damper closed. This indicates that the current compressor could be replaced by one of 5 ton capacity since current estimates indicate that 60,000 Btu's are available for recovery. This could be divided between space heating and water heating as required by using separate condensers. There were no real surprises in the feasibility model construction and test phase, and the validity of the assumptions made in the original project description have been established. That is, it has been demonstrated that it is feasible to extract heat from the kitchen exhaust duct in a restaurant and keep the heat pump evaporator clean. It is concluded that work done under this $10,000 grant demonstrated the technical feasibility of the HEAR System. However, additional funding (our original proposal called for a $47,000 grant) would be required to economically evaluate the benefit realized and to advance the HEAR System design to a workable prototype stage.

Venable, B.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... kitchens; cooking appliances; cooking tops; energy consumption; energy efficiency; kitchen appliances; microwave ovens; ovens; ranges; test ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Certain Consumer Products (Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, Microwave Ovens, and Electric and Gas Kitchen Ranges and Ovens) http:energy.govnepadownloadsea-1662-final-environmental...

82

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. How is Shale Gas Produced? Shale gas formations are "unconventional" reservoirs - i.e., reservoirs of low "permeability." Permeability refers to the capacity of a porous, sediment, soil - or rock in this case - to transmit a fluid. This contrasts with a "conventional" gas reservoir produced from sands and carbonates (such as limestone). The bottom line is that in a conventional reservoir, the gas is in interconnected pore spaces, much like a kitchen sponge, that allow easier flow to a well; but in an unconventional reservoir, like shale, the reservoir must be mechanically "stimulated" to

83

Reconnaissance electrical surveys in the Coso Range, California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electrical surveys in the Coso Range, California electrical surveys in the Coso Range, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reconnaissance electrical surveys in the Coso Range, California Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Telluric current, audiomagnetotelluric (AMT), and direct current (dc) methods were used to study the electrical structure of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal area. Telluric current mapping outlined major resistivity lows associated with conductive valley fill of the Rose Valley basin, the Coso Basin, and the northern extension of the Coso Basin east of Coso Hot Springs. A secondary resistivity low with a north-south trend runs through the Coso Hot Springs--Devil's Kitchen geothermal area. The secondary low in the geothermal area, best defined by the 7.5-Hz AMT map

84

Pairing, Off-Diagonal Long-Range Order, and Quantum Phase Transition in Strongly Attracting Ultracold Bose Gas Mixtures in Tight Waveguides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of two 1D ideal Bose gases A and B with strong odd-wave AB attractions induced by a p-wave AB Feshbach resonance is studied. The model is solved exactly by a Bose-Bose duality mapping, and it is shown that there is no A-component or B-component Bose-Einstein condensation and no AB-pair off-diagonal long-range order (ODLRO), but both AA-pair and BB-pair ODLRO. After generalization by adding even-wave AA and BB repulsions and reducing the strength of the odd-wave AB attraction by Feshbach resonance detuning, a quantum phase transition occurs between a phase with AB contact nodes and one with no such nodes.

Girardeau, M. D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

85

CounterIntelligence: Augmented Reality Kitchen Leonardo Bonanni, Chia-Hsun Lee, Ted Selker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a cell phone or PDA to help remote users shop for meals. FridgeCam works through a wide-angle CCD camera for hot and blue for cold. Similarly, work surfaces benefit from different types of information projection interfaces like the faucet handle or the dials on the range require users to focus their attention away from

86

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kitchen ranges and ovens, direct heating equipment (wall,Heating Equipment, Mobile Home Furnaces, Kitchen Ranges and Ovens,

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) contains varying amounts of radon-222 which becomes dispersed within homes when LPG is used in unvented appliances. Radon-222 decays to alpha-emitting daughter products which are associated with increased lung cancer when inhaled and deposited in the respiratory system. The average dose equivalents to the bronchial epithelium from the use of LPG in unvented kitchen ranges and space heaters are estimated to be about 0.9 and 4.0 mrem/year, respectively. When extrapolated to the United States population at risk, the estimated tracheobronchial dose equivalents are about 20,000 and 10,000 person-rems/year for these appliances, or a total of about 30,000 person-rems/year. These doses are very small compared to other natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation. It is estimated that these low doses would result in less than one lung cancer a year for the total U.S. population. Consequently, the use of LPG containing radon-222 does not contribute significantly to the incidence of lung cancer in the United States.

Gesell, T.F.; Johnson, R.H. Jr; Bernhardt, D.E.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 2, Fluorescent lamp ballasts, television sets, room air conditioners, and kitchen ranges and ovens  

SciTech Connect

This document is divided into ``volumes`` B through E, dealing with individual classes of consumer products. Chapters in each present engineering analysis, base case forecasts, projected national impacts of standards, life-cycle costs and payback periods, impacts on manufacturers, impacts of standards on electric utilities, and environmental effects. Supporting appendices are included.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kitchen Ranges and Ovens Kitchen Ranges and Ovens Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for residential kitchen ranges and ovens since 1990. Residential kitchen ranges and ovens include conventional ranges, conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens, and microwave/conventional ranges, known collectively as cooking products. Cooking products cook or heat food by means of gas, electricity, or microwave energy. These products are used primarily in homes and apartments. Kitchen ranges and ovens do not include portable or countertop ovens that use electric resistance heating or are designed to use an electrical supply of approximately 120 volts. For information about microwave ovens, go to microwave ovens.

90

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace (Replacement): $200 Dryer (Replacement): $100 Natural Gas Range/Cooktop (Replacement): $100 Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Tankless Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Provider Alabama Gas Corporation Alabama Gas Corporation (Alagasco) offers various rebates to its residential customers who replace older furnaces, water heaters, cooktops, ranges and clothes dryers with new, efficient equipment. All equipment

91

Gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

A core engine or gas generator is described for use in a range of gas turbine engines. A multi-stage compressor and a single stage supersonic turbine are mounted on a single shaft. The compressor includes a number of stages of variable angle and the gas generator has an annular combustion chamber.

MacDonald, A.G.

1976-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

92

RADIO RANGING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

Nieset, R.T.

1961-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

Range Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuels Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Range Fuels Name Range Fuels Address 11101 W. 120th Avenue Place Broomfield, Colorado Zip 80021 Sector Biomass Product Uses a thermochemical process to turn biomass into synthetic gas and then fuel Website http://www.rangefuels.com/ Coordinates 39.915572°, -105.122053° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.915572,"lon":-105.122053,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

94

Measurements of coefficients of discharge for concentric flange-tapped square-edged orifice meters in natural gas over the Reynolds Number range 25,000 to 16,000,000. Technical note (Final)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report describes the data acquisition systems and procedures used in the American Petroleum Institute (API)-sponsored orifice discharge coefficient project performed in natural gas flows and conducted at the test loop of the Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America (NGPL) in Joliet, Illinois. Measurements of orifice discharge coefficients for 6- and 10-inch diameter orifice meter runs were made using critical venturis for mass flowrate measurement with associated measurement of pressures and temperatures. Eleven venturis were calibrated at the Colorado Engineering Experiment Station, Inc. (CEESI). Measurements of absolute and differential pressure and temperature for venturi and orifice meter conditions were made using an automated data acquisition system. Temperature and pressure measurements were directly related to U.S. national measurement standards. Daily calibration of absolute and differential pressure transducers using pressure working standards was designed into the measurement procedures. Collected over a 2-year period, the database contains tests on 44 orifice plates in 8 beta ratios for two meter sizes (6- and 10-inches). The database contains 1,345 valid test points.

Whetstone, J.R.; Cleveland, W.G.; Bateman, B.R.; Sindt, C.F.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance, Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range Title Natural Gas...

96

Long range dependence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The notion of long range dependence is discussed from a variety of points of view, and a new approach is suggested. A number of related topics is also discussed, including connections with non-stationary processes, with ergodic theory, self-similar processes ... Keywords: large deviations, long range dependence, rare events

Gennady Samorodnitsky

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Realized and projected impacts of U.S. federal efficiency standards for residential appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kitchen ranges and ovens, direct heating equipment (wall,Ranges and Ovens Pool Heaters Direct Heating Equipment X =Heating Equipment, Mobile Home Furnaces, Kitchen Ranges and Ovens,

Meyers, Stephen; McMahon, James; McNeil, Michael; Liu, Xiaomin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Realized and prospective impacts of U.S. energy efficiency standards for residential appliances: 2004 update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kitchen ranges and ovens, direct heating equipment (wall,Ranges and Ovens Pool Heaters Direct Heating Equipment X =Heating Equipment, Mobile Home Furnaces, Kitchen Ranges and Ovens,

Meyers, Stephen; McMahon, James; McNeil, Michael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will benefit a wide range of industries, as well as the primary stakeholders within the oil and gas industry. Significant gas resources in the U.S. are in deep, HTHP reservoirs. A...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alabama Gas Corporation- Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alabama Gas Corporation (Alagasco) offers various rebates to its residential customers who replace older furnaces, water heaters, cooktops, ranges and clothes dryers with new, efficient equipment....

102

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

increases ranged from 5 to 16 cents at every market location tracked by Natural Gas Intelligence. And even though the storm was fast-moving and short-lived, cash prices for the...

103

RADIO RANGING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A description is given of a super-regenerative oscillator ranging device provided with radiating and receiving means and being capable of indicating the occurrence of that distance between itself and a reflecting object which so phases the received echo of energy of a preceding emitted oscillation that the intervals between oscillations become uniform.

Bogle, R.W.

1960-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

104

High dynamic range imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current display devices can display only a limited range of contrast and colors, which is one of the main reasons that most image acquisition, processing, and display techniques use no more than eight bits per color channel. This course outlines recent ...

Paul Debevec; Erik Reinhard; Greg Ward; Sumanta Pattanaik

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://www.hss.energy.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security Notices This document is intended for the exclusive use of elements of the Department of Energy (DOE), to include the National Nuclear Security Administration, their contractors, and other government agencies/individuals authorized to use DOE facilities. DOE disclaims any and all liability for personal injury or property damage due to use of this document in any context by any organization, group, or individual, other than during official government activities. Local DOE management is responsible for the proper execution of firearms-related programs for

106

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

Manglos, S.H.

1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Natural-gas liquids  

SciTech Connect

Casinghead gasoline or natural gasoline, now more suitably known as natural-gas liquids (NGL), was a nuisance when first found, but was developed into a major and profitable commodity. This part of the petroleum industry began at about the turn of the century, and more than 60 yr later the petroleum industry recovers approx. one million bbl of natural-gas liquids a day from 30 billion cu ft of natural gas processed in more than 600 gasoline plants. Although casinghead gasoline first was used for automobile fuel, natural-gas liquids now are used for fuel, industrial solvents, aviation blending stock, synthetic rubber, and many other petrochemical uses. Production from the individual plants is shipped by tank car, tank truck, pipeline, and tankers all over the world. Most of the natural-gas liquids come from wet natural gas which contains a considerable quantity of vapor, ranging from 0.5 to 6 gal/Mcf, and some particularly rich gases contain even more which can be liquefied. Nonassociated gas is generally clean, with a comparatively small quantity of gasoline, 0.1 to 0.5 gas/Mcf. The natural-gas liquids branch of the industry is build around the condensation of vapors in natural gas. Natural-gas liquids are processed either by the compression method or by adsorption processes.

Blackstock, W.B.; McCullough, G.W.; McCutchan, R.C.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Range imaging laser radar  

SciTech Connect

A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

Scott, Marion W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Lunar Laser Ranging Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data provides science results: gravitational physics and ephemeris information from the orbit, lunar science from rotation and solid-body tides, and Earth science. Sensitive tests of gravitational physics include the Equivalence Principle, limits on the time variation of the gravitational constant G, and geodetic precession. The equivalence principle test is used for an accurate determination of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameter \\beta. Lunar ephemerides are a product of the LLR analysis used by current and future spacecraft missions. The analysis is sensitive to astronomical parameters such as orbit, masses and obliquity. The dissipation-caused semimajor axis rate is 37.9 mm/yr and the associated acceleration in orbital longitude is -25.7 ''/cent^2, dominated by tides on Earth with a 1% lunar contribution. Lunar rotational variation has sensitivity to interior structure, physical properties, and energy dissipation. The second-degree lunar Love numbers are detected; k_2 has an accuracy of 11%. Lunar tidal dissipation is strong and its Q has a weak dependence on tidal frequency. A fluid core of about 20% the Moon's radius is indicated by the dissipation data. Evidence for the oblateness of the lunar fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary is getting stronger. This would be independent evidence for a fluid lunar core. Moon-centered coordinates of four retroreflectors are determined. Station positions and motion, Earth rotation variations, nutation, and precession are determined from analyses. Extending the data span and improving range accuracy will yield improved and new scientific results. Adding either new retroreflectors or precise active transponders on the Moon would improve the accuracy of the science results.

James G. Williams; Dale H. Boggs; Slava G. Turyshev; J. Todd Ratcliff

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

110

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating Equipment, Mobile Home Furnaces, Kitchen Ranges and Ovens,oven only range only GDR all gas dryers Gas Dryer cycle data only Gas HeatingHeating Waterbed Heaters Automatic Drip Coffeemaker Crankcase Heater Iron Spa/Hot Tub Electric Blankets Toaster Hair Dryer Toaster Oven

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Gas, Mister, not gasoline  

SciTech Connect

A prototype rechargeable CNG commuter car with an LP-gas standby reserve avoids the need for area fueling stations while providing an emergency range-extending technique through its LPG system. Operating on a household power line, the charging compressor fills each tank to 1000 psig at an electric cost of less than 7 cents/100 CF of compressed gas. The four fuel tanks weigh only 120 lb and give the small Opel GT car a range of 75 miles. A 10-gal LPG tank adds 300 miles to this range.

Axworthy, R.T.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Can Deployment of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Put Downward Pressure on Natural Gas Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a reduction in U.S. natural gas consumption, ranging fromhigh gas demand on U.S. natural gas consumption and price inU.S. wellhead price of natural gas and total gas consumption

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjćr, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Gas intrusion into SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Underground Storage Technology Dept.; Giles, H.N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Strategic Petroleum Reserve

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Natural Gas Pathways and Fuel Economy Guide Comparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I presentation slides: Natural Gas pathways and Fuel economy Guide Comparison Bob Wimmer, Toyota Natural Gas Pathways Toyota estimation Vehicle Total Fuel efficiency Range...

116

Long Range Ordered (LRO) Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specialty Steel Division. Mayer Street. Bridgeville, ... Designers of components for use in the gas turbine industry continually desire materials with improved high

117

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Friday, November 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices fell over the week at most market locations, declining on average 16 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Decreases ranged between 2 cents and 77 cents per MMBtu. In the few trading locations where prices rose, increases were modest, ranging between 1 and 4 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 10 cents on the week, closing at $4.49 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the December 2009 natural gas contract fell 34 cents per MMBtu, or 7 percent. The November contract expired on Wednesday, October 28, at $4.289 per MMBtu.

118

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 2, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 7 and 68 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $2.25 per MMBtu, decreasing by 51 cents or 18 percent. As of yesterday, the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub was the lowest since February 15, 2002, when natural gas at this location traded at $2.18 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

119

Synthesis gas production  

SciTech Connect

Raw synthesis gas produced by the gasification of coal, heavy oil or similar carbonaceous material is contacted with a reforming catalyst at a temperature in the range between about 1000/sup 0/ and about 1800/sup 0/F and at a pressure between about 100 and about 2000 psig prior to adjustment of the carbon monoxide-to-hydrogen ratio and treatment of the gas to increase its Btu content. This catalytic reforming step eliminates C/sub 2/+ compounds in the gas which tend to form tarry downstream waste products requiring further treatment, obviates polymerization problems which may otherwise interfere with upgrading of the gas by means of the water gas shift and methanation reactions, and improves overall process thermal efficiency by making possible efficient low level heat recovery.

Kalina, T.; Moore, R.E.

1977-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

120

Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.  

SciTech Connect

The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System (Redirected from LEAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Long range Energy Alternatives Planning System Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Anaerobic Digestion, - Biofuels, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, - Central Plant, Food Supply, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, - Embodied Energy, - Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Ground Source Heat Pumps, Hydrogen, Industry, - Industrial Processes, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, - Solar Ventilation Preheat, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power, Wind

122

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Long range Energy Alternatives Planning System Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Anaerobic Digestion, - Biofuels, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, - Central Plant, Food Supply, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, - Embodied Energy, - Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Ground Source Heat Pumps, Hydrogen, Industry, - Industrial Processes, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, - Solar Ventilation Preheat, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power, Wind

123

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

125

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

126

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

127

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

128

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

129

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

130

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

131

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

132

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

133

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

134

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

135

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

136

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to locate and bring into production. To help meet this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Fossil Energy over the years has amassed wide ranging expertise in areas related to deepwater resource location, production, safety and environmental protection.

137

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: July 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 15, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose during the week in all trading locations. Price increases ranged between 6 cents and 48 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the biggest increases occurring in the Rocky Mountain region. During the report week, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 15 cents or 5 percent to $3.37 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas near-month contract (August 2009) decreased 7 cents to $3.283 per MMBtu from $3.353 the previous week. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the August 2009 contract has lost 66 cents. As of Friday, July 10, 2009, working gas in storage rose to 2,886

138

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998 ... gas prices gradually declining after the winter heating . ...

139

Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of the Northern Cascade Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Hook, Reference Librarian, University of Idaho Library,Moscow, Idaho 83844-2350, (208) 885-6066.Robert D. Hook University of Idaho, USA Fred Beckey. Range

Hook, Robert D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Property:Wave Period Range(s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Period Range(s) Wave Period Range(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wave Period Range(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Wave Period Range(s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 10.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 2.1 + Alden Small Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.0 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.0 + Chase Tow Tank + 3.1 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 2.3 +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved binary and tertiary gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one gas or mixture of two gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a gas (Ar) having a very small cross section at and below aout 0.5 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electron field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); McCorkle, Dennis L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, David V. (Knoxville, TN); Carter, James G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Improved gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Maxey, D.V.; Carter, J.G.

1980-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

Gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); McCorkle, Dennis L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, David V. (Knoxville, TN); Carter, James G. (Knoxville, TN)

1982-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

145

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

147

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

148

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

149

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shutdown Planning Shutdown Planning Planning Templates Shutdown Planning Schedules: Current Shutdown Schedule Archives: 2006 - 2013 APS Long-Range Operations Schedule: 2014 Archives: 2013 | 2012 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 APS Long-Range Operations Schedule (Fiscal Year 2014) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2013-3 2014-1 2014-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

150

Adaptively parallelizing distributed range queries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of how to best parallelize range queries in a massive scale distributed database. In traditional systems the focus has been on maximizing parallelism, for example by laying out data to achieve the highest throughput. However, ...

Ymir Vigfusson; Adam Silberstein; Brian F. Cooper; Rodrigo Fonseca

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 1, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 23, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices rose at almost all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 2 and 23 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.43 per MMBtu, increasing by 15 cents or about 5 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for October delivery increased by 10 cents to $3.860 per MMBtu. The November contract also posted gains this week, albeit much smaller at 4

152

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 4, 2009 Next Release: May 21, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 13, 2009) Since Wednesday, May 6, natural gas spot prices rose at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 49 and 95 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed by 75 cents per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $4.42 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, May 13, at $4.333 per MMBtu, increasing by 45 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 2,013 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 8, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

153

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 20, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 12, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes ranging between 6 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, May 12, at $4.18 per MMBtu, 18 cents higher than the preceding week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.284 per MMBtu, increasing by 29 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,089 billion cubic feet (Bcf)

154

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 22, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 14, 2011) A touch of autumn in the air combined with hopes for the eventual return of winter was likely the catalyst enabling natural gas prices to recapture the $4 mark this week despite an environment of negative consumption fundamentals and continued strong production. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the October 2011 natural gas contract advanced 9.9 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to close at $4.039 per MMBtu over the week. The Henry Hub price oscillated in a similar but narrow range before closing up 5 cents for the week at $4.01 per MMBtu on September 14. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,112 billion cubic

155

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: May 28, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 20, 2009) Natural gas prices at most trading locations fell on the week because of mild weather as well as continued weakness in the economy. Declines ranged between 37 cents at the Dracut trading area in the Northeast to 90 cents at the El Paso non-Bondad area in the Rocky Mountains. The Henry Hub spot price fell by 67 cents during the week to $3.75 per million Btu (MMBtu). Moving in the opposite direction of natural gas prices, the price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil contract rose on the week to $61.45 per barrel, or $10.59 per MMBtu. Oil prices are now at their highest level since November 10, 2008, having more than doubled since falling to a

156

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: February 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 18, 2009) Since Wednesday, February 11, natural gas spot prices declined at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 3 and 78 cents per MMBtu. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 33 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 7 percent, to $4.35 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 18) at $4.214 per MMBtu, declining 32 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,996 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 13, which is about 8.4 percent above the 5-year average

157

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2009 7, 2009 Next Release: September 3, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 26, 2009) Since Wednesday, August 19, natural gas spot prices fell at all market locations, with decreases ranging between 10 and 39 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 26 cents per MMBtu, or about 9 percent, to $2.76 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, August 26, at $2.91 per MMBtu, decreasing by 21 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,258 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of August 21, which is about 18 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

158

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: March 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 11, 2009) Since Wednesday, March 4, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 59 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell 31 cents per MMBtu, or about 7 percent, to $3.92 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, March 11, at $3.80 per MMBtu, declining 54 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,681 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 6, which is about 13 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

159

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: August 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 5, 2009) Natural gas prices posted increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday, with price increases at the spot market ranging between 12 and 43 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.61 per MMBtu, increasing by 20 cents or 5.9 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for September delivery increased by 49 cents to $4.042 per MMBtu. The September futures contract closed above $4.00 per MMBtu for the first time since June 19 on Monday, reaching $4.031 per MMBtu. The near-month

160

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: April 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 8, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 1, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 40 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell by 6 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $3.50. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 8, at $3.63 per MMBtu, declining by 7 cents or about 2 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 3, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 7, 2009) Since last Wednesday, September 30, natural gas prices rose across the board, with increases ranging between 37 cents and $1.32 per million Btu (MMBtu). Natural gas prices oscillated by large amounts at most market locations across the United States. The Henry Hub began the report week at $3.24 per MMBtu, fell to $2.32 on October 2, and ended trading yesterday at $3.70 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the near-month contract for November ended the week at $4.904 per MMBtu, a slight increase from the previous weekÂ’s value of $4.841 per MMBtu.

162

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 29, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 21, 2009) Since Wednesday, October 14, natural gas spot prices increased at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes generally ranging between $0.31 and $1.14 per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed 98 cents per MMBtu, or about 26 percent, to $4.80 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, October 21, at $5.10 per MMBtu, increasing by 66 cents or about 15 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was a record-setting 3,734 billion cubic feet

163

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 21, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 13, 2010) Natural gas spot prices posted gains at most markets across the lower 48 States since Wednesday, October 6, accompanied by double-digit increases in trading since the holiday weekend. Price increases on the week ranged up to 25 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the Henry Hub natural gas spot price increasing $0.02 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $3.58 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, October 13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.696 per MMBtu, falling by $0.169, or about 4 percent, since the previous Wednesday.

164

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2009 16, 2009 Next Release: April 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 15, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with some exceptions including those in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent. Despite this weekÂ’s upticks at most locations, natural gas spot prices remain at relatively low levels and have continued to trade within a limited range for the past 4 weeks. The Henry Hub spot market prices gained about 10 cents or 2.9 percent per million Btu (MMBtu), ending trading yesterday at $3.60 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 15) at $3.693

165

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: July 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 8, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Price decreases at the spot market ranged between 1 and 44 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a few points in the lower 48 States posted small increases. During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $3.22 per MMBtu, decreasing by 11 percent since last Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for August delivery lost 44.2 cents and ended the report week at $3.353 per MMBtu. The price for the August 2009 contract has posted a

166

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: November 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 28, 2009) Natural gas prices posted decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at virtually all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 6 and 46 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, a couple trading locations did post gains this week. The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell 21 cents or about 4 percent, ending trading yesterday at $4.59 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for November delivery expired yesterday at $4.289 per MMBtu, falling 81 cents or about 16 percent since last Wednesday. The December

167

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

168

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

169

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

170

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

171

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

172

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

173

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

174

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

175

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

176

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

177

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

178

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

179

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

180

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

182

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

184

EA-1662: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

62: Final Environmental Assessment 62: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1662: Final Environmental Assessment 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program: EnergyConservation Standards for Certain Consumer Products (Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, Microwave Ovens, and Electric and Gas Kitchen Ranges and Ovens) This chapter describes potential environmental effects that may result from amended energy conservation standards for residential cooking products and commercial clothes washers. Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain Consumer Products (Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, Microwave Ovens, and Electric and Gas Kitchen Ranges and Ovens) and for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment (Commercial Clothes Washers), DOE/EA-1662 (April 2009)

185

Gas-driven microturbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This paper describes an invention which relates to microtechnology and the fabrication process for developing microelectrical systems. It describes a means for fabricating a gas-driven microturbine capable of providing autonomous propulsion in which the rapidly moving gases are directed through a micromachined turbine to power devices by direct linkage or turbo-electric generators components in a domain ranging from tenths of micrometers to thousands of micrometers.

Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.; McWhorter, P.J.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Miller, W.M.

1996-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

RANGE INCREASER FOR PNEUMATIC GAUGES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved pneumatic gage is offered in which the linear range has been increased without excessive air consumption. This has been accomplished by providing an expansible antechamber connected to the nozzle of the gage so that the position of the nozzle with respect to the workpiece is varied automatically by variation in pressure within the antechamber. This arrangement ensures that the nozzle-to-workpiece clearance is maintained within certain limits, thus obtaining a linear relation of air flow to nozzle-to-workpiece clearance over a wider range.

Fowler, A.H.; Seaborn, G.B. Jr.

1960-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

187

Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Research Natural Gas Research Natural gas offers tremendous opportunities for reducing the use of petroleum in transportation. Medium and heavy-duty fleets, which have significant potential to use natural gas, currently consume more than a third of the petroleum in transportation in the U.S. Natural gas is an excellent fit for a wide range of heavy-duty applications, especially transit buses, refuse haulers, and Class 8 long-haul or delivery trucks. In addition, natural gas can be a very good choice for light-duty vehicle fleets with central refueling. See the Alternative Fuels Data Center for a description of the uses and benefits of natural gas vehicles or its Laws and Incentives database for information on tax incentives. The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports the development of natural gas engines and research into renewable natural gas production.

188

BC gas takes new approach to gas supply optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide-ranging changes have taken place in the US and Canada since the mid-1980s in the way that local gas distribution utilities and large industrial customers contract for their gas supplies. This paper reports that these changes have been brought about by open-access policies, the intent of which was to allow customers more latitude to make their gas purchase and transportation arrangements and to improve the access of shippers to available gas transmission capacity. The effects of the new open-access regime have been profound on both sides of the border. More than 70% of North American gas supplies are now sold under unbundled arrangements in which gas supply is contracted under separate commodity and transportation agreements. For local distribution utilities, the numbers of potential supply options have become extremely large. Analysis of these options has become increasingly complex with the need to take account of complicated contract provisions, a wider range of storage options and swap arrangements with other utilities, opportunities for some customers to purchase gas directly and uncertainty about future demand, prices and supplier reliability.

Cawdery, J.; Swoveland, C. (Quantalytics Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia (CA))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Range gated strip proximity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

190

Range gated strip proximity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

192

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

September.25October.01.2008 THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS HOSPITAL UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS MEDICAL CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" KitchenAid gas stove, white, convection oven, $200. 816-560-7599. 2 NASCAR TICKETS, Sprint Cup Series

Albertini, David

194

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower on induction electric cooktops, compared with either gas or resistance electric models. Kitchen exhaust fan usage

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

196

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

197

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2) 2) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2011-3 2012-1 2012-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

198

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1) 1) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2010-3 2011-1 2011-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

199

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3) 3) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2012-3 2013-1 2013-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

200

Extended-range tiltable micromirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiens, Gloria J. (Newberry, FL); Bronson, Jessica R. (Gainesville, FL)

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sperm whales are found throughout the world's oceans in deep waters to the edge of the ice at both poles (Leatherwood and Reeves 1983; Rice 1989; Whitehead 2002). Sperm whales throughout the world exhibit a geographic social structure where females and juveniles of both sexes occur in mixed groups and inhabit tropical and subtropical waters. Males, as they mature, initially form bachelor groups but eventually become more socially isolated and more wide-ranging, inhabiting temperate and polar waters as well (Whitehead 2003). Sperm whales were commercially hunted in the Caribbean Sea by American whalers from sailing vessels until the early 1900s

Puerto Rico; U. S. Virgin Isl; S Stock

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

203

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

204

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

205

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

206

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

207

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

208

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

209

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

210

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

211

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

212

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

213

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

214

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

215

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

216

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

217

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

218

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

219

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

220

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

222

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

223

Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

None

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell for a third consecutive week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 10-17), as temperatures for most of the nation continued to be moderate to seasonal. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, for the smallest week-on-week decrease in the nation. Spot gas traded there yesterday (Wednesday, November 17) at $6.06 per MMBtu. Price declines at the majority of market locations ranged from around a dime to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the price for the near-month natural gas futures contract (for December delivery) fell by almost 40 cents on the week, settling yesterday at $7.283 per MMBtu. EIA reported that working gas inventories in underground storage were 3,321 Bcf as of Friday, November 12, which is 9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined for a fourth consecutive week, dropping $1.85 per barrel ($0.32 per MMBtu), or nearly 4 percent, from last Wednesday's level, to trade yesterday at $46.85 per barrel ($8.08 per MMBtu).

225

Exhaust gas reactor  

SciTech Connect

A reactor for the oxidation of unburned and partially burned components in the exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine comprising a chamber which is substantially circular in cross sections perpendicular to its axis, one or more inlet pipes which pass a mixture of exhaust gas and air substantially tangentially into the chamber near to one end thereof, and an outlet pipe near to the other end of the chamber and which is so arranged that exhaust gas leaves the chamber substantially tangentially. The tangential inlet and tangential outlet of gases minimizes energy losses in the gas passing through the reactor. The ratio of the cross-sectional areas of the inlet pipe(s) to reactor chamber is preferably from 1:9 to 25:36, and similar ranges of crosssectional area ratios are preferred for the outlet pipe and chamber. The ratio of the length of the reaction chamber to diameter is preferably from 1:1 to 4:1. The chamber may be cylindrical or divergent from inlet end to outlet end and may be thermally insulated.

Camarsa, M.; Cocchiara, F.; Garcea, G.P.

1981-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

226

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 21, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell during the week at locations across the country, with declines ranging from 12 to 62 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price fell 19 cents, or about 5 percent, averaging $3.96 per MMBtu yesterday, April 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the value of the futures contract for May 2010 delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 6 percent, from $4.199 per MMBtu on April 14 to $3.955 per MMBtu on April 21. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price fell 3 percent since last Wednesday to $82.98 per barrel, or $14.31 per MMBtu.

227

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. , 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 8, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 30, 2009) Since Wednesday, September 23, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations, with decreases generally ranging between 10 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 19 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $3.24 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, September 30, at $4.84 per MMBtu, increasing by 9 cents or about 2 percent during the report week. The contract for October delivery expired on September 28 at $3.73 per MMBtu, increasing nearly 70 cents per MMBtu or 21 percent during its

228

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: August 28, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 13, to Wednesday, August 20) During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, August 13-20), natural gas prices continued their overall declines in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 1 and 58 cents per million British thermal units (MMBtu). However, there were a few exceptions in the Rocky Mountains, where the only average regional price increase on the week was recorded. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for the September delivery contract decreased 38 cents per MMBtu, settling yesterday at $8.077. On Monday and Tuesday, the September contract price dipped below $8 per MMBtu, reaching this level for the first time since

229

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: February 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices decreased in half of the trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week. Generally, areas east of the Rockies and particularly those that experienced frigid temperatures posted weekly price increases. However, there were some exceptions, including the Midcontinent and East Texas. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures trading for the near-month contract was fairly volatile, with daily price changes ranging between a 16-cent loss and a 16-cent increase. The March 2009 contract ended trading yesterday 18 cents higher than on the previous Wednesday.

230

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

231

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

232

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

233

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

234

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

235

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

236

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

237

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

238

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

240

COPIES: Iron Range Legislative Delegation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dear Legislators: We are pleased to present the annual report on our research regarding the health status of taconite workers and Iron Range community air quality. This report, as in the past, details the progress made by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and the Natural Resources Research Institute (NRRI) in all research areas, including occupational exposure, mortality and incidence studies, the respiratory health survey of taconite workers and spouses and the environmental study of airborne particles. In addition, this report contains specific information regarding the assessment of mesothelioma as it pertains to exposure to mineral fibers, referred to as elongate mineral particles (EMP). For this report, the EMP measurement is a standard technique that identifies those fibers (EMP) considered long (over 5 microns). Although the research team felt this was the most important exposure to be assessed with the cases of mesothelioma, in the next several months there will be additional analyses that may provide further insight, including exposure to short EMP, silica and respirable dust. A final report is planned for the end of the year when all components are expected to be completed.

Sen Tony Lourey; Rep Tim Mahoney; Rep Sheldon Johnson; Rep David Dill; Rep Mary Murphy; Sen Tom Bakk; Rep John Persell; Rep Tom Anzelc; Sen Tom Saxhaug; Rep Carly Melin; Rep Jason Metsa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

How regulators should use natural gas price forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas prices are critical to a range of regulatory decisions covering both electric and gas utilities. Natural gas prices are often a crucial variable in electric generation capacity planning and in the benefit-cost relationship for energy-efficiency programs. High natural gas prices can make coal generation the most economical new source, while low prices can make natural gas generation the most economical. (author)

Costello, Ken

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Lagrangian Long-Range Transport Model with Atmospheric Boundary Layer Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper reports on the combination of a chemical model for the gas phase chemistry of the atmospheric boundary layer, with a Lagrangian model for the long-range transport of air pollutants. The resulting combined chemistry/transport ...

Anton Eliassen; Jřrgen Saltbones; Frode Stordal; Řystein Hov; Ivar S. A. Isaksen; Frode Stordal

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

244

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

245

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

246

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

247

Residential Kitchen Fire Suppression Research Needs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Bryner, Nelson NIST Chamblin, William Life Mist ... Kuchnicki, Dick ICC Lawler, Meredith USFA/DHS Love ... CPSC Peterson, Patrick Williams-Pyro Pitts ...

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

Relationships between {sup 222}Rn dissolved in ground water supplies and indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations in some Colorado front range houses  

SciTech Connect

Indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations were measured in 37 houses with alpha track detectors placed in water-use rooms near water sources (bathrooms, laundry rooms, and kitchens) and in non-water-use living rooms, dining rooms, and bedrooms away from water sources. Results show that relative contributions of {sup 222}Rn to indoor air from water use are insignificant when soil-gas concentrations are high but become increasingly important as the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas increases. High soil-gas {sup 222}Rn concentrations may mask {sup 222}Rn contributions from water even when waterborne {sup 222}Rn concentrations are as high as 750 kBq m{sup {minus}3}. Ground water in Precambrian Pikes Peak granite averages 340 kBq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn, vs. 170 kBq m{sup {minus}3} in Precambrian migmatite, but average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in soil gas are also lower in migmatite. Because the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas may be consistently higher for houses in migmatite than in Pikes Peak granite, indoor air in houses built on migmatite have a greater relative contribution from water use even though average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in the water are lower. Continuous monitoring of {sup 222}Rn concentrations in air on 15-min intervals also indicates that additions to indoor concentrations from water use are significant and measurable only when soil-gas concentrations are low and concentrations in water are high. When soil-gas concentrations were mitigated to less than 150 Bq m{sup {minus}3} in one house, water contributed 20-40% of the annual indoor {sup 222}Rn concentration in the laundry room ({sup 222}Rn concentration in water of 670 kBq m{sup {minus}3}). Conversely, when the mitigation system is inactive, diurnal fluctuations and other variations in the soil-gas {sup 222}Rn contribution swamp the variability due to water use in the house. 9 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Folger, P.F. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Wanty, R.B. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Poeter, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Nyberg, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Long-Range Neutron Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neutron detector designed for detecting neutron sources at distances of 50 to 100 m has been constructed and tested. This detector has a large surface area (1 m{sup 2}) to enhance detection efficiency, and it contains a collimator and shielding to achieve direction sensitivity and reduce background. An unusual feature of the detector is that it contains no added moderator, such as polyethylene, to moderate fast neutrons before they reach the {sup 3}He detector. As a result, the detector is sensitive mainly to thermal neutrons. The moderator-free design reduces the weight of the detector, making it more portable, and it also aids in achieving directional sensitivity and background reduction. Test results show that moderated fission-neutron sources of strength about 3 x 10{sup 5} n/s can be detected at a distance out to 70 m in a counting time of 1000 s. The best angular resolution of the detector is obtained at distances of 30 m or less. As the separation .distance between the source and detector increases, the contribution of scattered neutrons to the measured signal increases with a resultant decrease in the ability to detect the direction to a distant source. Applications for which the long-range detector appears to be suitable include detecting remote neutron sources (including sources in moving vehicles) and monitoring neutron storage vaults for the intrusion of humans and the effects they make on the detected neutron signal. Also, the detector can be used to measure waste for the presence of transuranic material in the presence of high gamma-ray background. A test with a neutron source (3 x 10{sup 5} n/s) in a vehicle showed that the detector could readily measure an increase in count rate at a distance of 10 m for vehicle speeds up to 35 mph (the highest speed tested). These results. indicate that the source should be detectable at this distance at speeds up to 55 mph.

AJ Peurrung; DC Stromswold; RR Hansen; PL Reeder; DS Barnett

1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs).

251

Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas: Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir, as in contrast to injected gas volumes. Natural Gas: A gaseous mixture...

252

Proceedings: EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum  

SciTech Connect

The EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum covered a range of topics related to remediation and management of former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites, with emphasis on technological advances and current issues associated with site cleanup. In specific, the forum covered MGP coal-tar delineation, soil and groundwater remediation technologies, improvements in air monitoring, and ecological risk characterization/risk management tools.

None

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Liquefied natural gas meets a quarter of New England's average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas prices in Europe and Asia have ranged much higher, reaching $10-$16/MMBtu. As a result, other LNG markets are typically served first, ...

254

Gas Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... automobile industry meeting more stringent … more. Audit of EPA Protocol Gas Suppliers EPA Protocol gas mixture calibration ...

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

255

Long-Range EV Charging Infrastructure Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scenario for adoption rates. There are far too many moving parts to arrive at a specific forecast, as gas prices, fuel taxes, biofuel technologies, battery costs, consumer...

256

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally moved in opposite directions for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 29-October 6), as spot prices fell at most market locations, while futures prices continued to climb higher. In yesterday's (Wednesday, October 6) trading at the Henry Hub, the spot price for natural gas averaged $6.00 per MMBtu, down 23 cents per MMBtu, or close to 4 percent, from the previous Wednesday. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery gained $0.134 per MMBtu on the week, or about 2 percent, as it settled yesterday at $7.045. Settlement prices for contracts for gas delivery in December 2004 through March 2005 rose much more sharply, with increases ranging from just over 40 cents to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 3,092 Bcf as of Friday, October 1, which is 6.9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose $2.45 per barrel (42 cents per MMBtu) on the week, or about 5 percent, to yesterday's record-high price of $51.98 per barrel ($8.96 per MMBtu).

257

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 27, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 5) June 27, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 5) Since Wednesday, June 19, natural gas spot prices increased at most locations, despite declines ranging between 5 and 14 cents per MMBtu on Wednesday, June 26. For the week, prices at the Henry Hub increased 19 cents to $3.42 per MMBtu, which is an increase of almost 6 percent. High temperatures and rising crude oil prices contributed to increased cooling demand for gas, which spurred the price hikes. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (June 26) at $3.278 per MMBtu, falling over 17 cents in its final day of trading. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,184 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by more 20 than percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.10 per barrel or over 4 percent since last Wednesday, trading at $26.67 per barrel or $4.60 per MMBtu.

258

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) 10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 2-9) as a late season cold front moved into major gas-consuming regions of the country, bringing a reminder that the end of winter is still two weeks away. Spot prices climbed 17 to 76 cents per MMBtu at trading locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday. Price changes in the Northeast were at the higher end of the range, while trading in the West resulted in gains at the lower end. The Henry Hub spot price increased 38 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.99. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery gained 16.3 cents per MMBtu, settling at $6.880 on Wednesday, March 9. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, March 4, decreased to 1,474 Bcf, which is 25.7 percent above the 5-year (2000-2004) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded at near-record highs, rising $1.75 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $54.75 per barrel, or $9.44 per MMBtu.

259

Natural Gas Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, January 2006 1 The natural gas product fed into the mainline gas transportation system in the United States must meet specific quality measures in order for the pipeline grid to operate properly. Consequently, natural gas produced at the wellhead, which in most cases contains contaminants 1 and natural gas liquids, 2 must be processed, i.e., cleaned, before it can be safely delivered to the high-pressure, long-distance pipelines that transport the product to the consuming public. Natural gas that is not within certain specific gravities, pressures, Btu content range, or water content levels will

260

Help:Range blocks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Range blocks Jump to: navigation, search Range blocks are technical restrictions applied through Special:Blockip to a group of IP addresses that prevent them from editing, creating...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Charge exchange stripping cell measurements over a wide pressure range  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency of the stripping cell incorporated in a charge exchange analyzer has been measured over a pressure range of 1.8 to 130 mtorr and over an energy range of 1 to 130 keV/amu. In these measurements, a beam of hydrogen atoms was ionized by helium gas. As a by-product of the measurements, the scattering cross section was also measured. At the lowest pressure, the scattering cross section compared well with those measured previously; at high pressure, the cross section no longer followed an energy power law. The analyzer efficiency (defined as the fraction of the atoms that is ionized and not lost through scattering) can be modeled over the entire range of energy and pressure by including the measured scattering cross sections.

Colchin, R.J.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Notice: Holiday Notice: Due to the federal holiday in observance of Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 21, 2002, the next issue of the Natural Gas Weekly Update will be published on Tuesday, January 22, 2002. Overview: Monday, January 14, 2002 Natural gas prices were generally lower last week as the fundamentals of ample working gas in storage and very little temperature-driven swing demand dominated the market. With little in the way of market-changing developments, trading in both the spot and futures markets tended to occur in relatively small price ranges throughout the week. The warming trend begun late in the previous week continued nearly unabated through last week, with the heavy gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast recording many of the greatest deviations above daily normal temperatures. Philadelphia, New York City, and Buffalo, NY had at least 3 days of temperatures that were 10 or more degrees above normal; Chicago's temperature reached an unusually warm 26 degrees above normal on Wednesday. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Spot prices at the Henry Hub moved down moderately from the previous week, ending trading on Friday at $2.31, down 5 cents from the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub declined by $0.071 from the previous Friday, settling on Friday, January 11 at $2.204 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil also fell, dipping below $20 per barrel for the first time in the New Year, ending trading last Friday at $19.67 per barrel, or $3.39 per MMBtu, down $1.80 per barrel, or $0.31 per MMBtu, from Friday, January 4.

263

Gas Mileage of 2014 Vehicles by Land Rover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19 Highway 2014 Land Rover Range Rover FFV 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic (S8), Premium Gas or E85 Compare 2014 Land Rover Range Rover FFV Prem 14 City 16 Combined 19 Highway E85 9 City...

264

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Gas Bubbles and Gas Pancakes at Liquid/Solid Interface: A Continuum Theory Incorporated with Molecular Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The states of gas accumulated at the liquid-solid interface are analyzed based on the continuum theory where the Hamaker constant is used to describe the long-range interaction at the microscopic scale. The Hamaker constant is always negative, whereas the gas spreading coefficient can be either sign. Despite the complexity of gas, including that the density profile may not be uniform due to absorption on both solid and liquid surfaces, we predict three possible gas states at the liquid-solid interface, i.e. complete wetting, partial wetting and pseudopartial wetting. These possible gas states correspond respectively to a gas pancake (or film) surrounded by a wet solid, a gas bubble with a finite contact angle, and a gas bubble(s) coexisting with a gas pancake. Typical thickness of the gas pancakes is at the nanoscale within the force range of the long-range interaction, whereas the radius of the gas bubbles can be large. The state of gas bubble(s) coexisting with a gas film is predicted theoretically for the first time. Our theoretical results can contribute to the development of a unified picture of gas nucleation at the liquid-solid interface.

Zhaoxia Li; Xuehua Zhang; Lijuan Zhang; Xiaocheng Zeng; Jun Hu; Haiping Fang

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

266

Natural gas 1994: Issues and trends  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry in 1993 and early 1994 (Chapter 1), focusing on the overall ability to deliver gas under the new regulatory mandates of Order 636. In addition, the report highlights a range of issues affecting the industry, including: restructuring under Order 636 (Chapter 2); adjustments in natural gas contracting (Chapter 3); increased use of underground storage (Chapter 4); effects of the new market on the financial performance of the industry (Chapter 5); continued impacts of major regulatory and legislative changes on the natural gas market (Appendix A).

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Short-Range Atmospheric Dispersion of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

layer model for heavy gas dispersion from natural sources:data to analyze dense gas dispersion modeling issues. Atmosforum (perf) dense gas dispersion modeling project. Atmos

Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

269

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

270

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

271

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

272

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

273

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

274

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

275

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

276

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

277

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

278

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

279

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

280

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

282

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

283

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

284

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

285

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

286

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

287

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

288

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

289

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

290

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

291

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

292

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

293

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

294

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

295

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

296

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

297

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Environmental Environmental Science Enviro Express Kenworth LNG tractor. Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas As a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's broad effort to develop cleaner transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, this study examines advanced 2011 natural gas fueled trucks using liquefied natural gas (LNG) replacing older diesel fueled trucks. The trucks are used 6 days per week in regional city-to-landfill long hauls of incinerator waste with two fills per day. This is a workable fit for the limited range LNG trucks. Reduction of fuel costs and harmful emissions relative to the replaced trucks are significant. Introduction The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act legislation

299

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Eligibility...

300

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

302

Assessment of hot gas contaminant control  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Medium- and Long-Range Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In contrast to short and extended range forecasts, predictions for periods beyond 5 days use time-averaged, midtropospheric height fields as their primary guidance. As time ranges are increased to 3O- and 90-day outlooks, guidance increasingly ...

A. James Wagner

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

305

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

306

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas prices, successful application of horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, as well as significant investments made by natural gas companies in production...

307

Gas scrubbing liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowrie, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Natural Gas Processed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

309

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service “Evolving Estimate” in Natural Gas Monthly.

310

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and a weather snapshot. Monthly Natural Gas Monthly Natural and supplemental gas production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices in the...

311

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

312

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

313

February Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

314

November Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

315

January Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

316

March Natural Gas Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

317

May Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

318

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7, 2009 Next Release: May 14, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 6, 2009) Natural gas...

319

CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

320

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

322

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

323

Natural Gas Dry Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

324

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview: Thursday April 11, 2002 Overview: Thursday April 11, 2002 Natural gas prices have declined substantially in the past 7 days. Spot prices at most market locations across the country finished the day on Wednesday, April 10 down slightly. However the cumulative difference from the previous Wednesday ranged between $0.21 and $0.89 per MMBtu. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 43 cents per MMBtu from the previous Wednesday to trade at $3.25 yesterday. On the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $3.184 per MMBtu, down roughly 32 cents since last Wednesday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.40 per barrel since the previous Wednesday, trading at $26.15 per barrel or $4.51 per MMBtu. Prices:

325

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 21, 2006) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 21, 2006) Softening natural gas market conditions led to spot price decreases at most market locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, December 6, with decreases ranging between $0.02 and $1.22 per MMBtu. The few price increases on the week were mostly confined to market locations west of the Rocky Mountains. On Wednesday, December 13, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $7.21 per MMBtu, decreasing $0.13 per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The prices of futures contracts through December 2007 changed only slightly since December 6. The price for the January delivery contract decreased about 5 cents per MMBtu, or about 1 percent on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), settling at $7.673 per MMBtu yesterday (December 13). Natural gas in storage was 3,238 Bcf as of December 8, which is 7.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 86 cents per barrel, or about 1 percent on the week to $61.34 per barrel or $10.58 per MMBtu.

326

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) 8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) Spot and futures prices seesawed throughout the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 30-May 7) with no clear underlying trend, however prices ended trading yesterday at uniformly higher levels than one week ago. The weather's influence on gas demand was muted, as temperatures in most areas of the country were generally comfortably spring-like, except for some parts of the Southeast and Southwest, where summer-like temperatures prompted some early air conditioning load. The Henry Hub average spot price increased 23 cents from the previous Wednesday (April 30) to $5.48 per MMBtu. The daily settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery rose $0.275 on the week, ending at $5.660 per MMBtu in yesterday's trading. The EIA reported that 821 Bcf of gas was held in storage as of Friday, May 2, which is 39.9 percent less than the 5-year average. The average spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil traded in a narrow range of less than $1 per barrel during the week, and ended trading yesterday with a small increase of 15 cents on the week, at $26.24 per barrel, or $4.52 per MMBtu.

327

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2002 11, 2002 On Friday, spot gas traded at the Henry Hub for $2.20 per MMBtu, marking no change from the price on the previous Friday. Last week spot prices at the Henry Hub traded within a tight range of $2.14-$2.20 per MMBtu. Temperatures in much of the country returned to above normal in the second half of the week and the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6-to 10-day forecast called for this pattern to continue through the weekend and all of this week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) This dominant pattern of above normal temperatures has resulted in heating degree days thus far this winter that are 16 percent lower than normal. At the NYMEX, the settlement price for the March contract ended the week up almost 5 cents at $2.191 per MMBtu. Natural gas stocks remained well above last year's level as estimated net withdrawals were 82 Bcf during the last week of January. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down 15 cents last week and ended Friday trading at $20.25 per barrel or $3.49 per MMBtu.

328

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2001 13, 2001 Spot prices for natural gas appeared to stabilize just above the $3.00 mark during the week ended August 10, 2001, as the price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana varied between $3.14 and $2.98 per million Btu. Net injections of natural gas into storage for the previous week again fell within the range of market expectations reported in the trade press and contributed to the stability of the price level. However, due to warmer-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast, Midwest, and parts of the Southwest and Southeast, prices at the Henry Hub increased early in the week before decreasing and finishing over 2 percent lower than the previous week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil finished the week at $28.10 per barrel or $4.84 per million Btu, an increase of almost 2 percent above the previous Friday.

329

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thursday, December 19 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 3) Thursday, December 19 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 3) Natural gas spot prices on Wednesday, December 18, were higher than the previous Wednesday at most locations in the Lower 48 States, climbing between 20 and 60 cents per MMBtu. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 36 cents or roughly 8 percent to $4.86 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub has increased nearly 57 cents since last Wednesday to settle at $5.278 per MMBtu yesterday (December 18). Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,635 Bcf, which is below the 5-year average by over 5 percent, but well within the 5-year historical range. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.95 per barrel or about 11 percent since last Wednesday to trade at $30.44 per barrel or $5.248 per MMBtu.

330

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 9, 2006) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 9, 2006) Since Wednesday, January 25, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 20 and 67 cents per MMBtu or about 2 to 8 percent at most markets. On Wednesday, February 1, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $8.71 per MMBtu, reflecting an increase of $0.21 per MMBtu or about 2 percent since Wednesday, January 25. The futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub closed at $8.40 per MMBtu on Friday, January 27, falling about 6 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, January 25. By February 1, the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub increased about 9 cents per MMBtu or about 1 percent since Wednesday, January 25. Natural gas in storage was 2,406 Bcf as of January 27, which is about 28 percent above the 5-year average. Since January 25, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.01 per barrel, or about 1.5 percent to $66.61 per barrel or $11.48 per MMBtu.

331

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 29) 2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 29) Natural gas prices continued their upward trend for a second consecutive week with most market locations in the Lower 48 States registering gains of up to 25 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, August 14. Continued hot temperatures across the country and an increase in oil prices resulted in prices generally ranging between $3.15 and $3.25 per MMBtu along the Gulf Coast, representing new 8-week highs. At the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for September delivery closed on Wednesday, August 21, at $3.274 per MMBtu, an increase of just over 36 cents, or about 12.5 percent, on the week. Working gas in storage for the week ended Friday, August 16 was 2,657 Bcf, which exceeds the average for the previous 5 years by 13.1 percent. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.18 to end trading yesterday at $30.37 per barrel, or $5.24 per MMBtu

332

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 22, 2006) 15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 22, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased at almost all locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, June 7-14) as wide ranging temperatures across the country affected some regional demand for both heating and air conditioning needs. The Henry Hub spot price rose 27 cents, or about 5 percent, to $6.09 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also increased for almost all the futures contracts listed. The NYMEX contract for July delivery rose about 62 cents, or about 10 percent, since last Wednesday to settle at $6.590 per MMBtu yesterday (June 14). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 9 was 2,397 Bcf, which is 37.9 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.78 per barrel, or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday, trading yesterday at $69.12 per barrel or $11.92 per MMBtu.

333

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 7) June 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 7) Natural gas spot prices dropped in almost all locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, June 22-29) partly because of a decline in cooling demand across much of the Lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 33 cents, or about 4.5 percent, to $7.07 per MMBtu, while locations in the West generally saw the largest decreases ranging between 27 cents and 71 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery expired Tuesday (June 28) at $6.976, decreasing about 47 cents per MMBtu, or 6.2 percent, since last Wednesday (June 22). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 24 was 2,123 Bcf, which is 14.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.04 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday, ending trading yesterday (June 29) at $57.28. The WTI crude oil spot price experienced an all-time high price of $59.78 per barrel on Monday, June 27.

334

Natural gas conversion process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental apparatus was dismantled and transferred to a laboratory space provided by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is already equipped with a high-ventilation fume hood. This will enable us to make tests at higher gas flow rates in a safe environment. Three papers presented at the ACS meeting in San Francisco (Symposium on Natural Gas Upgrading II) April 5--10, 1992 show that the goal of direct catalytic conversion of Methane into heavier Hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere is actively pursued in three other different laboratories. There are similarities in their general concept with our own approach, but the temperature range of the experiments reported in these recent papers is much lower and this leads to uneconomic conversion rates. This illustrates the advantages of Methane activation by a Hydrogen plasma to reach commercial conversion rates. A preliminary process flow diagram was established for the Integrated Process, which was outlined in the previous Quarterly Report. The flow diagram also includes all the required auxiliary facilities for product separation and recycle of the unconverted feed as well as for the preparation and compression of the Syngas by-product.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Collett, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) Since Wednesday, July 11, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 41 cents per MMBtu, or 6 percent, since Wednesday, July 11, to $6.24 per MMBtu. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (July 18) at $6.528 per MMBtu, falling 7 cents per MMBtu, or 1 percent since last Wednesday, July 11. Natural gas in storage was 2,692 Bcf as of July 13, which is 15.7 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.45 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $75.03 per barrel or $12.94 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas prices fell at virtually all market locations since last Wednesday, July 11, with declines of 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu or about 4 to 12 percent. Moderating temperatures in most areas of the Lower 48 States likely accounted for the widespread declines, as cooler temperatures mitigated cooling demand for natural gas. On a regional basis, price declines averaged between 18 and 58 cents per MMBtu, or 3 and 13 percent, since last Wednesday, July 11. The largest price decreases since last Wednesday, July 11, occurred principally in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices fell by more than 57 cents per MMBtu, or 13 percent on average. By far, the smallest decreases occurred in the Arizona/Nevada and Florida regions, where prices fell by 18 and 24 cents per MMBtu on average, respectively, with the Florida citygate posting the highest price in the Lower 48 States at $8.00 per MMBtu. Elsewhere, average price decreases by region ranged between 30 and 43 cents per MMBtu. Despite these declines and lower electric generation demand relative to last year, prices generally exceeded levels reported last year at this time, with prices at the Henry Hub $0.22 per MMBtu or 4 percent above last year's level. The principal exception to the year-over-year price increases occurred in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices at selected markets were between $1.87 and $2.28 per MMBtu or about 35 and 43 percent below last year's level.

337

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage by State About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through...

338

The french kitchen: task-based learning in an instrumented kitchen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ubiquitous computing technologies have traditionally striven to augment objects and the environment with sensing capabilities to enable them to respond appropriately to the needs of the individuals in the environment. This paper considers how such technologies ... Keywords: building-people interaction, instrumented environment, situated interaction, task-based learning

Clare J. Hooper; Anne Preston; Madeline Balaam; Paul Seedhouse; Daniel Jackson; Cuong Pham; Cassim Ladha; Karim Ladha; Thomas Plötz; Patrick Olivier

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Title Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59745 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., Victor H. Franco, Stephen Meyers, James E. McMahon, Michael A. McNeil, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-59745 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This paper presents analysis of the life-cycle costs for individual households and the aggregate energy and economic impacts from potential energy efficiency improvements in U.S. residential furnaces. Most homes in the US are heated by a central furnace attached to ducts for distributing heated air and fueled by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace blower is significant, comparable to the annual electricity consumption of a major appliance. Since the same blower unit is also used during the summer to circulate cooled air in centrally air conditioned homes, electricity savings occur year round. Estimates are provided of the potential electricity savings from more efficient fans and motors. Current regulations require new residential gas-fired furnaces (not including mobile home furnaces) to meet or exceed 78% annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE), but in fact nearly all furnaces sold are at 80% AFUE or higher. The possibilities for higher fuel efficiency fall into two groups: more efficient non-condensing furnaces (81% AFUE) and condensing furnaces (90-96% AFUE). There are also options to increase the efficiency of the furnace blower. This paper reports the projected national energy and economic impacts of requiring higher efficiency furnaces in the future. Energy savings vary with climate, with the result that condensing furnaces offer larger energy savings in colder climates. The range of impacts for a statistical sample of households and the percent of households with net savings in life cycle cost are shown. Gas furnaces are somewhat unusual in that the technology does not easily permit incremental change to the AFUE above 80%. Achieving significant energy savings requires use of condensing technology, which yields a large efficiency gain (to 90% or higher AFUE), but has a higher cost. With respect to electricity efficiency design options, the ECM has a negative effect on the average LCC. The current extra cost of this technology more than offsets the sizable electricity savings.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Characteristics of Natural Gas Trading and Exchanges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in energy trading grew exponentially during 2008 with numerous U.S. Congressional hearings on the influence of speculation on oil prices. Natural gas is an extremely important fuel in the electric industry, accounting for 54% of annual fuel expenses and frequently driving power prices. In a very timely report, this study examines the phenomenon of natural gas trading, which has experienced rapid growth across a wide range of markets. As best as can be gleaned from existing data, this report trac...

2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

342

The United States has significant natural gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States has significant natural gas United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to locate and bring into production. To help meet this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy over the years has amassed wide ranging expertise in areas related to deepwater resource location, production, safety and environmental protection. The goal of these activities has been to not only help overcome

343

Obtaining pressures in the 10?5 Pa range with oil?sealed rotary vacuum pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trapped oil?sealed rotary pumps are usually considered capable of ultimate pressures no lower than about 10?3 Pa. Experiments are described which confirm that most of this residual gas originates from air dissolved in the pump oil. Replacement of the air with a less soluble gas (helium) or an easily trapped gas (carbon dioxide) is shown to give a useful reduction in ultimate pressure and to reduce the oxygen partial pressure to essentially zero. Operation with completely degassed oil is shown to give ultimate pressures in the 10?5 Pa range. The design of pumps based on these principles is discussed.

B. R. F. Kendall

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

PowerPlex Fusion Product Size Ranges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The schematic diagram illustrates the fluorescent dye label color and relative PCR product size ranges for the various STR loci present in this ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

345

Physics Out Loud - Short-range Correlations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) Previous Video (Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD)) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (SRF Accelerator Cavities) SRF Accelerator Cavities Short-range...

346

HY RID WIDE RANGE TRANSIMPEDAN E AMPLIFIER  

TRANSIMPEDAN E AMPLIFIER TE HNOLOGY SUMMARY Many applications require wide range detection, where detector current is converted to a voltage by a

347

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

348

Adaptive Range Counting and Other Frequency-Based Range Query Problems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We consider variations of range searching in which, given a query range, our goal is to compute some function based on frequencies of points that… (more)

Wilkinson, Bryan T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Gas Lasers for Strong Field Applications  

SciTech Connect

Atomic, molecular and excimer gas lasers employ variety of pumping schemes including electric discharge, optical, or chemical reactions and cover a broad spectral range from UV to far-IR. Several types of gas lasers are capable to produce multi-kilojoule pulses and kilowatts of average power. Among them, excimer and high-pressure molecular lasers have sufficient bandwidth for producing pico- and femtosecond pulses. Projects are under way and prospects are open to bring ultra-fast gas laser technology to the front lines of the advanced accelerator applications.

Pogorelsky, I.V. [Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 820, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

GAS LASERS FOR STRONG-FIELD APPLICATIONS.  

SciTech Connect

Atomic-, molecular- and excimer-gas lasers employ variety of pumping schemes including electric discharge, optical, or chemical reactions and cover a broad spectral range from UV to far-IR. Several types of gas lasers can produce multi-kilojoule pulses and kilowatts of average power. Among them, excimer- and high-pressure molecular lasers have sufficient bandwidth for generating pico- and femtosecond pulses. Projects are underway and prospects are opening up to bring ultrafast gas laser technology to the front lines of advanced accelerator applications.

POGORELSKY,I.V.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Control apparatus for hot gas engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mean pressure power control system for a hot gas (Stirling) engine utilizing a plurality of supply tanks for storing a working gas at different pressures. During pump down operations gas is bled from the engine by a compressor having a plurality of independent pumping volumes. In one embodiment of the invention, a bypass control valve system allows one or more of the compressor volumes to be connected to the storage tanks. By selectively sequencing the bypass valves, a capacity range can be developed over the compressor that allows for lower engine idle pressures and more rapid pump down rates.

Stotts, Robert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Range search on multidimensional uncertain data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an uncertain database, every object o is associated with a probability density function, which describes the likelihood that o appears at each position in a multidimensional workspace. This article studies two types of range retrieval ... Keywords: Uncertain databases, range search

Yufei Tao; Xiaokui Xiao; Reynold Cheng

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Molecular communication options for long range nanonetworks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanotechnology is an emerging field of science devoted to provide new opportunities in a vast range of areas. In this paper, different techniques are proposed to enable the long range interconnection of nano-machines, deployed over distances from a few ... Keywords: Axons and action potential, Fluorescent proteins, MOLED, Molecular communication, Nanonetworks

Lluís Parcerisa Giné; Ian F. Akyildiz

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

355

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

356

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

357

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

358

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

359

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

360

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

362

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

363

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

364

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

365

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

366

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

367

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

368

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

370

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

371

Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major analysis completed recently by the gas transmission and distribution industry concludes that available supplies of gas energy will fall into the range of 23-31 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) by the year 2000, as conventional gas production is increasingly supplemented by supplies from coal gasification, Alaska, unconventional sources, LNG, Canada, and Mexico. At the same time, however, gas demand is characterized by price-induced conservation in all markets, together with continuing gas demand constraints and financial burdens imposed by Government regulators at all levels. With these restrictions and burdens eased, the gas industry can rebuild its marketing acumen and capacity. Thus, gas demand may likely increase in both the traditional heating and industrial fuel and feedstock applications, as well as such new non-traditional uses as cogeneration, natural gas vehicles and select gas use with coal. With regard to impending gas price decontrol, analyses conducted by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.), as well as studies by the U.S. Department of Energy and other groups, concur in the important finding that natural gas will be able to compete with alternate fuels in the energy marketplace after decontrol, as long as indefinite price escalators and other rigidities in gas purchase contracts can be defused so as to enable the market system to operate successfully. A.G.A.'s analysis, indeed, concluded that gas prices are rising rapidly enough under the existing law between now and 1985, so that concerns of a sudden price increase after deregulation in that year may be somewhat overstated, as long as the indefinite price escalators are defused.

Schlesinger, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 8, 2007) 1, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 8, 2007) Since Wednesday, January 24, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 9 and 60 cents per MMBtu or about 1.1 to 8.4 percent at most markets. On Wednesday, January 31, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $7.75 per MMBtu, reflecting an increase of 29 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since Wednesday, January 24. The futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub closed at $6.917 per MMBtu on Monday, January 29, decreasing about 50 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, January 24. By yesterday, (January 31), the futures contract for March 2007 delivery at the Henry Hub increased about 29 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since Wednesday, January 24. Natural gas in storage was 2,571 Bcf as of January 26, which is about 21 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.93 per barrel, or 7.3 percent to $58.17 per barrel or $10.03 per MMBtu. This week's WTI price change was the highest week-on-week increase since the week ended November 29, 2006, when crude oil increased $5.17 per barrel or $0.89 per MMBtu. Despite this week's relatively high increase, crude oil prices remain about 14.3 percent lower than a year ago.

373

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 24) 17, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 24) Spot and futures prices fell significantly during the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 9-16), as working gas inventories continued to grow strongly, intense summer heat was limited almost exclusively to the mountainous regions of the West, and Hurricane Claudette's immediate effect on prices was minimal. In trading at the Henry Hub, spot prices fell 56 cents from the previous Wednesday (July 9), to an even $5 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for August delivery dipped below $5 per MMBtu, as it closed yesterday (July 16) at $4.934 per MMBtu-the first sub-$5 settlement for a near-month contract in nearly 4 months. EIA reported that working gas inventories were 1,866 Bcf as of Friday, July 11, which is 13.9 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded in a narrow range between $31.04 and $31.60 per barrel for the week. It ended trading yesterday with a decline of 40 cents per barrel to $31.20, or about $5.38 per MMBtu, as oil markets also reacted to Hurricane Claudette's limited impact on infrastructure and production. For the week, WTI showed a modest gain of $0.33 per barrel ($0.03 per MMBtu).

374

STAR FORMATION IN ATOMIC GAS  

SciTech Connect

Observations of nearby galaxies have firmly established, over a broad range of galactic environments and metallicities, that star formation occurs exclusively in the molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Theoretical models show that this association results from the correlation between chemical phase, shielding, and temperature. Interstellar gas converts from atomic to molecular only in regions that are well shielded from interstellar ultraviolet (UV) photons, and since UV photons are also the dominant source of interstellar heating, only in these shielded regions does the gas become cold enough to be subject to Jeans instability. However, while the equilibrium temperature and chemical state of interstellar gas are well correlated, the timescale required to reach chemical equilibrium is much longer than that required to reach thermal equilibrium, and both timescales are metallicity-dependent. Here I show that the difference in timescales implies that, at metallicities below a few percent of the solar value, well shielded gas will reach low temperatures and proceed to star formation before the bulk of it is able to convert from atomic to molecular. As a result, at extremely low metallicities, star formation will occur in a cold atomic phase of the ISM rather than a molecular phase. I calculate the observable consequences of this result for star formation in low-metallicity galaxies, and I discuss how some current numerical models for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation may need to be modified.

Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Measurements of gas permeability on crushed gas shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, more attention has been given to unconventional gas reservoirs, including tight gas shales. Accurate description of gas transport and permeability measurements… (more)

Guarnieri, R.V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Generalized Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Design Schematic Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capcity Design Schematic...

377

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

378

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corridors > Major U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates...

379

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

380

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transmission...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Transmission Path Diagram About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Transmission Path Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Other Heating...

382

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

Rushford, M.C.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

383

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Thermal instability in the collisionally cooled gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have presented the non-equilibrium (time-dependent) cooling rate and ionization state calculations for a gas behind shock waves with $v \\sim 50-150$ km s$^{-1}$ ($T_s \\sim 0.5 - 6\\times 10^5$ K). Such shock waves do not lead to the radiative precursor formation, i.e. the thermal evolution of a gas behind the shock waves are controlled by collisions only. We have found that the cooling rate in a gas behind the shock waves with $v \\sim 50-120$ km s$^{-1}$ ($T_s \\sim 0.5 - 3\\times 10^5$ K) differs considerably from the cooling rate for a gas cooled from $T = 10^8$ K. It is well-known that a gas cooled from $T = 10^8$ K is thermally unstable for isobaric and isochoric perturbations at $T \\simgt 2\\times 10^4$ K. We have studied the thermal instability in a collisionally controlled gas for shock waves with $v \\sim 50-150$ km s$^{-1}$. We have found that the temperature range, where the postshock gas is thermally unstable, is significantly modified and depends on both gas metallicity and ionic composition of a ga...

Vasiliev, Evgenii O

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Lower and Middle Huron) in Ohio is estimated to range from 6.2 to 22.5 Tcf, depending on the stimulation method and pattern size selected. This estimate of recovery is based on the integration of the most recent data and research on the Devonian Age gas-bearing shales of Ohio. This includes: (1) a compilation of the latest geologic and reservoir data for the gas in-place; (2) analysis of the key productive mechanisms; and, (3) examination of alternative stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering this gas. Beyond a comprehensive assembly of the data and calculation of the technically recoverable gas, the key findings of this report are as follows: a substantial volume of gas is technically recoverable, although advanced (larger scale) stimulation technology will be required to reach economically attractive gas production rates in much of the state; well spacing in certain of the areas can be reduced by half from the traditional 150 to 160 acres per well without severely impairing per-well gas recovery; and, due to the relatively high degree of permeability anisotropy in the Devonian shales, a rectangular, generally 3 by 1 well pattern leads to optimum recovery. Finally, although a consistent geological interpretation and model have been constructed for the Lower and Middle Huron intervals of the Ohio Devonian shale, this interpretation is founded on limited data currently available, along with numerous technical assumptions that need further verification. 11 references, 21 figures, 32 tables.

Kuushraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.; Sawyer, W.K.; Esposito, P.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Short-range atmospheric dispersion of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important. We model dense gas dispersion using the steady-eld data to analyze dense gas dispersion mod- eling issues.element modeling of gas dispersion in the atmosphere. In:

Cortis, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental Impact Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANNUAL ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS DEMAND Utility CurrentAnnual Electricity and Natural Gas Demand V-1 Comparison of2002). The projected demand for natural gas at LBNL is also

Philliber, Jeff

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Long range interactions in nanoscale science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our understanding of the “long range” electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

Rajter, Richard F.

389

Factors affecting home range of mallard pairs  

SciTech Connect

Certain habitat and social factors were investigated for their effect on home range size of mallard (Anas platyhynchos) pairs breeding in a forested region of north-central Minnesota during the spring of 1971--72. Data from 31 radio-marked hens and drakes were used, but primary emphasis was placed on 8 pairs (5 with both members of the pair marked). Pairs were radio-tracked on river marsh areas, river channels, and large sand lakes to provide comparative data for evaluating home range size differences. Home ranges varied from an average of 53 ha for pairs using primarily river habitat to 871 ha for pairs using only large sand lakes. River and lake shorelines varied considerably in species and density of vegetation. Interaction between pairs as well as density of flocked males appeared to be influenced by these habitat differences with resultant effects on home range sizes.

Riechmann, J.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Range resolution of unequal strength targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the problem of resolving targets whose amplitudes may differ. A common metric used for resolution that assumes targets of equal strength is modified for the subject scenario. An expression for range ...

Carlson, Blair D.

391

Underwater vehicle localization using range measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the problem of cooperative navigation of autonomous marine vehicles using range-only acoustic measurements. We consider the use of a single maneuvering autonomous surface vehicle (ASV) to aid the ...

Papadopoulos, Ge?rgios

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Smart grid e PLC: TOA ranging.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In questo lavoro vengono presentati alcuni standard PLC (PowerLine Communication) nell'ottica del loro utilizzo in applicazioni di ranging in piccole reti intelligenti (micro smart grid).… (more)

Danzi, Pietro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

394

December Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DOEEIA-0130(9712) Distribution CategoryUC-950 Natural Gas Monthly December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC...

395

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

396

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

397

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage...

399

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to withdraw natural gas from storage to meet current demand. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 2,406 Bcf as of...

400

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas futures also reversed gains made in the previous week. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased by 63 Bcf...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

402

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Res., 104(B10), 22985-23003. Collett, T.S. (1992), Potential of gas hydrates outlined, Oil Gas J., 90(25), 84-87. 70 Cook, A.E., Goldberg, D., and R.L. Kleinberg (2008),...

403

Natural gas annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Southern California Gas Co  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Southern California Gas Co ... 236,147,041 98,326,527 274,565,356 690,930 139,093,560 748,823,414 Lone Star Gas Co......

405

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,451,1,35,17,,,10,3,0,48...

406

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,13889,36,837,1016,,,1129,181,...

407

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,151,-1,1,6,,,0,0,0,36...

408

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,6305,-3,226,165,,,884,391,10,...

409

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,495,-3,48,11,,,113,0,31,60...

410

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,11457,-3,122,171,,,219,21,7,7...

411

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,877,0,37,79,,,93,32,2,62...

412

Multiple-tracer gas analyzer  

SciTech Connect

A multi-gas tracer system has been designed, built, and used on an explosively fractured oil shale rubble bed. This paper deals exclusively with the hardware, software, and overall operation of the tracer system. This system is a field portable, self-contained unit, which utilizes a mass spectrometer for gas analysis. The unit has a 20 channel sample port capability and is controlled by a desk top computer. The system is configured to provide a dynamic sensitivity range of up to six orders of magnitude. A roots blower is manifolded to the unit to provide continuous flow in all sample lines. The continuous flow process allows representative samples as well as decreasing the time between each measurement. Typical multiplex cycle time to evaluate four unique gases is approximately 12 seconds.

Uhl, J.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Gas turbines for the future  

SciTech Connect

Utility gas turbine technology has been advancing fairly rapidly, one reason being that it shares in the benefits of the research and development for aviation gas turbines. In general, turbine progress is characterized by large, incremental advances in performance. At intervals of approx. 15 yr, new-generation turbines are introduced, refined, and eventually installed in relatively large numbers. A new generation of turbines is being readied for the market that will have power ratings into the 130- to 150-MW range (simple cycle), significantly higher than the 70 to 100 MW now in service. When the new turbines are installed in combined-cycle plants, the efficiency levels are expected to rise from the present value of approx. 42% higher heating value to approx. 46%.

Cohn, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Natural Gas Prices Are Above the Typical Range for the Past 2 Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

• Below average storage injections may be attributable, at least in part, to poor price incentives: high current prices and limited price increases are expected by ...

415

TECHNICAL REPORTS The greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of composting a range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of antibiotic resistance alleviated the inhibition of ERY (1­ 200 mg/L) on biogas production and on butyric acid

Brown, Sally

416

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association ConferenceMarch 12, 2004

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

417

Gas Turbine Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...times higher than atmospheric pressure.Ref 25The gas turbine was developed generally for main propulsion and power

418

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

with active programs. More information is available at: http:www.eia.doe.govcneafelectricitypagerestructuringrestructureelect.html. Information about natural gas...

419

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 6 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ... 7 Task 6: Numerical Models for...

420

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural gas annual 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Residual gas analysis device  

SciTech Connect

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association Conference, March 12, 2004 Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, Administrator, Energy Information Administration

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

Landfill Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Landfill Gas Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLandfillGas&oldid267173"...

425

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves U.S. natural gas liquids proved reserves decreased 7 percent to 7,459 million ...

426

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofreplacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for households and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Exports...

428

Natural gas industry directory  

SciTech Connect

This directory has information on the following: associations and organizations; exploration and production; gas compression; gas processors; gathering and transmission companies; liquefied natural gas; local distribution companies; marketing firms; regulatory agencies; service companies; suppliers and manufacturers; and regional buyer`s guide.

NONE

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ Fossil backed by a growing portfolio of assets. #12;Shale Gas Geography 5 | MARCELLUS SHALE COALITION #12;Shale Permits Price #12;Pricing Trend of Oil and Gas in the US $- $5.00 $10.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00 USDper

Lee, Dongwon

430

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

431

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, storage, and usage of compressed gas cylinders. 2.0 POLICY Colorado School of Mines ("Mines" or "the, storage, and usage requirements outlined below. This policy is applicable school-wide including all, or electrical circuits. Flammable gas cylinders must be stored in the building's gas cylinder storage cage until

432

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly highlights of activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry are presented. Feature articles for this issue are: Natural Gas Overview for Winter 1983-1984 by Karen A. Kelley; and an Analysis of Natural Gas Sales by John H. Herbert. (PSB)

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary Glossary Acquifer - A single underground geological formation, or group of formations, containing water. Antrim Shale - A shale deposit located in the northern Michigan basin that is a Devonian age rock formation lying at a relatively shallow depth of 1,000 feet. Gas has been produced from this formation for several decades primarily via vertical, rather than horizontal, wells. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates the technically recoverable Antrim shale resource at 20 trillion cubic feet (tcf). Appalachian Basin - The geological formations that roughly follow the Appalachian Mountain range and contain

434

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

435

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

436

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

437

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

438

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

439

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

440

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

442

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

443

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

444

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

445

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

446

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

447

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

448

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

449

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

450

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

451

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

452

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

453

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

454

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

455

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

456

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

457

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

458

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

459

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

460

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Experimental Study of Main Gas Ingestion and Purge Gas Egress Flow in Model Gas Turbine Stages.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Efficient performance of gas turbines depends, among several parameters, on the mainstream gas entry temperature. At the same time, transport of this high temperature gas… (more)

Balasubramanian, Jagdish Harihara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas & North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: 350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: 500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas & North Shore Gas Furnace: 200 - 500...

463

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates

464

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

465

NUCLEAR GAS ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary design study of the nuclear gas engine, consisting of a gas-cooled reactor directly coupled to a reciprocating engine, is presented. The principles of operation of the proposed gas engine are outlined and typical variations anre discussed. The nuclear gas engine is compared with other reciprocating engines and air compressors. A comparison between the ideal and actual cycles is made, with particular attention given to pumping, heat, and other losses to be expected. The applications and development of the nuclear gas engine are discussed. (W.D.M.)

Fraas, A.P.

1958-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

466

ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Iron aluminide hot gas filters have been developed using powder metallurgy techniques to form seamless cylinders. Three alloys were short-term corrosion tested in simulated IGCC atmospheres with temperatures between 925 F and 1200 F with hydrogen sulfide concentrations ranging from 783 ppm{sub v} to 78,300 ppm{sub v}. Long-term testing was conducted for 1500 hours at 925 F with 78,300 ppm{sub v}. The FAS and FAL alloys were found to be corrosion resistant in the simulated environments. The FAS alloy has been commercialized.

Matthew R. June; John L. Hurley; Mark W. Johnson

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Southwest Gas Corporation - Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Insulation: 0.15sq ft Floor Insulation: 0.30sq ft Builders Energy Star Certified Home: 450 Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: 450 Attic Insulation: 0.15sq ft Equipment...

468

Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition within the lattice gas model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition on the basis of a two-component lattice gas model. A Metropolis type of sampling method is used to generate microscopic states in the canonical ensemble. The effective equation of state and fragment mass distributions are evaluated in a wide range of temperatures and densities. A definition of the phase coexistence region appropriate for mesoscopic systems is proposed. The caloric curve resulting from different types of freeze-out conditions are presented.

J. Borg; I. N. Mishustin; J. P. Bondorf

1998-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

469

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

470

Natural gas sdtrategic plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s natural gas program is aimed at meeting simultaneously our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy The Natural Gas Strategic Plan for 1995 represents a Department-wide effort to articulate the key issues related to the expanded development and utilization of natural gas, and defines the roles of the federal government and US industry in partnering to accomplish the strategic goals defined. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Strategic Plan are to: foster the development of advanced natural gas technologies; encourage the adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets; support the removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets; and foster technologies and policies to maximize the environmental benefits of natural gas use. DOE`s proposed fiscal year (FY) 1996 budget represents a commitment to natural gas research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) from reservoir to end use. DOE has redirected and increased funding for its natural gas exploration, production, delivery and storage, processing, and utilization RD&D programs, shifting funds from other energy programs to programs that will enhance efficiency and advance the role of natural gas in our domestic energy resources portfolio.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking November 6, 2007 - 5:00pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you. And let me say how much it means to have my old friend Vinodh here to introduce me. You are a true pioneer in this industry. I also want to thank Mitch for asking me to be here. It's good to see Tom Dorr from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, our partner in so much of the federal government's biomass research and development and deployment efforts. Gov. Perdue, as always, it's great to be in Georgia and to see the progress occurring here under your leadership. I want to reaffirm our support for governors and state legislators who exhibit the kind of leadership you've shown in developing America's new energy future.

473

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

474

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

475

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands...

476

Range conditions for a spherical mean transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to the range description of the Radon type transform that averages a function over all spheres centered on a given sphere. Such transforms arise naturally in thermoacoustic tomography, a novel method of medical imaging. Range descriptions have recently been obtained for such transforms, and consisted of smoothness and support conditions, moment conditions, and some additional orthogonality conditions of spectral nature. It has been noticed that in odd dimensions, surprisingly, the moment conditions are superfluous and can be eliminated. It is shown in this text that in fact the same happens in any dimension.

Mark Agranovsky; David Finch; Peter Kuchment

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

477

UO 2 fission gas release rates from atomistic calculations of intrinsic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on DFT and empirical potential calculations, the diffusivity of fission gas atoms (Xe) in UO2 nuclear fuel has been calculated for a range of  ...

478

A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Periodic Flow Gas Turbine for Distributed Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

The proposed effort served as a feasibility study for an innovative, low-cost periodic flow gas turbine capable of realizing efficiencies in the 39-48% range.

Dr. Adam London

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

479

Flameholding Studies for Lean Premixed Fuel Injectors for Application in Gas Turbine Engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to the ever-increasing demand for energy, it is likely that stationary gas turbine engines will require the use of fuels with a diverse range… (more)

Marzelli, Steven

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Spectroscopic and computational investigations of molecular interactions in gas-expanded liquids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas-expanded liquids (GXLs) are a unique class of tunable solvents with unlimited potential. A wide range of solvent properties and solvent interactions and complexes are… (more)

Gohres, John Linton, III

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas kitchen ranges" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Greenhouse gas emissions associated with different meat-free diets in Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The production of food is responsible for large share of the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. There is a wide range of emissions associated with… (more)

Baumann, Andreas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range of different plausible price projections, using eitherthat renewables can provide price certainty over even longerof AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs? Gas pipelines attract substantial reseach to improve safety and cut costs. They operate ...

484

Natural Gas 1995: Preliminary Highlights  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Monthly April 1996 1. ... Widespread economic growth ... Growth in electric utility gas con-

485

Gravitomagnetism and the Earth-Mercury range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We numerically work out the impact of the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect on the Earth-Mercury range caused by the gravitomagnetic field of the rotating Sun. The peak-to peak nominal amplitude of the resulting time-varying signal amounts to 1.75 10^1 m over a temporal interval 2 yr. Future interplanetary laser ranging facilities should reach a cm-level in ranging to Mercury over comparable timescales; for example, the BepiColombo mission, to be launched in 2014, should reach a 4.5 - 10 cm level over 1 - 8 yr. We looked also at other Newtonian (solar quadrupole mass moment, ring of the minor asteroids, Ceres, Pallas, Vesta, Trans-Neptunian Objects) and post-Newtonian (gravitoelectric Schwarzschild solar field) dynamical effects on the Earth-Mercury range. They act as sources of systematic errors for the Lense-Thirring signal which, in turn, if not properly modeled, may bias the recovery of some key parameters of such other dynamical features of motion. Their nominal peak-to-peak amplitudes are as large as 4 10^5 m (Schwarzschild), 3 10^2 m (Sun's quadrupole), 8 10^1 m (Ceres, Pallas, Vesta), 4 m (ring of minor asteroids), 8 10^-1 m (Trans-Neptunian Objects). Their temporal patterns are different with respect to that of the gravitomagnetic signal.

Lorenzo Iorio

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Some Recent Long-Range Diffusion Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent atmospheric cloud-spreading (relative diffusion) data from a variety of sources are combined to show that the horizontal spreading rate is approximately linear over a time range from 1 to 10 or more hours (20?200 or more km) of downwind ...

F. A. Gifford

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Likely Ranges of Climate Change in Bolivia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bolivia is facing numerous climate-related threats, ranging from water scarcity due to rapidly retreating glaciers in the Andes to a partial loss of the Amazon forest in the lowlands. To assess what changes in climate may be expected in the future,...

Christian Seiler; Ronald W. A. Hutjes; Pavel Kabat

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Compact range for variable-zone measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector. 2 figs.

Burnside, W.D.; Rudduck, R.C.; Yu, J.S.

1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

489

Compact range for variable-zone measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Seasonal Variation in Daily Temperature Ranges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abrupt spring and autumnal changes in the daily temperature range, from low winter values to higher nonwinter values, were noted in the Minneapolis-St. Paul temperature record. Since this feature was even more evident in five rural and small town ...

David L. Ruschy; Donald G. Baker; Richard H. Skaggs

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

High-Dynamic-Range Imaging for artists  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An introduction and overview of the practical applications and uses of high-dynamic-range imaging (HDRI) from a production point of view. The course begins with a brief overview of HDRI and pre-production, production, and post-production techniques. ...

Kirt Witte

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Secure multidimensional range queries in sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most future large-scale sensor networks are expected to follow a two-tier architecture which consists of resource-rich master nodes at the upper tier and resource-poor sensor nodes at the lower tier. Sensor nodes submit data to nearby master nodes which ... Keywords: multidimensional range query, security, sensor networks,

Rui Zhang; Jing Shi; Yanchao Zhang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information Prior to developing the API Compendium of GHG Emissions Methodologies for the Oil and Gas Industry (PDF 14.6 MB), API reviewed a wide range of government estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from the oil and gas industry as well as existing and widely used methodologies for estimating emissions from our industry's operations. This review made it quite clear that while existing data and methods may be adequate for national-level estimates of greenhouse gas emissions, they were inadequate for developing reliable facility- and company-specific estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas operations. Download Acrobat Reader The Compendium is used by industry to assess its greenhouse gas emissions. Working with a number of other international associations as well as

494

Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time. 12 figs.

Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

495

Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time.

Wachter, Eric A. (138 Bay Path Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Fisher, Walter G. (8514 Carl Valentine, Knoxville, TN 37931)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

497

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

498

Manual gas tungsten arc (dc) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. Welding procedure specification  

SciTech Connect

Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2 in.; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW).

Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

500

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.