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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Environment Programme, Global Environment Facility Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website: ncsp.undp.org/document/managing-national-greenhouse-gas-inventory-proc Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Screenshot References: Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process[1] The objective of the handbook is to provide non-AnnexI Parties with a strategic and logical approach to a sustainable inventory process. About "The handbook was developed by United Nations Development Programme with

2

Method and apparatus for rapid adjustment of process gas inventory in gaseous diffusion cascades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved method and system for making relatively large and rapid adjustments in the process gas

Dyer, Robert H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fowler, Andrew H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Vanstrum, Paul R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 2007 #12;Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 is to identify and quantify the major sources of greenhouse q y j g gas emissions which result from the operation of the University.y #12;Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 2007 · Major sources

McConnell, Terry

4

RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY METHODS Prepared For: California Energy Commission Consulting · Riitta Pipatti, IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories · Dennis Rolston Agency · Fabian Wagner, IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories · Wilfried Winiwarter

5

Inventory Management Activities and Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of inventory management is to ensure that equipment, components, materials, and services required to support effective operation and maintenance of a power generating facility are available and ready for use when needed. Briefly stated, the goal of inventory management is to make sure that the right parts are available at the right time and the right cost to ensure safe and continuous plant operation. This technical update summarizes the activities and processes involved in an inventory manag...

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

6

Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY #12;OREGON STATE UNIVERSITYGHG . 2 . Carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) represents the quantity of a greenhouse gas multiplied

Escher, Christine

7

Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Registry (Iowa) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Registry (Iowa) Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Registry (Iowa) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General...

8

Event:UNFCCC Greenhouse Gas Inventory Training Seminar | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC Greenhouse Gas Inventory Training Seminar Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png UNFCCC Greenhouse Gas Inventory Training Seminar: on 20110418 "The UNFCCC Secretariat...

9

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling[1] Logo: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jointly sponsored by Greenhouse Gas Inventory & Research (GIR) Center of

10

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inventories and Performance to someone by E-mail Inventories and Performance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

11

Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Greg Smith Brandon Trelstad OSU Facilities Services June greenhouse gas multiplied by a Global Warming Potential (GWP) factor. (3) "Global Warming Potential factor" (GWP) means the radiative forcing impact of one mass-based unit of a given greenhouse gas relative

Escher, Christine

12

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Oregon State University Greg Smith Sustainability Program of oxygen. (2) "Carbon dioxide equivalent" (CO2e) represents the quantity of a greenhouse gas multiplied of one mass-based unit of a given greenhouse gas relative to an equivalent unit of carbon dioxide over

Escher, Christine

13

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

14

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20102011 Dalhousie Office of Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20102011 Dalhousie Office of Sustainability ..................................... 30 Appendix E: Canadian Default Factors for Calculating CO2 Emissions from Combustion of Natural Gas

Brownstone, Rob

15

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 2 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

16

The Transportation Greenhouse Gas Inventory: A First Step Toward City-Driven Emissions Rationalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Criteria Pollutnat Inventories of Automobiles, Buses,Transportation Greenhouse Gas Inventory: A First Step TowardTransportation Greenhouse Gas Inventory: A First Step toward

Ganson, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials References: 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories[1] Logo: IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories "The 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (2006 Guidelines) were produced at the invitation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change(UNFCCC) to update the Revised 1996 Guidelines and associated good practice guidance which provide internationally agreed

18

EIA provides new breakout of natural gas storage inventories in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Starting with the March 22, 2012 edition of the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report, EIA will provide new breakouts of inventory levels at salt cavern and nonsalt ...

19

EIA provides new breakout of natural gas storage inventories ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Starting with the March 22, 2012 edition of the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report, EIA will provide new breakouts of inventory levels at salt cavern ...

20

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to FY 2008. Read the White House Council on Environmental Quality's Guidance for Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Inventories under E.O. 13515. The Federal Energy Management...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Agency/Company /Organization: Center for Global Environmental Research Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.nies.go.jp/gaiyo/media_kit/9.WGIA_I067.pdf Country: Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Screenshot

22

Estonian greenhouse gas emissions inventory report  

SciTech Connect

It is widely accepted that the increase of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere due to human activities would result in warming of the Earth`s surface. To examine this effect and better understand how the GHG increase in the atmosphere might change the climate in the future, how ecosystems and societies in different regions of the World should adapt to these changes, what must policymakers do for the mitigation of that effect, the worldwide project within the Framework Convention on Climate Change was generated by the initiative of United Nations. Estonia is one of more than 150 countries, which signed the Framework Convention on Climate Change at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. In 1994 a new project, Estonian Country Study was initiated within the US Country Studies Program. The project will help to compile the GHG inventory for Estonia, find contemporary trends to investigate the impact of climate change on the Estonian ecosystems and economy and to formulate national strategies for Estonia addressing to global climate change.

Punning, J.M.; Ilomets, M.; Karindi, A.; Mandre, M.; Reisner, V. [Inst. of Ecology, Tallinn (Estonia); Martins, A.; Pesur, A. [Inst. of Energy Research, Tallinn (Estonia); Roostalu, H.; Tullus, H. [Estonian Agricultural Univ., Tartu (Estonia)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Greenhouse Gas Regional Inventory Protocol (GRIP) Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Regional Inventory Protocol (GRIP) Website Greenhouse Gas Regional Inventory Protocol (GRIP) Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Regional Inventory Protocol (GRIP) Website Focus Area: Other Crosscutting Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.getagriponemissions.com/index-cycle.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/greenhouse-gas-regional-inventory-pro Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: "Lead by Example" is not in the list of possible values (Audit Programs, Demonstration & Implementation, Green Power/Voluntary RE Purchase, High Performance Buildings, Industry Codes & Standards, Project Development, Public Tenders, Procurement, & Lead Examples, Public-Private Partnerships, Retrofits, Ride Share, Bike Share, etc., Technical Assistance, Training & Education, Voluntary Appliance & Equipment Labeling, Voluntary Industry Agreements) for this property.

24

The University of Western Ontario Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2 Ontario Regulation 452/09 9 I.3 Non-mandatory programs 10 I.4 Greenhouse Gas Inventories 10 I.4 combustion accounted for the vast majority of the emissions. Within this category, natural gas reactions. Methane is emitted during the production and transport of coal, natural gas and oil. Methane

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

25

Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inventories and Performance Inventories and Performance Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance October 7, 2013 - 10:07am Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides links to progress data tables illustrating Federal agency progress in meeting the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets established under Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, as well as the comprehensive greenhouse gas inventories as reported by the Federal agencies: Federal GHG Requirements Overview E.O. 13514 required Federal agencies to set individual targets for reduction of combined Scope 1 and 2 GHG emissions in FY 2020 compared to FY 2008. When all agency targets are combined, the overall target for the entire Federal Government is a 28% reduction in FY 2020 compared to FY 2008. GHG emissions from certain

26

INEEL Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Trend Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the INEEL GHG Inventory and Trend Analysis is to establish INEEL expertise in carbon management decision making and policy analysis. This FY-99 effort is the first step toward placing the INEEL in a leadership role within the DOE laboratories to support carbon management systems and analysis.

Shropshire, David Earl; Teel, Dale Milton

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington October 2007 ............................................................................................6 Operational Boundaries.......................................................................................................................21 Montlake Landfill

Kaminsky, Werner

28

UBC 2006 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Faculty-Specific Preliminary Analysis 1 University of British Columbia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC 2006 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Faculty-Specific Preliminary Analysis 1 University of British Columbia 2006 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Faculty-Specific Preliminary Analysis SEEDS Sustainability Project Sustainability Office, Kelly Coulson Course: CHBE 484 April 15, 2009 #12;UBC 2006 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

29

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20112012 Office of Sustainability September 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20112012 Office of Sustainability ..................................... 31 Appendix E: Canadian Default Factors for Calculating CO2 Emissions from Combustion of Natural Gas

Brownstone, Rob

31

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: GHG Inventory  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols GHG Inventory Protocols Petroleum Industry Guidelines for Reporting Greenhouse Gas Emissions (PDF 2.0 MB) Download Acrobat Reader IPIECA, as part of a joint industry task force with the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (OGP), has developed, on behalf of the petroleum industry, a voluntary industry-endorsed approach for measuring and reporting GHG emissions. The petroleum industry has recognized the need for GHG accounting and reporting guidance that is focused specifically on the industry. Current approaches vary among government reporting programs. Companies also differ in how they voluntarily report their emissions data. This variability in approaches has resulted in a lack of comparability of reported GHG

32

A construction and improvement heuristic for a liquefied natural gas inventory routing problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a large scale ship routing and inventory management problem for a producer and distributor of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The problem contains multiple products, inventory and berth capacity at the loading port and a heterogeneous fleet of ... Keywords: Heuristics, Inventory routing, Maritime transportation

Magnus Stlhane; Jrgen Glomvik Rakke; Christian Rrholt Moe; Henrik Andersson; Marielle Christiansen; Kjetil Fagerholt

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Branch-and-Price Method for a Liquefied Natural Gas Inventory Routing Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a maritime inventory routing problem in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) business, called the LNG inventory routing problem (LNG-IRP). Here, an actor is responsible for the routing of the fleet of special purpose ships, and the inventories ... Keywords: branch-and-price, column generation, maritime transportation

Roar Grnhaug; Marielle Christiansen; Guy Desaulniers; Jacques Desrosiers

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

EIA projects natural gas inventories to reach 3,800 billion cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demonstrated peak capacity of 4,265 bcf is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas in each facility between 2008 and 2012.

35

Gas-separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material.

Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Using statistical process control to monitor inventory accuracy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inventory accuracy is critical for almost all industrial environments such as distribution, warehousing, and retail. It is quite common for companies with exceptional inventory accuracy (more)

Huschka, Kyle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Working natural gas inventories below last year's level at ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Despite inventory levels at the end of March above the 5-year average, cumulative net injections this year are over 20% lower than in 2010.

38

Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Gas-separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material. 6 figures.

Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.; Baker, R.W.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

40

Inventory Optimization in Support of the EPRI Work Control Process Module  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent industry concerns about competitiveness of generating plants and total production costs are causing utilities to focus on the costs of inventory and material support. Changes in the fundamental processes used to identify, obtain, and establish inventory levels are required to achieve significant savings. This report provides guidance necessary to install competitive inventory optimization processes and integrate them with work control scheduling. It focuses on those processes required to support a...

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Executive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 19902009 1 n emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stone, flue gas desulfurization, and glass manufacturing), soda ash production and consumption, titaniumExecutive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990­2009 1 n, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention, stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations

Little, John B.

42

Tema: Emissions Inventories Titel: Denmark's National Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Summary report for national greenhouse gas inventories - Table 7B: Short summary report for national greenhouse gas inventories - Short summary report for national greenhouse gas inventories with electricity-values - Short summary report for national greenhouse gas inventories as GWP-values with electricity exchange

43

Natural gas conversion process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental apparatus was dismantled and transferred to a laboratory space provided by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is already equipped with a high-ventilation fume hood. This will enable us to make tests at higher gas flow rates in a safe environment. Three papers presented at the ACS meeting in San Francisco (Symposium on Natural Gas Upgrading II) April 5--10, 1992 show that the goal of direct catalytic conversion of Methane into heavier Hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere is actively pursued in three other different laboratories. There are similarities in their general concept with our own approach, but the temperature range of the experiments reported in these recent papers is much lower and this leads to uneconomic conversion rates. This illustrates the advantages of Methane activation by a Hydrogen plasma to reach commercial conversion rates. A preliminary process flow diagram was established for the Integrated Process, which was outlined in the previous Quarterly Report. The flow diagram also includes all the required auxiliary facilities for product separation and recycle of the unconverted feed as well as for the preparation and compression of the Syngas by-product.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Natural Gas Processed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

45

Forecasting and strategic inventory placement for gas turbine aftermarket spares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of forecasting demand for Life Limited Parts (LLPs) in the gas turbine engine aftermarket industry. It is based on work performed at Pratt & Whitney, a major producer of turbine engines. ...

Simmons, Joshua T. (Joshua Thomas)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

,"California Natural Gas Plant Processing"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Processing",3,"Annual",2011,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1031...

47

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Processing"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Processing",3,"Annual",2011,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1031...

48

AVESTAR® - Shale Gas Processing (SGP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shale Gas Processing (SGP) Shale Gas Processing (SGP) SPG The shale gas revolution is transforming America's energy landscape and economy. The shale gas boom, including the Marcellus play in Appalachia, is driving job creation and investment in the energy sector and is also helping to revive other struggling sectors of the economy like manufacturing. Continued growth in domestic shale gas processing requires that energy companies maximize the efficiency and profitability from their operations through excellent control and drive maximum business value from all their plant assets, all while reducing negative environmental impact and improving safety. Changing demographics and rapidly evolving plant automation and control technologies also necessitate training and empowering the next-generation of shale gas process engineering and

49

Standardizing and improving test wafer processes : inventory optimization and a days of inventory pull system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past few years, the Intel Fab-17 facility has aggressively pursued lean methodology to reduce the manufacturing costs associated with its aging 200mm diameter wafer process. One area ripe with improvement opportunities ...

Johnson, David W. (David William), S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Jeffery B. Greenblatt Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 November 2013 This work was supported by the Research Division, California Air Resources Board under ARB Agreement No. 12-329. LBNL-6451E DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of

51

Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 6,146 6,200 1989-2011 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 347 356 2010-2011 Extraction Loss...

52

Process gas solidification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has been the practice to (a) withdraw hot, liquid UF.sub.6 from various systems, (b) direct the UF.sub.6 into storage cylinders, and (c) transport the filled cylinders to another area where the UF.sub.6 is permitted to solidify by natural cooling. However, some hazard attends the movement of cylinders containing liquid UF.sub.6, which is dense, toxic, and corrosive. As illustrated in terms of one of its applications, the invention is directed to withdrawing hot liquid UF.sub.6 from a system including (a) a compressor for increasing the pressure and temperature of a stream of gaseous UF.sub.6 to above its triple point and (b) a condenser for liquefying the compressed gas. A network containing block valves and at least first and second portable storage cylinders is connected between the outlet of the condenser and the suction inlet of the compressor. After an increment of liquid UF.sub.6 from the condenser has been admitted to the first cylinder, the cylinder is connected to the suction of the compressor to flash off UF.sub.6 from the cylinder, thus gradually solidifying UF.sub.6 therein. While the first cylinder is being cooled in this manner, an increment of liquid UF.sub.6 from the condenser is transferred into the second cylinder. UF.sub.6 then is flashed from the second cylinder while another increment of liquid UF.sub.6 is being fed to the first. The operations are repeated until both cylinders are filled with solid UF.sub.6, after which they can be moved safely. As compared with the previous technique, this procedure is safer, faster, and more economical. The method also provides the additional advantage of removing volatile impurities from the UF.sub.6 while it is being cooled.

Fort, William G. S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lee, Jr., William W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Optimization models of gas recovery and gas condensate processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a complex of mathematical models that formalize gas recovery and processing. Optimization problems for gas recovery and gas condensate processing are stated and corresponding solution algorithms are suggested. These mathematical models provide ...

M. Kh. Prilutskii; V. E. Kostyukov

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

U.S. natural gas inventories at end of winter heating season ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... storage operators reflect a wide range of inventory levels, and they have a variety of ways they can work with their customers to manage these inventory levels.

55

Monitoring the progress of emission inventories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue of EM contains three articles which focus on the latest improvements on the emissions inventory process. The first, 'Building the national emissions inventory: challenges and plans for improvements' by Doug Solomon and Martin Husk (pages 8-11), looks at the US national emissions inventory. The next, 'Greenhouse gas inventories - a historical perspective and assessment of improvements since 1990' by Bill Irving and Dina Kruger (pages 12-19) assesses improvements in national and international greenhouse gas emissions inventories over the last 15 years. The third article, 'The global mercury emissions inventory' by Leonard Levin (pages 20-25) gives an overview of the challenges associated with conducting a worldwide inventory of mercury emissions.

Levy, J.A. Jr.; Solomon, D.; Husk, M.; Irving, B.; Kruger, D.; Levin. L. [Exponent Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating C{sub 3}+ hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane. 6 figs.

Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

57

Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating C.sub.3 + hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane.

Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

EIA projects natural gas inventories to reach 3,800 billion ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... when storage was unusually high after an extremely mild winter. To meet their target storage inventory levels for the start of the ...

59

Process for purifying natural gas  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for separating water and carbon dioxide from a feedstream comprising hydrocarbons, water and carbon dioxide. It includes passing the feedstream to a first adsorption zone containing a solid adsorbent having selectivity for water at a first zone adsorption temperature effective to adsorb water and a first zone adsorption pressure and withdrawing a first zone adsorption effluent stream having a reduced concentration of water relative to the feedstream; passing at least a portion of the first zone adsorption effluent stream to a second adsorption zone containing a solid adsorbent having selectivity for carbon dioxide at a second zone adsorption temperature effective to adsorb carbon dioxide and a second zone adsorption pressure, the second zone adsorption temperature being lower than the first zone adsorption temperature, and withdrawing a second zone adsorption effluent stream having a reduced concentration of carbon dioxide relative to the first effluent stream; passing a first purge gas through the first adsorption zone at a first zone regeneration temperature.

Markovs, J.; James, F.E.

1992-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

Advanced Materials and Processes for Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2003 ... Out of Print. Description These proceedings from the United Engineering Foundation's Advanced Materials and Processes for Gas Turbines...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Natural Gas Processing Plant- Sulfur (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation establishes sulfur emission standards for natural gas processing plants. Standards are stated for both existing and new plants. There are also rules for stack height requirements,...

62

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Processing"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Processing",3,"Annual",2011,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1031...

63

Peru`s national greenhouse gas inventory, 1990. Peru climate change country study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study has been to determine the Inventory and to propose greenhouse gases mitigation alternatives in order to face the future development of the country in a clean environmental setting, improving in this way the Peruvian standard of life. The main objective of this executive summary is to show concisely the results of the National Inventory about greenhouse gases emitted by Peru in 1990.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Formation Process Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Non-provisional Patent Application entitled "Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process." Disclosed in this application is a method and device for producing gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas such as methane (CH 4 ) or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone, which may be contained within the body of the spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction vessel, under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for gas hydrate formation. The reaction

65

Process for treatment of residual gas  

SciTech Connect

A process is disclosed for the treatment of the residual gases which are produced when hydrogen sulfide is reduced, by combustion, to elementary sulfur by the Claus process. The residual gases are fed through a heated conduit and gas scrubber, wherein the temperature of those residual gases are maintained above the melting point of sulfur. A portion of the raw coke oven gas condensate is admitted to the gas scrubber to be returned to the coke oven battery main from the flushing liquid separator as flushing liquor. The residual gases are then conducted through the coke oven gas purification process equipment along with the raw coke oven gas where the residual gases are intermixed with the raw coke oven gas prior to tar separation.

Nolden, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Exhaust gas clean up process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

Walker, R.J.

1988-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Establishing an inventory management process to meet high customer service levels in a vaccines organization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inventory management is a complex aspect of Supply Chain Management that is frequently discussed and debated due to the fact that it has a high (more)

Wonsowicz, Johanna Christine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

"NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 3 "Operator Company:" "PART 3. CONTACTS" "Section A: Contact information during an emergency (such as a hurricane):" "Processing Plant Operations Contact:",,,...

69

Methanation process utilizing split cold gas recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the methanation of feed gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen in multiple stages, the feed gas, cold recycle gas and hot product gas is mixed in such proportions that the mixture is at a temperature sufficiently high to avoid carbonyl formation and to initiate the reaction and, so that upon complete reaction of the carbon monoxide and hydrogen, an excessive adiabatic temperature will not be reached. Catalyst damage by high or low temperatures is thereby avoided with a process that utilizes extraordinarily low recycle ratios and a minimum of investment in operating costs.

Tajbl, Daniel G. (Evanston, IL); Lee, Bernard S. (Lincolnwood, IL); Schora, Jr., Frank C. (Palatine, IL); Lam, Henry W. (Rye, NY)

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

70

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Processing Plants and Production Basins, 2009 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, GasTran Natural Gas Transportation ...

71

UPGRADING NATURAL GAS VIA MEMBRANE SEPARATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present study is to assess the potential usefulness of membrane separation processes for removing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from low-quality natural gas containing substantial amounts of both these ''acid'' gases, e.g., up to 40 mole-% CO{sub 2} and 10 mole-% H{sub 2}S. The membrane processes must be capable of upgrading the crude natural gas to pipeline specifications ({le} 2 mole-% CO{sub 2}, {le} 4 ppm H{sub 2}S). Moreover, these processes must also be economically competitive with the conventional separation techniques, such as gas absorption, utilized for this purpose by the gas industry.

S.A.Stern; P.A. Rice; J. Hao

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Process for the desulfurization of flue gas  

SciTech Connect

A process for the removal of sulfur oxides from gases is described that is comprised of the steps of contacting the gas with a cerium oxide sorbent at conditions whereby the sulfur oxides present in the gas are sorbed by the cerium oxide sorbent and regenerate the cerium oxide sorbent by contacting it with a reducing atmosphere at conditions whereby the sorbent is substantially converted to a sulfur-free state. The gas may be an exhaust gas, e.g., from an automobile or a flue gas. This invention is especially preferred for treating flue gas. In this preferred embodiment, the flue gas may be contacted with the cerium oxide sorbent at a temperature of from 300/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C, to form cerium sulfate and/or sulfite and the sorbent is regenerated by contacting with a reducing gas, for example, hydrogen in admixture with steam or other inert gases at a temperature of from 500/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C to convert the cerium sulfate or sulfite to cerium oxide. During the regeneration step, the desorbed species is initially sulfur dioxide. However, when about 50% of the sulfur is removed from the sorbent, the desorbed species becomes H/sub 2/S. Thus, the instant invention provides SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in admixture with the excess reducing gas, which can be fed conveniently to the Claus plant for conversion into elemental sulfur.

Longo, J.M.

1977-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Establishing an inventory management process to meet high customer service levels in a vaccines organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inventory management is a complex aspect of Supply Chain Management that is frequently discussed and debated due to the fact that it has a high impact on customer satisfaction as well as financial performance. This thesis ...

Wonsowicz, Johanna Christine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Illinois Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 483,902 483,336 478,291 1970's 429,691 341,750 376,310 358,142 342,046 322,393 305,441 275,060 327,451 1980's 150,214 152,645 166,568 156,791 153,419 146,463 106,547 757 509 1990's 607 951 942 809 685 727 578 500 468 358 2000's 271 233 299 306 328 280 242 235 233 164 2010's 5,393 15,727 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Illinois Natural Gas Plant Processing

75

Florida Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 375,090 409,248 765,597 854,064 886,147 859,996 1980's 279,690 272,239 270,004 265,840 247,870 218,288 228,721 226,028 260,627 1990's 258,984 222,893 226,254 207,975 10,265 9,061 8,514 8,364 8,174 8,439 2000's 7,844 7,186 6,063 5,771 4,805 3,584 3,972 2,422 300 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Florida Natural Gas Plant Processing

76

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Expansion Process Flow Diagram  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Development and Expansion Process For Natural Gas Pipeline Projects Figure showing the expansion process...

77

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Natural Gas Processing Plants Utilization Rates Based on 2008 Flows Figure 3. Natural Gas Processing Plants Utilization Rates Based on 2008 Flows Note: Average utilization rates...

78

U.S. natural gas processing capacity expands rapidly - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... EIA tracks shut-in natural gas processing capacity through the emergency schedule on the survey of natural gas processing plants, Form EIA-757B.

79

The Transportation Greenhouse Gas Inventory: A First Step Toward City-Driven Emissions Rationalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for greenhouse gas emissions, Department of Chemical andStep Toward City-Driven Emissions Rationalization ChrisStep toward City-Driven Emissions Rationalization Submitted

Ganson, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

U.S. natural gas inventories at end of winter heating season ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The amount of U.S. working natural gas in underground storage at the end of March 2012 is expected to be the highest since 1983 for the close of the month, the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Montana Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 60,500 59,058 57,793 1970's 59,193 57,105 61,757 56,960 146,907 156,203 0 0 0 1980's 11,825 13,169 15,093 16,349 19,793 16,212 14,177 15,230 15,475 1990's 14,629 14,864 12,697 11,010 10,418 9,413 10,141 8,859 8,715 5,211 2000's 5,495 5,691 6,030 6,263 6,720 10,057 12,685 13,646 13,137 12,415 2010's 12,391 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Montana Natural Gas Plant Processing

82

Utah Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 68,211 95,670 93,934 98,598 99,233 241,904 274,470 286,592 286,929 1990's 334,067 333,591 319,017 348,010 368,585 308,174 265,546 249,930 242,070 211,514 2000's 169,553 166,505 136,843 161,275 193,093 187,524 193,836 195,701 202,380 412,639 2010's 454,832 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Utah Natural Gas Plant Processing

83

Alabama Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 57,208 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 25,517 31,610 32,806 1980's 38,572 41,914 38,810 42,181 45,662 48,382 49,341 52,511 55,939 1990's 58,136 76,739 126,910 132,222 136,195 118,688 112,868 114,411 107,334 309,492 2000's 372,136 285,953 290,164 237,377 263,426 255,157 287,278 257,443 253,028 248,232 2010's 242,444 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Alabama Natural Gas Plant Processing

84

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,247 2,390 1,708 1970's 1,418 1,112 1,711 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 2,001 2,393 5,432 6,115 5,407 6,356 6,459 6,126 6,518 1990's 6,613 10,244 11,540 10,263 7,133 10,106 10,341 11,661 11,366 11,261 2000's 7,758 9,928 7,033 9,441 9,423 11,462 12,386 13,367 18,046 22,364 2010's 56,162 131,959 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Processing

85

Mississippi Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,068 44,510 0 1970's 50,509 44,732 29,538 29,081 24,568 29,694 0 0 0 1980's 34,337 38,315 29,416 29,705 23,428 21,955 12,131 9,565 8,353 1990's 7,887 7,649 4,822 4,892 5,052 4,869 4,521 4,372 3,668 135,773 2000's 205,106 239,830 263,456 283,675 283,763 292,023 278,436 224,596 174,573 215,951 2010's 218,840 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Processing

86

Process for production desulfurized of synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1900.degree.-2600.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises a calcium-containing compound portion, a sodium-containing compound portion, and a fluoride-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (1) a sulfur-containing sodium-calcium-fluoride silicate phase; and (2) a sodium-calcium sulfide phase.

Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Najjar, Mitri S. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Louisiana Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,383,334 3,728,717 4,465,379 1970's 5,237,519 5,994,431 6,337,328 6,524,729 6,273,136 5,831,487 5,749,783 5,709,535 5,561,040 1980's 5,197,429 4,770,095 4,190,105 4,439,430 3,811,852 3,794,464 3,880,364 3,918,236 4,002,843 1990's 4,220,068 4,340,531 4,466,425 4,315,312 4,200,126 4,604,292 4,652,677 4,767,965 4,610,969 4,687,261 2000's 4,316,127 4,206,470 3,771,001 3,391,870 3,244,850 2,527,636 2,511,802 2,857,443 2,208,920 2,175,026 2010's 2,207,760 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

88

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

Cha, Chang Y. (3807 Reynolds St., Laramie, WY 82070)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection in Life-Cycle Inventories Using Hybrid Approaches,and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses,Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Process for making substitute natural gas  

SciTech Connect

A process, having high thermal efficiency, is provided for the production of substitute natural gas from fossil fuels such as crude oil, by non-catalytic hydrogenation. High thermal efficiency is obtained by using cryogenic systems for separating hydrogen from (A) the product of the hydrogenation reaction and (B) from products produced by partial oxidation in the production of hydrogen required for the hydrogenation reactions. Other products from the partial oxidation reaction may be used either as fuel or as feedstocks for catalytic steam reforming to produce SNG.

Conway, H.L.; Hargis, J.A.; Stroud, H.J.

1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

91

Natural gas conversion process. Sixth quarterly report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental apparatus was dismantled and transferred to a laboratory space provided by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is already equipped with a high-ventilation fume hood. This will enable us to make tests at higher gas flow rates in a safe environment. Three papers presented at the ACS meeting in San Francisco (Symposium on Natural Gas Upgrading II) April 5--10, 1992 show that the goal of direct catalytic conversion of Methane into heavier Hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere is actively pursued in three other different laboratories. There are similarities in their general concept with our own approach, but the temperature range of the experiments reported in these recent papers is much lower and this leads to uneconomic conversion rates. This illustrates the advantages of Methane activation by a Hydrogen plasma to reach commercial conversion rates. A preliminary process flow diagram was established for the Integrated Process, which was outlined in the previous Quarterly Report. The flow diagram also includes all the required auxiliary facilities for product separation and recycle of the unconverted feed as well as for the preparation and compression of the Syngas by-product.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Inventory...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) Borates and Soda Ash Sections Greenhouse Gas Inventory Protocol (PDF 75 KB) Download...

93

DOE Contract Number DE-FE0004001Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Inventory of Natural Gas Extraction, Delivery and Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency

Timothy J. Skone; Timothy J. Skone

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Media Inventory Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Media Inventory Control 11_0406 Page 1 of 5 8 Media Inventory Control 11_0406 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Media Inventory Control Document Number: ITTP-018 Rev. 09_0910 Document Owner: Janet Lee Backup Owner: Ben Aragon Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: Referenced Document(s): MGTP-003 Customer Property, ISDP-002 Training Production Process, ADMP-001 Procurement Process, ADMP-003 Receiving/Inspection Process, ITTF-013 Media Requests ITTP-018 Media Inventory Control 11_0406 Page 2 of 5 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release B Added use of ITTF-013, Media Requests (SMS Records) 08_0904 Changed Media Specialist to Online Learning support Specialist (OLSS). Modified process to better fit actual media request process.

95

Colorado Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 112,440 96,397 85,171 1970's 82,736 97,420 104,116 110,662 118,686 136,090 175,624 171,233 167,959 1980's 201,637 220,108 173,894 181,150 191,625 163,614 180,290 178,048 196,682 1990's 208,069 234,851 256,019 307,250 353,855 345,441 493,963 374,728 425,083 444,978 2000's 494,581 497,385 534,295 555,544 703,804 730,948 751,036 888,705 1,029,641 1,233,260 2010's 1,434,003 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

96

Oklahoma Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,038,103 1,122,692 1,167,150 1970's 1,183,273 1,123,614 1,116,872 1,175,548 1,092,487 1,033,003 1,072,992 1,057,326 1,069,293 1980's 1,063,256 1,112,740 1,023,057 1,118,403 1,137,463 1,103,062 1,127,780 1,301,673 1,145,688 1990's 1,102,301 1,100,812 1,071,426 1,082,452 1,092,734 1,015,965 1,054,123 1,014,008 947,177 892,396 2000's 963,464 957,665 854,220 804,029 839,366 865,411 908,055 964,709 1,047,643 1,112,510 2010's 1,110,236 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

97

Michigan Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 171,531 156,996 143,802 1970's 139,571 141,784 94,738 37,384 45,106 79,154 151,318 172,578 199,347 1980's 155,984 151,560 137,364 148,076 151,393 142,255 137,687 125,183 123,578 1990's 134,550 170,574 186,144 201,985 196,000 179,678 117,119 86,564 83,052 67,514 2000's 58,482 50,734 47,292 41,619 37,977 34,545 33,213 29,436 30,008 23,819 2010's 22,405 21,518 21,243 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

98

Arkansas Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 93,452 88,011 56,190 1970's 37,816 31,387 17,946 26,135 19,784 17,918 20,370 18,630 18,480 1980's 29,003 31,530 33,753 34,572 258,648 174,872 197,781 213,558 228,157 1990's 272,278 224,625 156,573 198,074 218,710 100,720 219,477 185,244 198,148 179,524 2000's 207,045 207,352 12,635 13,725 10,139 16,756 13,702 11,532 6,531 2,352 2010's 9,599 5,611 6,872 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

99

California Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 505,063 476,596 455,692 1970's 444,700 431,605 386,664 359,841 252,402 213,079 216,667 206,981 204,693 1980's 169,812 261,725 263,475 276,209 281,389 263,823 276,969 270,191 254,286 1990's 263,667 246,335 243,692 246,283 228,346 226,548 240,566 243,054 235,558 259,518 2000's 260,049 258,271 249,671 238,743 236,465 226,230 223,580 206,239 195,272 198,213 2010's 204,327 180,648 169,203 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014

100

Wyoming Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 261,478 259,227 269,921 1970's 276,926 292,434 298,439 303,519 263,684 215,104 251,846 262,801 255,760 1980's 366,530 393,027 432,313 579,479 624,619 506,241 512,579 560,603 591,472 1990's 635,922 681,266 728,113 750,853 821,689 895,129 845,253 863,052 870,518 902,889 2000's 993,702 988,595 1,083,860 1,101,425 1,249,309 1,278,087 1,288,124 1,399,570 1,278,439 1,507,142 2010's 1,642,190 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Texas Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 7,018,237 7,239,621 7,613,234 1970's 7,808,476 7,938,550 8,139,408 7,683,830 7,194,453 6,509,132 6,253,159 6,030,131 5,621,419 1980's 4,563,931 4,507,771 4,258,852 4,377,799 4,164,382 4,199,501 3,997,226 3,813,727 3,842,395 1990's 3,860,388 4,874,718 4,231,145 4,301,504 4,160,551 4,132,491 4,180,062 4,171,967 4,073,739 3,903,351 2000's 4,096,535 3,876,399 3,861,114 3,658,929 3,748,670 3,781,565 3,990,862 4,187,358 4,431,574 4,478,331 2010's 4,534,403 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

102

Alaska Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 149,865 151,669 147,954 1980's 111,512 115,394 42,115 62,144 66,062 58,732 134,945 76,805 75,703 1990's 1,571,438 1,873,279 2,121,838 2,295,499 2,667,254 2,980,557 2,987,364 2,964,734 2,966,461 2,950,502 2000's 3,123,599 2,984,807 2,997,824 2,447,017 2,680,859 3,089,229 2,665,742 2,965,956 2,901,760 2,830,034 2010's 2,731,803 2,721,396 2,788,997 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014

103

Gas purification facilities at Purex: Process study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of the results of a process study, requested by the Atomic Energy Commission an the recovery of krypton and xenon from irradiated uranium at the Hanford Purex Plant. This request was prompted by original Commission forecasts of the expanded requirements for Krypton-85 for commercial phosphorescent signal lights and markers and for xenon isotopes of low neutron cross-section for use in liquid xenon scintillation counters, in connection with D.M.A., government and university-sponsored work. It was requested that both Hanford and Savannah River submit order of magnitude cost estimates for recovery facilities at the respective sites for three separate design cases. The cost information developed, along with market survey information obtained-through the A. D. Little Company and Department of Defense market surveys, would serve as the basis for scheduling of the Hanford and Savannah River participation in the Commission`s overall fission rare gas recovery program.

Michels, L.R.; Gerhart, J.M.

1958-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Transportation Process & Flow  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Process and Flow Process and Flow About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Transportation Process and Flow Overview | Gathering System | Processing Plant | Transmission Grid | Market Centers/Hubs | Underground Storage | Peak Shaving Overview Transporting natural gas from the wellhead to the final customer involves several physical transfers of custody and multiple processing steps. A natural gas pipeline system begins at the natural gas producing well or field. Once the gas leaves the producing well, a pipeline gathering system directs the flow either to a natural gas processing plant or directly to the mainline transmission grid, depending upon the initial quality of the wellhead product.

105

Troubleshooting natural gas processing: Wellhead to transmission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book describes practical, day-to-day problems of natural gas handling. This book combines field experience with technical principles on natural gas production treating and transmission. This volume is dominated by illustrative case histories and rules of thumb. The book also provides a checklist of distillation problems which is a summary of causes and cures of the problems encountered in the fractionation of propane, butane and natural gasoline. A glossary of terms used in natural gas transmission is another good part of this book. The author has avoided complex mechanical details in favor of simple line drawings. Among the topics discussed are; wellhead pressure and gas flow, vapor-liquid separation at the wellhead, wellhead compression, corrosion in gathering systems, gas sweetening using amines, sulfur recovery, dehydration, centrifugal gas compression, reciprocal gas compression, hydrates, gas cooling and condensate recovery.

Lieberman, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated using the eGRID post 2006 emission factor for all subject years (1990-2009); the CA-CP Calculator uses a different (lower) factor (eGRID pre 2006) for years 1990-2006. WUSTL deviated from the CA-CP Calculator on this emission factor because using the pre and post eGRID factors skews GHG emissions

Dobbins, Ian G.

107

Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

Diaz, Zaida (Katy, TX); Del Paggio, Alan Anthony (Spring, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

108

Method for processing coke oven gas  

SciTech Connect

Coke oven gas is subjected, immediately after the discharge thereof from coke ovens, and without any preliminary cooling operation or any purification operation other than desulfurization, to a catalytic cracking operation to form a hot cracked gas which is rich in hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The catalytic cracking reaction is carried out in the presence of a hydrogen-containing and/or CO2-containing gas, with a steam reforming catalyst.

Flockenhaus, C.; Meckel, J.F.; Wagener, D.

1980-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

109

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Gas Processing Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In North Dakota, materials purchased for building or expending gas processing facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes. Building materials, equipment, and other tangible property are eligible...

110

Process Optimization of Cast Alloy 718 for Water Cooled Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FOR WATER COOLED GAS TURBINE APPLICATION. G.K. Bouse+ and P.W. Schilke*. Gene@ Electric Company+ Materials and Processes Laboratory, and.

111

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants in the United States as of 2009 and highlights characteristics of this segment of the industry. The purpose of the paper is to examine the role of natural gas processing plants in the natural gas supply chain and to provide an overview and summary of processing plant characteristics in the United States, such as locations, capacities, and operations. Key Findings There were 493 operational natural gas processing plants in the United States with a combined operating capacity of 77 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. Overall, operating capacity increased about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009, not including the processing capacity in Alaska1. At the same time, the number of all processing plants in the lower 48 States decreased

112

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

Cha, C.Y.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

113

Natural Gas Liquefaction Process for Small-scale LNG Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the field of natural gas liquefaction, the small-scale natural gas liquefier has been attracting more and more attentions home and abroad, thanks to its small volume, mobile transportation, easy start-up and shut-down, as well as skid-mounted package. ... Keywords: Natural gas, Small-scale, LNG, Liquefaction process

Cao Wensheng

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Cosmic Energy Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an inventory of the cosmic mean densities of energy associated with all the known states of matter and radiation at the present epoch. The observational and theoretical bases for the inventory have become rich enough to allow estimates with observational support for the densities of energy in some 40 forms. The result is a global portrait of the effects of the physical processes of cosmic evolution.

Masataka Fukugita; P. J. E. Peebles

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

115

Natural Gas Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, January 2006 1 The natural gas product fed into the mainline gas transportation system in the United States must meet specific quality measures in order for the pipeline grid to operate properly. Consequently, natural gas produced at the wellhead, which in most cases contains contaminants 1 and natural gas liquids, 2 must be processed, i.e., cleaned, before it can be safely delivered to the high-pressure, long-distance pipelines that transport the product to the consuming public. Natural gas that is not within certain specific gravities, pressures, Btu content range, or water content levels will

116

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices References: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building[1] Logo: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building "Developing greenhouse gas inventories is an important first step to managing emissions. U.S. EPA's approach for building capacity to develop GHG inventories is based on the following lessons learned from working alongside developing country experts: Technical expertise for GHG inventories already exists in developing countries.

117

Regional Inventories  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This year has not started well for gasoline inventories, with inventories being low across regions of the country. The Midwest region (PADD II) had been running lower than most regions, but began to catch up during the last week in April. Gasoline inventories ran about 9% below their 5-year average for this time of year and about 4% below where they were last year. The recent refinery problems in the Midwest, though, could erase some of that recovery. The impacts of Tosco's Wood River refinery and Marathon's St Paul refinery are not fully realized. But inventories were also precariously low along the East Coast (PADD I) and are extremely low in the Rocky Mountain region (PADD IV), although the size of this market mitigates any national impact. While the

118

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Reference Manual (VolumeNational Greenhouse Gas Inventories: the Workbook (VolumeN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Inventory of Chinas Energy-Related CO

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Process for recovering condensible components from a gas stream  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for adsorbing the condensible components out of the inlet gas stream in one of a number of stationary adsorption beds, while simultaneously cooling one or more of the other adsorption beds with the residue gas stream from the adsorbing bed. At the same time, one or more other adsorption beds are heated by a regeneration gas stream in a closed cycle, thereby stripping and vaporizing the condensible components. A special main gas-flow pattern is utilized at the beginning of each cycle to prevent condensible components, remaining in the bed or beds just heated, from being lost, with the gas stream leaving the process. (6 claims)

McMinn, R.E.; Loomer, J.A.; Sellars, A.I.

1970-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

120

Adsorption process producing chronologically constant amount of a residual gas  

SciTech Connect

An adsorption process is disclosed for purifying or fractionating a gaseous feed mixture comprises an adsorption phase, at least one expansion phase, a purging phase and at least one pressure buildup phase. The expansion phase(S) and the purging phase produce residual process gas fractions. The sum total of volume, and/or mass streams of the residual process gas fractions comprises a residual gas stream which is maintained chronologically substantially constant by controlling the volume and/or gas streams of the gas entering the purging phase and maintaining the gas leaving the expansion phase(S) at a substantially constant value, dependent on the desired mass and/or volume quantity of the residual gas stream. The length of the purging phase and of the expansion phase(S) is adjusted accordingly so that the relationship of the length of time of the purging phase to the length of time of the expansion phase(S) is substantially the same as the relationship of the volume and/or mass of the gas fractions obtained during the purging to those obtained during the expansion phase(S), respectively. The control of the purging and of the expansion phase(S) can also be varied in response to a flow rate of a feed gas entering the process.

Benkmann, C.

1982-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cryogenic fractionator gas as stripping gas of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an integrated coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped with a stripping gas to remove acidic gases, at least a portion of the stripping gas comprises a gas comprising hydrogen, nitrogen and methane separated from the coker products.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Oil and Gas Environmental Review and Approval Processes (New Brunswick,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Environmental Review and Approval Processes (New Oil and Gas Environmental Review and Approval Processes (New Brunswick, Canada) Oil and Gas Environmental Review and Approval Processes (New Brunswick, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Brunswick Natural Resources Oil and natural gas companies engaged in exploration, development and production in New Brunswick will be required by the Department of Environment to undergo a Phased Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process. The process will identify potential environmental impacts at the early stages before a project is implemented so that negative environmental impacts can be avoided.

123

Gas Turbines Increase the Energy Efficiency of Industrial Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is a well known fact that the gas turbine in a combined cycle has a higher inherent Carnot efficiency than the steam cycle which has been more generally accepted by industry. Unlike steam turbines, gas turbines do not require large boiler feed water, condensate and cooling water facilities. The benefits of the high efficiency of combined cycle gas turbines can only be realized if the energy in the hot exhaust can be utilized. Data for several plants, in various stages of engineering, in which clean fuel gas for the gas turbine is produced by gasification of coal, are presented. Waste heat from the gasifier and the gas turbine exhaust is converted to high pressure steam for steam turbines. Gas turbines may find application in other industrial processes, namely in the production of ammonia, LNG, and olefins. These options are briefly discussed.

Banchik, I. N.; Bohannan, W. R.; Stork, K.; McGovern, L. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Humidification Processes in Gas Turbine Cycles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The global climate change caused by emissions of greenhouse gases from combustion processes has been recognized as a continuously growing problem and much research focuses (more)

Thern, Marcus

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Process of producing combustible gas and for carbonizing coal  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process of producing combustible gas by supporting a column of fuel in a shaft furnace, intermittently blasting a combustion-supporting gas transversely through a mid portion of said column to produce a mid zone of sufficiently high temperature to decompose steam. The steam then circulated upwardly through said column between said blasting operations.

Doherty, H.L.

1922-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Process for producing dimethyl ether form synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a Fischer Tropsch process for converting synthesis gas to an oxygenated hydrocarbon with particular emphasis on dimethyl ether. Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted to dimethyl ether by carrying out the reaction in the presence of an alkali metal-manganese-iron carbonyl cluster incorporated onto a zirconia-alumina support.

Pierantozzi, Ronald (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Process for producing dimethyl ether from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a Fischer Tropsch process for converting synthesis gas to an oxygenated hydrocarbon with particular emphasis on dimethyl ether. Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted to dimethyl ether by carrying out the reaction in the presence of an alkali metal-manganese-iron carbonyl cluster incorporated onto a zirconia-alumina support.

Pierantozzi, R.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

128

Investigation of Flue Gas Desulfurization Chemical Process Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of flue gas desulfurization process chemistry is crucial in troubleshooting problems in operating FGD systems. This report discusses a variety of problems and solutions associated with process chemistry for 25 different wet FGD systems, including lime/limestone and double alkali processes. Among the problems addressed are SO2 removal, mist eliminator scaling, poor solids dewatering, and water management.

1990-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

Permeation: A new competitive process for offshore gas dehydration  

SciTech Connect

Usual process for gas dehydration implement absorption (glycol chemical process) or adsorption (molecular sieves). The new dehydration process as described in this paper will be a strong competitor with these usual processes, especially for offshore applications, due to its simplicity and space and weight saving. This new membrane based process is discussed along major constraints of the application, suitable characteristics of the adapted permeation membranes and gain versus conventional gylcol in offshore application.

Fournie, F.; Agostini, J.P.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Thief Process Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,521,021 entitled "Thief Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas." Disclosed in this patent is a novel process in which partially combusted coal is removed from the combustion chamber of a power plant using a lance (called a "thief"). This partially combusted coal acts as a thermally activated adsorbent for mercury. When it is in- jected into the duct work of the power plant downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber, mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury

131

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 10:10am Addthis The portfolio-based planning process for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation offers an approach to: Evaluating the GHG reduction potential at the site, program, and agency level Identifying strategies for reducing those emissions Prioritizing activities to achieve both GHG reduction and cost objectives. Portfolio-based management for GHG mitigation helps agencies move from "peanut-butter-spreading" obligations for meeting GHG reduction targets evenly across all agency operating units to strategic planning of GHG reduction activities based on each operating unit's potential and cost to reduce emissions. The result of this prioritization will lay the foundation

132

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research and Development (R&D)...

133

Process Design and Integration of Shale Gas to Methanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent breakthroughs in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technology have made huge reservoirs of previously untapped shale gas and shale oil formations available for use. These new resources have already made a significant impact on the United States chemical industry and present many opportunities for new capital investments and industry growth. As in conventional natural gas, shale gas contains primarily methane, but some formations contain significant amounts of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons and inorganic gases such as nitrogen and carbon dioxide. These differences present several technical challenges to incorporating shale gas with current infrastructure designed to be used with natural gas. However, each shale presents opportunities to develop novel chemical processes that optimize its composition in order to more efficiently and profitably produce valuable chemical products. This paper is aimed at process synthesis, analysis, and integration of different processing pathways for the production of methanol from shale gas. The composition of the shale gas feedstock is assumed to come from the Barnett Shale Play located near Fort Worth, Texas, which is currently the most active shale gas play in the US. Process simulation and published data were used to construct a base-case scenario in Aspen Plus. The impact of different processing pathways was analyzed. Key performance indicators were assessed. These include overall process targets for mass and energy, economic performance, and environmental impact. Finally, the impact of several factors (e.g., feedstock composition, design and operating variables) is studied through a sensitivity analysis. The results show a profitable process above a methanol selling price of approximately $1.50/gal. The sensitivity analysis shows that the ROI depends much more heavily on the selling price of methanol than on the operating costs. Energy integration leads to a savings of $30.1 million per year, or an increase in ROI of 2% points. This also helps offset some of the cost required for the oxygen necessary for syngas generation through partial oxidation. For a sample shale gas composition with high levels of impurities, preprocessing costs require a price differential of $0.73/MMBtu from natural gas. The process is also environmentally desirable because shale gas does not lead to higher GHG emissions than conventional natural gas. More water is required for hydraulic fracturing, but some of these concerns can be abated through conservation techniques and regulation.

Ehlinger, Victoria M.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for$/kWh References EPA. 2002. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Predictive LPV control of a liquid-gas separation process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of controlling a liquid-gas separation process is approached by using LPV control techniques. An LPV model is derived from a nonlinear model of the process using differential inclusion techniques. Once an LPV model is available, an LPV controller ... Keywords: BMIs, LMIs, LPV controllers, LPV systems, Nonlinear systems, Predictive control

J. V. Salcedo; M. Martnez; C. Ramos; J. M. Herrero

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Simulation and integration of liquefied natural gas (lng) processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global use of natural gas is growing quickly. This is primarily attributed to its favorable characteristics and to the environmental advantages it enjoys over other fossil fuels such as oil and coal. One of the key challenges in supplying natural gas is the form (phase) at which it should be delivered. Natural gas may be supplied to the consumers as a compressed gas through pipelines. Another common form is to be compressed, refrigerated and supplied as a liquid known as liquefied natural gas (LNG). When there is a considerable distance involved in transporting natural gas, LNG is becoming the preferred method of supply because of technical, economic, and political reasons. Thus, LNG is expected to play a major role in meeting the global energy demands. This work addresses the simulation and optimization of an LNG plant. First, the process flowsheet is constructed based on a common process configuration. Then, the key units are simulated using ASPEN Plus to determine the characteristics of the various pieces of equipment and streams in the plant. Next, process integration techniques are used to optimize the process. Particular emphasis is given to energy objectives through three activities. First, the synthesis and retrofitting of a heat-exchange network are considered to reduce heating and cooling utilities. Second, the turbo-expander system is analyzed to reduce the refrigeration consumption in the process. Third, the process cogeneration is introduced to optimize the combined heat and power of the plant. These activities are carried out using a combination of graphical, computeraided, and mathematical programming techniques. A case study on typical LNG facilities is solved to examine the benefits of simulation and integration of the process. The technical, economic, and environmental impact of the process modifications are also discussed.

Al-Sobhi, Saad Ali

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Carbon Dioxide Hydrate Process for Gas Separation from a Shifted Synthesis Gas Stream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration and Sequestration and Gasification Technologies Carbon DioxiDe HyDrate ProCess for Gas seParation from a sHifteD syntHesis Gas stream Background One approach to de-carbonizing coal is to gasify it to form fuel gas consisting predominately of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. This fuel gas is sent to a shift conversion reactor where carbon monoxide reacts with steam to produce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and hydrogen. After scrubbing the CO 2 from the fuel, a stream of almost pure hydrogen stream remains, which can be burned in a gas turbine or used to power a fuel cell with essentially zero emissions. However, for this approach to be practical, it will require an economical means of separating CO 2 from mixed gas streams. Since viable options for sequestration or reuse of CO

138

Gas permeation carbon capture --- Process modeling and optimization  

SciTech Connect

A multi-staged gas permeation carbon capture process model was developed in Aspen Custom Modeler{reg_sign} (ACM) and optimized in the context of the retrofit of a 550 MW subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The gas permeation stages in the process are described by a custom multi-component, hollowfiber membrane model. Gas transport across the asymmetric membrane was modeled according to the solution-diffusion model for the selective skin layer and the assumption of negligible flux resistance by the porous support. Counter-current, one-dimensional plug flow was assumed with permeate pressure drop in the fiber lumen side due to capillary constrained flow. A modular optimization framework was used to minimize the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) by optimizing a set of key process variables. The framework allows the external control of multiple simulation modules from different software packages from a common interface.

Morinelly, Juan; Miller, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Coke oven gas desulphurization by the Carl Still process  

SciTech Connect

The Steubenville East Coke Plant need a desulfurization process that would desulfurize an eventual 95 million standard cubic feet per day of coke oven gas from an inlet of 450 gr/DSCF to an outlet of 45 gr/DSCF of hydrogen sulfide. The Dravo/Still plant process was selected, due to the use of ammonia which was available in the gas, as the absorbing agent. It was also a proven process. Dravo/Still also was capable of building a sulfuric acid plant. The desulfurization efficiency of the plant has consistently provided an average final gas sulfur loading below the guaranteed 45 gr/DSCF. This removal efficiency has enabled production of an average of 4615 tons per day of 66/sup 0/Be acid. Also SO/sub 2/ to SO/sub 3/ conversion has averaged 98%. 3 figures. (DP)

Knight, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Applying a MEIO approach to manage Intel's VMI Hub Supply; Applying a Multi Echelon Inventory Optimization approach to manage Intel's Vendor Managed Inventory Hub Supply.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To improve customer service levels, Intel implemented Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI) hub process for its Central Processing Unit (CPU) Finished Good (FG) inventory, which allows (more)

Hsieh, Min Fang, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Inventory management for drug discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis documents a study carried out at the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR) in Cambridge, MA. The study focused on the development of inventory management processes for laboratory consumables. The ...

Sriram, Ranganath

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Demonstration plant for IGCC using the U-GAS process  

SciTech Connect

Tampella, Ltd., in cooperation with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), is developing the gasification technology for U-GAS{reg_sign} to produce electricity from coal using the integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC). The concept of IGCC is to join the clean burning gasification island with a more efficient gas and stream turbine island to produce electric power with minimal environmental impact. IGT has developed the U-GAS process to produce a low- or medium-Btu gas from different types of coal feedstocks. The process uses a combination of fluidized=bed gasification and ash agglomeration in a single-stage reactor. A 30-tons/day-capacity pilot plant located in Chicago has been used to develop the process. Feedstocks ranging from relatively unreactive metallurgical coke to highly reactive peat have been gasified successfully in the this pilot plant, indicating its ability to handle a feedstock with widely varying properties. A new 10 megawatt pilot plant has been designed and is under construction in Tampere, Finland, as the first step toward the commercialization of this technology. Tampella is planning to design and deliver a commercial-scale IGCC demonstration plant by 1994. 7 refs., 5 figs.

Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Salo, K. [Tampella Power, Tampere (Finland)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Membrane Technology and Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR), based in Menlo Park, CA, is a privately- owned developer, manufacturer, and supplier of customized membrane process solutions. Currently, the company's principal membrane products are * VaporSep® systems to remove organic vapors from air and nitrogen * NitroSep TM and fuel gas conditioning systems for natural gas treatment * Hydrogen recovery systems for refinery and other applications MTR's current R&D is extending use of membranes to carbon sequestration and biofuels separations. www.mtrinc.com New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes Challenge Membrane technology was first commercialized in the 1960s and 1970s for well-known applications such as water filtration

144

Takahax-Hirohax process for coke oven gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Takahax-Hirohax process to desulfurize coke oven gas and to produce an ammonium sulfate end product. A review is also made of current operating experience and recent technical developments. The Takahax-Hirohax process is extremely useful when the COG contains a suitable ammonia to sulfur ratio and when ammonium sulfate is a desirable end product. No contaminated effluent streams are emitted from the process. The process is simple, reliable, flexible, and responds easily to COG variations. 4 figures, 3 tables. (DP)

Gastwirth, H.; Miner, R.; Stengle, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Processing - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 33,213: 29,436: 30,008: 23,819: 22,405: 21,518: 1967-2011: Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 2,335: 2,547: 2,840 ...

146

DRY FLUE GAS CLEANING PROCESSES FOR ACHIEVING AIR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was mercury adsorption onto calcium sulfate (CaSO4), a byproduct of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wet., Powers K.W., and Pitoniak E.R. (2004) Method for Purifying Flue Gases from Combustion Sources. PatentCoupling of Advanced Oxidation and Adsorption Processes onto Silica-Titania Composites for Low

Columbia University

147

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail,Heavy Rail and Air, University of California, Berkeley,of Passenger Transportation: Rail and Air Arpad Horvath,

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

North Dakota Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 42,828 41,318 37,818 1970's 36,830 33,252 32,131 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 50,900 57,608 71,745 77,524 81,008 72,678 86,329 67,867 59,841 1990's 62,042 59,228 50,462 51,713 55,150 49,861 47,942 51,657 52,777 52,191 2000's 54,738 58,536 59,894 58,479 60,261 63,240 65,575 69,653 76,762 87,977 2010's 91,539 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Processing

149

Slag processing system for direct coal-fired gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Direct coal-fired gas turbine systems and methods for their operation are provided by this invention. The systems include a primary combustion compartment coupled to an impact separator for removing molten slag from hot combustion gases. Quenching means are provided for solidifying the molten slag removed by the impact separator, and processing means are provided forming a slurry from the solidified slag for facilitating removal of the solidified slag from the system. The released hot combustion gases, substantially free of molten slag, are then ducted to a lean combustion compartment and then to an expander section of a gas turbine.

Pillsbury, Paul W. (Winter Springs, FL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Reactive gas atomization processing for Fe-based ODS alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas atomization reaction synthesis was employed as a simplified method for processing oxide dispersion forming precursor Fe-based powders (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-Hf). During this process a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O{sub 2}) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t dispersion strengthened microstructures were engineered from different powder particle size ranges, illustrating microstructural control as a function of particle solidification rate. Additionally, preliminary thermal-mechanical processing was used to develop a fine scale dislocation substructure for ultimate strengthening of the alloy.

Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.; Odette, G.R.; Stergarc, E.; Haney, E.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

151

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building (Redirected from US EPA GHG Inventory Capacity Building) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices References: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building[1] Logo: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building "Developing greenhouse gas inventories is an important first step to managing emissions. U.S. EPA's approach for building capacity to develop GHG inventories is based on the following lessons learned from working alongside developing country experts: Technical expertise for GHG inventories already exists in developing

152

Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800.degree.-2200.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (i) a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and (ii) a sodium-iron sulfide phase. The sulfur capture additive may optionally comprise a copper-containing compound portion.

Najjar, Mitri S. (Hopewell Junction, NY); Corbeels, Roger J. (Wappingers Falls, NY); Kokturk, Uygur (Wappingers Falls, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis (Siemens) We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas recovery and compare the difference between conventional and unconventional gas reservoir and recovery technologies. Then we did theoretical analysis on the shale gas production. According

Ge, Zigang

154

Processing mixed-waste compressed-gas cylinders at the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until recently, several thousand kilograms of compressed gases were stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, because these cylinders could not be taken off-site in their state of configuration for disposal. Restrictions on the storage of old compressed-gas cylinders compelled the Waste Management Organization of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) to dispose of these materials. Furthermore, a milestone in the ORR Site Treatment Plan required repackaging and shipment off-site of 21 cylinders by September 30, 1997. A pilot project, coordinated by the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was undertaken to evaluate and recontainerize or neutralize these cylinders, which are mixed waste, to meet that milestone. Because the radiological component was considered to be confined to the exterior of the cylinder, the contents (once removed from the cylinder) could be handled as hazardous waste, and the cylinder could be handled as low-level waste (LLW). This pilot project to process 21 cylinders was important because of its potential impact. The successful completion of the project provides a newly demonstrated technology which can now be used to process the thousands of additional cylinders in inventory across the DOE complex. In this paper, many of the various aspects of implementing this project, including hurdles encountered and the lessons learned in overcoming them, are reported.

Morris, M.I.; Conley, T.B.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Desulphurization of coke oven gas by the Stretford Process  

SciTech Connect

The Stretford process is probably the most effective means available for removing hydrogen sulphide from gas streams. For streams which do not contain hydrogen cyanide or excessive oxygen it should be nearly ideal. However, the large volume of waste liquor generated by fixation of hydrogen cyanide has prevented its widespread adoption for coke oven gas treatment. Investigations of various proposals for treating the waste liquor indicate that the only practicable way of dealing with it is by reductive incineration. Although attempts to apply the Peabody-Holmes reductive incineration process have been disappointing, significant progress in overcoming some of its deficiencies has been made. The Zimpro wet oxidation process will provide a convenient method of treating the HCN scrubber effluent at No. 1 Plant. However, it will not treat the sodium based liquor from the Stretford plant. Its application to Stretford waste treatment is limited to situations where ammonium liquors and ammonium sulphate recovery facilities are available. Commissioning of this plant has been delayed while a defect in the air compressor supplied for the plant is being remedied. When the problem of liquid effluent disposal has been overcome, and if reagent chemicals continue to be available at reasonable prices, the Stretford process will be a good choice for coke oven gas desulphurization. 8 figures.

Plenderleith, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Thief Process for Mercury Removal from Flue Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Thief Process is a cost-effective variation to activated carbon injection (ACI) for removal of mercury from flue gas. In this scheme, partially combusted coal from the furnace of a pulverized coal power generation plant is extracted by a lance and then re-injected into the ductwork downstream of the air preheater. Recent results on a 500-lb/hr pilot-scale combustion facility show similar removals of mercury for both the Thief Process and ACI. The tests conducted to date at laboratory, bench, and pilot-scales demonstrate that the Thief sorbents exhibit capacities for mercury from flue gas streams that are comparable to those exhibited by commercially available activated carbons. Independent verification of the sorbent activity at a pilot-plant that uses a slipstream from a Wisconsin utility has been accomplished. A patent for the process was issued in February 2003 [1]. The Thief sorbents are cheaper than commerciallyavailable activated carbons; exhibit excellent capacities for mercury; and the overall process holds great potential for reducing the cost of mercury removal from flue gas [1-4].

Evan J. Granite; Mark C. Freeman; Richard A. Hargis; William J. Odowd; Henry W. Pennline

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Method for treating a nuclear process off-gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for selectively removing and recovering the noble gas and other gaseous components typically emitted during nuclear process operations. The method is adaptable and useful for treating dissolver off-gas effluents released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels whereby to permit radioactive contaminant recovery prior to releasing the remaining off-gases to the atmosphere. Briefly, the method sequentially comprises treating the off-gas stream to preliminarily remove NO.sub.x, hydrogen and carbon-containing organic compounds, and semivolatile fission product metal oxide components therefrom; adsorbing iodine components on silver-exchanged mordenite; removing water vapor carried by said stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing the carbon dioxide components of said off-gas stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing xenon in gas phase by passing said stream through a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from oxygen by means of a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from the bulk nitrogen stream using a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; concentrating the desorbed krypton upon a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchange mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; and further cryogenically concentrating, and the recovering for storage, the desorbed krypton.

Pence, Dallas T. (San Diego, CA); Chou, Chun-Chao (San Diego, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Multiphase Mechanisms and Fluid Dynamics in Gas Injection Enhanced Oil Recovery Processes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Currently, the Water-Alternating-Gas (WAG) process is the most widely practiced horizontal mode gas injection process in the industry. Although this process is conceptually sound, it (more)

Kulkarni, Madhav M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Program is performing research to develop advanced technologies focusing on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control for existing pulverized coal-fired plants. This new focus on post-combustion and oxy-combustion CO 2 emissions control technology, CO 2 compression, and beneficial reuse is in response to the priority for advanced

160

Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes  

SciTech Connect

Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3 % of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to testing the FHR-32 sorbent. FHR-32 sorbent was tested for 50 cycles of sulfidation in a laboratory scale reactor.

Jothimurugesan, K.

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

development Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit 3a. Analytical Decision Making - Developing BAU Scenario 3b. Analytical Decision Making - Assessing Opportunities 3b.1....

162

Large neighborhood search for LNG inventory routing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is steadily becoming a common mode for commercializing natural gas. Due to the capital intensive nature of LNG projects, the optimal design of LNG supply chains is extremely important from a profitability perspective. Motivated ... Keywords: LNG, Liquefied natural gas, Maritime inventory routing, Ship schedule optimization

Vikas Goel; Kevin C. Furman; Jin-Hwa Song; Amr S. El-Bakry

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

LANCE HAYS

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

164

Thermal Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment Processes for Zero Liquid Discharge Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a worldwide inventory of power plant flue gas desulfurization (FGD) blowdown treatment systems using thermal technologies to achieve zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management. The number of thermal treatment systems presently operating is very few, with the majority using chemical pretreatment followed by evaporation in a brine concentrator and crystallizer and finally dewatering of the residual salts. Of the operating thermal ZLD systems identified, six are located in Italy and o...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

The use of process information for verification of inventory in solvent extraction contactors in near-real-time accounting for reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect

Near-real-time accounting is being studied as a technique for improving the timeliness of accounting in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A major criticism of near-real-time accounting is perceived disclosure of proprietary data for IAEA verification, particularly in verifying the inventory of solvent extraction contactors. This study indicates that the contribution of uncertainties in estimating the inventory of pulsed columns or mixer settlers may be insignificant compared to uncertainties in measured throughput and measurable inventory for most reprocessing plants, and verification may not be a serious problem. Verification can become a problem for plants with low throughput and low inventory in tanks if contactor inventory variations or uncertainties are greater than /approximately/25%. Each plant must be evaluated with respect to its specific inventory and throughput characteristics. 11 refs., 4 figs.

Hakkila, E.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Hafer, J.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Reactive gas atomization processing for Fe-based ODS alloys  

SciTech Connect

Gas atomization reaction synthesis was employed as a simplified method for processing oxide dispersion forming precursor Fe-based powders (e.g., FeCrYHf). During this process a reactive atomization gas (i.e., ArO2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 50 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide shell that was used as a vehicle to transport oxygen into the consolidated microstructure. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatment promoted thermodynamically driven oxygen exchange reactions between trapped films of Cr-enriched oxide and internal (Y, Hf)-enriched intermetallic precipitates, resulting in highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., YHfO) that were identified with X-ray diffraction. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography results also revealed that the size and distribution of the dispersoids were found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, several oxide dispersion strengthened microstructures were engineered from different powder particle size ranges, illustrating microstructural control as a function of particle solidification rate. Additionally, preliminary thermalmechanical processing was used to develop a fine scale dislocation substructure for ultimate strengthening of the alloy.

Rieken, Joel R [Ames Laboratory; Anderson, Iver E [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J [Ames Laboratory; Odette, G R [University of California; Stergar, E [University of California; Haney, E [University of California

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

167

Explaining Harvard's Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No data available Factors from EPA's eGRID database, MA-specific Factors from ISO NE's emission reports

Paulsson, Johan

168

Peer-to-peer inventory management of returnable transport items: A design science approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The packaged gas industry suffers from the loss of gas cylinders due to ineffective inventory management and lack of suitably robust identification technologies. This paper takes a design science approach to this problem and contributes a prototype inventory ... Keywords: Inventory, Packaged gas, RFID, Returnable transport item, Wireless sensor network

Alex Mason; Andy Shaw; Ahmed Al-Shamma'a

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1168-2013 October 2013 DOE STANDARD CONFINEMENT VENTILATION AND PROCESS GAS TREATMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1168-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/department-energy-technical-standards-program ii DOE-STD-1168-2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK iv DOE-STD-1168-2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT...................................................................................................................vii

170

NETL's Gas Process Development Unit for Hot/Warm Gas Cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The long-term objectives for the GPDU project are to: (1) assess transport and fluidized bed reactor control and performance to determine the most suitable mode for continuous gas desulfurization, and (2) evaluate candidate sorbents for bulk removal of sulfurous compounds from syngas to assess the readiness of sorbents for commercial scale. The DOE has funded desulfurization and sorbent research for over 20 years and extensive laboratory-scale and bench-scale work has been conducted by government, academia and industry on the development and testing of regenerable sorbents for bulk sulfur removal from syngas (Cicero, et.al, 2000; Mitchell, 1998; Lew, 1989). However, the technologies still need to be proven in controlled conditions at a larger scale. Several Clean Coal Technology projects (i.e, the Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project, the Pinon Pine IGCC Power Project and the Tampa Electric Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Project) had proposed demonstrations of hot-gas desulfurization technology, but were not seen to completion (Clean Coal Technology Compendium website, 2002). As a result, there is a lack of data on sorbent and reactor performance under longer-term continuous conditions at a large scale. For commercial acceptance of hot- or warm-gas desulfurization, technology reliability is a question yet to be answered. The GPDU will fill the gap and has the objective to provide the proof-of-concept that is needed to foster commercialization of hot (greater than 538 C (1,000 F)) and/or warm (260 to 427 C (500 to 800 F)) gas desulfurization for IGCC processes. The GPDU facility, which includes a separate Syngas Generator (SGG) that supplies a simulated coal gas to the GPDU, is in the shakedown phase of operations with an initial reactor configuration of transport absorber-transport regenerator. The status and preliminary results of shakedown activities are presented to provide insight into startup and operations of a continuous transport desulfurization process.

Everitt, E.; Bissett, L.A.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

171

The exact solution of several classes of inventory-routing problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to be competitive companies need to take advantage of synergistic interactions between different decision areas. Two of these are related to the distribution and inventory management processes. Inventory-Routing Problems (IRPs) arise when inventory ... Keywords: Branch-and-cut, Consistency, Inventory management, Inventory-routing, Multi-vehicle, Transshipment, Vehicle routing

Leandro C. Coelho; Gilbert Laporte

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Gas Interactions In Nonferrous Metals Processing II - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SOME GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CONTINUOUS GAS-STIRRED ... the bulk liquid phase, as well as the chemical reaction at the gas/liquid interface,...

173

Advanced Materials and Processes for Gas Turbines TABLE OF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Issues for the Design of Industrial Gas Turbines [pp. 3-13] ... French Developments of Superalloys for Gas Turbine Disks and Blades [pp. 17-28

174

Extraction Loss of Natural Gas at Processing Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

175

Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final reprot, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluations, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Information Inaccuracy in Inventory Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many companies have automated their inventory management processes and rely on an information system in critical decision making. However, if the information is inaccurate, the ability of the system to provide high availability of products at the minimal operating cost can be compromised. In this paper, analytical and simulation modelling demonstrate that even a small rate of stock loss undetected by the information system can lead to inventory inaccuracy that disrupts the replenishment process and creates severe out-of-stocks. In fact, revenue losses due to out-of-stocks can far outweigh the stock losses themselves. This sensitivity of performance to the inventory inaccuracy becomes even higher in systems operating in lean environments. Motivated by an automatic product identification technology under development at the Auto-ID Center, various methods of compensating for the inventory inaccuracy are presented and evaluated. Comparisons of the methods reveal that the inventory inaccuracy problem can be effectively treated even without automatic product identification technologies in some situations. 1

Stock Loss; Yun Kang; Stanley B. Gershwin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Chemical Process Measurements Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in the gas and liquid phases and ... inventory of atmospheric greenhouse gases, most notably ... Gas and Particulate Concentration Measurements and ...

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

Building GHGs National Inventory Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHGs National Inventory Systems GHGs National Inventory Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Building GHGs National Inventory Systems - Capacity Development for National GHG´s Inventories in Non-Annex I Countries Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview The forthcoming climate regime will include a global mechanism called REDD - Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation. Each developing country must draw up a Greenhouse Gas Inventory (GHG Inventory)

179

Process for the production of fuel gas from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and process for the conversion of hydrocarbonaceous materials, such as coal, to more valuable gaseous products in a fluidized bed gasification reaction and efficient withdrawal of agglomerated ash from the fluidized bed is disclosed. The improvements are obtained by introducing an oxygen containing gas into the bottom of the fluidized bed through a separate conduit positioned within the center of a nozzle adapted to agglomerate and withdraw the ash from the bottom of the fluidized bed. The conduit extends above the constricted center portion of the nozzle and preferably terminates within and does not extend from the nozzle. In addition to improving ash agglomeration and withdrawal, the present invention prevents sintering and clinkering of the ash in the fluidized bed and permits the efficient recycle of fine material recovered from the product gases by contacting the fines in the fluidized bed with the oxygen as it emanates from the conduit positioned within the withdrawal nozzle. Finally, the present method of oxygen introduction permits the efficient recycle of a portion of the product gases to the reaction zone to increase the reducing properties of the hot product gas.

Patel, Jitendra G. (Bolingbrook, IL); Sandstrom, William A. (Chicago, IL); Tarman, Paul B. (Elmhurst, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

U.S. Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 15,641,633 16,316,674 17,655,108 1970's 18,509,309 19,252,807 19,947,740 19,679,291 18,684,480 17,748,426 17,717,951 17,569,835 17,012,234 1980's 14,816,393 14,163,667 13,173,129 13,946,385 13,434,644 12,949,592 12,874,263 12,794,932 12,810,246 1990's 14,610,303 16,229,684 16,045,855 16,396,894 16,459,516 16,930,662 17,470,017 16,836,795 16,557,779 16,662,873 2000's 16,998,687 16,511,427 15,920,911 14,697,316 15,190,200 14,915,680 14,682,188 15,663,381 15,316,804 15,904,517 2010's 16,267,757 16,566,883 17,538,026 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

West Virginia Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 235,832 210,058 185,937 1970's 169,695 145,206 324,381 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 86,348 67,341 72,404 102,219 106,740 104,310 105,848 106,885 109,793 1990's 107,210 111,635 115,260 115,963 113,865 116,792 70,709 69,092 70,641 66,388 2000's 131,681 125,537 127,044 116,761 127,384 130,255 129,334 133,422 138,601 143,468 2010's 137,740 189,278 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages:

182

New Mexico Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 923,202 1,058,587 1,079,492 1970's 1,101,442 1,124,139 1,126,192 1,101,341 1,060,491 1,037,160 1,066,104 1,136,254 1,040,098 1980's 948,680 799,990 735,882 747,412 709,601 561,369 605,035 591,837 638,498 1990's 665,232 646,116 722,433 804,536 800,836 809,893 1,129,598 851,305 868,209 873,801 2000's 880,463 966,882 994,953 987,762 940,295 893,586 817,261 811,312 853,470 769,783 2010's 737,187 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013

183

Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS Process)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project is to develop an advanced, clean coal biogasification (MicGAS) Process. The objectives of the research during FY 1993--94 were to: (1) enhance kinetics of methane production (biogasification, biomethanation) from Texas lignite (TxL) by the Mic-1 consortium isolated and developed at ARCTECH, (2) increase coal solids loading, (3) optimize medium composition, and (4) reduce retention time. A closer analysis of the results described here indicate that biomethanation of TxL at >5% solids loading is feasible through appropriate development of nutrient medium and further adaptation of the microorganisms involved in this process. Further understanding of the inhibitory factors and some biochemical manipulations to overcome those inhibitions will hasten the process considerably. Results are discussed on the following: products of biomethanation and enhance of methane production including: bacterial adaptation; effect of nutrient amendment substitutes; effects of solids loading; effect of initial pH of the culture medium; effect of hydrogen donors and carbon balance.

Walia, D.S.; Srivastava, K.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

"NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.5 hours" 1.5 hours" "NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY" "FORM EIA-757" "Schedule B: Emergency Status Report" "This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction."

185

Processing and Gas Barrier Behavior of Multilayer Thin Nanocomposite Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin films with the ability to impart oxygen and other types of gas barrier are crucial to commercial packaging applications. Commodity polymers, such as polyethylene (PE), polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), have insufficient barrier for goods requiring long shelf life. Current gas barrier technologies like plasma-enhanced vapor deposition (PECVD) often create high barrier metal oxide films, which are prone to cracking when flexed. Bulk composites composed of polymer and impermeable nanoparticles show improved barrier, but particle aggregation limits their practical utility for applications requiring high barrier and transparency. Layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies allow polymers and nanoparticles to be mixed with high particle loadings, creating super gas barrier thin films on substrates normally exhibiting high gas permeability. Branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) were deposited using LbL to create gas barrier films with varying pH combinations. Film thickness and mass fraction of each component was controlled by their combined charge. With lower charge density (PEI at pH 10 and PAA at pH 4), PEI/PAA assemblies exhibit the best oxygen barrier relative to other pH combinations. An 8 BL PEI/PAA film, with a thickness of 451 nm, has an oxygen permeability lower than 4.8 x 10^-21 cm^3 * cm/cm^2 * s * Pa, which is comparable to a 100 nm SiOx nanocoating. Crosslinking these films with glutaraldehyde (GA), 1-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-3-ethylcarbodiimide methiodide (EDC) or heating forms covalent bonds between PEI and/or PAA. Oxygen transmission rates (OTR) of 8 BL films crosslinked with 0.1M GA or 0.01M EDC show the best oxygen barrier at 100% RH. Graphene oxide (GO) sheets and PEI were deposited via LbL with varying GO concentration. The resulting thin films have an average bilayer thickness from 4.3 to 5.0 nm and a GO mass fraction from 88 to 91wt%. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images reveal a highly-oriented nanobrick wall structure. A 10 BL PEI/GO film that is 91 nm thick, made with a 0.2 wt% GO suspension, exhibits an oxygen permeability of 2.5 x 10^-20 cm^3 * cm/cm^2 * s * Pa. Finally, the influence of deposition time on thin film assembly was examined by depositing montmorillonite (MMT) or laponite (LAP) clays paired with PEI. Film growth and microstructure suggests that smaller aspect ratio LAP clay is more dip-time dependent than MMT and larger aspect ratio MMT has better oxygen barrier. A 30 BL PEI/MMT film made with 10 second dips in PEI has the same undetectable OTR as a film with 5 minute dips (with dips in MMT held at 5 minutes in both cases), indicating LbL gas barrier can be made more quickly than initially thought. These high barrier recipes, with simple and efficient processing conditions, are good candidates for a variety of packaging applications.

Yang, You-Hao

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperatures to improve reaction kinetics and permeation. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. The first-year screening studies of WGS catalysts identified Cu-ceria as the most promising high-temperature shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}, and were thus eliminated from further consideration. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. Several catalyst formulations were prepared, characterized and tested in the first year of study. Details from the catalyst development and testing work were given in our first annual technical report. Hydrogen permeation through Pd and Pd-alloy foils was investigated in a small membrane reactor constructed during the first year of the project. The effect of temperature on the hydrogen flux through pure Pd, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} and Pd{sub 75}Ag{sub 25} alloy membranes, each 25 {micro}m thick, was evaluated in the temperature range from 250 C to 500 C at upstream pressure of 4.4 atm and permeate hydrogen pressure of 1 atm. Flux decay was observed for the Pd-Cu membrane above 500 C. From 350-450 C, an average hydrogen flux value of 0.2 mol H{sub 2}/m{sup 2}/s was measured over this Pd-alloy membrane. These results are in good agreement with literature data. In this year's report, we discuss reaction rate measurements, optimization of catalyst kinetics by proper choice of dopant oxide (lanthana) in ceria, long-term stability studies, and H{sub 2} permeation data collected with unsupported flat, 10 {micro}m-thick Pd-Cu membranes over a wide temperature window and in various gas mixtures. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was further improved, by proper selection of dopant type and amount. The formulation 10 at%Cu-Ce(30 at%La)Ox was the best; this was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The stability of catalyst performance was examined in 40-hr long tests. A series of hydrogen permeation tests were conducted in a small flat-membrane reactor using the 10 m{micro}-thick Pd-Cu membranes. Small inhibitory effects of CO and CO{sub 2} were found at temperatures above 350 C, while H{sub 2}O vapor had no effect on hydrogen permeation. No carbon deposition took place during many hours of membrane operation. The reaction extent on the blank (catalyst-free) membrane was also negligible. A larger flat-membrane reactor will be used next year with the catalyst wash coated on screens close coupled with the Pd-Cu membrane.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, PI; Jerry Meldon, Co-PI; Xiaomei Qi

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

188

Active constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsena , Sigurd little attention. this paper addresses optimal operation of a simple natural gas liquefaction process at all times. Keywords: Self-optimizing control, liquefied natural gas, LNG, PRICO, disturbances, optimal

Skogestad, Sigurd

189

Selection of Controlled Variables for a Natural Gas to Liquids Process Mehdi Panahi and Sigurd Skogestad*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection of Controlled Variables for a Natural Gas to Liquids Process Mehdi Panahi and Sigurd variables (CVs) for a natural gas to hydrocarbon liquids (GTL) process based on the idea of self of operation are studied. In mode I, where the natural gas flow rate is given, there are three unconstrained

Skogestad, Sigurd

190

Utilization of natural gas in large-scale separation processes. Final report, September 1987-August 1988  

SciTech Connect

Several industrial separation processes were identified which could be operated in a cost-effective manner utilizing pipeline natural gas as a processing fluid. In one such process, natural gas stripping, hazardous materials are transferred from hazardous water to the natural gas phase. When the natural gas phase is later burned as fuel, the heating value is realized and hazardous materials are destroyed. The combination of extraction, natural gas stripping, and incineration may be used to remove and destroy hazardous material contained in soil. It is possible for this system to be portable so that it could be used for the treatment of contaminated soils at remote sites. Natural gas may also be used to flush hazardous materials from adsorbents and thus regenerate adsorption beds used to remove hazardous materials from water or gas streams. The regenerant gas stream, containing natural gas and hazardous materials, would be used as boiler fuel where the hazardous material would be destroyed.

Humphrey, J.L.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY Revision 1 10/31/07 Approved by: DOE Records Management Division, IM-23 PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY 1. GENERAL. A records inventory is compiling a descriptive list of each record series or system, including the location of the records and any other pertinent data. A records inventory is not a list of each document or each folder. 2. DEFINE THE RECORDS INVENTORY GOAL(S). The goals of a records inventory should be to: a. Gather information for scheduling purposes; b. Prepare for conversion to other media or to identify the volume of classified and/or permanent records in your organization's custody; and c. Identify any existing shortcomings, deficiencies, or problems with

192

New Concepts in Hardware and Processes to Conserve Oil and Gas in Industrial Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A broad program to identify and evaluate new types of hardware and processes to conserve oil and gas in chemical plants and petroleum refineries has been completed. During the course of this program, which was sponsored by the Office of Industrial Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne interacted with 130 industrial companies to help define and evaluate appropriate areas of technology. The initial step was to assemble a master list of technologies that promised to conserve oil and gas. These technologies were then screened on the basis of quantity of energy saved, capital and operating costs, industry attitude, market potential, and special barriers to implementation such as environmental issues and other special types of problems. One approach used to determine industry attitudes on technologies was to poll several key energy-conservation groups. These included the Gulf Coast Energy Society, Golden Triangle Energy Society, CMA Energy Committee, and the Energy Conservation Committee of the American Petroleum Institute. This paper will summarize some of the results of this program in terms of the following areas of technology: Energy-efficient methods of separation ; Alternative fuels and feed stocks ; Recovery of low-level heat; Advanced Concepts Although the above technologies were identified and evaluated in terms of their application specifically to chemical plants and petroleum refineries, they have the potential of conserving oil and gas across a broad spectrum of industrial processes.

Humphrey, J. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Global gas processing will strengthen to meet expanding markets  

SciTech Connect

The worldwide LPG industry continues to expand faster than the petroleum industry -- 4%/year for LPG vs. 2%/year for petroleum in 1995 and less than 1%/year in the early 1990s. This rapid expansion of LPG markets is occurring in virtually every region of the world, including such developing countries as China. The Far East is the focus of much of the LPG industry`s attention, but many opportunities exist in other regions such as the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. The investment climate is improving in all phases of downstream LPG marketing, including terminaling, storage, and wholesale and retail distribution. The world LPG supply/demand balance has been relatively tight since the Gulf War and should remain so. Base demand (the portion of demand that is not highly price-sensitive) is expanding more rapidly than supplies. As a result, the proportion of total LPG supplies available for price-sensitive petrochemical feedstock markets is declining, at least in the short term. The paper discusses importers, price patterns, world LPG demand, world LPG supply, US NGL supply, US gas processing, ethane and propane supply, butane, isobutane, and natural gasoline supply, and US NGL demand.

Haun, R.R. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C.; Gist, R.L. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Timothy C. Merkel (Primary Contact) Timothy C. Merkel (Primary Contact) RTI P.O. Box 12194 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 merkel@rti.org Tel (919) 485-2742 Fax (919) 541-8000 Raghubir P. Gupta RTI P.O. Box 12194 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 gupta@rti.org Tel (919) 541-8023 Fax (919) 541-8000 Suresh C. Jain U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 suresh.jain@netl.doe.gov Tel (304) 285-5431 Fax (304) 285-4403 Brian S. Turk RTI P.O. Box 12194 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 bst@rti.org Tel (919) 541-8024 Fax (919) 541-8000 Daniel C. Cicero U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 daniel.cicero@netl.doe.gov Tel (304) 285-4826 Fax (304) 285-4403 A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas

196

Gas conditioning and processing. Volume II. Absorption and fractionation; pumping, compression and expansion; refrigeration; hydrate inhibition, dehydration and process control  

SciTech Connect

Volume II of a two volume publication is presented in which aspects of conditioning and/or processing of natural gas for sale are examined. Chapters are included on absorption and fractionation, compression and expansion of fluids, refrigeration systems, liquefaction processes, water-hydrocarbon system behavior, dehydration and sweetening, adsorption processing, sulfur recovery, process control, and cost estimation. (JRD)

Campbell, J.M.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process - Energy Innovation Portal  

This invention may have utility in natural gas / CH4 storage and transport, CO2 sequestration, cold energy storage, ... (CH4) or carbon dioxide (CO2).

198

NETL: Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting. Preliminary Technical and Economic Feasibility Study - Topical Report PDF-381KB (October 2012) Development of a Novel Gas...

199

Oil and Gas Environmental Review and Approval Processes (New...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jersey Program Type Environmental Regulations Oil and natural gas companies engaged in exploration, development and production in New Brunswick will be required by the...

200

Gas Interactions In Nonferrous Metals Processing I - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GAS-METAL REACTIONS DURING DEBINDING AND SINTERING OF ... Less well-defined are the corresponding liquid phase reaction and reactions which...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Developing a water treatment system for Subsea Gas processing plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The petroleum industry is currently moving to meet the ever-rising demand for oil and gas production. As onshore fields become depleted and decline in production, (more)

Honer Badi M Nazhat, Dana

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Natural gas processing plant data now available - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This past summer, EIA activated the baseline survey (EIA-757, Schedule A), the results of which are published in EIA's Natural Gas Annual Respondent Query System.

203

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and...

204

NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY FORM EIA-757 INSTRUCTIONS ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Schedule B is the Emergency Status Report, which will only be activated during an emergency situation that impacts the supply of natural gas to ...

205

Natural gas processing plant data now available - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The EIA-757 survey has a baseline portion, Schedule A, to track the country's population of natural gas plants, and an emergency activation portion, ...

206

Microeconomic Inventory Adjustment and Aggregate Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine microeconomic and aggregate inventory dynamics in the business sector of the U.S. economy. We employ high-frequency ...rm-level data and use an empirically tractable model, in which the aggregate dynamics are derived explicitly from the underlying microeconomic data. Our results show that the microeconomic adjustment function in both the manufacturing and trade sectors is nonlinear and asymmetric, results consistent with ...rms using (S; s)-type inventory policies. There are dierences in the estimated adjustment functions between the two sectors as well as the durable and nondurable goods ...rms within each sector. The estimated adjustment function is remarkably stable across subperiods, indicating little change in the inventory adjustment process over time. As predicted by our model, higher moments of the cross-sectional distribution of inventory deviations aect aggregate inventory dynamics. Both authors are aliated with the Research Department, Federal Reserve...

Jonathan Mccarthy; Egon Zakrajsek; We Thank Palle Andersen; Andy Caplin; Mark Gertler; John Haltiwanger; Jim Harrigan; Brad Humphreys; Spence Krane; Trish Mosser; Simon Potter; Tom Sargent

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Silica Exposure Assessment of Oil And Gas Drilling Workers During Hydraulic Fracking Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The problem investigated in this study was that of identifying the silica exposure to the employees of an oil gas company during the fracking process (more)

Li, Jigang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector`s centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gas flow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel`s wall in the form of a ``wavy film,`` while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator. 4 figs.

Carl, D.E.

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

STEM Education Program Inventory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issue for STEM Education Program Inventory Title of Program* Requestor Contact Information First Name* Last Name* Phone Number* E-mail* Fax Number Institution Name Program...

210

Effect of flue gas impurities on the process of injection and storage of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous experiments - injecting pure CO2 into carbonate cores - showed that the process is a win-win technology, sequestrating CO2 while recovering a significant amount of hitherto unrecoverable natural gas that could help defray the cost of CO2 sequestration. In this thesis, I report my findings on the effect of flue gas ??impurities?? on the displacement of natural gas during CO2 sequestration, and results on unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests to carbonate samples. In displacement experiments, corefloods were conducted at 1,500 psig and 70??C, in which flue gas was injected into an Austin chalk core containing initially methane. Two types of flue gases were injected: dehydrated flue gas with 13.574 mole% CO2 (Gas A), and treated flue gas (N2, O2 and water removed) with 99.433 mole% CO2 (Gas B). The main results of this study are as follows. First, the dispersion coefficient increases with concentration of ??impurities??. Gas A exhibits the largest dispersion coefficients, 0.18-0.25 cm2/min, compared to 0.13-0.15 cm2/min for Gas B, and 0.15 cm2/min for pure CO2. Second, recovery of methane at breakthrough is relatively high, ranging from 86% OGIP for pure CO2, 74-90% OGIP for Gas B, and 79-81% for Gas A. Lastly, injection of Gas A would sequester the least amount of CO2 as it contains about 80 mole% nitrogen. From the view point of sequestration, Gas A would be least desirable while Gas B appears to be the most desirable as separation cost would probably be cheaper than that for pure CO2 with similar gas recovery. For UCS tests, corefloods were conducted at 1,700 psig and 65??C in such a way that the cell throughput of CO2 simulates near-wellbore throughput. This was achieved through increasing the injection rate and time of injection. Corefloods were followed by porosity measurement and UCS tests. Main results are presented as follows. First, the UCS of the rock was reduced by approximately 30% of its original value as a result of the dissolution process. Second, porosity profiles of rock samples increased up to 2.5% after corefloods. UCS test results indicate that CO2 injection will cause weakening of near-wellbore formation rock.

Nogueira de Mago, Marjorie Carolina

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

New process for coke-oven gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

With the EPA reclassifying spent iron oxide as a hazardous waste material in 1990, an alternative technology was sought for desulfurizing coke-oven gas. Vacasulf technology was adopted for reasons that included: producing of coke battery heating gas without further polishing and high-quality elemental sulfur; lowest operating cost in comparison with other methods; no waste products; and integrates with existing ammonia destruction facility. Vacasulf requires a single purchased material, potassium hydroxide, that reacts with carbon dioxide in coke-oven gas to form potassium carbonate which, in turn, absorbs hydrogen sulfide. Operation of the system has been successful following the resolution of relatively minor start-up problems.

Currey, J.H. [Citizens Gas and Coke Utility, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A process for off-gas particulate removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This paper describes an off-gas system for the removal of radioactive particulates from a melter for the vitrification of radioactive wastes to form glass waste forms. A diagram is provided.

Carl, D.E.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Method and apparatus for processing exhaust gas with corona discharge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is placing a catalyst coating upon surfaces surrounding a volume containing corona discharge. In addition, the electrodes are coated with a robust dielectric material. Further, the electrodes are arranged so that at least a surface portion of each electrode extends into a flow path of the exhaust gas to be treated and there is only exhaust gas in the volume between each pair of electrodes. 12 figs.

Barlow, S.E.; Orlando, T.M.; Tonkyn, R.G.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

214

Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Thief process for the removal of mercury from flue gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for removing mercury from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant is described. Mercury removal is by adsorption onto a thermally activated sorbent produced in-situ at the power plant. To obtain the thermally activated sorbent, a lance (thief) is inserted into a location within the combustion zone of the combustion chamber and extracts a mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas. The semi-combusted coal has adsorptive properties suitable for the removal of elemental and oxidized mercury. The mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas is separated into a stream of gas and semi-combusted coal that has been converted to a stream of thermally activated sorbent. The separated stream of gas is recycled to the combustion chamber. The thermally activated sorbent is injected into the duct work of the power plant at a location downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber. Mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury combination is removed from the plant by a particulate collection system.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Freeman, Mark C. (South Park Township, PA); Hargis, Richard A. (Canonsburg, PA); O' Dowd, William J. (Charleroi, PA)

2003-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

216

An Evaluation of Low-BTU Gas from Coal as an Alternate Fuel for Process Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the price gap between oil and natural gas and coal continues to widen, Monsanto has carefully searched out and examined opportunities to convert fuel use to coal. Preliminary studies indicate that the low-btu gas produced by fixed-bed, air blown gasifiers could potentially replace the natural gas now used in process heaters. The technology is well established and requires less capital than the higher-btu process heaters. Low-btu gas has sufficient heating value and flame temperature to be acceptable fuel for most process heaters. Economics for gas production appear promising, but somewhat uncertain. Rough evaluations indicate rates of return of as much as 30-40%. However, the economics are very dependent on a number of site- specific considerations including: coal vs. natural gas prices, economic life of the gas-consuming facility, quantity of gas required, need for desulfurization, location of gasifiers in relation to gas users, existence of coal unloading and storage facilities, etc. Two of these factors, the difference between coal and natural gas prices and the project life are difficult to predict. The resulting uncertainty has caused Monsanto to pursue coal gasification for process heaters with cautious optimism, on a site by site basis.

Nebeker, C. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

PHYSICS PROCESSES IN DISRUPTION MITIGATION USING MASSIVE NOBLE GAS INJECTION  

SciTech Connect

Methods for detecting imminent disruptions and mitigating disruption effects using massive injection of noble gases (He, Ne, or Ar) have been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak [1]. A jet of high injected gas density (> 10{sup 24} m{sup -3}) and pressure (> 20 kPa) penetrates the target plasma at the gas sound speed ({approx}300-500 m/s) and increases the atom/ion content of the plasma by a factor of > 50 in several milliseconds. UV line radiation from the impurity species distributes the plasma energy uniformly on the first wall, reducing the thermal load to the divertor by a factor of 10. Runaway electrons are almost completely eliminated by the large density of free and bound electrons supplied by the gas injection. The small vertical plasma displacement before current quench and high ratio of current decay rate to vertical growth rate result in a 75% reduction in peak halo current amplitude and attendant forces.

D.A. HUMPHREYS; D.G. WHYTE; T.C. JERNIGAN; T.E.EVANS; D.S. GRAY; E.M. HOLLMANN; A.W. HYATT; A.G. KELLMAN; C.J. LASNIER; P.B. PARKS; P.L. TAYLOR

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

TSCA Inventory | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TSCA Inventory Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov Communities Consumer Data TSCA Inventory Dataset...

219

stocked inventory.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 08 AUDIT REPORT STOCKED INVENTORY AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES JUNE 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Stocked Inventory at the Savannah River Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's (Department) management and operating contractor at the Savannah River Site, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse), is responsible for managing the majority of the Department's missions and associated stocked inventory at the site. As of March 2001, Westinghouse maintained about

220

Evaluation of the NeuStream-S Flue Gas Desulfurization Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harris Group Inc. (HGI) of Denver, Colorado, was contracted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to monitor, evaluate, and prepare this report on a dual-alkali flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process developed by Neumann Systems Group, Inc. (NSG). The process is being demonstrated in a nominal 20-MW demonstration plant, treating a slip stream of flue gas from the Colorado Springs Utilities 142-MW Drake Unit 7. HGI evaluated performance, operability, and readiness for scale-up of the process. Co...

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

U.S., Canada continue dominance of world`s gas processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas plants in the US and Canada continued to lead the rest of the world in processing capacity, throughput, and NGL production in 1996. The consolidation of gas-processing assets that has been rolling through US companies in recent years continued to limit growth in new capacity. Canadian liquids producers, on the other hand, will likely benefit from increased gas production and export sales to the US when a clutch of pipeline expansions in the next 18--30 months eases the capacity constraints on gas movements southward. And, markets and suppliers around the world continue to become more closely dependent on each other, stimulating new capacity and production. US capacity stood at slightly more than 678 bcfd as of January 1, 1997; throughput for 1996 averaged 48.8 bcfd; and NGL production exceeded 76,000 gpd. Canadian gas-processing capacity last year approached 40 bcfd. Gas-processing throughput there averaged more than 30.8 bcfd; NGL production fell to slightly more than 42,000 gpd. Oil and Gas Journal`s most recent exclusive, plant-by-plant, worldwide gas-processing survey and its international survey of petroleum-derived sulfur recovery reflect these trends. This report supplements operator-supplied capacity and production data for Alberta with figures from the (1) Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (AEUB), formerly the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERBC), (2) British Columbia Ministry of Employment and Investment`s Engineering and Operations Branch, and (3) Saskatchewan Ministry of Energy and Mines.

True, W.R.

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

Slag processing system for direct coal-fired gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Direct coal-fired gas turbine systems and methods for their operation are provided by this invention. The gas turbine system includes a primary zone for burning coal in the presence of compressed air to produce hot combustion gases and debris, such as molten slag. The turbine system further includes a secondary combustion zone for the lean combustion of the hot combustion gases. The operation of the system is improved by the addition of a cyclone separator for removing debris from the hot combustion gases. The cyclone separator is disposed between the primary and secondary combustion zones and is in pressurized communication with these zones. In a novel aspect of the invention, the cyclone separator includes an integrally disposed impact separator for at least separating a portion of the molten slag from the hot combustion gases.

Pillsbury, Paul W. (Winter Springs, FL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's Engineering group has found a new site for the project at a Duke Energy gas processing plant in Milfay, Oklahoma.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The techniques employed in this project have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing sorbents that achieve greater than 99% H{sub 2}S removal at temperatures 480 C and that retain their activity over 50 cycles. Fundamental understanding of phenomena leading to chemical deactivation and high regeneration light-off temperature has enabled us to successfully prepare and scale up a FHR-32 sorbent that showed no loss in reactivity and capacity over 50 cycles. This sorbent removed H{sub 2}S below 80 ppmv and lighted-off nicely at 480 C during regeneration. Overall the test is a success with potential for an optimized FHR-32 to be a candidate for Sierra-Pacific. An advanced attrition resistant hot-gas desulfurization sorbent that can eliminate the problematic SO{sub 2} tail gas and yield elemental sulfur directly has been developed. Attrition resistant Zn-Fe sorbent (AHI-2) formulations have been prepared that can remove H{sub 2}S to below 20 ppmv from coal gas and can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} to produce elemental sulfur.

K. Jothimurugesan; Santosh K. Gangwal

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Appendix  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Appendix Appendix The preceding report is the most comprehensive report published by the EIA on natural gas processing plants in the United States. The data in the report for the year 2008 were collected on Form EIA-757, Natural Gas Processing Survey Schedule A, which was fielded to EIA respondents in the latter part of 2008 for the first time. This survey was used to collect information on the capacity, status, and operations of natural gas processing plants and to monitor constraints of natural gas processing plants during periods of supply disruption in areas affected by an emergency, such as a hurricane. EIA received authorization to collect information on processing plants from the Office of Management and Budget in early 2008. The form consists of two parts, Schedule A and Schedule B. Schedule A is

226

Fleet Inventory.xlsx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2007 SUV 10400 Tuba City, AZ F150 2006 Pick up truck 31180 Monticello, UT RAM 2500 2007 Pick up truck 55603 Weldon Springs, MO RAM 1500 2006 Pick up truck 32702 FLEET INVENTORY...

227

Life Cycle Inventory Database | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Database Life Cycle Inventory Database The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database serves as a central repository for information about the total energy and resource impacts of developing and using various commercial building materials, components, and assemblies. The database helps manufacturers, building designers, and developers select energy-efficient and environmentally friendly materials, products, and processes for their projects based on the environmental impact of an item over its entire lifespan. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the database in 2003 with input from a variety of partners. NREL maintains and updates the database with support from the

228

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space velocities. Equilibrium CO conversion at 400 C was measured at a space velocity of 30,000 h{sup -1} with the 10{micro}m- thick Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} membrane operating under a pressure differential of 100 psi. No carbon deposition took place during operation. The performance of the coupled Cu-ceria catalyst/membrane system at 400 C was stable in {approx} 30 h of continuous operation. The overall conclusion from this project is that Cu-doped ceria catalysts are suitable for use in high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactors. CO{sub 2}-rich operation does not affect the catalyst activity or stability; neither does it affect hydrogen permeation through the Pd-Cu membrane. Operation in the temperature range of 400-430 C is recommended.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

THE INTEGRATION OF PROCESS HEAT APPLICATIONS TO HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature gas reactor, HTGR, can produce industrial process steam, high-temperature heat-transfer gases, and/or electricity. In conventional industrial processes, these products are generated by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas, resulting in significant emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Heat or electricity produced in an HTGR could be used to supply process heat or electricity to conventional processes without generating any greenhouse gases. Process heat from a reactor needs to be transported by a gas to the industrial process. Two such gases were considered in this study: helium and steam. For this analysis, it was assumed that steam was delivered at 17 MPa and 540 C and helium was delivered at 7 MPa and at a variety of temperatures. The temperature of the gas returning from the industrial process and going to the HTGR must be within certain temperature ranges to maintain the correct reactor inlet temperature for a particular reactor outlet temperature. The returning gas may be below the reactor inlet temperature, ROT, but not above. The optimal return temperature produces the maximum process heat gas flow rate. For steam, the delivered pressure sets an optimal reactor outlet temperature based on the condensation temperature of the steam. ROTs greater than 769.7 C produce no additional advantage for the production of steam.

Michael G. McKellar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Low Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal and Recovery CNG Claus Sulfur Recovery Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased use of natural gas (methane) in the domestic energy market will force the development of large non-producing gas reserves now considered to be low quality. Large reserves of low quality natural gas (LQNG) contaminated with hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N) are available but not suitable for treatment using current conventional gas treating methods due to economic and environmental constraints. A group of three technologies have been integrated to allow for processing of these LQNG reserves; the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFZ) process for hydrocarbon / acid gas separation; the Triple Point Crystallizer (TPC) process for H{sub 2}S / C0{sub 2} separation and the CNG Claus process for recovery of elemental sulfur from H{sub 2}S. The combined CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus group of processes is one program aimed at developing an alternative gas treating technology which is both economically and environmentally suitable for developing these low quality natural gas reserves. The CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus process is capable of treating low quality natural gas containing >10% C0{sub 2} and measurable levels of H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} to pipeline specifications. The integrated CFZ / CNG Claus Process or the stand-alone CNG Claus Process has a number of attractive features for treating LQNG. The processes are capable of treating raw gas with a variety of trace contaminant components. The processes can also accommodate large changes in raw gas composition and flow rates. The combined processes are capable of achieving virtually undetectable levels of H{sub 2}S and significantly less than 2% CO in the product methane. The separation processes operate at pressure and deliver a high pressure (ca. 100 psia) acid gas (H{sub 2}S) stream for processing in the CNG Claus unit. This allows for substantial reductions in plant vessel size as compared to conventional Claus / Tail gas treating technologies. A close integration of the components of the CNG Claus process also allow for use of the methane/H{sub 2}S separation unit as a Claus tail gas treating unit by recycling the CNG Claus tail gas stream. This allows for virtually 100 percent sulfur recovery efficiency (virtually zero SO{sub 2} emissions) by recycling the sulfur laden tail gas to extinction. The use of the tail gas recycle scheme also deemphasizes the conventional requirement in Claus units to have high unit conversion efficiency and thereby make the operation much less affected by process upsets and feed gas composition changes. The development of these technologies has been ongoing for many years and both the CFZ and the TPC processes have been demonstrated at large pilot plant scales. On the other hand, prior to this project, the CNG Claus process had not been proven at any scale. Therefore, the primary objective of this portion of the program was to design, build and operate a pilot scale CNG Claus unit and demonstrate the required fundamental reaction chemistry and also demonstrate the viability of a reasonably sized working unit.

Klint, V.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States The Gulf of Mexico area, which includes the States of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, has in the past accounted for the majority of natural gas production. Processing plants are especially important in this part of the country because of the amount of NGLs in the natural gas produced and existence of numerous petro-chemical plants seeking that feedstock in this area. Consequently, the States along the Gulf of Mexico are home to the largest number of plants and the most processing capacity in the United States. Natural gas produced in this area of the country is typically rich in NGLs and requires processing before it is pipeline-quality dry natural gas. Offshore natural gas production can contain more than 4 gallons of

232

Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil ...  

A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing ...

233

Aeroengine turbine exhaust gas temperature prediction using process support vector machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The turbine exhaust gas temperature (EGT) is an important parameter of the aeroengine and it represents the thermal health condition of the aeroengine. By predicting the EGT, the performance deterioration of the aeroengine can be deduced in advance and ... Keywords: aeroengine, condition monitoring, process support vector machines, time series prediction, turbine exhaust gas temperature

Xu-yun Fu, Shi-sheng Zhong

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gas and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

Huang, H.S.; Sather, N.F.

1987-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

235

Membrane Process to Sequester CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MeMbrane Process to sequester co MeMbrane Process to sequester co 2 froM Power Plant flue Gas Background Carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants are believed to contribute significantly to global warming climate change. The direct approach to address this problem is to capture the carbon dioxide in flue gas and sequester it underground. However, the high cost of separating and capturing CO 2 with conventional technologies prevents the adoption of this approach. This project investigates the technical and economic feasibility of a new membrane process to capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. Description Direct CO 2 capture from power plant flue gas has been the subject of many studies. Currently, CO 2 capture with amine absorption seems to be the leading candidate technology-although membrane processes have been suggested. The principal

236

Biomass gasification using a horizontal entrained-flow gasifier and catalytic processing of the product gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A novel study on biomass-air gasification using a horizontal entrained-flow gasifier and catalytic processing of the product gas has been conducted. The study was designed (more)

Legonda, Isack Amos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

U.S. Normal Butane-Butylene Stocks at Natural Gas Processing ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Normal Butane-Butylene Stocks at Natural Gas Processing Plants (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: ...

238

Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

Leininger, Thomas F. (Chino Hills, CA); Robin, Allen M. (Anaheim, CA); Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Suggitt, Robert M. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

1995-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

240

Thermal Analysis of the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System Piping During the Gas Baking Process  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary analysis has been performed examining the temperature distribution in the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS) piping and the divertor itself during the gas baking process. During gas baking, it is required that the divertor reach a temperature of 350 C. Thermal losses in the piping and from the divertor itself require that the gas supply temperature be maintained above that temperature in order to ensure that all of the divertor components reach the required temperature. The analysis described in this report was conducted in order to estimate the required supply temperature from the gas heater.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Harvey, Karen [ORNL; Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Topsoe`s Wet gas Sulfuric Acid (WSA) process: An alternative technology for recovering refinery sulfur  

SciTech Connect

The Topsoe Wet gas Sulfuric Acid (WSA) process is a catalytic process which produces concentrated sulfuric acid from refinery streams containing sulfur compounds such as H{sub 2}S (Claus plant feed), Claus plant tail gas, SO{sub 2} (FCC off-gas, power plants), and spent sulfuric acid (alkylation acid). The WSA process recovers up to 99.97% of the sulfur value in the stream as concentrated sulfuric acid (93--98.5 wt%). No solid waste products or waste water is produced and no chemicals are consumed in the process. The simple process layout provides low capital cost and attractive operating economy. Twenty four commercial WSA plants have been licensed. The WSA process is explained in detail and comparisons with alternative sulfur management technology are presented. Environmental regulations applying to SO{sub x} abatement and sulfuric acid production plants are explained in the context of WSA plant operation.

Ward, J.W. [Haldor Topsoe, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This DOE Industrial Program fact sheet describes ten effective ways to save energy and money in industrial process heating systems by making some changes in equipment, operations, and maintenance.

Not Available

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Mathematical modeling of wet magnesia flue gas desulphurization process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desulphurization of flue gases from various chemical industries in a techno-econo-enviro manner is a demanding technology. The concentrations of sulphur dioxide in and around these plants overshoot the danger point. In recent years, the process analysis ...

M. K. Mondal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2013 (million cubic feet per day) Alabama 1,403 Arkansas 24 California 926 Colorado 5,450 Florida 90 Illinois 2,100 Kansas 1,818 Kentucky 240 Louisiana 10,737 Michigan 479 Mississippi 1,123

246

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Processes: Will They Work?  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at DOEs National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETLs 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. Results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve (see Figure 1).

Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology Group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group first found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produced about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit was built to bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid was built by ABB. NTE ordered the required compressor and MTR made the membrane modules for a December 2004 delivery. However, the gas supply was not steady enough for field testing, and MTR/ABB have now located other sites for field testing and commercial development.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

248

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is now working with the company's Randall Gas Technology Group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group first found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produced about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit was built to bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid was built by ABB. NTE ordered the required compressor and MTR made the membrane modules for a December 2004 delivery. However, the gas supply was not steady enough for field testing, and MTR/ABB have now located other sites for field testing and commercial development.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd nitrogen removal/gas treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project field test at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

250

A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning IGCC generated syngas to meet contaminant tolerance limits for fuel cell and chemical production applications. The specific goals are to develop processes for (1) removal of reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removal of hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface-area material; and (3) removal of NH3 with acidic adsorbents followed by conversion of this NH3 into nitrogen and water. Existing gasification technologies can effectively and efficiently convert a wide variety of carbonaceous feedstocks (coal, petcoke, resids, biomass, etc.) into syngas, which predominantly contains carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Unfortunately, the impurities present in these carbonaceous feedstocks are converted to gaseous contaminants such as H2S, COS, HCl, NH3, alkali macromolecules and heavy metal compounds (such as Hg) during the gasification process. Removal of these contaminants using conventional processes is thermally inefficient and capital intensive. This research and development effort is focused on investigation of modular processes for removal of sulfur, chlorine, nitrogen and mercury compounds from syngas at elevated temperature and pressures at significantly lower costs than conventional technologies.

Merkel, T.C.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.; Cicero, D.C.; Jain, S.C.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hanford regulated laundry: inventory control and production improvement study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to assist the Hanford regulated laundry facility in reducing processing costs and in improving facility performance. Specific problem areas addressed were: no method for determining optimum manpower requirements, resulting in excessive amounts of employee overtime; no buffer inventory available to offset demand peaks, resulting in additional employee overtime and unmet demand; lack of adequate inventory control, resulting in unnecessary inventory costs; and no detailed analysis of the impact of 100% monitoring.

Hostick, C.J.; Imhoff, C.H.; Levine, L.O.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Keywords: Gas Storage, Natural Gas, Storage, Deliverability, Inventory Chapters Glossary Bibliography Biographical Sketch Summary Underground storage of natural gas

Mohaghegh, Shahab

254

The LANL Physical Inventory Program  

SciTech Connect

The LANL physical inventory program (statistically based) provides assurance that the inventory is represented to the defined confidence levels. In addition, it establishes a benchmark to prove that the inventory is accurately stated. The LANL's Physical Inventory Program for nuclear materials requires the performance of periodic physical inventories and special inventories of nuclear material. The Inventory Program also requires the reconciliation of inventory measurements with previously established nuclear material accountability values. This inventory program applies to all material balance areas (MBAs) and is designed in accordance with DOE order 474.1, 'Nuclear Material Control and Accountability'. The program uses a graded approach for performing physical inventories with primary emphasis placed on Categories I and II quantities of special nuclear material. This paper describes the essential elements of the LANL Physical Inventory Program. In addition, the inter-dependency of the Inventory Program with respect to other LANL MC&A Programs is discussed. This paper, by outlining the elements and approach of a site-specific physical inventory program assists safeguards practitioners in the design of related physical inventory programs.

Pompeo, J. A. (John A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 14 years, the Gas Technology Institute and jointly with Uhde since 1997 developing Morphysorb{reg_sign} a new physical solvent-based acid gas removal process. Based on extensive laboratory, bench, pilot-plant scale experiments and computer simulations, DEGT Gas Transmission Company, Canada (DEGT) has chosen the process for use at its Kwoen processing facility near Chetwynd, British Columbia, Canada as the first commercial application for the Morphysorb process. DOE co-funded the development of the Morphysorb process in various stages of development. DOE funded the production of this report to ensure that the results of the work would be readily available to potential users of the process in the United States. The Kwoen Plant is designed to process 300 MMscfd of raw natural gas at 1,080-psia pressure. The sour natural gas contains 20 to 25 percent H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}. The plant reduces the acid gas content by about 50% and injects the removed H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} into an injection well. The Kwoen plant has been operating since August 2002. Morphysorb{reg_sign} is a physical solvent-based process used for the bulk removal of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S from natural gas and other gaseous streams. The solvent consists of N-Formyl morpholine and other morpholine derivatives. This process is particularly effective for high-pressure and high acid-gas applications and offers substantial savings in investment and operating cost compared to competitive physical solvent-based processes. GTI and DEGT first entered into an agreement in 2002 to test the Morphysorb process at their Kwoen Gas Treating Plant in northern BC. The process is operating successfully without any solvent related problems and has between DEGTC and GTI. As of December 2003, about 90 Bcf of sour gas was processed. Of this about 8 Bcf of acid gas containing mainly H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} was injected back into the depleted reservoir and 82 Bcf sent for further processing at DEGTC's Pine River Plant. This report discusses the operational performance at Kwoen plant during the performance test as well as the solvent performance since the plant started up. The Morphysorb performance is assessed by Duke Energy according to five metrics: acid gas pickup, recycle gas flow, total hydrocarbon loss in acid gas stream, Morphysorb solvent losses and foaming related problems. Plant data over a period of one year show that the Morphysorb solvent has performed extremely well in four out of five of these categories. The fifth metric, Morphysorb solvent loss, is being evaluated over a longer-term period in order to accurately assess it. However, the preliminary indications based on makeup solvent used to date are that solvent losses will also be within expectations. The analysis of the solvent samples indicates that the solvent is very stable and did not show any sign of degradation. The operability of the solvent is good and no foaming related problems have been encountered. According to plant operators the Morphysorb unit runs smoothly and requires no special attention.

Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1-MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technologies group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The system has been installed in the field and initial startup activities have been completed. The system has not yet produced the flow rate required for continuous stable operation. NTE, the company hosting this test site/pilot plant, will drill additional wells to increase the inlet flow rate. The system is expected to be in full continuous operation by May 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. The target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Andre Da Costa

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

260

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPERATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. System fabrication was completed in January 2004 and the membrane inserts were loaded. Additional pressure testing and verification will be completed prior to shipment, which is expected in early February 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. System fabrication was completed in January 2004 and the membrane inserts were loaded. Additional pressure testing and verification will be completed prior to shipment, which is expected in early February 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GTI and Krupp Uhde have been jointly developing advanced technology for removing high concentrations of acid gas from high-pressure natural gas for over a decade. This technology, the Morphysorb{reg_sign} process, based on N-formyl and N-acetyl morpholine mixtures, has now been tested in a large-scale facility and this paper presents preliminary results from acceptance testing at that facility. Earlier publications have discussed the bench-scale and pilot plant work that led up to this important milestone. The site was Duke Energy's new Kwoen sour gas upgrader near Chetwynd B.C., Canada. This facility has a nameplate capacity of 300 MMscfd of sour natural gas. The objective of the Morphysorb process at this site was to remove 33 MMscfd of acid gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) for reinjection downhole. This represents about half the acid gas present in the feed to the plant. In so doing, proportionately more of the plant ''sales'' gas, which is sent for final processing at the nearby Pine River plant, can be sent down the line without coming up against the sulfur removal capacity limits of Pine River plant, than could with other solvents that were evaluated. Other benefits include less loss of methane downhole with the rejected acid gas and lower circulation and recycle compression horsepower than with competitive solvents. On the downside, the process is expected to have higher solvent vaporization losses than competitive solvents, but this is a comparatively minor drawback when weighed against the value of the benefits. These benefits (and drawbacks) were developed into quantitative ''acceptance'' criteria, which will determine if the solvent will continue to be used at the site and for award of monetary bonuses to the process developer (GTI).

Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GTI and Krupp Uhde have been jointly developing advanced technology for removing high concentrations of acid gas from high-pressure natural gas for over a decade. This technology, the Morphysorb{reg_sign} process, based on N-formyl and N-acetyl morpholine mixtures, has now been tested in a large-scale facility and this paper presents preliminary results from acceptance testing at that facility. Earlier publications have discussed the bench-scale and pilot plant work that led up to this important milestone. The site was Duke Energy's new Kwoen sour gas upgrader near Chetwynd B.C., Canada. This facility has a nameplate capacity of 300 MMscfd of sour natural gas. The objective of the Morphysorb process at this site was to remove 33 MMscfd of acid gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) for reinjection downhole. This represents about half the acid gas present in the feed to the plant. In so doing, proportionately more of the plant ''sales'' gas, which is sent for final processing at the nearby Pine River plant, can be sent down the line without coming up against the sulfur removal capacity limits of Pine River plant, than could with other solvents that were evaluated. Other benefits include less loss of methane downhole with the rejected acid gas and lower circulation and recycle compression horsepower than with competitive solvents. On the downside, the process is expected to have higher solvent vaporization losses than competitive solvents, but this is a comparatively minor drawback when weighed against the value of the benefits. These benefits (and drawbacks) were developed into quantitative ''acceptance'' criteria, which will determine if the solvent will continue to be used at the site and for award of monetary bonuses to the process developer (GTI).

Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING Form supports nuclear materials control and accountability. PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING More Documents & Publications DOENRC F...

265

Data Sources 3. Data Sources This indicator uses data and analysis from EPAs Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This indicator describes emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the United States and its territories between 1990 and 2011. This indicator reports emissions of GHGs according to their global warming potential, a measure of how much a given amount of the GHG is estimated to contribute to global warming over a selected period of time. For the purposes of comparison, global warming potential values are given in relation to carbon dioxide (CO2) and are expressed in terms of CO2 equivalents. Components of this indicator include: U.S. GHG emissions by gas (Figure 1) U.S. GHG emissions and sinks by economic sector (Figure 2) U.S. GHG emissions per capita and per dollar of GDP (Figure 3)

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Data Sources 3. Data Sources This indicator uses data and analysis from EPAs Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This indicator describes emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States and its territories between 1990 and 2010. This indicator reports emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) according to their global warming potential, a measure of how much a given amount of the GHG is estimated to contribute to global warming over a selected period of time. For the purposes of comparison, global warming potential values are given in relation to carbon dioxide (CO2) and are expressed in terms of CO2 equivalents. Components of this indicator include: U.S. GHG emissions by gas (Figure 1) U.S. GHG emissions and sinks by economic sector (Figure 2) U.S. GHG emissions per capita and per dollar of GDP (Figure 3)

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of analyses performed by the NGNP project to determine whether it is technically and economically feasible to integrate high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) technology into industrial processes. To avoid an overly optimistic environmental and economic baseline for comparing nuclear integrated and conventional processes, a conservative approach was used for the assumptions and calculations.

Lee Nelson

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Moldova National Inventory Report - Lessons Learned | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moldova National Inventory Report - Lessons Learned Moldova National Inventory Report - Lessons Learned Jump to: navigation, search Name Moldova Second National Inventory Report - Lessons Learned Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme Sector Energy, Land Topics GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Country Moldova Eastern Europe References UNDP National Communications Support Program[1] "Key Lessons Learned From The Process of Preparing Moldova's SNC 1. National experts stated that IPCC default Emission Factors (EFs) were sometimes inappropriate for sources highly dependent on local conditions. Active involvement of key stakeholders and relevant organizations made it possible for Moldova to develop local EFs for prioritized key sources;

269

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has started to negotiate a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) continued to negotiate a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term ( 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Novel cost allocation framework for natural gas processes: methodology and application to plan economic optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas plants can have multiple owners for raw natural gas streams and processing facilities as well as for multiple products. Therefore, a proper cost allocation method is necessary for taxation of the profits from natural gas and crude oil as well as for cost sharing among gas producers. However, cost allocation methods most often used in accounting, such as the sales value method and the physical units method, may produce unacceptable or even illogical results when applied to natural gas processes. Wright and Hall (1998) proposed a new approach called the design benefit method (DBM), based upon engineering principles, and Wright et al. (2001) illustrated the potential of the DBM for reliable cost allocation for natural gas processes by applying it to a natural gas process. In the present research, a rigorous modeling technique for the DBM has been developed based upon a Taylor series approximation. Also, we have investigated a cost allocation framework that determines the virtual flows, models the equipment, and evaluates cost allocation for applying the design benefit method to other scenarios, particularly those found in the petroleum and gas industries. By implementing these individual procedures on a computer, the proposed framework easily can be developed as a software package, and its application can be extended to large-scale processes. To implement the proposed cost allocation framework, we have investigated an optimization methodology specifically geared toward economic optimization problems encountered in natural gas plants. Optimization framework can provide co-producers who share raw natural gas streams and processing plants not only with optimal operating conditions but also with valuable information that can help evaluate their contracts. This information can be a reasonable source for deciding new contracts for co-producers. For the optimization framework, we have developed a genetic-quadratic search algorithm (GQSA) consisting of a general genetic algorithm and a quadratic search that is a suitable technique for solving optimization problems including process flowsheet optimization. The GQSA inherits the advantages of both genetic algorithms and quadratic search techniques, and it can find the global optimum with high probability for discontinuous as well as non-convex optimization problems much faster than general genetic algorithms.

Jang, Won-Hyouk

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Demonstrated maximum working gas volume is the sum of the highest storage inventory levels of working gas observed in each facility over the previous 5-year ...

274

World`s gas-processing expands; Canada, U.S. lead remains steady  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide gas-processing capacity increased in 1997, led by expansions in North America, Latin America, and the Middle East. Canada and the US continued to dominate the rest of the world in capacity, but those countries` combined share of world capacities and production was kept steady in 1997 by expansions elsewhere. The paper discusses prices of natural gas in the US, Canadian plans, North American activity, world activity, and sulfur recovery capacity.

True, W.R.

1998-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

275

VolumeExplorer: Roaming Large Volumes to Couple Visualization and Data Processing for Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VolumeExplorer: Roaming Large Volumes to Couple Visualization and Data Processing for Oil and Gas dedicated to oil and gas exploration. Our system combines probe- based volume rendering with data processing Seismic interpretation is an important task in the oil and gas exploration-production (EP) workflow [9, 26

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

Information inaccuracy in inventory systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is critically important for inventory-carrying facilities to provide high availability of products at the minimal operating cost. To achieve this objective, many companies have automated their inventory operations and ...

Kang, Yun Kyu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. MTR then located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; the units will be delivered in mid-2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we are now negotiating with Atmos Energy for a final test of the project demonstration unit. Several commercial sales have also resulted from the partnership with ABB, and sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units now total $2.3 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we continue, but have as yet been unsuccessful in our attempts, to negotiate with Atmos Energy for a final test of the original project demonstration unit. In the meantime, MTR has located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract with Towne Exploration for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA, to be run through May 2007. Several commercial sales have resulted from the partnership with ABB, and total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units are now approaching $2.6 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Efficient gas-separation process to upgrade dilute methane stream for use as fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane-based gas separation process for treating gas streams that contain methane in low concentrations. The invention involves flowing the stream to be treated across the feed side of a membrane and flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side. Carbon dioxide permeates the membrane preferentially and is picked up in the sweep air stream on the permeate side; oxygen permeates in the other direction and is picked up in the methane-containing stream. The resulting residue stream is enriched in methane as well as oxygen and has an EMC value enabling it to be either flared or combusted by mixing with ordinary air.

Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Lin, Haiqing (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Scott (Brecksville, OH); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Processing Capacity Processing plants are typically clustered close to major producing areas, with a high number of plants close to the Federal Gulf of Mexico offshore and the Rocky Mountain production areas (Figure 1). In terms of both the number of plants and processing capacity, about half of these plants are concentrated in the States along the Gulf of Mexico. Gulf States have been some of the most prolific natural gas producing areas. U.S. natural gas processing capacity showed a net increase of about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009 (not including the State of Alaska), with the largest increase occurring in Texas, where processing capacity rose by more than 4 Bcf per day. In fact, increases in Texas' processing capacity accounted for 57 percent of the total lower 48 States' capacity increase

282

Market Opportunities for Electric Drive Compressors for Gas Transmission, Storage, and Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is great interest in the large potential market for electric drives in the gas transmission, gas storage, and gas processing industries. Progressive electric utilities and astute vendors are moving to meet the needs of these industries as they confront rapid changes and new realities. New policy and economic considerations, brought on by changes in environmental and business regulations and new compressor/driver technology, are causing these gas industry companies to consider electric motors for replacement of older gas engines and for new compressor installations. In ozone nonattainment regions, bringing gas compressor stations into compliance with NOx emission regulations is a must. Outside those regions, new electric drives are being considered because of their improved operating efficiencies and lower costs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), working through the EPRI Chemicals and Petroleum Office, is providing leadership in the efforts to further dialogue among gas companies, electric utilities, and vendors. EN strategists is working closely with EPRI, the electric utilities, and the gas transmission companies to promote consideration of The Electric Option.

Parent, L. V.; Ralph, H. D.; Schmeal, W. R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Inventory  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols GHG Inventory Protocols EPA/IAI PFC Measurement Protocol (PDF 243 KB) Download Acrobat Reader EPA and the International Aluminium Institute have collaborated with the global primary aluminium industry to develop a standard facility-specific PFC emissions measurement protocol. Use of the protocol will help ensure the consistency and accuracy of measurements. International Aluminum Institute's Aluminum Sector Greenhouse Gas Protocol (PDF 161 KB) Download Acrobat Reader The International Aluminum Institute (IAI) Aluminum Sector Addendum to the WBCSD/WRI Greenhouse Gas Protocol enhances and expands for the aluminum sector the World Business Council for Sustainable Development/World Resources Institute greenhouse gas corporate accounting and reporting protocol.

284

Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Service Contract Inventory | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Service Contract Inventory Service Contract Inventory DOE 2012 Service Contract Inventory 122712.xlsx DOE FY12 Analysis Plan MAX 122712.pdf DOEFY11ServiceContractInventory0.xl...

286

Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible multiphase mechanisms at work, namely, Darcy-type displacement until gas breakthrough, gravity drainage after breakthrough and film-drainage in gas-invaded zones throughout the duration of the process. The partially-scaled physical model was used in a series of experiments to study the effects of wettability, gas-oil miscibility, secondary versus tertiary mode gas injection, and the presence of fractures on GAGD oil recovery. In addition to yielding recoveries of up to 80% IOIP, even in the immiscible gas injection mode, the partially-scaled physical model confirmed the positive influence of fractures and oil-wet characteristics in enhancing oil recoveries over those measured in the homogeneous (unfractured) water-wet models. An interesting observation was that a single logarithmic relationship between the oil recovery and the gravity number was obeyed by the physical model, the high-pressure corefloods and the field data.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant gas systems. Design baseline package, Volume 8. [DEA process  

SciTech Connect

Volume 8 contains the design of the fuel gas desulfurization process (DEA) and of the liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) section of the plant. The removal of acid gases is accomplished by intimately contacting the feed stream with the descending DEA solution. A partially regenerated semi-lean DEA solution is fed to an intermediate tray of the column for the bulk removal of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ while a fully regenerated lean DEA solution is fed at the top tray for the removal of the remaining acid gases in the top section of the absorber. The lean solution stream temperature is maintained at 10 to 15/sup 0/F above the absorber feed gas temperature to prevent hydrocarbon condensation in the column with consequent foaming and flooding of the column. The overhead gas (Stream 6305) leaving the H.P. DEA absorber is cooled and passed through the Sweet Gas K.O. Drum (bottom section of V-15305) to separate any condensate. The gas leaving the drum is further contacted with a 3 weight percent caustic solution in the bottom section of the Treated Gas Wash Column (T-15303) for removal of residual acid gases in order to comply with the sweet gas specifications of 1 ppMv H/sub 2/S and 10 ppMv CO/sub 2/. The LPG Recovery Unit is designed to process 15.95 MMSCFD of low pressure fuel reject gas from the HPU to recover approximately 60 percent of the propane and most of the heavier hydrocarbons. The recovered hydrocarbons are produced as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) product. Specifications for the LPG product are: (1) Ethane/Propane (Vol/Vol) 0.02; and (2) LPG product should meet GPA Publication 2140-77 Commercial B-P mixture specifications.

1983-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

288

Simulation, integration, and economic analysis of gas-to-liquid processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-to-liquid (GTL) process involves the chemical conversion of natural gas (or other gas sources) into synthetic crude that can be upgraded and separated into different useful hydrocarbon fractions including liquid transportation fuels. A leading GTL technology is the Fischer Tropsch process. The objective of this work is to provide a techno-economic analysis of the GTL process and to identify optimization and integration opportunities for cost saving and reduction of energy usage and environmental impact. First, a basecase flowsheet is synthesized to include the key processing steps of the plant. Then, computer-aided process simulation is carried out to determine the key mass and energy flows, performance criteria, and equipment specifications. Next, energy and mass integration studies are performed to address the following items: (a) heating and cooling utilities, (b) combined heat and power (process cogeneration), (c) management of process water, (c) optimization of tail-gas allocation, and (d) recovery of catalystsupporting hydrocarbon solvents. Finally, an economic analysis is undertaken to determine the plant capacity needed to achieve the break-even point and to estimate the return on investment for the base-case study. After integration, 884 million $/yr is saved from heat integration, 246 million $/yr from heat cogeneration, and 22 million $/yr from water management. Based on 128,000 barrels per day (BPD) of products, at least 68,000 BPD capacity is needed to keep the process profitable, with the return on investment (ROI) of 5.1%. Compared to 8 $/1000 SCF natural gas, 5 $/1000 SCF price can increase the ROI to 16.2%.

Bao, Buping

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier, Fleming, and Mulberry coals--are the major coals of sufficient thickness (nominally >1-foot) that can imbibe carbon dioxide gas with an enhanced coalbed injection. Comparison of the adsorption gas content of coals to the gas desorbed from the coals shows that the degree of saturation decreases with depth for the coals.

K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absoption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Value of Information in Inventory Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inventory management traditionally assumes the precise knowledge of the ... stage inventory management in a robust optimization framework; the precise...

292

Use of Chemical Inventory Accuracy Measurements as Leading Indicators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical safety and lifecycle management (CSLM) is a process that involves managing chemicals and chemical information from the moment someone begins to order a chemical and lasts through final disposition(1). Central to CSLM is tracking data associated with chemicals which, for the purposes of this paper, is termed the chemical inventory. Examples of data that could be tracked include chemical identity, location, quantity, date procured, container type, and physical state. The reason why so much data is tracked is that the chemical inventory supports many functions. These functions include emergency management, which depends upon the data to more effectively plan for, and respond to, chemical accidents; environmental management that uses inventory information to aid in the generation of various federally-mandated and other regulatory reports; and chemical management that uses the information to increase the efficiency and safety with which chemicals are stored and utilized. All of the benefits of having an inventory are predicated upon having an inventory that is reasonably accurate. Because of the importance of ensuring one's chemical inventory is accurate, many have become concerned about measuring inventory accuracy. But beyond providing a measure of confidence in information gleaned from the inventory, does the inventory accuracy measurement provide any additional function? The answer is 'Yes'. It provides valuable information that can be used as a leading indicator to gauge the health of a chemical management system. In this paper, we will discuss: (1) what properties make leading indicators effective, (2) how chemical inventories can be used as a leading indicator, (3) how chemical inventory accuracy can be measured, what levels of accuracies should realistically be expected in a healthy system, and (4) what a subpar inventory accuracy measurement portends.

Quigley, David; Freshwater, David; Alnajjar, Mikhail S.; Siegel, Dina; Kuntamukkula, Murty; Simmons, Fred

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

USE OF CHEMICAL INVENTORY ACCURACY MEASUREMENTS AS LEADING INDICATORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical safety and lifecycle management (CSLM) is a process that involves managing chemicals and chemical information from the moment someone begins to order a chemical and lasts through final disposition(1). Central to CSLM is tracking data associated with chemicals which, for the purposes of this paper, is termed the chemical inventory. Examples of data that could be tracked include chemical identity, location, quantity, date procured, container type, and physical state. The reason why so much data is tracked is that the chemical inventory supports many functions. These functions include emergency management, which depends upon the data to more effectively plan for, and respond to, chemical accidents; environmental management that uses inventory information to aid in the generation of various federally-mandated and other regulatory reports; and chemical management that uses the information to increase the efficiency and safety with which chemicals are stored and utilized. All of the benefits of having an inventory are predicated upon having an inventory that is reasonably accurate. Because of the importance of ensuring one's chemical inventory is accurate, many have become concerned about measuring inventory accuracy. But beyond providing a measure of confidence in information gleaned from the inventory, does the inventory accuracy measurement provide any additional function? The answer is 'Yes'. It provides valuable information that can be used as a leading indicator to gauge the health of a chemical management system. In this paper, we will discuss: what properties make leading indicators effective, how chemical inventories can be used as a leading indicator, how chemical inventory accuracy can be measured, what levels of accuracies should realistically be expected in a healthy system, and what a subpar inventory accuracy measurement portends.

Kuntamukkula, M.

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

294

Evaluation of a Combined Cyclone & Gas Filtration System for Particulate Removal in the Gasification Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Wabash gasification facility, owned and operated by sgSolutions LLC, is one of the largest single train solid fuel gasification facilities in the world capable of transforming 2,000 tons per day of petroleum coke or 2,600 tons per day of bituminous coal into synthetic gas for electrical power generation. The Wabash plant utilizes Phillips66 proprietary E-Gas Gasification Process to convert solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal into synthetic gas that is fed to a combined cycle combustion turbine power generation facility. During plant startup in 1995, reliability issues were realized in the gas filtration portion of the gasification process. To address these issues, a slipstream test unit was constructed at the Wabash facility to test various filter designs, materials and process conditions for potential reliability improvement. The char filtration slipstream unit provided a way of testing new materials, maintenance procedures, and process changes without the risk of stopping commercial production in the facility. It also greatly reduced maintenance expenditures associated with full scale testing in the commercial plant. This char filtration slipstream unit was installed with assistance from the United States Department of Energy (built under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-97FT34158) and began initial testing in November of 1997. It has proven to be extremely beneficial in the advancement of the E-Gas char removal technology by accurately predicting filter behavior and potential failure mechanisms that would occur in the commercial process. After completing four (4) years of testing various filter types and configurations on numerous gasification feed stocks, a decision was made to investigate the economic and reliability effects of using a particulate removal gas cyclone upstream of the current gas filtration unit. A paper study had indicated that there was a real potential to lower both installed capital and operating costs by implementing a char cyclonefiltration hybrid unit in the E-Gas gasification process. These reductions would help to keep the E-Gas technology competitive among other coal-fired power generation technologies. The Wabash combined cyclone and gas filtration slipstream test program was developed to provide design information, equipment specification and process control parameters of a hybrid cyclone and candle filter particulate removal system in the E-Gas gasification process that would provide the optimum performance and reliability for future commercial use. The test program objectives were as follows: 1. Evaluate the use of various cyclone materials of construction. 2. Establish the optimal cyclone efficiency that provides stable long term gas filter operation. 3. Determine the particle size distribution of the char separated by both the cyclone and candle filters. This will provide insight into cyclone efficiency and potential future plant design. 4. Determine the optimum filter media size requirements for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit. 5. Determine the appropriate char transfer rates for both the cyclone and filtration portions of the hybrid unit. 6. Develop operating procedures for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit. 7. Compare the installed capital cost of a scaled-up commercial cyclone-filtration hybrid unit to the current gas filtration design without a cyclone unit, such as currently exists at the Wabash facility.

Rizzo, Jeffrey

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Predicted nuclear heating and temperatures in gas-cooled nuclear reactors for process heat applications  

SciTech Connect

The high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) is an attractive potential source of primary energy for many industrial and chemical process applications. Significant modification of current HTGR core design will be required to achieve the required elevations in exit gas temperatures without exceeding the maximum allowable temperature limits for the fuel material. A preliminary evaluation of the effects of various proposed design modifications by predicting the resulting fuel and gas temperatures with computer calculational modeling techniques is reported. The design modifications evaluated are generally those proposed by the General Atomic Company (GAC), a manufacturer of HTGRs, and some developed at the LASL. The GAC modifications do result in predicted fuel and exit gas temperatures which meet the proposed design objectives. (auth)

Cort, G.E.; Vigil, J.C.; Jiacoletti, R.J.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

Stevens, William H. (Deep River, CA)

1976-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

297

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

298

Survey of processes for high temperature-high pressure gas purification. [52 references  

SciTech Connect

In order to ensure the optimum operating efficiency of a combined-cycle electric power generating system, it is necessary to provide gas treatment processes capable of operating at high temperatures (> 1000/sup 0/F) and high pressures (> 10 atm (absolute)). These systems will be required to condition the inlet stream to the gas turbine to suitable levels of gas purity (removal of particulate matter, sulfur, nitrogen, and alkali metal compounds) to be compatible with both environmental and machine constraints. A survey of the available and developmental processes for the removal of these various contaminant materials has been conducted. Based on the data obtained from a variety of sources, an analysis has been performed to evaluate the performance of a number of potential cleanup processes in view of the overall system needs. The results indicate that commercially available, reliable, and economically competitive hot-gas cleanup systems (for the removal of H/sub 2/S, particulate matter, alkali, and nitrogen compounds) capable of conditioning raw product gas to the levels required for turbine use will not be available for some time.

Meyer, J.P.; Edwards, M.S.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Capacity Development Team March 2009INVENTORY OF DONOR APPROACHES TO CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT: WHAT WE ARE LEARNING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. INVENTORY RESULTS............................................................................................................................................... 3

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

CLEAN Inventory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CLEAN Inventory CLEAN Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Inventory There are a number of international efforts to provide assistance for the creation of low emission development plans and strategies including work on technology needs assessments (TNAs), Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs), low carbon growth plans and roadmaps. This user-generated inventory presents many of these assistance efforts occurring internationally. The inventory was developed to provide information on relevant activities and tools that can inform and support future work. The goals of this inventory activity are to avoid duplication of effort, to promote efficient use of resources, to assess assistance gaps and to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Direct Chlorination Process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5% hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90% excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

Sims, A.V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs by displacing oil downwards within the oil reservoir and into an oil recovery apparatus is disclosed. The process is referred to as "gas-assisted gravity drainage" and comprises the steps of placing one or more horizontal producer wells near the bottom of a payzone (i.e., rock in which oil and gas are found in exploitable quantities) of a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir and injecting a fluid displacer (e.g., CO.sub.2) through one or more vertical wells or horizontal wells. Pre-existing vertical wells may be used to inject the fluid displacer into the reservoir. As the fluid displacer is injected into the top portion of the reservoir, it forms a gas zone, which displaces oil and water downward towards the horizontal producer well(s).

Rao, Dandina N. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

English-Spanish glossary: offshore exploration and production, gas processing, and valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This series of articles contains 3 different English-Spanish glossaries of related terms used in the oil industry. The glossary of the offshore exploration and production involves a summary of terms used in the offshore oil activity. It also includes names of singular equipment used in offshore drilling, as well as several navigation terms in relation to the floating oil structures. With the help of the Gas Processors Association it was possible to compile a glossary of gas processing with a concise selection of common terms of the industry of gas processing. The glossary of valves includes more than 200 terms of the industry of valves in a specialized glossary, and several explanations about the application and operation of valves.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Membrane Process to Capture CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane Process to Capture CO Membrane Process to Capture CO 2 from Power Plant Flue Gas Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program is performing research to develop advanced technologies focusing on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control for existing pulverized coal-fired plants. This new focus on post-combustion and oxy-combustion CO 2 emissions control technology, CO 2 compression, and beneficial reuse is in response to the priority for advanced

306

Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gases and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

Huang, Hann S. (Darien, IL); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Microemulsion impregnated catalyst composite and use thereof in a synthesis gas conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst composition for synthesis gas conversion comprising a ruthenium metal component deposited on a support carrier wherein the average metal particle size is less than about 100 A. The method of manufacture of the composition via a reverse micelle impregnation technique and the use of the composition in a Fischer-Tropsch conversion process is also disclosed.

Abrevaya, Hayim (Chicago, IL); Targos, William M. (Palatine, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Microemulsion impregnated catalyst composite and use thereof in a synthesis gas conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst composition is described for synthesis gas conversion comprising a ruthenium metal component deposited on a support carrier wherein the average metal particle size is less than about 100 A. The method of manufacture of the composition via a reverse micelle impregnation technique and the use of the composition in a Fischer-Tropsch conversion process is also disclosed.

Abrevaya, H.; Targos, W.M.

1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, S.K.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

S. K. Zohner

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

NETL: Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007567 Carbon Capture Scientific is developing and testing a novel, proprietary, Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS) process-based technology for CO2 capture from post-combustion flue gases. GPS process-based technology has many advantages. For the solvent based process it will be able to: Reduce the energy penalty associated with solvent regeneration Increase the CO2 desorption pressure Integrate CO2 capture and compression into one step Reduce CO2 compression needs Reduce solvent degradation These advantages could potentially eliminate CO2 compression entirely, hence reducing the total parasitic power load of a CO2 capture process to about 0.14kWh/kgCO2. This power load is a 60 percent reduction compared to the baseline case of 0.38kWh/kgCO2. The economic impact of this parasitic power reduction is a reduction in the incremental cost of electricity (COE) by about 21 mills/kWh.

312

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a computerized database inventory of compressor engines used in the oil and natural gas exploration and production (E&P) industry. This database will be used to evaluate...

313

New Gas Standard Reference Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... inventories of required gas SRMs that consist of dilute mixtures of key pollutants such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

DNDC: A process-based model of greenhouse gas fluxes from agricultural soils Donna L. Giltrap a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DNDC: A process-based model of greenhouse gas fluxes from agricultural soils Donna L. Giltrap a complex feedbacks and interactions. Understanding the impacts of human activities on greenhouse gas to feed the Earth's increasing population. As greenhouse gas emissions from soils are the result

315

Process for the production of a chemical synthesis gas from coal  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for the production of a chemical synthesis product gas from a carbonaceous feed material and steam which comprises: (A) reacting said steam with said carbonaceous feed material in a reaction zone at a reaction temperature between about 1000F and about 1500/sup 0/F and at a reaction pressure in excess of about 100 psia, in the presence of a carbon-alkali metal catalyst and sufficient added hydrogen and carbon monoxide to provide substantially equilibrium quantities of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in said reaction zone at said reaction temeperature and said reaction pressure; (B) withdrawing from said reaction zone an effluent gas containing substantially equilibrium quantities, at said reaction temperature and pressure, of methane, carbon dioxide, steam, hydrogen and carbon monoxide; (C) treating said effluent gas for the removal of steam and acid gases to produce a treated gas containing primarily carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane; (D) recovering substantially all of the carbon monoxide and hydrogen from said treated gas as a chemical synthesis product gas, thereby producing a gas comprised substantially of methane; (E) contacting the gas produced in step (D) comprised substantially of methane with steam in a steam reforming zone under conditions such tat at least a portion of the methane present reacts with said steam to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide; and (F) passing the effluent from said steam reforming zone into said reaction zone without substantial cooling, thereby supplying said added hydrogen and carbon monoxide required in said reaction zone and wherein said reforming zone is operated at conditions such that the heat content of said effluent from said steam reforming zone is sufficient to supply substantially all of the heat needed to preheat said carbonaceous feed material to said reaction temperature.

Eakman, J.; Kalina, T.; Marshall, H.

1980-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

316

Stochastic Programming Approaches for the Placement of Gas Detectors in Process Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The release of flammable and toxic chemicals in petrochemical facilities is a major concern when designing modern process safety systems. While the proper selection of the necessary types of gas detectors needed is important, appropriate placement of these detectors is required in order to have a well-functioning gas detection system. However, the uncertainty in leak locations, gas composition, process and weather conditions, and process geometries must all be considered when attempting to determine the appropriate number and placement of the gas detectors. Because traditional approaches are typically based on heuristics, there exists the need to develop more rigorous optimization based approaches to handling this problem. This work presents several mixed-integer programming formulations to address this need. First, a general mixed-integer linear programming problem is presented. This formulation takes advantage of precomputed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to determine a gas detector placement that minimizes the expected detection time across all scenarios. An extension to this formulation is added that considers the overall coverage in a facility in order to improve the detector placement when enough scenarios may not be available. Additionally, a formulation considering the Conditional-Value-at-Risk is also presented. This formulation provides some control over the shape of the tail of the distribution, not only minimizing the expected detection time across all scenarios, but also improving the tail behavior. In addition to improved formulations, procedures are introduced to determine confidence in the placement generated and to determine if enough scenarios have been used in determining the gas detector placement. First, a procedure is introduced to analyze the performance of the proposed gas detector placement in the face of unforeseen scenarios, or scenarios that were not necessarily included in the original formulation. Additionally, a procedure for determine the confidence interval on the optimality gap between a placement generated with a sample of scenarios and its estimated performance on the entire uncertainty space. Finally, a method for determining if enough scenarios have been used and how much additional benefit is expected by adding more scenarios to the optimization is proposed. Results are presented for each of the formulations and methods presented using three data sets from an actual process facility. The use of an off-the-shelf toolkit for the placement of detectors in municipal water networks from the EPA, known as TEVA-SPOT, is explored. Because this toolkit was not designed for placing gas detectors, some adaptation of the files is necessary, and the procedure for doing so is presented.

Legg, Sean W

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Analysis Regional Analysis Rocky Mountain States and California Rocky Mountain States and California The Rocky Mountain States, which include all of the States west of the Great Plains and Texas and those east of California, have seen significant natural gas production increases over the last decade. With the development of new production basins, including the San Juan Basin, Powder River Basin, and Green River Basin, natural gas processing capacity in this region has expanded significantly. In 2009, California and Rocky Mountain States accounted for a total of 16.9 Bcf per day or about 22 percent of total U.S. capacity. Since 2004, only California and New Mexico noted a decrease in overall processing capacity, falling by 17 and 12 percent, respectively. Processing capacity in all of the remaining States (Colorado, Montana, New

318

Problems and methods for multiproduct inventory control in production conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Problems and methods for control of multiproduct inventory of finished product in the conditions of fixed and random demand and problems of in-process storage of components, billets, and accessories for assembling finished products are considered. Special ...

E. N. Khobotov

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Processed (Million Cubic Feet)" Processed (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_ygp_ssd_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_ygp_ssd_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 7:02:45 AM"

320

RESEARCH ARTICLE A Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and students. In fiscal year 2008, UIC's carbon footprint was not significantly higher than the 2004 emissions (275,000 vs. 273,000 met- ric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents, respectively). For 2008, the largest of waste vegetable oil as fuel to power campus vehicles. Energy projects run the gamut from energy con

Illinois at Chicago, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

HSS Information and Services Inventory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Topical Areas HSS Topical Areas Quality Assurance Enforcement / Oversight Environment HSS Outreach and Communications HSPD-12 Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System (NMMSS) HSS Internal Operations Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) HSS Information and Services Inventory Web Site Priorities and Schedules The Office of Health, Safety and Security maintains an inventory of the HSS Website content as required by Section 207(f)(2) of the E-Government Act of 2002. This inventory is reviewed periodically for relevance and content update, and establishes a schedule for publishing information. HSS Information Inventory last updated: MAY 4, 2009 Priority 1: Required by law, regulation, Presidential directive, or other official directive or to ensure national security.

322

MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEQUESTER CO2 FROM POWER PLANT FLUE GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of using a membrane process to capture CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. During this program, MTR developed a novel membrane (Polaris) with a CO2 permeance tenfold higher than commercial CO2-selective membranes used in natural gas treatment. The Polaris membrane, combined with a process design that uses a portion of combustion air as a sweep stream to generate driving force for CO2 permeation, meets DOE post-combustion CO2 capture targets. Initial studies indicate a CO2 separation and liquefaction cost of $20 - $30/ton CO2 using about 15% of the plant energy at 90% CO2 capture from a coal-fired power plant. Production of the Polaris CO2 capture membrane was scaled up with MTRs commercial casting and coating equipment. Parametric tests of cross-flow and countercurrent/sweep modules prepared from this membrane confirm their near-ideal performance under expected flue gas operating conditions. Commercial-scale, 8-inch diameter modules also show stable performance in field tests treating raw natural gas. These findings suggest that membranes are a viable option for flue gas CO2 capture. The next step will be to conduct a field demonstration treating a realworld power plant flue gas stream. The first such MTR field test will capture 1 ton CO2/day at Arizona Public Services Cholla coal-fired power plant, as part of a new DOE NETL funded program.

Tim Merkel; Karl Amo; Richard Baker; Ramin Daniels; Bilgen Friat; Zhenjie He; Haiqing Lin; Adrian Serbanescu

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Process Parameters and Energy Use of Gas and Electric Ovens in Industrial Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study was conducted to evaluate the energy use of natural gas and electric ovens in the production of polymer bearings and components. Tests were conducted to evaluate and compare the performance of natural gas and electric ovens in the process of sintering billets which are made from a broad range of materials such as PTFE and other fluoropolymers, elastomers, themosets, themoplastics and composites. The purpose of this study was to compare the process parameters under similar conditions for industrial applications where electric ovens have predominant use. Tests were performed to obtain the process efficiency and examine cost savings potential in converting electric ovens to natural gas. Preliminary results show that, for the plat studied, cost savings of about $10,000 per oven can be achieved, with a simple payback period of less than two years. The results also show that additional energy savings will be realized if the oven size and exhaust flow are carefully selected. The data obtained from these experiments were used to calculate process efficiency. Design features and environmental issues are discussed.

Kosanovic, D.; Ambs, L.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992  

SciTech Connect

Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term (< 6 months) and long-term (> 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas injection in oil reservoirs offers huge potential for improved oil recovery. However, successful design of a gas injection process requires a detailed understanding of a variety of different significant processes, including the phase behavior of multicomponent mixtures and the approach to multi-contact miscibility in the reservoir, the flow of oil, water and gas underground, and the interaction of phase behavior reservoir heterogeneity and gravity on overall performance at the field scale. This project attempts to tackle all these issues using a combination of theoretical, numerical and laboratory studies of gas injection. The aim of this work is to develop a set of ultra-fast compositional simulation tools that can be used to make field-scale predictions of the performance of gas injection processes. To achieve the necessary accuracy, these tools must satisfy the fundamental physics and chemistry of the displacement from the pore to the reservoir scales. Thus this project focuses on four main research areas: (1) determination of the most appropriate methods of mapping multicomponent solutions to streamlines and streamtubes in 3D; (2) development of techniques for automatic generation of analytical solutions for one-dimensional flow along a streamline; (3) experimental investigations to improve the representation of physical mechanisms that govern displacement efficiency along a streamline; and (4) Theoretical and experimental investigations to establish the limitations of the streamline/streamtube approach. In this report they briefly review the status of the research effort in each area. They then give a more in depth discussion of the development of a CT scanning technique which can measure compositions in a two-phase, three-component system in-situ.

Thomas A. Hewett; Franklin M. Orr Jr.

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Processing of mixed-waste compressed-gas cylinders on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To comply with restrictions on the storage of old compressed gas cylinders, the environmental management organization of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems must dispose of several thousand kilograms of compressed gases stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) because the cylinders cannot be taken off-site for disposal in their current configuration. In the ORR Site Treatment Plan, a milestone is cited that requires repackaging and shipment off-site of 21 cylinders by September 30, 1997. A project was undertaken to first evaluate and then either recontainerize or neutralize these cylinders using a transportable compressed gas recontainerization skid (TCGRS), which was developed by Integrated Environmental Services of Atlanta. The transportable system can: (1) sample, analyze, and identify at the site the chemical and radiological content of each cylinder, even those with inoperable valves; (2) breach cylinders, when necessary, to release their contents into a containment chamber; and (3) either neutralize the gas or liquid contents within the containment chamber or transfer the gas or liquids to a new cylinder. The old cylinders and cylinder fragments were disposed of and the gases neutralized or transferred to new cylinders for transportation off-site for disposal. The entire operation to process the 21 cylinders took place in only 5 days once the system was approved for operation. The system performed as expected and can now be used to process the potentially thousands of more cylinders located across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex that have not yet been declared surplus.

Morris, M.I.; Conley, T.B.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Management of Fleet Inventory  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

In fulfillment of Executive Order 13514, DOE began a 3-year, 3-phase strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and decrease petroleum use.

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

328

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Analysis Regional Analysis Alaska Alaska The State of Alaska had the third-largest processing capacity, trailing only Texas and Louisiana. While much of the natural gas processed in Alaska does not enter any transmission system and is instead re-injected into reservoirs, its processing capability is nonetheless significant. At 9.5 Bcf per day of processing capacity, the State of Alaska accounted for about 12 percent of total U.S. capacity. As of 2009, there were a total of 4 plants in the State, with the largest one reporting a capacity of 8.5 Bcf per day. Average plant size of 2.4 Bcf per day far exceeded any other State, with Illinois noting the next largest average plant size of 1.1 Bcf per day. In addition to the significant processing total capacity, plants in

329

PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY More Documents...

330

Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing. Quarterly report No. 10, October--December 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the work performed at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) during the tenth program quarter from October 1 to December 31, 1995. The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process consists of two steps that each use catalysts and sulfur-containing intermediates: (1) converting natural gas to CS{sub 2} and (2) converting CS{sub 2} to gasoline-range liquids. Experimental data will be generated to demonstrate the potential of catalysts and the overall process. During this quarter, progress in the following areas has been made: Short duration activity test on catalyst IGT-MS-103 showed no deactivation over a 6 hour period and preliminary data of CS{sub 2} reaction with H{sub 2} at 400 {minus} 410{degree}C and at atmospheric pressure indicates that IGT-HS-103 is an active catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis from CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}.

Erekson, E.J.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Optimum Reactor Outlet Temperatures for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Integrated with Industrial Processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a temperature sensitivity study conducted to identify the optimum reactor operating temperatures for producing the heat and hydrogen required for industrial processes associated with the proposed new high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This study assumed that primary steam outputs of the reactor were delivered at 17 MPa and 540C and the helium coolant was delivered at 7 MPa at 625925C. The secondary outputs of were electricity and hydrogen. For the power generation analysis, it was assumed that the power cycle efficiency was 66% of the maximum theoretical efficiency of the Carnot thermodynamic cycle. Hydrogen was generated via the hightemperature steam electrolysis or the steam methane reforming process. The study indicates that optimum or a range of reactor outlet temperatures could be identified to further refine the process evaluations that were developed for high temperature gas-cooled reactor-integrated production of synthetic transportation fuels, ammonia, and ammonia derivatives, oil from unconventional sources, and substitute natural gas from coal.

Lee O. Nelson

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing. Quarterly progress report, June--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process consists of two steps that each utilize catalysts and sulfur containing intermediates: (1) to convert natural gas to CS{sub 2}, and (2) to convert CS{sub 2} to gasoline range liquids. Experimental data will be generated to demonstrate the potential of catalysts and the overall process. During this first quarter, progress in the following areas has been made. One high surface area molybdenum catalyst has been prepared. An existing unit at IGT is being modified to accommodate the sulfur feedstocks and the higher temperatures(> 1300{degrees}K) required for studying the reactions of hydrogen sulfide and methane as proposed in Tasks 2 through 5. An HP 5890 gas chromatograph with a TCD(thermal conductivity detector) for detecting fixed gases including hydrogen and an FPD(flame photometric detector) for detecting sulfur compounds was purchased using SMP funds and has been received.

Erekson, E.J.; Miao, F.Q.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Determining the locus of a processing zone in an oil shale retort by effluent off gas heating value  

SciTech Connect

A processing zone advances through a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort has an effluent gas passing therefrom. The effluent gas has a heating value which is dependent on the kerogen content of the oil shale then in contact with the processing zone. To determine the locus of the processing zone, the formation is assayed at selected locations in the retort for kerogen content before processing the selected locations, and effluent gas from the retort is monitored for its heating value.

Cha, C.Y.

1981-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

Reduction of NO[sub x] emissions coke oven gas combustion process  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes by-product processing at Clairton Works which uses a unique cryogenic technology. Modifications to the desulfurization facility, nitrogen oxide formation in combustion processes (both thermal and fuel NO[sub x]), and the boilers plants are described. Boilers were used to study the contribution of fuel NO[sub x] formation during the combustion of coke oven gas. Results are summarized. The modifications made to the desulfurization facility resulted in the overall H[sub 2]S emission being reduced by 2-4 grains/100scf and the NO[sub x] emission being reduced by 21-42% in the boiler stacks.

Terza, R.R. (USS Clairton Works, PA (United States)); Sardesai, U.V. (Westfield Engineering and Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Membrane Process to Capture CO{sub 2} from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) on development of an efficient membrane process to capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from power plant flue gas (award number DE-NT0005312). The primary goal of this research program was to demonstrate, in a field test, the ability of a membrane process to capture up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in coal-fired flue gas, and to evaluate the potential of a full-scale version of the process to perform this separation with less than a 35% increase in the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Arizona Public Services (APS), who hosted a membrane field test at their Cholla coal-fired power plant, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and WorleyParsons (WP), who performed a comparative cost analysis of the proposed membrane CO{sub 2} capture process. The work conducted for this project included membrane and module development, slipstream testing of commercial-sized modules with natural gas and coal-fired flue gas, process design optimization, and a detailed systems and cost analysis of a membrane retrofit to a commercial power plant. The Polaris membrane developed over a number of years by MTR represents a step-change improvement in CO{sub 2} permeance compared to previous commercial CO{sub 2}-selective membranes. During this project, membrane optimization work resulted in a further doubling of the CO{sub 2} permeance of Polaris membrane while maintaining the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity. This is an important accomplishment because increased CO{sub 2} permeance directly impacts the membrane skid cost and footprint: a doubling of CO{sub 2} permeance halves the skid cost and footprint. In addition to providing high CO{sub 2} permeance, flue gas CO{sub 2} capture membranes must be stable in the presence of contaminants including SO{sub 2}. Laboratory tests showed no degradation in Polaris membrane performance during two months of continuous operation in a simulated flue gas environment containing up to 1,000 ppm SO{sub 2}. A successful slipstream field test at the APS Cholla power plant was conducted with commercialsize Polaris modules during this project. This field test is the first demonstration of stable performance by commercial-sized membrane modules treating actual coal-fired power plant flue gas. Process design studies show that selective recycle of CO{sub 2} using a countercurrent membrane module with air as a sweep stream can double the concentration of CO{sub 2} in coal flue gas with little energy input. This pre-concentration of CO{sub 2} by the sweep membrane reduces the minimum energy of CO{sub 2} separation in the capture unit by up to 40% for coal flue gas. Variations of this design may be even more promising for CO{sub 2} capture from NGCC flue gas, in which the CO{sub 2} concentration can be increased from 4% to 20% by selective sweep recycle. EPRI and WP conducted a systems and cost analysis of a base case MTR membrane CO{sub 2} capture system retrofitted to the AEP Conesville Unit 5 boiler. Some of the key findings from this study and a sensitivity analysis performed by MTR include: The MTR membrane process can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} in coal flue gas and produce high-purity CO{sub 2} (>99%) ready for sequestration. CO{sub 2} recycle to the boiler appears feasible with minimal impact on boiler performance; however, further study by a boiler OEM is recommended. For a membrane process built today using a combination of slight feed compression, permeate vacuum, and current compression equipment costs, the membrane capture process can be competitive with the base case MEA process at 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a coal-fired power plant. The incremental LCOE for the base case membrane process is about equal to that of a base case MEA process, within the uncertainty in the analysis. With advanced membranes (5,000 gpu for CO{sub 2} and 50 for CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}), operating with no feed compression and

Merkel, Tim; Wei, Xiaotong; Firat, Bilgen; He, Jenny; Amo, Karl; Pande, Saurabh; Baker, Richard; Wijmans, Hans; Bhown, Abhoyjit

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States combined accounted for about 13 percent of total U.S. processing capacity in 2009, accounting for the smallest portion of any region in the lower 48 States. The combined processing capacity in these States more than doubled, although a few of the States saw decreased capacity compared with 2004. Processing capacity in Illinois, Kansas, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania fell since 2004, with the highest decrease occurring in Kansas, which saw a 65 percent drop in processing capacity. At the same time, the number of plants in Kansas decreased by four. The decrease was likely the result of falling natural gas proved reserves, which decreased in this State between 1995 and 2005. While the proved reserves have

337

Applications for a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor in oil shale processing  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of a study concerning possible applications for a high temperature gas cooled reactor as a process heat source in oil shale retorting and upgrading. Both surface and in situ technologies were evaluated with respect to the applicability and potential benefits of introducing an outside heat source. The primary focus of the study was to determine the fossil resource which might be conserved, or freed for higher uses than furnishing process heat. In addition to evaluating single technologies, a centralized upgrading plant, which would hydrotreat the product from a 400,000 bbl/day regional shale oil industry was also evaluated. The process heat required for hydrogen manufacture via steam reforming, and for whole shale oil hydrotreating would be supplied by an HTGR. Process heat would be supplied where applicable, and electrical power would be generated for the entire industry.

Sinor, J.E.; Roe, D.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

H[sub 2]S in EOR--1: Gas processing for CO[sub 2] EOR involves sulfur removal  

SciTech Connect

A design study for a new West Texas gas processing plant for a CO[sub 2] EOR project provides for installation of H[sub 2]S removal processes to be delayed for 3 years after completion of the plant. During this delay, a more precise produced gas composition will be obtained so that the process equipment for removing H[sub 2]S can be properly selected and sized to handle the gas stream that at the peak will reach about 30 MMscfd. The new plant's processing components include inlet separation, sulfur removal and recovery, compression, dehydration, and NGL recovery. The new plant will be capable of processing CO[sub 2]-contaminated associated gas, recovering valuable propane-plus NGLs,a nd producing a miscible CO[sub 2] for reinjection. The first in a series of two articles details the process and configuration options. The concluding part will discuss in greater detail the sulfur recovery alternatives.

Johnson, J.E. (Pritchard Corp., Overland Park, KS (United States)); Tzap, S.J.; Kelley, R.E. (Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Denver, CO (United States)); Laczko, L.P. (OXY USA Inc., Midland, TX (United States))

1993-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

MONTHLY UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE REPORT FORM EIA-191M ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Page 2 DEFINITIONS Base (Cushion) Gas: The volume of gas needed as a permanent inventory to maintain adequate storage reservoir pressures and deliverability rates.

340

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of May, as strong demand for natural gas coupled with high petroleum prices has led to higher gas prices despite nearly normal storage inventory levels. Storage stocks at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas Year-in-Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

12 'Demonstrated peak working gas capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period ...

342

Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Greenhouse Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resources for reporting annual greenhouse gas activities. FedCenter Greenhouse Gas Inventory Reporting Website: Features additional information, training, and tools to assist...

343

Natural Gas Year-in-Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum Weekly Petroleum Status Report Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report ... U.S. inventories of working natural gas in storage hit new records ...

344

Environmental software systems for emission inventories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric emission inventories are important tools for environmental decision making. The need to include transparency and reproducibility in emission calculation also fostered the development of environmental software systems for emission inventories. ... Keywords: Emission inventory theory, Model validation, Upper Austria

Wilfried Winiwarter; Gerald Schimak

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reichl, H. Life cycle inventory analysis and identificationAllen, D.T. ; Life cycle inventory development for waferLife Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip Sarah Boyd and David

Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Processing Plant Capacity by State 1. Natural Gas Processing Plant Capacity by State Natural Gas Processing Capacity (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Number of Natural Gas Plants Average Plant Capacity (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Change Between 2004 and 2009 State 2009 Percent of U.S. Total 2009 Percent of U.S. Total 2004 2009 Capacity (Percent) Number of Plants Texas 19,740 25.5 163 33.1 95 121 24.7 -3 Louisiana 18,535 23.9 60 12.2 271 309 12.3 -1 Wyoming 7,273 9.4 37 7.5 154 197 5.1 -8 Colorado 3,791 4.9 44 8.9 49 86 81.1 1 Oklahoma 3,740 4.8 58 11.8 58 64 8.8 -1 New Mexico 3,022 3.9 24 4.9 137 126 -11.8 -1 Mississippi 2,273 2.9 4 0.8 262 568 44.6 -2 Illinois 2,102 2.7 2 0.4 1101 1,051 -4.6 0 Kansas 1,250 1.6 6 1.2 353 208 -64.6 -4 Alabama 1,248 1.6 12 2.4 87 104 -4.7 -3 Utah 1,185 1.5 12 2.4 61 99 22.2 -4 Michigan 977 1.3 10 2.0 30 98 102.2 -6 California 876 1.1 20 4.1 43 44 -15.5 -4 Arkansas 710 0.9 4 0.8 10 178

347

An Integrated RFID and Barcode Tagged Item Inventory System for Deployment at New Brunswick Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has a numerous inventory containing thousands of plutonium and uranium certified reference materials. The current manual inventory process is well established but is a lengthy process which requires significant oversight and double checking to ensure correctness. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has worked with NBL to develop and deploy a new inventory system which utilizes handheld computers with barcode scanners and radio frequency identification (RFID) readers termed the Tagged Item Inventory System (TIIS). Certified reference materials are identified by labels which incorporate RFID tags and barcodes. The label printing process and RFID tag association process are integrated into the main desktop software application. Software on the handheld computers syncs with software on designated desktop machines and the NBL inventory database to provide a seamless inventory process. This process includes: 1) identifying items to be inventoried, 2) downloading the current inventory information to the handheld computer, 3) using the handheld to read item and location labels, and 4) syncing the handheld computer with a designated desktop machine to analyze the results, print reports, etc. The security of this inventory software has been a major concern. Designated roles linked to authenticated logins are used to control access to the desktop software while password protection and badge verification are used to control access to the handheld computers. The overall system design and deployment at NBL will be presented. The performance of the system will also be discussed with respect to a small piece of the overall inventory. Future work includes performing a full inventory at NBL with the Tagged Item Inventory System and comparing performance, cost, and radiation exposures to the current manual inventory process.

Younkin, James R [ORNL; Kuhn, Michael J [ORNL; Gradle, Colleen [New Brunswick Laboratory, Argonne, IL; Preston, Lynne [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security; Thomas, Brigham B. [ORNL; Laymance, Leesa K [ORNL; Kuziel, Ron [DOE SC - Chicago Office

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate- Ammonium Bicarbonate Process Description Current commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from conventional power plants are expensive and energy intensive. The objective of this project is to reduce the cost associated with the capture of CO 2 from coal based gasification processes, which convert coal and other carbon based feedstocks to synthesis gas.

349

HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines progress in the second 3 months of the first year of the DOE project ''High Resolution Prediction of Gas Injection Process Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs.'' The development of an automatic technique for analytical solution of one-dimensional gas flow problems with volume change on mixing is described. The aim of this work is to develop a set of ultra-fast compositional simulation tools that can be used to make field-scale predictions of the performance of gas injection processes. To achieve the necessary accuracy, these tools must satisfy the fundamental physics and chemistry of the displacement from the pore to the reservoir scales. Thus this project focuses on four main research areas: (1) determination of the most appropriate methods of mapping multicomponent solutions to streamlines and streamtubes in 3D; (2) development of techniques for automatic generation of analytical solutions for one-dimensional flow along a streamline; (3) experimental investigations to improve the representation of physical mechanisms that govern displacement efficiency along a streamline; and (4) theoretical and experimental investigations to establish the limitations of the streamline/streamtube approach. In this report they briefly review the status of the research effort in each area. They then give a more in depth discussion of their development of techniques for analytic solutions along a streamline including volume change on mixing for arbitrary numbers of components.

Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Evaluation of high-efficiency gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing. Second semiannual technical progress report, April 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this proposed program is to evaluate the potential of rotating gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing by expanding the currently available database. This expansion will focus on application of this technology to environments representative of those typically encountered in natural gas processing plants. Operational and reliability concerns will be addressed while generating pertinent engineering data relating to the mass-transfer process. Work to be performed this reporting period are: complete all negotiations and processing of agreements; complete assembly, modifications, shakedown, and conduct fluid dynamic studies using the plastic rotary contactor unit; confirmation of project test matrix; and locate, and transport an amine plant and dehydration plant. Accomplishment for this period are presented.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Annual Inventory Troubleshooting Checklist Problem Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Inventory Troubleshooting Checklist Problem Solutions Duplicate tag number Send email to am;Annual Inventory Troubleshooting Checklist Problem Solutions Personal property Send email to am

Li, Mo

352

Robust Inventory Management Using Tractable Replenishment ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inventory ties up working capital and incurs holding costs, reducing profit every ... Good inventory management has hence become crucial to businesses as they...

353

Convex Optimization of Centralized Inventory Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 10, 2005 ... holding and penalty costs, inventory centralization induces a cooperative cost alloca- ... buying, storing and distributing their inventory jointly.

354

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

355

Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information APS Non-NRTL Electrical Equipment Inventory Spreadsheet ANL Recognized Reputable Electrical Equipment Manufacturer List as...

356

National Bridge Inventory Record Data Submission Requirement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Bridge Inventory Record Data Submission Requirement National Bridge Inventory Record Data Submission Requirement 2011.09.02 OECM-NBI Record Data Submission Req.pdf More...

357

Incremental validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The current study examined the incremental validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised in relation to the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles and Personality Assessment (more)

McCoy, Katrina.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Building Technologies Office: Life Cycle Inventory Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Inventory Database to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Life Cycle Inventory Database on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Life...

359

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE ROADMAP rsed e Goals of the U.S. LCI Database Project * Maintain data quality and transparency. * Cover commonly used materials, products, and processes in the United States with up-to-date, critically reviewed LCI data. * Support the expanded use of LCA as an environmental decision-making tool. * Maintain compatibility with international LCI databases. * Provide exceptional data accessibility.

360

What can be learned from classical inventory models: a cross-industry empirical investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Classical inventory models offer a variety of insights into the optimal way to manage inventories of individual products. However, top managers and industry analysts are often concerned with the aggregate macroscopic view of a firms inventory rather than with the inventories of individual products. Given that classical inventory models often do not account for many practical considerations that a companys management faces (e.g., competition, industry dynamics, business cycles, the financial state of the company and of the economy, etc.) and that they are derived at the product and not at the firm level, can insights from these models be used to explain the inventory dynamics of entire companies? This exploratory study aims to address this issue using empirical data. We analyze absolute and relative inventories using a quarterly data panel that contains 722 public US companies for the period 1992 to 2002. We have chosen companies that are not widely diversified and whose business in large part relies on inventory management in order to concentrate on empirically testing hypotheses derived from a variety of classical inventory models (EOQ, (Q,r), newsvendor, periodic review, etc.). We find empirical evidence that firms operating with more uncertain demand, longer lead times and higher gross margins have higher inventory levels. Furthermore, larger companies appear to benefit from economies of scale and therefore have relatively less inventory than smaller companies. We obtain mixed evidence on the relationship between inventory levels and inventory holding costs. We also analyze the breakdown of data into eight segmentsoil and gas, electronics, wholesale, retail, machinery, hardware, food and chemicalsand find that, with a few notable exceptions, our hypotheses are supported within the segments as well. Overall, our results demonstrate that many of the predictions from classical inventory models extend beyond individual products to the more aggregate firm level; hence, these models can help with high-level strategic choices in addition to tactical decisions.

Serguei Roumiantsev; Serguei Netessine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Bose Gas and Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process on the Half-Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we find explicit formulas for: (1) Green's function for a system of one-dimensional bosons interacting via a delta-function potential with particles confined to the positive half-line; and (2) the transition probability for the one-dimensional asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) with particles confined to the nonnegative integers. These are both for systems with a finite number of particles. The formulas are analogous to ones obtained earlier for the Bose gas and ASEP on the line and integers, respectively. We use coordinate Bethe Ansatz appropriately modified to account for confinement of the particles to the half-line. As in the earlier work, the proof for the ASEP is less straightforward than for the Bose gas.

Tracy, Craig A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Regeneration of an aqueous solution from an acid gas absorption process by matrix stripping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide and other acid gases are removed from gaseous streams using aqueous absorption and stripping processes. By replacing the conventional stripper used to regenerate the aqueous solvent and capture the acid gas with a matrix stripping configuration, less energy is consumed. The matrix stripping configuration uses two or more reboiled strippers at different pressures. The rich feed from the absorption equipment is split among the strippers, and partially regenerated solvent from the highest pressure stripper flows to the middle of sequentially lower pressure strippers in a "matrix" pattern. By selecting certain parameters of the matrix stripping configuration such that the total energy required by the strippers to achieve a desired percentage of acid gas removal from the gaseous stream is minimized, further energy savings can be realized.

Rochelle, Gary T. (Austin, TX); Oyenekan, Babatunde A. (Katy, TX)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

363

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Processing Plant Utilization Data collected for 2009 show that the States with the highest total processing capacity are among the States with the highest average utilization rates. This is to be expected as most of the plants are located in production areas that have been prolific for many years. In fact, the five States situated along the Gulf of Mexico accounted for nearly 49 percent of total processing volume in 2009. The total utilization rate in the United States averaged 66 percent of total capacity in 2009 (Table 2). Plants in Alaska ran at 86 percent of total capacity during the year, the highest capacity utilization rate in the country. Texas had significant utilization capacity at 71 percent, for an average of 14 Bcf per day of natural gas in 2009. However, a number of

364

Upgrading Fischer-Tropsch LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) with the Cyclar process  

SciTech Connect

The use of the UOP/BP Cyclar{reg sign} process for upgrading Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) was studied at UOP{reg sign}. The Cyclar process converts LPG into aromatics. The LPG derived from F-T is highly olefinic. Two routes for upgrading F-T LPG were investigated. In one route, olefinic LPG was fed directly to a Cyclar unit (Direct Cyclar). The alternative flow scheme used the Huels CSP process to saturate LPG olefins upstream of the Cyclar unit (Indirect Cyclar). An 18-run pilot plant study verified that each route is technically feasible. An economic evaluation procedure was designed to choose between the Direct and Indirect Cyclar options for upgrading LPG. Four situations involving three different F-T reactor technologies were defined. The main distinction between the cases was the degree of olefinicity, which ranged between 32 and 84 wt % of the fresh feed. 8 refs., 80 figs., 44 tabs.

Gregor, J.H.; Gosling, C.D.; Fullerton, H.E.

1989-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

365

An Effective Implementation of Operational Inventory Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Record of Study describes the Doctor of Engineering (DE) internship experience at the Supply Chain Systems Laboratory (SCSL) at Texas A&M University. The objective of the internship was to design and develop automation tools to streamline lab operations related to inventory management projects and during that process adapt and/or extend theoretical inventory models according to real-world business complexity and data integrity problems. A holistic approach to automation was taken to satisfy both short-term and long-term needs subject to organizational constraints. A comprehensive software productivity tool was designed and developed that considerably reduced time and effort spent on non-value adding activities. This resulted in standardizing and streamlining data analysis related activities. Real-world factors that significantly influence the data analysis process were identified and incorporated into model specifications. This helped develop an operational inventory management model that accounted for business complexity and data integrity issues commonly encountered during implementation. Many organizational issues including new business strategies, human resources, administration, and project management were also addressed during the course of the internship.

Sellamuthu, Sivakumar

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

Major, C.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing. Quarterly progress report, January 1994--March 1994, final version  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the work performed at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) during the third program quarter from January 1, 1994 to March 31, 1994, under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC22-93PC92114. This program has coordinated funding for Task I from IGT`s Sustaining Membership Program(SMP), while DOE is funding Tasks 2 through 8. Progress in all tasks is reported here. The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process consists of two steps that each utilize catalysts and sulfur containing intermediates: (1) to convert natural gas to CS{sub 2}, and (2) to convert CS{sub 2} to gasoline range liquids. Experimental data will be generated to demonstrate the potential of catalysts and the overall process. During this quarter, progress in the following areas has been made. Five catalysts for step I have been prepared. A total of thirty runs with catalysts, IGT-MS-103 and IGT-MS-105, were performed. At 5 seconds residence time and above 1000 {degrees}C the hydrogen sulfide decomposition approached equilibrium. H{sub 2}S conversion was 80% at 1131 {degrees}C. A total of fourteen runs were performed for carbon deposition/regeneration studies. Six catalysts as well as quartz wool were used in these studies. During the methane decomposition runs, carbon formation was found on the catalyst surface. During the subsequent hydrogen sulfide regeneration runs, a significant amount of carbon disulfide was detected in the product stream. Equilibrium calculations for the reaction of carbon with sulfur and with hydrogen sulfide were also performed in this quarter. At 1227{degrees}C, 1 atm, as high as 80% carbon conversion can be obtained at equilibrium.

Erekson, E.J.; Miao, F.Q.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment Inventory Equipment Resources Title Equipment Type Facility Laboratory Building Room Accumet Basic AB15 pH meter pH Meter SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 2 131 209 Agate...

369

Risk Aversion in Inventory Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional inventory models focus on risk-neutral decision makers, i.e., characterizing replenishment strategies that maximize expected total profit, or equivalently, minimize expected total cost over a planning horizon. ...

Chen, Xin

370

Publications inventory control and distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most publications stocked by STSC, Inc. are produced at headquarters. A small number of other publications, however, are ordered from outside vendors and then stocked at headquarters for distribution. Past procedures for inventory control and distribution ...

Deborah R. Richardson

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Lot sizing with inventory gains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the problem of scheduling the shutdown of nuclear reactors for refuelling and maintenance ... nuclear plant refuelling, as well as how much energy should be produced by nuclear and ...... Perishable inventory theory: A review. Operations Re-.

372

Modeling the fast fill process in natural gas vehicle storage cylinders  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The on-board storage capacity of natural gas vehicles (NGVs) is a critical issue to the wide spread marketing of these alternate fueled vehicles. Underfilling of NGV cylinders, during fast fill (< 5 min.) charging operations, can occur at fueling stations, at ambient temperatures greater than 50{degrees}F or 60{degrees}F. The resulting reduced driving range of the vehicle is a serious obstacle which the gas industry is striving to overcome, without resorting to unnecessarily high fueling station pressures, or by applying extensive overpressurization of the cylinder during the fueling operation. Undercharged storage cylinders are a result of the elevated temperature which occurs in the NGV storage cylinder, due to compression and other processes which have not, to the author`s knowledge, been analyzed and documented to date. This paper presents a model and solution methodology which quantifies the cylinder undercharging phenomena which occurs during rapid (< 5 min.) fueling. The effects of heat transfer from the cylinder gas to its constraining walls and ambient are considered in the model analysis. The ramifications of the results on fueling station and cylinder designs are discussed. Suggestions are made for controlled experimental programs to verify the theoretical results, and for fueling station design studies which could minimize or eliminate cylinder underfilling.

Kountz, K.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Accounting strategy of tritium inventory in the heavy water detritiation pilot plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a methodology for determination of tritium inventory in a tritium removal facility. The method proposed is based on the developing of computing models for accountancy of the mobile tritium inventory in the separation processes, of the stored tritium and of the trapped tritium inventory in the structure of the process system components. The configuration of the detritiation process is a combination of isotope catalytic exchange between water and hydrogen (LPCE) and the cryogenic distillation of hydrogen isotopes (CD). The computing model for tritium inventory in the LPCE process and the CD process will be developed basing on mass transfer coefficients in catalytic isotope exchange reactions and in dual-phase system (liquid-vapour) of hydrogen isotopes distillation process. Accounting of tritium inventory stored in metallic hydride will be based on in-bed calorimetry. Estimation of the trapped tritium inventory can be made by subtraction of the mobile and stored tritium inventories from the global tritium inventory of the plant area. Determinations of the global tritium inventory of the plant area will be made on a regular basis by measuring any tritium quantity entering or leaving the plant area. This methodology is intended to be applied to the Heavy Water Detritiation Pilot Plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea (Romania) and to the Cernavoda Tritium Removal Facility (which will be built in the next 5-7 years). (authors)

Bidica, N.; Stefanescu, I. [Inst. of Cryogenics and Isotopes Technologies, Uzinei Str. No. 4, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Cristescu, I. [TLK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bornea, A.; Zamfirache, M.; Lazar, A.; Vasut, F.; Pearsica, C.; Stefan, I. [Inst. of Cryogenics and Isotopes Technologies, Uzinei Str. No. 4, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Prisecaru, I.; Sindilar, G. [Univ. Politehnica of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 313, Bucharest (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

increased to 2,260 Bcf for the week, which is 19.5 percent above the 5-year average inventory at this time of the year, according to EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The...

375

Meeting an 80% Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transportation by 2050: A Case Study in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from ,Board, 2008. California Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventory.A. , 2003. Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from US

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases. IFT measurements were carried out in a standard ternary liquid system of benzene, ethanol and water using drop shape analysis and capillary rise techniques. The experimental results indicate strong correlation among the three thermodynamic properties solubility, miscibility and IFT. The miscibility determined from IFT measurements for this ternary liquid system is in good agreement with phase diagram and solubility data, which clearly indicates the sound conceptual basis of VIT technique to determine fluid-fluid miscibility. Model fluid systems have been identified for VIT experimentation at elevated pressures and temperatures. Section III comprises of the experimental study aimed at evaluating the multiphase displacement characteristics of the various gas injection EOR process performances using Berea sandstone cores. During this reporting period, extensive literature review was completed to: (1) study the gravity drainage concepts, (2) identify the various factors influencing gravity stable gas injection processes, (3) identify various multiphase mechanisms and fluid dynamics operative during the GAGD process, and (4) identify important dimensionless groups governing the GAGD process performance. Furthermore, the dimensional analysis of the GAGD process, using Buckingham-Pi theorem to isolate the various dimensionless groups, as well as experimental design based on these dimensionless quantities have been completed in this reporting period. On the experimental front, recommendations from previous WAG and CGI have been used to modify the experimental protocol. This report also includes results from scaled preliminary GAGD displacements as well as the details of the planned GAGD corefloods for the next quarter. The technology transfer activities have mainly consisted of preparing technical papers, progress reports and discussions with industry personnel for possible GAGD field tests.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizing available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.

Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen J. Gerdemann; John Clark

2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

378

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (see Table 1), and why any given week's storage ... Demonstrated maximum working gas volume is the sum of the highest storage inventory levels of ...

379

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Greenhouse Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2008 ... This U. S. EPA webpage gives an overview of greenhouse gases and a description of greenhouse gas inventories. It provides emission trends...

380

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

53 Wood products originating from forests outside the United States are not included in the U.S. greenhouse gas inventory. 54 Source: U.S. Energy Information ...

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381

Process for simultaneous removal of SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from gas streams  

SciTech Connect

A process for simultaneous removal of SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from a gas stream that includes flowing the gas stream to a spray dryer and absorbing a portion of the SO.sub.2 content of the gas stream and a portion of the NO.sub.x content of the gas stream with ZnO by contacting the gas stream with a spray of an aqueous ZnO slurry; controlling the gas outlet temperature of the spray dryer to within the range of about a 0.degree. to 125.degree. F. approach to the adiabatic saturation temperature; flowing the gas, unreacted ZnO and absorbed SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from the spray dryer to a fabric filter and collecting any solids therein and absorbing a portion of the SO.sub.2 remaining in the gas stream and a portion of the NO.sub.x remaining in the gas stream with ZnO; and controlling the ZnO content of the aqueous slurry so that sufficient unreacted ZnO is present in the solids collected in the fabric filter to react with SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x as the gas passes through the fabric filter whereby the overall feed ratio of ZnO to SO.sub.2 plus NO.sub.x is about 1.0 to 4.0 moles of ZnO per of SO.sub.2 and about 0.5 to 2.0 moles of ZnO per mole of NO.sub.x. Particulates may be removed from the gas stream prior to treatment in the spray dryer. The process further allows regeneration of ZnO that has reacted to absorb SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from the gas stream and acid recovery.

Rosenberg, Harvey S. (Columbus, OH)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Process for simultaneous removal of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for simultaneous removal of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from a gas stream that includes flowing the gas stream to a spray dryer and absorbing a portion of the SO[sub 2] content of the gas stream and a portion of the NO[sub x] content of the gas stream with ZnO by contacting the gas stream with a spray of an aqueous ZnO slurry; controlling the gas outlet temperature of the spray dryer to within the range of about a 0 to 125 F approach to the adiabatic saturation temperature; flowing the gas, unreacted ZnO and absorbed SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from the spray dryer to a fabric filter and collecting any solids therein and absorbing a portion of the SO[sub 2] remaining in the gas stream and a portion of the NO[sub x] remaining in the gas stream with ZnO; and controlling the ZnO content of the aqueous slurry so that sufficient unreacted ZnO is present in the solids collected in the fabric filter to react with SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] as the gas passes through the fabric filter whereby the overall feed ratio of ZnO to SO[sub 2] plus NO[sub x] is about 1.0 to 4.0 moles of ZnO per of SO[sub 2] and about 0.5 to 2.0 moles of ZnO per mole of NO[sub x]. Particulates may be removed from the gas stream prior to treatment in the spray dryer. The process further allows regeneration of ZnO that has reacted to absorb SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from the gas stream and acid recovery. 4 figs.

Rosenberg, H.S.

1987-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

383

It Just Keeps Getting Better-Tru Waste Inventory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opened on March 26, 1999, becoming the nation's first deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste. In May 1998, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified WIPP and re-certified WIPP in March 2006. The knowledge of TRU waste inventory is fundamental to packaging, transportation, disposal strategies, resource allocation, and is also imperative when working in a regulatory framework. TRU waste inventory data are used to define the waste that will fill the WIPP repository in terms of volume, radionuclides, waste material parameters, other chemical components, and to model the impact of the waste on the performance of the WIPP over a 10,000-year evolution. The data that pertain to TRU waste is defined in the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA), as '..waste containing more that 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years..' Defining TRU waste further, the wastes are classified as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH) TRU waste, depending on the dose rate at the surface of the waste container. CH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate not greater than 200 milli-rem (mrem) per hour, while RH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate of 200 mrem per hour or greater. The Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) Inventory Team has developed a powerful new database, the Comprehensive Inventory Database (CID), to maintain the TRU waste inventory information. The CID is intended to replace the Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Database (TWBID), Revision 2.1, as the central inventory information repository for tracking all existing and potential (TRU) waste generated across the Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste complex. It is also the source for information submitted for the Annual TRU Waste Inventory Reports some of which will be used in future Compliance Re-certification Applications (CRAs) for the WIPP. Currently, the DOE is preparing for the second re-certification, CRA-2009. The CID contains comprehensive TRU waste inventory that is consistent, relevant, and easily accessible to support DOE needs, not only the CRAs and performance assessments, but also waste management planning activities and other regulatory needs (e.g., National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analyses). The comprehensive inventory contains information obtained via inventory updates and approved acceptable knowledge (AK) characterization information to ensure inventory data integrity is maintained and the inventory is current. The TRU waste inventory is maintained in the CID under configuration management as defined in the LANL-CO Quality Assurance Program. The CID was developed using Microsoft{sup TM} Access Data Project{sup TM} (ADP) technology with a Microsoft SQL Server{sup TM} back end. The CID is user friendly, contains more fields, provides for easy upload of data, and has the capability to generate fully qualified data reports. To go along with the new database, the LANL-CO Inventory Team has developed an improved data collection/screening process and has excellent communications with the TRU waste site personnel. WIPP has now received over 6,000 shipments, emplaced over 50,000 cubic meters of CH waste, and successfully completed one re-certification. With a new robust qualified database, the CID, to maintain the inventory information, the TRU waste inventory information is continuously improving in quality, accuracy, and usability (better). (authors)

Lott, S.; Crawford, B.; McInroy, W.; Van Soest, G.; McTaggart, J.; Guerin, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Patterson, R. [U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad, Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Materials processing issues for non-destructive laser gas sampling (NDLGS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Non-Destructive Laser Gas Sampling (NDLGS) process essentially involves three steps: (1) laser drilling through the top of a crimped tube made of 304L stainles steel (Hammar and Svennson Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} = 1.55, produced in 1985); (2) gas sampling; and (3) laser re-welding of the crimp. All three steps are performed in a sealed chamber with a fused silica window under controlled vacuum conditions. Quality requirements for successful processing call for a hermetic re-weld with no cracks or other defects in the fusion zone or HAZ. It has been well established that austenitic stainless steels ({gamma}-SS), such as 304L, can suffer from solidification cracking if their Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} is below a critical value that causes solidification to occur as austenite (fcc structure) and their combined impurity level (%P+%S) is above {approx}0.02%. Conversely, for Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} values above the critical level, solidification occurs as ferrite (bcc structure), and cracking propensity is greatly reduced at all combined impurity levels. The consensus of results from studies of several researchers starting in the late 1970's indicates that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value is {approx}1.5 for arc welds. However, more recent studies by the author and others show that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value increases to {approx}1 .6 for weld processes with very rapid thermal cycles, such as the pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam welding (LBW) process used here. Initial attempts at NDLGS using pulsed LBW resulted in considerable solidification cracking, consistent with the results of work discussed above. After a brief introduction to the welding metallurgy of {gamma}-SS, this presentation will review the results of a study aimed at developing a production-ready process that eliminates cracking. The solution to the cracking issue, developed at LANL, involved locally augmenting the Cr content by applying either Cr or a Cr-rich stainless steel (ER 312) to the top of the crimp using the electro-spark deposition (ESD) process followed by laser mixing, drilling and rewelding. Results of a study of the ESD parameters on deposition rate and efficiency will be discussed along with mass balance calculations for determining the desired Cr content to eliminate cracking. The study also required purchase of new pulsed Nd:YAG laser welders. Evaluation of the performance of the new lasers, including beam profiling results, will also be presented. Development of a mixing, drilling and re-welding process at atmospheric pressure with inert gas shielding demonstrated the efficacy of the Cr-augmentation approach. However, extending the process to vacuum conditions proved more challenging owing to loss of laser transmission through the window from spatter and condensation of metal vapors. Solutions developed to circumvent hese issues will be reviewed. Weld microstructures found with various Cr levels will be presented and discussed.

Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Fuel Processing Research Facility - A Platform for the Conduct of Synthesis Gas Technology R&D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vision 21 is the U. S. Department of Energy's initiative to deploy high efficiency, ultraclean co-production coal conversion power plants in the twenty-first century. These plants will consist of power and co-production modules, which are integrated to meet specific power and chemical markets. A variety of fuel gas processing technology issues involving gas separations, cleanup, gas-to-liquid fuels production and chemical synthesis, to mention a few, will be addressed by the program. The overall goal is to effectively eliminate, at competitive costs, environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for producing electricity and transportation fuels. The Fuel Processing Research Facility (FPRF) was developed as a fuel-flexible platform to address many of these technology needs. The facility utilizes a simplified syngas generator that is capable of producing 2,000 standard cubic feet per hour of 900 degree Celsius and 30 atmosphere synthesis gas that can be tailored to the gas composition of interest. It was built on a ''mid-scale'' level in an attempt to successfully branch the traditionally difficult scale-up from laboratory to pilot scale. When completed, the facility will provide a multi-faceted R&D area for the testing of fuel cells, gas separation technologies, and other gas processing unit operations.

Monahan, Michael J.; Berry, David A.; Gardner, Todd H.; Lyons, K. David

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

386

Coal gasification via the Lurgi process: Topical report: Volume 1, Production of SNG (substitute material gas)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Lurgi baseline study was requested by the DOE/GRI Operating Committee of the Joint Coal Gasification Program for the purpose of updating the economics of earlier Lurgi coal gasification plant studies for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) based on commercially advanced technologies. The current study incorporates the recent experience with large size Lurgi plants in an effort to improve capital and operating costs of earlier plant designs. The present coal gasification study is based on a mine mouth plant producing 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG using the Lurgi dry bottom coal gasification technology. A Western subbituminous coal was designated as the plant food, obtained from the Rosebud seam at Colstrip, Montana. This study presents the detailed description of an integrated facility which utilizes coal, air, and water to produce 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG. The plant consists of coal handling and preparation, twenty-six Lurgi dry bottom gasifiers, shift conversion, acid gas removal, methanation, compression and drying of product gas, sulfur recovery, phenol and ammonia recovery, as well as necessary support facilities. The plant is a grass roots, mine mouth facility located in a Western location similar to the town of Colstrip in Rosebud County, Montana. The Lurgi Corporation assisted in this study, under subcontract to Foster Wheeler, by supplying the heat and material balances, flow sheets, utilities, catalysts and chemical requirements, and cost data for Lurgi designed process sections. Details of material supplied by Lurgi Corporation are presented in Appendix A. 52 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

Zahnstecher, L.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed mechanistic Parachor models. In the decane-CO{sub 2} binary system, Parachor model was found to be sufficient for interfacial tension calculations. The predicted miscibility from the Parachor model deviated only by about 2.5% from the measured VIT miscibility. However, in multicomponent live decane-CO{sub 2} system, the performance of the Parachor model was poor, while good match of interfacial tension predictions has been obtained experimentally using the proposed mechanistic Parachor model. The predicted miscibility from the mechanistic Parachor model accurately matched with the measured VIT miscibility in live decane-CO2 system, which indicates the suitability of this model to predict miscibility in complex multicomponent hydrocarbon systems. In the previous reports to the DOE (15323R07, Oct 2004; 15323R08, Jan 2005; 15323R09, Apr 2005; 15323R10, July 2005 and 154323, Oct 2005), the 1-D experimental results from dimensionally scaled GAGD and WAG corefloods were reported for Section III. Additionally, since Section I reports the experimental results from 2-D physical model experiments; this section attempts to extend this 2-D GAGD study to 3-D (4-phase) flow through porous media and evaluate the performance of these processes using reservoir simulation. Section IV includes the technology transfer efforts undertaken during the quarter. This research work resulted in one international paper presentation in Tulsa, OK; one journal publication; three pending abstracts for SCA 2006 Annual Conference and an invitation to present at the Independents Day session at the IOR Symposium 2006.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

In situ gasification process for producing product gas enriched in carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to an in situ coal gasification process wherein the combustion zone within the underground coal bed is fed with air at increasing pressure to increase pressure and temperature in the combustion zone for forcing product gases and water naturally present in the coal bed into the coal bed surrounding the combustion zone. No outflow of combustion products occurs during the build-up of pressure and temperature in the combustion zone. After the coal bed reaches a temperature of about 2000.degree. F and a pressure in the range of about 100-200 psi above pore pressure the airflow is terminated and the outflow of the combustion products from the combustion zone is initiated. The CO.sub.2 containing gaseous products and the water bleed back into the combustion zone to react endothermically with the hot carbon of the combustion zone to produce a burnable gas with a relatively high hydrogen and carbon monoxide content. About 11 to 29 percent of the gas recovered from the combustion zone is carbon monoxide which is considerably better than the 4 to 10 percent carbon monoxide obtained by employing previously known coal gasification techniques.

Capp, John P. (Morgantown, WV); Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fair Act Inventory | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fair Act Inventory Fair Act Inventory Fair Act Inventory This page provides guidance for submission of the DOE FAIR Act Inventory, or otherwise known as the Inherently Governmental Commercial Activities (IGCA) Inventory. This inventory will be used to respond to various reporting requirements including, but not limited to, the Federal Activities Inventory Reform Act of 1998, Public Law 105-270 (FAIR Act) and the inventory of inherently governmental activities required by OMB. OMB requires the submission of the IGCA Inventory in a specified electronic format. As a result, an updated version of the collection tool used last year is provided along with this guidance. This data collection tool is somewhat different than the tool used by OMB. However, the data fields can be easily converted to the OMB tool and will be completed by OPAM.

391

A Monte Carlo Analysis of Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Process Load Cell Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As uranium enrichment plants increase in number, capacity, and types of separative technology deployed (e.g., gas centrifuge, laser, etc.), more automated safeguards measures are needed to enable the IAEA to maintain safeguards effectiveness in a fiscally constrained environment. Monitoring load cell data can significantly increase the IAEA s ability to efficiently achieve the fundamental safeguards objective of confirming operations as declared (i.e., no undeclared activities), but care must be taken to fully protect the operator s proprietary and classified information related to operations. Staff at ORNL, LANL, JRC/ISPRA, and University of Glasgow are investigating monitoring the process load cells at feed and withdrawal (F/W) stations to improve international safeguards at enrichment plants. A key question that must be resolved is what is the necessary frequency of recording data from the process F/W stations? Several studies have analyzed data collected at a fixed frequency. This paper contributes to load cell process monitoring research by presenting an analysis of Monte Carlo simulations to determine the expected errors caused by low frequency sampling and its impact on material balance calculations.

Garner, James R [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Process and apparatus for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and process for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from subsurface soil is provided having filter zone adjacent an external expander ring. The expander ring creates a void within the soil substrate which encourages the accumulation of soil-borne fluids. The fluids migrate along a pressure gradient through a plurality of filters before entering a first chamber. A one-way valve regulates the flow of fluid into a second chamber in further communication with a collection tube through which samples are collected at the surface. A second one-way valve having a reverse flow provides additional communication between the chambers for the pressurized cleaning and back-flushing of the apparatus. 8 figs.

Rossabi, J.; May, C.P.; Pemberton, B.E.; Shinn, J.; Sprague, K.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Industrial Compositional Streamline Simulation for Efficient and Accurate Prediction of Gas Injection and WAG Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas-injection processes are widely and increasingly used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In the United States, for example, EOR production by gas injection accounts for approximately 45% of total EOR production and has tripled since 1986. The understanding of the multiphase, multicomponent flow taking place in any displacement process is essential for successful design of gas-injection projects. Due to complex reservoir geometry, reservoir fluid properties and phase behavior, the design of accurate and efficient numerical simulations for the multiphase, multicomponent flow governing these processes is nontrivial. In this work, we developed, implemented and tested a streamline based solver for gas injection processes that is computationally very attractive: as compared to traditional Eulerian solvers in use by industry it computes solutions with a computational speed orders of magnitude higher and a comparable accuracy provided that cross-flow effects do not dominate. We contributed to the development of compositional streamline solvers in three significant ways: improvement of the overall framework allowing improved streamline coverage and partial streamline tracing, amongst others; parallelization of the streamline code, which significantly improves wall clock time; and development of new compositional solvers that can be implemented along streamlines as well as in existing Eulerian codes used by industry. We designed several novel ideas in the streamline framework. First, we developed an adaptive streamline coverage algorithm. Adding streamlines locally can reduce computational costs by concentrating computational efforts where needed, and reduce mapping errors. Adapting streamline coverage effectively controls mass balance errors that mostly result from the mapping from streamlines to pressure grid. We also introduced the concept of partial streamlines: streamlines that do not necessarily start and/or end at wells. This allows more efficient coverage and avoids the redundant work generally done in the near-well regions. We improved the accuracy of the streamline simulator with a higher order mapping from pressure grid to streamlines that significantly reduces smoothing errors, and a Kriging algorithm is used to map from the streamlines to the background grid. The higher accuracy of the Kriging mapping means that it is not essential for grid blocks to be crossed by one or more streamlines. The higher accuracy comes at the price of increased computational costs, but allows coarser coverage and so does not generally increase the overall costs of the computations. To reduce errors associated with fixing the pressure field between pressure updates, we developed a higher order global time-stepping method that allows the use of larger global time steps. Third-order ENO schemes are suggested to propagate components along streamlines. Both in the two-phase and three-phase experiments these ENO schemes outperform other (higher order) upwind schemes. Application of the third order ENO scheme leads to overall computational savings because the computational grid used can be coarsened. Grid adaptivity along streamlines is implemented to allow sharp but efficient resolution of solution fronts at reduced computational costs when displacement fronts are sufficiently separated. A correction for Volume Change On Mixing (VCOM) is implemented that is very effective at handling this effect. Finally, a specialized gravity operator splitting method is proposed for use in compositional streamline methods that gives an effective correction of gravity segregation. A significant part of our effort went into the development of a parallelization strategy for streamline solvers on the next generation shared memory machines. We found in this work that the built-in dynamic scheduling strategies of OpenMP lead to parallel efficiencies that are comparable to optimal schedules obtained with customized explicit load balancing strategies as long as the ratio of number of streamlines to number of threads is sufficiently high, which is the case in real-fie

Margot Gerritsen

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

CO{sub 2} Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the fleet of coal-fired power plants is of such importance to the nation??s energy production while also being the single largest emitter of CO{sub 2}, the development of retrofit, post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies for existing and new, upcoming coal power plants will allow coal to remain a major component of the U.S. energy mix while mitigating global warming. Post-combustion carbon capture technologies are an attractive option for coal-fired power plants as they do not require modification of major power-plant infrastructures, such as fuel processing, boiler, and steam-turbine subsystems. In this project, the overall objective was to develop an advanced, hollow-fiber, polymeric membrane process that could be cost-effectively retrofitted into current pulverized coal-fired power plants to capture at least 90% of the CO{sub 2} from plant flue gas with 95% captured CO{sub 2} purity. The approach for this project tackled the technology development on three different fronts in parallel: membrane materials R&D, hollow-fiber membrane module development, and process development and engineering. The project team consisted of RTI (prime) and two industrial partners, Arkema, Inc. and Generon IGS, Inc. Two CO{sub 2}-selective membrane polymer platforms were targeted for development in this project. For the near term, a next-generation, high-flux polycarbonate membrane platform was spun into hollow-fiber membranes that were fabricated into both lab-scale and larger prototype (~2,200 ft{sup 2}) membrane modules. For the long term, a new fluoropolymer membrane platform based on poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] chemistry was developed using a copolymer approach as improved capture membrane materials with superior chemical resistance to flue-gas contaminants (moisture, SO{sub 2}, NOx, etc.). Specific objectives were: ? Development of new, highly chemically resistant, fluorinated polymers as membrane materials with minimum selectivity of 30 for CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} permeance greater than 300 gas permeation units (GPU) targeted; ? Development of next-generation polycarbonate hollow-fiber membranes and membrane modules with higher CO{sub 2} permeance than current commercial polycarbonate membranes; ? Development and fabrication of membrane hollow fibers and modules from candidate polymers; ? Development of a CO{sub 2} capture membrane process design and integration strategy suitable for end-of-pipe, retrofit installation; and ? Techno-economic evaluation of the "best" integrated CO{sub 2} capture membrane process design package In this report, the results of the project research and development efforts are discussed and include the post-combustion capture properties of the two membrane material platforms and the hollow-fiber membrane modules developed from them and the multi-stage process design and analysis developed for 90% CO{sub 2} capture with 95% captured CO{sub 2} purity.

Lora Toy; Atish Kataria; Raghubir Gupta

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; R. Hofmann; K.A. Lokhandwala

2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

397

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provided onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dewpoint and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 11 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions was conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute partially supported the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. During the course of this project, MTR has sold thirteen commercial units related to the field test technology. Revenue generated from new business is already more than four times the research dollars invested in this process by DOE. The process is ready for broader commercialization and the expectation is to pursue the commercialization plans developed during this project, including collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provides onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 13 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency, United States Agency for International Development Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/ghginventorycapacitybuilding/templ National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems Screenshot References: National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems[1]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas: Nineteenth Quarterly Progress Report (Second Quarter 2006)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation, and is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we continue, but have as yet been unsuccessful in our attempts, to negotiate with Atmos Energy for a final test of the project demonstration unit. In the meantime, MTR has located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA. Several commercial sales have resulted from the partnership with ABB, and total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units are now approaching $2.6 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho...

403

A METHODOLOGY TO EVALUATE OBSOLETE INVENTORY IN HEALTH CARE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many organizations are currently facing inventory management problems such as distributing inventory on-time and maintain the correct inventory levels to satisfy the customer or end (more)

Thummalapalli, Rama

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

An Inventory-Location Model: Formulation, Solution Algorithm and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 18, 2001 ... working inventory and safety stock inventory costs at the distribution ... Managing inventory has become a major challenge for firms as they.

405

Evaluating Obselete Inventory Policies in a Hospital's Supply Chain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Numerous organizations are currently facing inventory management problems including distributing inventory on time and maintaining the appropriate inventory level to satisfy the end user. Organizations (more)

Cavitt, Maurice D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Monetary Policy Shocks, Inventory Dynamics, and Price-Setting Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sticky Prices and Inventories: Produc- tion Smoothingbetween monetary shocks and ?nished goods inventories. Fur-nd that allowing for inventory holdings leads to a Phillips

Jung, YongSeung; Yun, Tack

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

FY 2007 FAIR ACT INVENTORY REASON CODES | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07 FAIR ACT INVENTORY REASON CODES FY 2007 FAIR ACT INVENTORY REASON CODES FY 2007 FAIR ACT INVENTORY REASON CODES More Documents & Publications OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT &...

408

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Data (Redirected from UNFCCC GHG Inventory Data) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Data AgencyCompany Organization: United...

409

CARTOGRAPHIC BASE FILES AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY: 1978. INVENTORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BERKELEY LABORATORY: 1978 INVENTORY f(ECEfVED tAWRENCE!FILES AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY: 1978 INVENTORY B. R.1979 ABSTRACT This inventory describes the cartographic base

Burkhart, B.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Gray Markets, A Product of Demand Uncertainty and Excess Inventory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two-market stochastic inventory system, Management Science.M. , P. Kouvelis. 2007. Inventory, speculation, and sourcing2001. A two-location inventory model with transshipment and

Ahmadi, R.; Carr, S. M.; Dasu, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Inventory and Typology of Fauna Passages on French Transport Infrastructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

passages faune en Picardie (Inventory of fauna passages inis to carry out a database to inventory the structures oforganisation). Methods The inventory of fauna passages uses

Bielsa, Sabine; Pineau, Christophe

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 More Documents & Publications Job Counting...

413

The Binary Customer Satisfaction Model in Inventory and Queueing Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caine, R. H. Plaut. Optimal Inventory Policy when Stockoutsin a Manufacturer/Dealer Inventory Sys- tem Under StochasticErnst, S. Powell. Optimal Inventory Policies Under Service-

Azadivar, Justin Sepehr

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Defining Information System For the Baseline Inventory | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Defining Information System For the Baseline Inventory Defining Information System For the Baseline Inventory Defining Information System For the Baseline Inventory Defining...

415

Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) Removal Process, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale and pilot-scale testing - so that it could be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization. The new process, known as the IROA process, is based on U.S. patent No. 6,553,784, which if commercialized, has the potential of achieving substantial energy savings compared to currently used cryogenic technology. When successfully developed, this technology will benefit the petrochemical industry, which uses NGL as feedstocks, and will also benefit other chemical industries that utilize gas-liquid separation and distillation under similar operating conditions. Specific goals and objectives of the overall program include: (i) collecting relevant physical property and Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) data for the design and evaluation of the new technology, (ii) solving critical R&D issues including the identification of suitable dehydration and NGL absorbing solvents, inhibiting corrosion, and specifying proper packing structure and materials, (iii) designing, construction and operation of bench and pilot-scale units to verify design performance, (iv) computer simulation of the process using commercial software simulation platforms such as Aspen-Plus and HYSYS, and (v) preparation of a commercialization plan and identification of industrial partners that are interested in utilizing the new technology. NGL is a collective term for C2+ hydrocarbons present in the natural gas. Historically, the commercial value of the separated NGL components has been greater than the thermal value of these liquids in the gas. The revenue derived from extracting NGLs is crucial to ensuring the overall profitability of the domestic natural gas production industry and therefore of ensuring a secure and reliable supply in the 48 contiguous states. However, rising natural gas prices have dramatically reduced the economic incentive to extract NGLs from domestically produced natural gas. Successful gas processors will be those who adopt technologies that are less energy intensive, have lower capital and operating costs and offer the flexibility to tailor the plant performance to maximize product revenue as market conditions change, while maintaining overall system efficiency. Presently, cryogenic turbo-expander technology is the dominant NGL recovery process and it is used throughout the world. This process is known to be highly energy intensive, as substantial energy is required to recompress the processed gas back to pipeline pressure. The purpose of this project is to develop a new NGL separation process that is flexible in terms of ethane rejection and can reduce energy consumption by 20-30% from current levels, particularly for ethane recoveries of less than 70%. The new process integrates the dehydration of the raw natural gas stream and the removal of NGLs in such a way that heat recovery is maximized and pressure losses are minimized so that high-value equipment such as the compressor, turbo-expander, and a separate dehydration unit are not required. GTI completed a techno-economic evaluation of the new process based on an Aspen-HYSYS simulation model. The evaluation incorporated purchased equipment cost estimates obtained from equipment suppliers and two different commercial software packages; namely, Aspen-Icarus and Preliminary Design and Quoting Service (PDQ$). For a 100 MMscfd gas processing plant, the annualized capital cost for the new technology was found to be about 10% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery above 70% and about 40% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery below 50%. It was also found that at around 40-50% C2 recovery (which is economically justifiable at the current natural gas prices), the energy cost to recover NGL using the new technology is about 50% of that of conventional cryogenic technology.

Meyer, Howard, S.; Lu, Yingzhong

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Automatic Estimation of the Radiological Inventory for the Dismantling of Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimation of the radiological inventory of Nuclear Facilities to be dismantled is a process that included information related with the physical inventory of all the plant and radiological survey. Estimation of the radiological inventory for all the components and civil structure of the plant could be obtained with mathematical models with statistical approach. A computer application has been developed in order to obtain the radiological inventory in an automatic way. Results: A computer application that is able to estimate the radiological inventory from the radiological measurements or the characterization program has been developed. In this computer applications has been included the statistical functions needed for the estimation of the central tendency and variability, e.g. mean, median, variance, confidence intervals, variance coefficients, etc. This computer application is a necessary tool in order to be able to estimate the radiological inventory of a nuclear facility and it is a powerful tool for decision taken in future sampling surveys.

Garcia-Bermejo, R.; Felipe, A.; Gutierrez, S.; Salas, E. [Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construccion (Spain); Martin, N. [ENRESA (Spain)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Plasma-chemical treatment of hydrogen sulfide in natural gas processing. Final report, May 1991--December 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new process for the treatment of hydrogen sulfide waste that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology has been under development in Russia and the United States. Whereas the present waste-treatment technology, at best, only recovers sulfur, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur by dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a plasma by means of a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. A research project has been undertaken to determine the suitability of the plasma process in natural gas processing applications. The experiments tested acid-gas compositions with 30--65% carbon dioxide, 0--7% water, and 0--0.2% of a standard mixture of pipeline gas. The balance gas in all cases was hydrogen sulfide. The reactor pressure for the experiments was 50 torr, and the microwave power was 1.0 kW. Conversions of hydrogen sulfide ranged from 80 to 100%, while 35--50% of the carbon dioxide was converted to carbon monoxide. This conversion of carbon dioxide resulted in a loss of hydrogen production and an energy loss from a hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment perspective. Tests of a direct natural gas treatment concept showed that hydrocarbon losses were unacceptably high; consequently, the concept would not be economically viable.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Research Report National inventory of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey Pilot for the Survey of Small Woodland and Trees 4. Aerial photography and mapping Introduction Aerial photography Scotland England and Wales Woodland map for the Main Woodland Survey Scotland England. Forestry Commission Scotland, Edinburgh. i­iv + 1­60 pp. Keywords: inventory, woodland, survey, trees

419

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consistent with OECD inventories, U.S. inventories are low. They have been well below the normal range for over one year. Crude oil stocks in the United States, while tending to...

420

Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia Jump to: navigation, search Name Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Policies/deployment programs Program End 2015 Country Tunisia Northern Africa References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview Tunisia has developed NAMA approaches; however, robust systems by which to measure, report and verify (MRV) these measures are still lacking. The project supports the establishment of a comprehensive national MRV system for mitigation measures including greenhouse gas monitoring. This will be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas inventory process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hynol -- An economic process for methanol production from biomass and natural gas with reduced CO{sub 2} emission  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hynol process is proposed to meet the demand for an economical process for methanol production with reduced CO{sub 2} emission. This new process consists of three reaction steps: (a) hydrogasification of biomass, (b) steam reforming of the produced gas with additional natural gas feedstock, and (c) methanol synthesis of the hydrogen and carbon monoxide produced during the previous two steps. The H{sub 2}-rich gas remaining after methanol synthesis is recycled to gasify the biomass in an energy neutral reactor so that there is no need for an expensive oxygen plant as required by commercial steam gasifiers. Recycling gas allows the methanol synthesis reactor to perform at a relatively lower pressure than conventional while the plant still maintains high methanol yield. Energy recovery designed into the process minimizes heat loss and increases the process thermal efficiency. If the Hynol methanol is used as an alternative and more efficient automotive fuel, an overall 41% reduction in CO{sub 2} emission can be achieved compared to the use of conventional gasoline fuel. A preliminary economic estimate shows that the total capital investment for a Hynol plant is 40% lower than that for a conventional biomass gasification plant. The methanol production cost is $0.43/gal for a 1085 million gal/yr Hynol plant which is competitive with current U.S. methanol and equivalent gasoline prices. Process flowsheet and simulation data using biomass and natural gas as cofeedstocks are presented. The Hynol process can convert any condensed carbonaceous material, especially municipal solid waste (MSW), to produce methanol.

Steinberg, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Dong, Yuanji [Hynol Corp., New York, NY (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Gas atomization processing of tin and silicon modified LaNi{sub 5} for nickel-metal hydride battery applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous researchers have studied the relevant material properties of so-called AB{sub 5} alloys for battery applications. These studies involved LaNi{sub 5} substituted alloys which were prepared using conventional cast and crush alloying techniques. While valuable to the understanding of metal hydride effects, the previous work nearly ignored the potential for alternative direct powder production methods, like high pressure gas atomization (HPGA). Thus, there is a need to understand the relationship between gas atomization processes, powder particle solidification phases, and hydrogen absorption properties of ultra fine (< 25 {micro}m) atomized powders with high surface area for enhanced battery performance. Concurrently, development of a gas atomization nozzle that is more efficient than all current designs is needed to increase the yield of ultrafine AB{sub 5} alloy powder for further processing advantage. Gas atomization processing of the AB{sub 5} alloys was demonstrated to be effective in producing ultrafine spherical powders that were resilient to hydrogen cycling for the benefit of improving corrosion resistance in battery application. These ultrafine powders benefited from the rapid solidification process by having refined solute segregation in the microstructure of the gas atomized powders which enabled a rapid anneal treatment of the powders. The author has demonstrated the ability to produce high yields of ultrafine powder efficiently and cost effectively, using the new HPGA-III technology. Thus, the potential benefits of processing AB{sub 5} alloys using the new HPGA technology could reduce manufacturing cost of nickel-metal hydride powder. In the near future, the manufacture of AB{sub 5} alloy powders could become a continuous and rapid production process. The economic benefit of an improved AB{sub 5} production process may thereby encourage the use of nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries in electrical vehicle applications in the foreseeable future.

Ting, J.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROCUREMENT & ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT PROCUREMENT & ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT INHERENTLY GOVERNMENTAL AND COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES (IGCA) INVENTORY GUIDANCE Name Date Tel E-Mail Created by: Jeff Davis March 16, 2011 202-287-1877 Jeff.Davis@hq.doe.gov Modified by: i Table of Contents Summary ............................................................................................................................................. 1 Guide to Inventory Submission ............................................................................................................ 2 DOE FUNCTION CODES .............................................................................................................................. 2 CODING RULES FOR THE IGCA INVENTORY .............................................................................................. 3

424

How is Chemical Inventory Information Used?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How is Chemical Inventory Information Used? June 2, 2010 https://medmeeting.stanford.edu/healthsafety-group/ 1-866-642-1665 Participant passcode is 111483 #12;Agenda · Introductions · Chemical Inventory roster Maintain Training records Chemical inventory Life Safety Box updates Complete Self

Ford, James

425

Aviation emission inventory development and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An up to date and accurate aviation emission inventory is a prerequisite for any detailed analysis of aviation emission impact on greenhouse gases and local air quality around airports. In this paper we present an aviation emission inventory using real ... Keywords: Air traffic, Aviation emission, Emission inventory, Environmental modelling

Viet Van Pham; Jiangjun Tang; Sameer Alam; Chris Lokan; Hussein A. Abbass

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Note: 1) 'Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period as...

427

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

gas capacity, which is the sum of the highest observed working natural gas storage inventory level in each facility over the prior 5-year period; and working gas design...

428

Optimal Inventory Policies when Purchase Price and Demand Are Stochastic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the problem of a firm that faces a stochastic (Poisson) demand and must replenish from a market in which prices fluctuate, such as a commodity market. We describe the price evolution as a continuous stochastic process and we ... Keywords: production/inventory

Peter Berling; Victor Martnez-de-Albniz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

Schilke, Peter W. (4 Hempshire Ct., Scotia, NY 12302); Muth, Myron C. (R.D. #3, Western Ave., Amsterdam, NY 12010); Schilling, William F. (301 Garnsey Rd., Rexford, NY 12148); Rairden, III, John R. (6 Coronet Ct., Schenectady, NY 12309)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Time-to-Produce, Inventory, and Asset Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a production-based general equilibrium model, I study the impact of time-to-build and time-to-produce technology constraints and inventory on asset prices and macroeconomic quantity dynamics. A time-to-build constraint captures the delay in transforming new investment into productive capital; a time-to-produce constraint captures the delay in transforming productive capital into final products. Empirically, I find that the U.S. economy in aggregate exhibits approximately a three-quarter time-to-build and a four-quarter time-to-produce constraint. These delays in the production process introduce short-run risks in the economy where inventory accumulation facilitates consumption smoothing over time. Using this structure for time-to-build and time-to-produce constraints, I numerically calibrate a production-based general equilibrium model where the representative investor has recursive preferences over consumption and inventory. The model delivers first and second moments of macroeconomic quantities and asset prices consistent with the data. A small elasticity of intertemporal substitution is necessary to positively price the short-run risks induced by the production constraints. Inventories help fit the volatilities of asset returns, while the time-to-produce feature ensures nontrivial inventory holdings. In addition, the model is able to match empirical lead-lag patterns between asset prices and macroeconomic quantities as well as observed equity return predictability.

Chen, Zhanhui

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

a constructive heuristic for the integrated inventory-distribution ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 12, 2008 ... Abstract: We study the integrated inventory distribution problem which is concerned with multiperiod inventory holding, backlogging, and...

432

Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory This study has been prepared by the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) campaign of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate of the volume of low level waste resulting from a variety of commercial fuel cycle alternatives in order to support subsequent system-level evaluations of disposal system performance. This study provides an estimate of Class A/B/C low level waste (LLW), greater than Class C (GTCC) waste, mixed LLW and mixed GTCC waste generated from the following initial set of fuel cycles and recycling processes: 1. Operations at a geologic repository based upon a once through light

433

Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory This study has been prepared by the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) campaign of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate of the volume of low level waste resulting from a variety of commercial fuel cycle alternatives in order to support subsequent system-level evaluations of disposal system performance. This study provides an estimate of Class A/B/C low level waste (LLW), greater than Class C (GTCC) waste, mixed LLW and mixed GTCC waste generated from the following initial set of fuel cycles and recycling processes: 1. Operations at a geologic repository based upon a once through light

434

Steel Plate Processing for Line Pipes in Oil and Gas Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This has further helped in reducing the specific steel consumption in oil and gas transportation. The current focus on less wall thickness at increased strength...

435

A pilot-scale Process Development Unit for transport and fluid-bed hot-gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has designed and is currently constructing an on-site, hot gas desulfurization (HGD) Process Development Unit (PDU). The PDU is designed to use regenerable solid metal oxide sorbents that absorb hydrogen sulfide from high-temperature, high-pressure simulated coal-gasification fuel gas that is generated by a METC designed syngas generator. The simulated coal gas is a mixture of partially combusted natural gas, water, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. PDU process conditions will be representative of anticipated commercial applications in terms of temperatures, pressures, compositions, velocities, and sorbent cycling. The PDU supports the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) mission at METC by providing a test bed for development of IGCC cleanup systems that offer low capital cost, operating costs, and costs of electricity. METC intends to develop additional industrial involvement opportunities as the project progresses towards operations. The primary objectives of the PDU are to (1) fill the gap between small-scale testing and large-scale demonstration projects by providing a cost effective test site for transport and fluid-bed desulfurization reactor and sorbent development, (2) demonstrate sorbent suitability over a wide range of parameters, and (3) generate significant information on process control for transport and fluidized bed based desulfurization. PDU data is expected to be used to optimize process performance by expanding the experience for larger scale demonstration projects such as Sierra Pacific Power Company`s Clean Coal Technology project.

McMillian, M.H.; Bissett, L.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Service Contract Inventory Analysis 0 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Department of Energy Office of Procurement & Assistance Management Strategic Programs Division (MA-622) January 2012 (REVISED) FY2010 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Department of Energy Contents Page Section 1: Background 1 Section 2: Analysis and Findings 3 Section 3: Next Steps 5 FY2010 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Department of Energy 1 Section 1: Background Section 743 of Division C of the FY 2010 Consolidated Appropriations Act, P.L. 111-117, requires civilian agencies to prepare an annual inventory of their service contracts. The Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) November 5, 2010 and December 19, 2012 Memorandums entitled, "Service Contract

437

The Effects of Macroscopic Heterogeneities of Pore Structure and Wettability on Residual Oil Recovery Using the Gravity-Assisted Inert Gas Injection (GAIGI) Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To recover oil remaining in petroleum reservoirs after waterflooding, the gravitationally stable mode of gas injection is recognized as a promising tertiary oil recovery process. (more)

Parsaei, Rafat

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Chemical Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Inventory Chemical Inventory Use the following dropdown menus to filter the results for chemical records. To reset the results clear the entries and click "update". Facility - Any - SSRL LCLS Building - Any - 120 131 999 Room - Any - 109 113 209 257 Storage Area Storage Category Apply Title Facility Building Room Storage Area Storage Category Available to All Qty. Size Units Responsible Person 1,3-cyclohexadiene SSRL 131 209 CI L No 1 25 milliliters (ml) Tsu-Chien Weng 1,4- dioxane SSRL 120 257 CB1 L Yes 1 1 liters (l) Cynthia Patty 1,8-Octanedithiol SSRL 131 209 CA3 L No 1 5 grams (g) Schmidt 1-Chloronapthalene SSRL 131 209 CA3 L No 1 100 grams (g) Schmidt 1-Propanol LCLS 999 109 B1 L Yes 1 4 liters (l) Lisa Hammon

439

EXAMINE AND EVALUATE A PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy cooperative research project is to define, describe, and validate, a process to utilize salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships. The project defines the process as receiving LNG from a ship, pumping the LNG up to cavern injection pressures, warming it to cavern compatible temperatures, injecting the warmed vapor directly into salt caverns for storage, and distribution to the pipeline network. The performance of work under this agreement is based on U.S. Patent 5,511,905, and other U.S. and Foreign pending patent applications. The cost sharing participants in the research are The National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), BP America Production Company, Bluewater Offshore Production Systems (U.S.A.), Inc., and HNG Storage, L.P. Initial results indicate that a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at about half the capital cost, less than half the operating costs and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. There is a significant body of knowledge and practice concerning natural gas storage in salt caverns, and there is a considerable body of knowledge and practice in handling LNG, but there has never been any attempt to develop a process whereby the two technologies can be combined. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or terrorist acts, and much more acceptable to the community. The project team developed conceptual designs of two salt cavern based LNG terminals, one with caverns located in Calcasieu Parish Louisiana, and the second in Vermilion block 179 about 50 miles offshore Louisiana. These conceptual designs were compared to conventional tank based LNG terminals and demonstrate superior security, economy and capacity. The potential for the development of LNG receiving terminals, utilizing salt caverns for storage and the existing comprehensive pipeline system has profound implications for the next generation of LNG terminals. LNG imports are expected to become an increasingly more important part of the U.S. energy supply and the capacities to receive LNG securely, safely, and economically must be expanded. Salt cavern LNG receiving terminals both in onshore and offshore locations can be quickly built and provide additional import capacity into the U.S. exceeding 6-10 Bcf/day in the aggregate.

Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; D. Braxton Scherz

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

440

Quantum gravity and inventory accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We begin by studying inventory accumulation at a LIFO (last-in-first-out) retailer with two products. In the simplest version, the following occur with equal probability at each time step: first product ordered, first product produced, second product ordered, second product produced. The inventory thus evolves as a simple random walk on Z^2. In more interesting versions, a p fraction of customers orders the "freshest available" product regardless of type. We show that the corresponding random walks scale to Brownian motions with diffusion matrices depending on p. We then turn our attention to the critical Fortuin-Kastelyn random planar map model, which gives, for each q>0, a probability measure on random (discretized) two-dimensional surfaces decorated by loops, related to the q-state Potts model. A longstanding open problem is to show that as the discretization gets finer, the surfaces converge in law to a limiting (loop-decorated) random surface. The limit is expected to be a Liouville quantum gravity surface decorated by a conformal loop ensemble, with parameters depending on q. Thanks to a bijection between decorated planar maps and inventory trajectories (closely related to bijections of Bernardi and Mullin), our results about the latter imply convergence of the former in a particular topology. A phase transition occurs at p = 1/2, q=4.

Scott Sheffield

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary comparison of conventional and potential HTGR-integrated processesa in several common industrial areas: ? Producing electricity via a traditional power cycle ? Producing hydrogen ? Producing ammonia and ammonia-derived products, such as fertilizer ? Producing gasoline and diesel from natural gas or coal ? Producing substitute natural gas from coal, and ? Steam-assisted gravity drainage (extracting oil from tar sands).

Lee Nelson

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research and Development Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research and Development Platform 2010 -2015 Accounting Building/Data Mining · Aim: improve the UK's greenhouse gas inventory by replacing generic IPCCC emission inventory #12;Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Platform ­ missing data #12;AC0115 ­ led by IBERS

Edinburgh, University of

443

Distribution of Natural Gas: The Final Step in the Transmission Process  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

June 2008 June 2008 1 Each day, close to 70 million customers in the United States depend upon the national natural gas distribution network, including natural gas distribution companies and pipelines, to deliver natural gas to their home or place of business (Figure 1). These customers currently consume approximately 20 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of natural gas per annum, accounting for about 22 percent of the total energy consumed in the United States each year. This end- use customer base is 92 percent residential units, 7 percent commercial businesses, and 1 percent large industrial and electric power generation customers. 1 However, the large- volume users, though small in number, account for more than 60 percent of the natural gas used by end users.

444

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to create a computerized database inventory of compressor engines being used in the oil and natural gas exploration and production industry to evaluate emissions control...

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

inventories. Nonetheless, concerns are growing over the slowing pace of liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports, which have fallen off significantly as cargos are diverted to Europe...

446

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a quantitative and qualitative estimation of uncertainty associated with a GHG inventory. Overview The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Uncertainty Tool is designed to facilitate a...

447

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Guidance and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance and Reporting Federal agencies are required to inventory and manage their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change. Federal...

448

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5-year average inventory level for the report week, according to EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (See Storage Figure). This matches the highest level that weekly working...

449

Retail Inventory Management When Records are Inaccurate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inventory record inaccuracy is a significant problem for retailers using automated inventory management systems. While investments in preventative and corrective measures can be effective remedies, gains can also be achieved through inventory management tools that account for record errors. In this paper, we consider intelligent inventory management tools that account for record errors using a Bayesian inventory record. We assume that excess demands are lost and unobserved, in which case sales data reveal information about physical inventory positions. We show that a probability distribution on inventory levels is a sufficient summary of past sales and replenishment observations, and that this probability distribution can be efficiently updated as observations are accumulated. We also demonstrate the use of this distribution as the basis for practical replenishment and inventory audit policies, and illustrate how the needed parameters can be estimated using data from a large national retailer. Our replenishment policies avoid the problem of freezing, in which a physical inventory position persists at zero while the corresponding record is positive. In addition, simulation studies show that our replenishment policies recoup much of the cost of inventory record inaccuracy, and that our audit policies significantly outperform the popular zero-balance walk audit policy. 1.

Nicole Dehoratius; Adam J. Mersereau; Linus Schrage

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: continue both screening and high pressure experiments to determine optimum inhibitors; investigate molecular mechanisms of hydrate formation/inhibition, through microscopic and macroscopic experiments; begin controlled tests on the Exxon pilot plant loop at their Houston facility; and continue to act as a forum for the sharing of field test results. Progress on these objectives are described in this report.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Influence of technological factors on statics of hydrogen sulfide absorption from coke-oven gas by the ammonia process  

SciTech Connect

The basic technological factors that determine the effectiveness of hydrogen sulfide absorption from coke-oven gas by the cyclic ammonia process are the initial H/sub 2/S content of the gas, the degree of purification, the