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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The Hurricane Intensity Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensity issue of hurricanes is addressed in this paper using the angular momentum budget of a hurricane in storm-relative cylindrical coordinates and a scale-interaction approach. In the angular momentum budget in storm-relative coordinates,...

T. N. Krishnamurti; S. Pattnaik; L. Stefanova; T. S. V. Vijaya Kumar; B. P. Mackey; A. J. O’Shay; Richard J. Pasch

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

3

Natural Gas Issues and Trends  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides a summary of the latest data and information relating to the natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission, consumption, and financial aspects of the industry.

Information Center

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends provides a summary of the latest data and information relating to the US natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission, consumption, and the financial and environmental aspects of the industry. The report consists of seven chapters and five appendices. Chapter 1 presents a summary of various data trends and key issues in today`s natural gas industry and examines some of the emerging trends. Chapters 2 through 7 focus on specific areas or segments of the industry, highlighting some of the issues associated with the impact of natural gas operations on the environment. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

China energy issues : energy intensity, coal liquefaction, and carbon pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In my dissertation I explore three independent, but related, topics on China's energy issues. First, I examine the drivers for provincial energy-intensity trends in China, and finds that technology innovation is the key ...

Wu, Ning, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Natural gas 1995: Issues and trends  

SciTech Connect

Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends addresses current issues affecting the natural gas industry and markets. Highlights of recent trends include: Natural gas wellhead prices generally declined throughout 1994 and for 1995 averages 22% below the year-earlier level; Seasonal patterns of natural gas production and wellhead prices have been significantly reduced during the past three year; Natural gas production rose 15% from 1985 through 1994, reaching 18.8 trillion cubic feet; Increasing amounts of natural gas have been imported; Since 1985, lower costs of producing and transporting natural gas have benefitted consumers; Consumers may see additional benefits as States examine regulatory changes aimed at increasing efficiency; and, The electric industry is being restructured in a fashion similar to the recent restructuring of the natural gas industry.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Natural Gas 1996 Issues and Trends December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends iii Preface Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends provides a summary of  Chapter 1. "Overview," Mary E. Carlson (202/586-4749). the latest data and information relating to the U.S. natural gas

8

Natural Gas 1995 Issues and Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Natural Gas 1995 Issues and Trends November 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends iii Preface Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends has been prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide a summary of the latest data and information relating to the natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission,

9

Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) Distribution Category UC-950 Natural Gas 1994 Issues and Trends July 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. ii Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends Energy Information Administration Contacts Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, under the direction of Diane W. Lique (202/586-6401). General information concerning this report may be obtained from Joan

10

Safety Issues for High Temperature Gas Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety Issues for High Temperature Gas Reactors Andrew C. Kadak Professor of the Practice #12;Major regulation) 50mSv/a (Could be exceeded for rear recovery events) 50 mSv/a 20 mSv/a (average 5 y) (5 m performance of safety systems - natural circulation - heat conduction and convection. #12;Issues · Fuel

11

Critical design issues of high intensity proton linacs  

SciTech Connect

Medium-energy proton linear accelerators are being studied as drivers for spallation applications requiring large amounts of beam powder. Important design factors for such high-intensity linacs are reviewed, and issues and concerns specific to this unprecedented power regime are discussed.

Lawrence, G.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Natural gas 1994: Issues and trends  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry in 1993 and early 1994 (Chapter 1), focusing on the overall ability to deliver gas under the new regulatory mandates of Order 636. In addition, the report highlights a range of issues affecting the industry, including: restructuring under Order 636 (Chapter 2); adjustments in natural gas contracting (Chapter 3); increased use of underground storage (Chapter 4); effects of the new market on the financial performance of the industry (Chapter 5); continued impacts of major regulatory and legislative changes on the natural gas market (Appendix A).

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Natural gas: major issues still unresolved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to statistics gathered from the US Department of Energy, the American Gas Association, and the Process Gas Consumers Group, total US gas consumption and production declined in 1983 for the fourth consecutive year, although increases of 3.4% and 6.6%, respectively, are expected for 1984. This turnaround is contingent on the effects of a strong economic recovery and normal winter weather overriding those of higher gas prices. In today's competitive market, gas demand will be closely tied to the gas pricing issue. A.G.A projects a moderation in both wellhead and consumer prices from 1983 to 1992. Regarding price deregulation, A.G.A. recommends a limited approach designed to moderate consumer gas prices while the PGC Group approves of total deregulation via a three-step process. Controversy over gas purchase contracts is also considerable among all sectors of the gas industry; meaningful action by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in this area would be of substantial benefit to all gas consumers.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Natural gas hydrates - issues for gas production and geomechanical stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas hydrates are solid crystalline substances found in the subsurface. Since gas hydrates are stable at low temperatures and moderate pressures, gas hydrates are found either near the surface in arctic regions or in deep water marine environments where the ambient seafloor temperature is less than 10°C. This work addresses the important issue of geomechanical stability in hydrate bearing sediments during different perturbations. I analyzed extensive data collected from the literature on the types of sediments where hydrates have been found during various offshore expeditions. To better understand the hydrate bearing sediments in offshore environments, I divided these data into different sections. The data included water depths, pore water salinity, gas compositions, geothermal gradients, and sedimentary properties such as sediment type, sediment mineralogy, and sediment physical properties. I used the database to determine the types of sediments that should be evaluated in laboratory tests at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The TOUGH+Hydrate reservoir simulator was used to simulate the gas production behavior from hydrate bearing sediments. To address some important gas production issues from gas hydrates, I first simulated the production performance from the Messsoyakha Gas Field in Siberia. The field has been described as a free gas reservoir overlain by a gas hydrate layer and underlain by an aquifer of unknown strength. From a parametric study conducted to delineate important parameters that affect gas production at the Messoyakha, I found effective gas permeability in the hydrate layer, the location of perforations and the gas hydrate saturation to be important parameters for gas production at the Messoyakha. Second, I simulated the gas production using a hydraulic fracture in hydrate bearing sediments. The simulation results showed that the hydraulic fracture gets plugged by the formation of secondary hydrates during gas production. I used the coupled fluid flow and geomechanical model "TOUGH+Hydrate- FLAC3D" to model geomechanical performance during gas production from hydrates in an offshore hydrate deposit. I modeled geomechanical failures associated with gas production using a horizontal well and a vertical well for two different types of sediments, sand and clay. The simulation results showed that the sediment and failures can be a serious issue during the gas production from weaker sediments such as clays.

Grover, Tarun

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Natural Gas Regulatory Policy: Current Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Many changes have occurred in recent months in both federal and state natural gas regulation. Those changes have increased the options of industrial energy consumers for purchasing and moving natural gas. This panel will discuss important developments in federal and state regulatory arenas and their impacts on purchasing options. Among the issues discussed will be: 1. Federal Regulation a. Self-implementing transportation b. Service obligation c. Pipeline capacity brokering d. Non-regulated and partially regulated sales e. FERC Order No. 500 f. Rate treatments impacts 2. State Regulation a. Prorationing impacts b. Federal preemption of state conservation authority 3. Regulatory and Contract Problems Facing the Natural Gas Marketer 4. The Contours of the Current Marketplace "

Watkins, G.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Knowledge-Intensive Work in the Oil and Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge-Intensive Work in the Oil and Gas Industry: A Case Study Thesis for the degree collaborative work practices within a large international oil and gas company (OGC). The work is founded empirical findings, we argue that in knowledge-intensive, interdisciplinary work such as oil and gas

Langseth, Helge

17

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Updated: November 25, 2013 For prior report data see Natural Gas Year-in-Review archives EIA's Natural Gas Issues and Trends highlights timely information and analyses on natural gas markets. Natural gas prices reflect decreasing seasonality. Today in Energy, November 20, 2013 Increased Northeast natural gas production reduces net inflow of supply from other areas. Today in Energy, November 19, 2013 Gas pipeline expansions reduce Marcellus backup, New York gas prices. Natural Gas Weekly Update, November 13, 2013 EIA projects lower natural gas use this winter. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 31, 2013 Northeast net imports from Canada plummet, driven by export growth at Niagara Falls. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 10, 2013

18

Variability of Gas Composition and Flux Intensity in Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gas composition and flux intensity in natural marineof gas composition and flux intensity in natural marine

Clark, J F; Schwager, Katherine; Washburn, Libe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Strategy for resolution of the flammable gas safety issue  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a strategy for resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. It defines the key elements required for the following: Closing the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ); Providing the administrative basis for resolving the safety issue; Defining the data needed to support these activities; and Providing the technical and administrative path for removing tanks from the Watch List.

Johnson, G.D.

1997-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

20

Natural gas 1996 - issues and trends  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents a summary of the latest data and information relating to the U.S. natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission, consumption, and financial aspects of the industry.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Natural Gas Distributed Resource Fuel Pressure and Delivery Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many emerging distributed resource (DR) technologies will be developed to operate on natural gas. However, increased reliance on natural gas as an energy source raises issues with regard to its availability and delivery capacity. In addition, some DR technologies may require specific pressure levels to operate properly. This report discusses the natural gas distribution infrastructure as well as the availability and suitability of DR gas booster technologies.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Name Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Partner Turkish Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, Turkish Electricity Transmission-Generation Company Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Background analysis Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/39 Country Turkey Western Asia References http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/39156.pdf Abstract CEEESA trained a team of experts from Turkey's Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources (MENR) and the Turkish Electricity Transmission-Generation Company (TEAS) to use various ENPEP modules. CEEESA trained a team of experts from Turkey's Ministry of Energy and

23

Flue Gas Desulfurization Equipment Issues Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As electric utilities enter a more competitive environment, every aspect of electric power generation is under scrutiny to determine where costs can be reduced. Because flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems represent significant capital, operating, and maintenance expenses for many coal-fired power plants, identification and implementation of cost reduction options are crucial. This report documents successful approaches for determining the cost-effectiveness of key FGD optimization strategies.

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Issues and R&D Required for the Intensity Frontier Accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss main issues and R&D Required for the Intensity Frontier Accelerators and therefore provide input for the 2013 APS/DPF Community Summer Study (Snowmass-2013).

V. Shiltsev; S. Henderson; P. Hurh; I. Kourbanis; V. Lebedev

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

25

Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 ® . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

None

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

27

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 ® . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97{reg_sign}. Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy/Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

NONE

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals March 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Energy Information Administration / Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals

30

Investing in Oil and Natural Gas A Few Key Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Investing in Oil and Natural Gas: A Few Key Issues Prepared for EIA Conference Susan Farrell, Senior Director PFC Energy April 8, 2009 Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 2 The Top 20 IOCs and Top 20 NOCs Account for Over Half of E&P Spend Source: PFC Energy, Global E&P Surveys Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 3 Oil Prices Rose, But So Did Costs + 52% $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 WTI $/barrel Annual averages Large Gulf of Mexico Facility Costs by Segment Avg $28.31 Avg $59.13 Source: PFC Energy Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 4 Near term Spending Cuts will be Significant

31

Variability of Gas Composition and Flux Intensity in Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Development and Technology 008 "Variability of gas composition and flux intensity in natural marine hydrocarbon seeps" Jordan

Clark, J F; Schwager, Katherine; Washburn, Libe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Pipeline issues shape southern FSU oil, gas development  

SciTech Connect

To future production from southern republics of the former Soviet Union (FSU), construction and revitalization of pipelines are as important as the supply of capital. Export capacity will limit production and slow development activity in the region until new pipelines are in place. Plenty of pipeline proposals have come forward. The problem is politics, which for every proposal so far complicates routing or financing or both. Russia has made clear its intention to use pipeline route decisions to retain influence in the region. As a source of external pressure, it is not alone. Iran and Turkey also have made strong bids for the southern FSU`s oil and gas transport business. Diplomacy thus will say as much as commerce does about how transportation issues are settled and how quickly the southern republics move toward their potentials to produce oil and gas. The paper discusses possible routes and the problems with them, the most likely proposal, and future oil flows.

NONE

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

33

Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends - Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Monthly April 1999 vii The following article is the Executive Summary from the report Natural Gas ...

34

Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Issues & Trends: 1998. Naruc Winter Conference. Click here to start. This presentation was given before the National Association of Regulatory Utility ...

35

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative [91]. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING INTENSE ENERGETIC GAS DISCHARGES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for producing an energetic gas arc discharge employing the use of gas-fed hollow cathode and anode electrodes is reported. The rate of feed of the gas to the electrodes is regulated to cause complete space charge neutralization to occur within the electrodes. The arc discharge is closely fitted within at least one of the electrodes so tint the gas fed to this electrode is substantially completely ionized before it is emitted into the vacuum chamber. It is this electrode design and the axial potential gradient that exists in the arc which permits the arc to be operated in low pressures and at volthges and currents that permit the arc to be energetic. The use of the large number of energetic ions that are accelerated toward the cathode as a propulsion device for a space vehicle is set forth.

Bell, P.R.; Luce, J.S.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas such as tight gas, shale gas, or coal bed methane gas tolocation. Development of shale oil and gas, tar sands, coalGas hydrates will undoubtedly also be present in shales,

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

CONTROL ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTROL ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Query Sheet Q1: AU: short title OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Lars Imsland, Dagfinn Snarheim, and Bjarne A. Foss Department-closed / gas turbine cycle for capture. Some control strategies and their interaction with the process design

Foss, Bjarne A.

39

Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement Final, climate policy, global Abstract. We give empirical welfare results for global greenhouse gas emission recycling together. #12;1. Introduction Designing policy mechanisms for abating greenhouse gas emissions

Pezzey, Jack

40

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time frame. The unconventional oil and gas hydrocarbonsare currently no unconventional developments, oil or gas, in

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Natural Gas Transportation - Infrastructure Issues and Operational Trends  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report examines how well the current national natural gas pipeline network has been able to handle today's market demand for natural gas. In addition, it identifies those areas of the country where pipeline utilization is continuing to grow rapidly and where new pipeline capacity is needed or is planned over the next several years.

Information Center

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Gas composition issues and implications for natural gas vehicles and fueling stations. Topical report, October 1993-June 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a general overview of gas composition issues related to compressed natural gas for vehicles, recent research, and practical experience gained in the field. Its purpose is to summarize and communicate information and, where possible, to help fuel providers, original equipment manufacturers, and other members of the industry to formulate appropriate responses to emerging challenges and issues. Three critical topics are covered: compressor oil carryover, moisture content, and elevated levels of higher hydrocarbons. Where appropriate, economic analyses and general guidelines are provided to indicate alternative approaches to fuel issues and relative costs.

Schaedel, S.; Czachorski, M.; Rowley, P.; Richards, M.; Shikari, Y.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Natural gas `96: Foretelling the FERC: Experts weigh the issues  

SciTech Connect

Should the FERC lift the cap on secondary rates from its July 31 notice of proposed rulemaking (NOPR) on capacity release? Shifting to the FERC`s alternative ratemaking policy statement: Is a negotiated rate with a default rate fallback (or recourse rate fallback) the way to go? To get a sense of attitudes toward Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) initiatives, Public Utilities Fortnightly interviewed two natural gas attorneys as well as a representative from a major pipeline.

Edwards, K.B. [Grammer, Kissel, Robbins & Skancke, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Liquefied natural gas. A literature survey issued quarterly. [235 references  

SciTech Connect

This literature survey is a compilation of approximately 235 citations on LNG in the following areas: thermodynamic, phase equilibria, and other properties of methane; other properties of methane mixtures; liquefaction and separation; regasification;peak shaving and terminal storage plants; liquid storage; importation of LNG; ground and sea transportation; liquid pipelines; heat and mass transport; safety; sorption; instrumentation; gas fields and cavern storage; transportation and other applications; general references; economic factors; miscellaneous; patents; energy; and SNG.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Liquefied natural gas. A literature survey issued quarterly. [225 references  

SciTech Connect

The literature survey covers approximately 225 references under 25 headings: thermodynamic properties of methane; other properties of methane; phase equilibria of methane; other properties of methane mixtures; liquefaction and separation; regasification;peak shaving and terminal storage plants; liquid storage; importation of LNG; ground transportation; sea transportation; liquid pipelines; heat and mass transport; safety; sorption; instrumentation; gas fields and cavern storage; transportation and other applications; general references; economic factors; miscellaneous; patents; energy; and SNG. (MCW)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Protocols for wide-area data-intensive applications: design and performance issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing high-speed data transfer is vital to various data-intensive applications. While there have been remarkable technology advances to provide ultra-high-speed network bandwidth, existing protocols and applications may not be able to fully utilize ...

Yufei Ren; Tan Li; Dantong Yu; Shudong Jin; Thomas Robertazzi; Brian L. Tierney; Eric Pouyoul

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current conventional oil and gas exploration, is gainingface current oil and gas exploration and productionexploration and production activities will be prone to many of the same potential environmental impacts as conventional oil and gas

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of United States oil and gas resources on CD-ROM:Assessment of United States Oil and Gas Resources conductedto assess conventional oil and gas resources. In order to

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compressibility for coal-bed methane (CBM) reservoirs (Bumband gas, tar sands, coal bed methane etc. can proceed whengas, shale gas, or coal bed methane gas to compete in the

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Return as a Function of Gas Price ($/Mscf) for Offshore Gasattractive at prevailing gas prices. This may have an impactrate of return to gas price for the two cases considered.

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focus of GH exploration and production studies in northernoil and gas exploration and production activities; includingGas hydrate exploration and production activities will be

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Issues related to setting exemption levels for oil and gas NORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the absence of any federal regulations that specifically address the handling and disposal of wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), individual states have taken responsibility for developing their own regulatory programs for NORM. A key issue in developing NORM rules is defining exemption levels--specific levels or concentrations that determine which waste materials are subject to controlled management. In general, states have drawn upon existing standards and guidelines for similar waste types in establishing exemption levels for NORM. Simply adopting these standards may not be appropriate for oil and gas NORM for several reasons. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission's NORM Subcommittee has summarized the issues involved in setting exemption levels in a report titled ``Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM): Issues from the Oil and Gas Point of View''. The committee has also recommended a set of exemption levels for controlled practices and for remediation activities on the basis of the issues discussed.

Blunt, D. L.; Gooden, D. S.; Smith, K. P.

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shales, silts, and non-commercial sand stringers above the target GH reservoirs. High gas production

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Gas Price ($/Mscf) for Offshore Gas Hydrate StudyProceedings of the 2010 Offshore Technology Conference, 3-6Proceedings of the 2010 Offshore Technology Conference, 3-6

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

Nibur, Kevin A.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

State policies affecting natural gas consumption (Notice of inquiry issued on August 14, 1992)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On August 14, 1992, the United States Department of Energy issued a Request for Comments Concerning State Policies Affecting Natural Gas Consumption. This Notice of (NOI) noted the increasing significance of the role played by states and sought to gain better understanding of how state policies impact the gas industry. The general trend toward a. more competitive marketplace for natural gas, as well as recent regulatory and legislative changes at the Federal level, are driving State regulatory agencies to reevaluate how they regulate natural gas. State action is having a significant impact on the use of natural gas for generating electricity, as well as affecting the cost-effective trade-off between conservation expenditures and gas use. Additionally, fuel choice has an impact upon the environment and national energy security. In light of these dimensions, the Department of Energy initiated this study of State regulation. The goals of this NOI are: (1) help DOE better understand the impact of State policies on the efficient use of gas; (2) increase the awareness of the natural gas industry and Federal and State officials to the important role of State policies and regulations; (3) create an improved forum for dialogue on State and Federal natural gas issues; and, (4) develop a consensus on an analytical agenda that would be most helpful in addressing the regulatory challenges faced by the States. Ninety-seven parties filed comments, and of these ninety-seven, fifteen parties filed reply comments. Appendix One lists these parties. This report briefly syntheses the comments received. The goal is to assist parties to judging the extent of consensus on the problems posed and the remedies suggested, aid in identifying future analytical analyses, and assist parties in assessing differences in strategies and regulatory philosophies which shape these issues and their resolution.

Lemon, R.; Kamphuis-Zatopa, W.

1993-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

57

Editorial and Introduction of the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short one page editorial to introduce the +30 peer reviewed papers contained within the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

Dooley, James J.; Benson, Sally M.; Karimjee, Anhar; Rubin, Edward S.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Influence of Intense Beam in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas Filled RF Cavities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of an intense beam in a high-pressure gas filled RF cavity has been measured by using a 400 MeV proton beam in the Mucool Test Area at Fermilab. The ionization process generates dense plasma in the cavity and the resultant power loss to the plasma is determined by measuring the cavity voltage on a sampling oscilloscope. The energy loss has been observed with various peak RF field gradients (E), gas pressures (p), and beam intensities in nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Observed RF energy dissipation in single electron (dw) in N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} gases was 2 10{sup -17} and 3 10{sup -17} Joules/RF cycle at E/p = 8 V/cm/Torr, respectively. More detailed dw measurement have been done in H{sub 2} gas at three different gas pressures. There is a clear discrepancy between the observed dw and analytical one. The discrepancy may be due to the gas density effect that has already been observed in various experiments.

Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Collura, M.G.; Jana, M.R.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; /Fermilab; Johnson, R.P.; Franagan, G.; /Muons, Inc. /IIT

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Propagation of Partially Coherent Photons in an Ultra-Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The scattering of photons off photons at the one-loop level is investigated. We give a short review of the weak field limit, as given by the first order term in the series expansion of the Heisenberg-Euler Lagrangian. The dispersion relation for a photon in a radiation gas is presented. Based on this, a wave kinetic equation and a set of fluid equations is formulated. These equations describe the interaction between a partially coherent electromagnetic pulse and an intense radiation gas. The implications of the results are discussed.

Mattias Marklund

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

60

EIA - AEO2010 - Naturall gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Environmental and energy security concerns related to petroleum use for transportation fuels, together with recent growth in U.S. proved reserves and technically recoverable natural gas resources, including shale gas, have sparked interest in policy proposals aimed at stimulating increased use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel, particularly for heavy trucks. In 2008, U.S. freight trucks used more than 2 million barrels of petroleum-based diesel fuel per day. In the AEO2010 Reference case, they are projected to use 2.7 million barrels per day in 2035. Petroleum-based diesel use by freight trucks in 2008 accounted for 15 percent of total petroleum consumption (excluding biofuels and other non-petroleum-based products) in the transportation sector (13.2 million barrels per day) and 12 percent of the U.S. total for all sectors (18.7 million barrels per day). In the Reference case, oil use by freight trucks grows to 20 percent of total transportation use (13.7 million barrels per day) and 14 percent of the U.S. total (19.0 million barrels per day) by 2035. The following analysis examines the potential impacts of policies aimed at increasing sales of heavy-duty natural gas vehicles (HDNGVs) and the use of natural gas fuels, and key factors that lead to uncertainty in these estimates.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Electricity Shortage in California: Issues for Petroleum and Natural Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Shortage in Electricity Shortage in California: Issues for Petroleum and Natural Gas Supply 1. Summary 2. Electricity Reliability Issues in California 3. Petroleum Refineries 4. Constraints Outside the Refinery Gate 5. Petroleum Product Prices and Supply Disruptions 6. Natural Gas 7. End Notes 8. Contacts 1. Summary Industry electric reliability organizations, the California Energy Commission, and the California Independent System Operator, expect California to be subject to rotating electricity outages in the summer of 2001 during the peak afternoon demand hours. These outages are expected to affect almost all sectors of the State's economy, including crude oil and natural gas producers, petroleum refineries, and pipelines. This report addresses the potential impact of rotating electrical

62

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing materials. Transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials (NM), and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE’s Environmental Management (EM) organization to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a "program level" roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This "program level" roadmapping involves linking technology development (and deployment) efforts to the programs’ needs and requirements for dispositioning the material/waste that generates combustible gas through radiolysis and chemical decomposition. The roadmapping effort focused on needed technical & programmatic support to the baselines (and to alternatives to the baselines) where the probability of success is low (i.e., high uncertainty) and the consequences of failure are relatively high (i.e., high programmatic risk). A second purpose for roadmapping was to provide the basis for coordinating sharing of "lessons learned" from research and development (R&D) efforts across DOE programs to increase efficiency and effectiveness in addressing gas generation issues.

Luke, Dale Elden; Rogers, Adam Zachary; Hamp, S.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

SciTech Connect

The current paper complements the Moridis et al. (2009) review of the status of the effort toward commercial gas production from hydrates. We aim to describe the concept of the gas hydrate petroleum system, to discuss advances, requirement and suggested practices in gas hydrate (GH) prospecting and GH deposit characterization, and to review the associated technical, economic and environmental challenges and uncertainties, including: the accurate assessment of producible fractions of the GH resource, the development of methodologies for identifying suitable production targets, the sampling of hydrate-bearing sediments and sample analysis, the analysis and interpretation of geophysical surveys of GH reservoirs, well testing methods and interpretation of the results, geomechanical and reservoir/well stability concerns, well design, operation and installation, field operations and extending production beyond sand-dominated GH reservoirs, monitoring production and geomechanical stability, laboratory investigations, fundamental knowledge of hydrate behavior, the economics of commercial gas production from hydrates, and the associated environmental concerns.

Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Hancock, S.; Santamarina, C.; Boswell, R.; Kneafsey, T.; Rutqvist, J.; Kowalsky, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Sloan, E.D.; Sum, A.K.; Koh, C.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Flammable gas issues in double-contained receiver tanks. Revision 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs) at Hanford will be used to store salt-well pumped liquids from tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. This document was created to serve as a reference document describing the current knowledge of flammable gas issues in DCRTs. The document identifies, describes, evaluates, and attempts to quantify potential gas carryover and release mechanisms. It estimates several key parameters needed for these calculations, such as initial aqueous concentrations and ventilation rate, and evaluates the uncertainty in those estimates. It justifies the use of the Schumpe model for estimating vapor-liquid equilibrium constants. It identifies several potential waste compatibility issues (such as mixing and pH or temperature changes) that could lead to gas release and provides a basis for calculating their effects. It evaluates the potential for gas retention in precipitated solids within a DCRT and whether retention could lead to a buoyant displacement instability (rollover) event. It discusses rates of radiolytic, thermal, and corrosive hydrogen generation within the DCRT. It also describes in detail the accepted method of calculating the lower flammability limit (LFL) for mixtures of flammable gases. The report incorporates these analyses into two models for calculating headspace flammability, one based on instantaneous equilibrium between dissolved gases and the headspace and one incorporating limited release rates based on mass-transfer considerations. Finally, it demonstrates the use of both models to estimate headspace flammable gas concentrations and minimum ventilation rates required to maintain concentrations below 25% of the LFL.

Peurrung, L.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Stewart, C.W.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.; Shepard, C.L.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Strategies for the Commercialization and Deployment of Greenhouse Gas Intensity-Reducing Technologies and Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New technologies will be a critical component--perhaps the critical component--of our efforts to tackle the related challenges of energy security, climate change, and air pollution, all the while maintaining a strong economy. But just developing new technologies is not enough. Our ability to accelerate the market penetration of clean energy, enabling, and other climate-related technologies will have a determining impact on our ability to slow, stop, and reverse the growth in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Title XVI, Subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) directs the Administration to report on its strategy to promote the commercialization and deployment (C&D) of GHG intensity-reducing technologies and practices. The Act also requests the Administration to prepare an inventory of climate-friendly technologies suitable for deployment and to identify the barriers and commercial risks facing advanced technologies. Because these issues are related, they are integrated here within a single report that we, representing the Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration (CCCSTI), are pleased to provide the President, the Congress, and the public. Over the past eight years, the Administration of President George W. Bush has pursued a series of policies and measures aimed at encouraging the development and deployment of advanced technologies to reduce GHG emissions. This report highlights these policies and measures, discusses the barriers to each, and integrates them within a larger body of other extant policy. Taken together, more than 300 policies and measures described in this document may be viewed in conjunction with the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program's (CCTP's) Strategic Plan, published in September 2006, which focuses primarily on the role of advanced technology and associated research and development (R&D) for mitigating GHG emissions. The CCTP, a multi-agency technology planning and coordination program, initiated by President Bush, and subsequently authorized in EPAct2005, is responsible for preparing this report on behalf CCCSTI. This report systematically examines the market readiness of key technologies important to meeting climate change mitigation goals. It assesses the barriers and business risks impeding their progress and greater market application. Importantly, by documenting the hundreds of Federal policies, programs, regulations, incentives, and other activities that are in effect and operating today to address these barriers, it provides a broad context for evaluating the adequacy of current policy and the potential need, if any, for additional measures that might be undertaken by government or industry. Finally, it draws conclusions about the current situation, identifies gaps and opportunities, and suggests analytical principles that should be applied to assess and formulate policies and measures to accelerate the commercialization and deployment of these technologies.

Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration (CCCSTI)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Issues Involving The OSI Concept of Operation For Noble Gas Radionuclide Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a technically sound protocol for detecting the subsurface release of noble gas radionuclides is critical to the successful operation of an on site inspection (OSI) under the CTBT and has broad ramifications for all aspects of the OSI regime including the setting of specifications for both sampling and analysis equipment used during an OSI. With NA-24 support, we are investigating a variety of issues and concerns that have significant bearing on policy development and technical guidance regarding the detection of noble gases and the creation of a technically justifiable OSI concept of operation. The work at LLNL focuses on optimizing the ability to capture radioactive noble gases subject to the constraints of possible OSI scenarios. This focus results from recognizing the difficulty of detecting gas releases in geologic environments - a lesson we learned previously from the LLNL Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE). Evaluation of a number of important noble gas detection issues, potentially affecting OSI policy, has awaited the US re-engagement with the OSI technical community. Thus, there have been numerous issues to address during the past 18 months. Most of our evaluations of a sampling or transport issue necessarily involve computer simulations. This is partly due to the lack of OSI-relevant field data, such as that provided by the NPE, and partly a result of the ability of LLNL computer-based models to test a range of geologic and atmospheric scenarios far beyond what could ever be studied in the field making this approach very highly cost effective. We review some highlights of the transport and sampling issues we have investigated during the past year. We complete the discussion of these issues with a description of a preliminary design for subsurface sampling that is intended to be a practical solution to most if not all the challenges addressed here.

Carrigan, C R; Sun, Y

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

67

Key Issues in Designing Mechanisms to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, EPRI launched the EPRI Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Offset Policy Dialogue project. The goals of this project are 1) to inform key constituencies involved in the development of U.S. climate mitigation strategies and policies about GHG emissions offset–related policies and design issues and 2) to provide a forum in which representatives of key sectors of the U.S. economy and communities involved in the ongoing development and debate on climate change policies can discuss these issues. On May 13...

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

Flammable gas issues in double-contained receiver tanks. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs) at Hanford will be used to store salt-well pumped liquids from tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. This document was created to serve as a technical basis or reference document for flammable gas issues in DCRTs. The document identifies, describes, evaluates, and attempts to quantify potential gas carryover and release mechanisms. It estimates several key parameters needed for these calculations, such as initial aqueous concentrations and ventilation rate, and evaluates the uncertainty in those estimates. It justifies the use of the Schumpe model for estimating vapor-liquid equilibrium constants. It identifies several potential waste compatibility issues (such as mixing and pH or temperature changes) that could lead to gas release and provides a basis for calculating their effects. It evaluates the potential for gas retention in precipitated solids within a DCRT and whether retention could lead to a buoyant displacement instability (rollover) event. It discusses rates of radiolytic, thermal, and corrosive hydrogen generation within the DCRT. It also describes in detail the accepted method of calculating the lower flammability limit (LFL) for mixtures of flammable gases.

Peurrung, L.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Stewart, C.W.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.; Shepard, C.L.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

F-Class Gas Turbine Technology Summary: Design Features, Reliability Statistics, and Durability Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the design features and capabilities of current F-class gas turbine models, and includes reliability/availability statistics and a summary of durability issues. The design matrix table includes models GT24/GT26 by Alstom, 7FA/9FA and 7FB/9FB by General Electric, M501F/M701F by Mitsubishi, and W501F by Siemens, presented in a format that facilitates a comparison of their design characteristics.BackgroundGas turbine technology continues ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Estimates of U.S. Commercial Building Electricity Intensity Trends: Issues Related to End-Use and Supply Surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines measurement issues related to the amount of electricity used by the commercial sector in the U.S. and the implications for historical trends of commercial building electricity intensity (kWh/sq. ft. of floor space). The report compares two (Energy Information Administration) sources of data related to commercial buildings: the Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the reporting by utilities of sales to commercial customers (survey Form-861). Over past two decades these sources suggest significantly different trend rates of growth of electricity intensity, with the supply (utility)-based estimate growing much faster than that based only upon the CBECS. The report undertakes various data adjustments in an attempt to rationalize the differences between these two sources. These adjustments deal with: 1) periodic reclassifications of industrial vs. commercial electricity usage at the state level and 2) the amount of electricity used by non-enclosed equipment (non-building use) that is classified as commercial electricity sales. In part, after applying these adjustments, there is a good correspondence between the two sources over the the past four CBECS (beginning with 1992). However, as yet, there is no satisfactory explanation of the differences between the two sources for longer periods that include the 1980s.

Belzer, David B.

2004-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

71

Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blending Hydrogen into Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues M. W. Melaina, O. Antonia, and M. Penev Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-51995 March 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues M. W. Melaina, O. Antonia, and M. Penev Prepared under Task No. HT12.2010 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-51995 March 2013 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

72

Liquefied natural gas. A literature survey issued quarterly, October--December 1976. [About 130 items  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography is compiled on LNG. In this issue, about 130 items are categorized in the following areas: thermodynamic, other properties, and phase equilibria of methane; other properties of methane mixtures; liquefaction and separation; regasification; peak shaving and terminal storage plants; liquid storage; importation of LNG; ground and sea transport; liquid pipelines; heat and mass transport; safety; sorption; instrumentation; gas fields and cavern storage; transportation and other applications; general references; economic factors; miscellaneous; patents; energy; and SNG. (MCW)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Liquefied natural gas. A literature survey issued quarterly, April--June 1976. [About 250 items  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography is compiled on LNG. In this issue, about 250 items are categorized in the following areas: thermodynamic, other properties, and phase equilibria of methane; other properties of methane mixtures; liquefaction and separation; regasification; peak shaving and terminal storage plants; liquid storage; importation of LNG; ground and sea transport; liquid pipelines; heat and mass transport; safety; sorption; instrumentation; gas fields and cavern storage; transportation and other applications; general references; economic factors; miscellaneous; patents; energy; and SNG. (MCW)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Liquefied natural gas. A literature survey issued quarterly, January--March 1976. [About 400 items  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography is compiled on LNG. In this issue, over four hundred items are categorized in the following areas: thermodynamic, other properties, and phase equilibria of methane; other properties of methane mixtures; liquefaction and separation; regasification; peak shaving and terminal storage plants; liquid storage; importation of LNG; ground and sea transportation; liquid pipelines; heat and mass transport; safety; sorption; instrumentation; gas fields and cavern storage; transportation and other applications; general references; economic factors; miscellaneous; patents; energy; and SNG. (MCW)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Liquefied natural gas. A literature survey issued quarterly, July--September 1976. [About 150 items  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography is compiled on LNG. In this issue, about 150 items are categorized in the following areas: thermodynamic, other properties, and phase equilibria of methane; other properties of methane mixtures; liquefaction and separation; regasification; peak shaving and terminal storage plants; liquid storage; importation of LNG; ground and sea transport; liquid pipelines; heat and mass transport; safety; sorption; instrumentation; gas fields and cavern storage; transportation and other applications; general references; economic factors; miscellaneous; patents; energy; and SNG. (MCW)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Abstract--Modelling and control of gas turbines (GTs) have always been a controversial issue because of the complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract--Modelling and control of gas turbines (GTs) have always been a controversial issue that there is no end to the efforts for performance optimization of gas turbines. A variety of analytical and experimental models as well as control systems has been built so far for gas turbines. However, the need

Sainudiin, Raazesh

77

Int. J. Global Energy Issues, Vol. 23, No. 4, 2005 307 Canada's efforts towards greenhouse gas emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Int. J. Global Energy Issues, Vol. 23, No. 4, 2005 307 Canada's efforts towards greenhouse gas greenhouse gas emissions reductions. Without a major change in direction towards more compulsory policies, it seems unlikely that Canada will achieve significant domestic greenhouse gas reductions over and beyond

78

Resource planning for gas utilities: Using a model to analyze pivotal issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of wellhead price decontrols that began in the late 1970s and the development of open access pipelines in the 1980s and 90s, gas local distribution companies (LDCs) now have increased responsibility for their gas supplies and face an increasingly complex array of supply and capacity choices. Heretofore this responsibility had been share with the interstate pipelines that provide bundled firm gas supplies. Moreover, gas supply an deliverability (capacity) options have multiplied as the pipeline network becomes increasing interconnected and as new storage projects are developed. There is now a fully-functioning financial market for commodity price hedging instruments and, on interstate Pipelines, secondary market (called capacity release) now exists. As a result of these changes in the natural gas industry, interest in resource planning and computer modeling tools for LDCs is increasing. Although in some ways the planning time horizon has become shorter for the gas LDC, the responsibility conferred to the LDC and complexity of the planning problem has increased. We examine current gas resource planning issues in the wake of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636. Our goal is twofold: (1) to illustrate the types of resource planning methods and models used in the industry and (2) to illustrate some of the key tradeoffs among types of resources, reliability, and system costs. To assist us, we utilize a commercially-available dispatch and resource planning model and examine four types of resource planning problems: the evaluation of new storage resources, the evaluation of buyback contracts, the computation of avoided costs, and the optimal tradeoff between reliability and system costs. To make the illustration of methods meaningful yet tractable, we developed a prototype LDC and used it for the majority of our analysis.

Busch, J.F.; Comnes, G.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Issues surrounding continuation of the noncompetitive oil and gas lottery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bureau of Land Management is responsible for the leasing of oil and gas mineral rights on over 300 million acres of public lands. Under the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, lands with known oil and gas deposits are leased competitively. However, much more federal land is leased through a noncompetitive lottery system, which generates substantial receipts for the federal Treasury - about $250 million in filing fees for the 5-year period 1980-1984. The lottery system has been criticized since its 1959 inception for encouraging fraud, misleading the public, and generating insufficient revenues. On October 12, 1983, the program was suspended for 10 months because of recognized weaknesses in the system. This report highlights major issues surrounding the lottery program.

Not Available

1985-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

80

Summary of tank information relating salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Active use of these SSTs was phased out completely by November 1980, and the first step toward final disposal of the waste in the SSTs is interim stabilization, which involves removing essentially all of the drainable liquid from the tank. Stabilization can be achieved administratively, by jet pumping to remove drainable interstitial liquid, or by supernatant pumping. To date, 116 tanks have been declared interim stabilized; 44 SSTs have had drainable liquid removed by salt well jet pumping. Of the 149 SSTs, 19 are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because the waste in these tanks is known or suspected, in all but one case, to generate and retain mixtures of flammable gases, including; hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Salt well pumping to remove the drainable interstitial liquid from these SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. The scope of this work is to collect and summarize information, primarily tank data and observations, that relate salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues. While the waste within FGWL SSTs is suspected offering flammable gases, the effect of salt well pumping on the waste behavior is not well understood. This study is being conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the Flammable Gas Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Understanding the historical tank behavior during and following salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

Caley, S.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thermal barrier coatings issues in advanced land-based gas turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is aimed at fostering the development of a new generation of land-based gas turbine systems with overall efficiencies significantly beyond those of current state-of-the-art machines, as well as greatly increased times between inspection and refurbishment, improved environmental impact, and decreased cost. The proposed duty cycle of ATS machines will emphasize different criteria in the selection of materials for the critical components. In particular, thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) will be an essential feature of the hot gas path components in these machines. In fact, the goals of the ATS will require significant improvements in TBC technology, since these turbines will be totally reliant on TBCs, which will be required to function on critical components such as the first stage vanes and blades for times considerably in excess of those experienced in current applications. Issues that assume increased importance are the mechanical and chemical stability of the ceramic layer and of the metallic bond coat; the thermal expansion characteristics and compliance of the ceramic layer; and the thermal conductivity across the thickness of the ceramic layer. Obviously, the ATS program provides a very challenging opportunity for TBCs, and involves some significant opportunities to extend this technology. A significant TBC development effort is planned in the ATS program which will address these key issues.

Parks, W.P. [USDOE Office of Industrial Technologies, Washington, DC (United States); Lee, W.Y.; Wright, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Shale-Gas Experience as an Analog for Potential Wellbore Integrity Issues in CO2 Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shale-gas development in Pennsylvania since 2003 has resulted in about 19 documented cases of methane migration from the deep subsurface (7,0000) to drinking water aquifers, soils, domestic water wells, and buildings, including one explosion. In all documented cases, the methane leakage was due to inadequate wellbore integrity, possibly aggravated by hydrofracking. The leakage of methane is instructive on the potential for CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration operations. Although there are important differences between the two systems, both involve migrating, buoyant gas with wells being a primary leakage pathway. The shale-gas experience demonstrates that gas migration from faulty wells can be rapid and can have significant impacts on water quality and human health and safety. Approximately 1.4% of the 2,200 wells drilled into Pennsylvania's Marcellus Formation for shale gas have been implicated in methane leakage. These have resulted in damage to over 30 domestic water supplies and have required significant remediation via well repair and homeowner compensation. The majority of the wellbore integrity problems are a result of over-pressurization of the wells, meaning that high-pressure gas has migrated into an improperly protected wellbore annulus. The pressurized gas leaks from the wellbore into the shallow subsurface, contaminating drinking water or entering structures. The effects are localized to a few thousands of feet to perhaps two-three miles. The degree of mixing between the drinking water and methane is sufficient that significant chemical impacts are created in terms of elevated Fe and Mn and the formation of black precipitates (metal sulfides) as well as effervescing in tap water. Thus it appears likely that leaking CO{sub 2} could also result in deteriorated water quality by a similar mixing process. The problems in Pennsylvania highlight the critical importance of obtaining background data on water quality as well as on problems associated with previous (legacy) oil and gas operations. The great majority of the leakage issues in Pennsylvania are due to improperly abandoned wells, however in the media there is no clear distinction between past and present problems. In any case, significant analytical work is required to attribute differing sources of methane (or CO{sub 2} in the case of sequestration). In Pennsylvania, a relatively lax regulatory environment appears to have contributed to the problem with inadequate oversight of well design and testing to ensure well integrity. New rules were adopted at the end of 2010, and it will be interesting to observe whether methane leakage problems are significantly reduced.

Carey, James W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simpson, Wendy S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ziock, Hans-Joachim [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than other. For instance corn ethanol is the most economicalthe carbon intensity of corn ethanol and gasoline fromEmission intensity of corn ethanol, conventional crude oil

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Tight Western Sands  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study to identify and evaluate potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Tight Western Sands are reported. A brief discussion of economic and technical constraints to development of this resource is also presented to place the environmental and safety issues in perspective. A description of the resource base, recovery techniques, and possible environmental effects associated with tight gas sands is presented.

Riedel, E.F.; Cowan, C.E.; McLaughlin, T.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

State policies affecting natural gas consumption (Notice of inquiry issued on August 14, 1992). Summary of comments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On August 14, 1992, the United States Department of Energy issued a Request for Comments Concerning State Policies Affecting Natural Gas Consumption. This Notice of (NOI) noted the increasing significance of the role played by states and sought to gain better understanding of how state policies impact the gas industry. The general trend toward a. more competitive marketplace for natural gas, as well as recent regulatory and legislative changes at the Federal level, are driving State regulatory agencies to reevaluate how they regulate natural gas. State action is having a significant impact on the use of natural gas for generating electricity, as well as affecting the cost-effective trade-off between conservation expenditures and gas use. Additionally, fuel choice has an impact upon the environment and national energy security. In light of these dimensions, the Department of Energy initiated this study of State regulation. The goals of this NOI are: (1) help DOE better understand the impact of State policies on the efficient use of gas; (2) increase the awareness of the natural gas industry and Federal and State officials to the important role of State policies and regulations; (3) create an improved forum for dialogue on State and Federal natural gas issues; and, (4) develop a consensus on an analytical agenda that would be most helpful in addressing the regulatory challenges faced by the States. Ninety-seven parties filed comments, and of these ninety-seven, fifteen parties filed reply comments. Appendix One lists these parties. This report briefly syntheses the comments received. The goal is to assist parties to judging the extent of consensus on the problems posed and the remedies suggested, aid in identifying future analytical analyses, and assist parties in assessing differences in strategies and regulatory philosophies which shape these issues and their resolution.

Lemon, R.; Kamphuis-Zatopa, W.

1993-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

86

U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

from the Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports. Table SR7.

87

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(MAOP). To address this issue, the NTSB asked PG&E to conduct an intensive records search to identify all the gas transmission lines that had not previously undergone a testing...

88

Materials processing issues for non-destructive laser gas sampling (NDLGS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Non-Destructive Laser Gas Sampling (NDLGS) process essentially involves three steps: (1) laser drilling through the top of a crimped tube made of 304L stainles steel (Hammar and Svennson Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} = 1.55, produced in 1985); (2) gas sampling; and (3) laser re-welding of the crimp. All three steps are performed in a sealed chamber with a fused silica window under controlled vacuum conditions. Quality requirements for successful processing call for a hermetic re-weld with no cracks or other defects in the fusion zone or HAZ. It has been well established that austenitic stainless steels ({gamma}-SS), such as 304L, can suffer from solidification cracking if their Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} is below a critical value that causes solidification to occur as austenite (fcc structure) and their combined impurity level (%P+%S) is above {approx}0.02%. Conversely, for Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} values above the critical level, solidification occurs as ferrite (bcc structure), and cracking propensity is greatly reduced at all combined impurity levels. The consensus of results from studies of several researchers starting in the late 1970's indicates that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value is {approx}1.5 for arc welds. However, more recent studies by the author and others show that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value increases to {approx}1 .6 for weld processes with very rapid thermal cycles, such as the pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam welding (LBW) process used here. Initial attempts at NDLGS using pulsed LBW resulted in considerable solidification cracking, consistent with the results of work discussed above. After a brief introduction to the welding metallurgy of {gamma}-SS, this presentation will review the results of a study aimed at developing a production-ready process that eliminates cracking. The solution to the cracking issue, developed at LANL, involved locally augmenting the Cr content by applying either Cr or a Cr-rich stainless steel (ER 312) to the top of the crimp using the electro-spark deposition (ESD) process followed by laser mixing, drilling and rewelding. Results of a study of the ESD parameters on deposition rate and efficiency will be discussed along with mass balance calculations for determining the desired Cr content to eliminate cracking. The study also required purchase of new pulsed Nd:YAG laser welders. Evaluation of the performance of the new lasers, including beam profiling results, will also be presented. Development of a mixing, drilling and re-welding process at atmospheric pressure with inert gas shielding demonstrated the efficacy of the Cr-augmentation approach. However, extending the process to vacuum conditions proved more challenging owing to loss of laser transmission through the window from spatter and condensation of metal vapors. Solutions developed to circumvent hese issues will be reviewed. Weld microstructures found with various Cr levels will be presented and discussed.

Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

89

Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues  

SciTech Connect

The United States has 11 distinct natural gas pipeline corridors: five originate in the Southwest, four deliver natural gas from Canada, and two extend from the Rocky Mountain region. This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines.

Melaina, M. W.; Antonia, O.; Penev, M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Energy Market and Economic Impacts Proposal to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Intensity with a Cap and Trade System  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), in response to a September 27, 2006, request from Senators Bingaman, Landrieu, Murkowski, Specter, Salazar, and Lugar. The Senators requested that EIA assess the impacts of a proposal that would regulate emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) through an allowance cap-and-trade system. The program would set the cap to achieve a reduction in emissions relative to economic output, or greenhouse gas intensity.

John J. Conti

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

91

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE's Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a ''program level'' roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, D.E. (INEEL); Hamp, S. (DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office)

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE's Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a ''program level'' roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, D.E. (INEEL); Hamp, S. (DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office)

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

93

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen- containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE’s Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a "program level" roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, Dale Elden; Hamp, S.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Sector-Specific information infrastructure issues in the oil, gas, and petrochemical sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this chapter we have discussed vulnerabilities and mitigating actions to improve safety, security and continuity of the information and process infrastructure used in the oil, gas and petrochemical sector. An accident in the oil and gas industry can ...

Stig O. Johnsen; Andreas Aas; Ying Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipeline

96

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

us assume the blending condition for conventional crude oil,US and ROW is -0.15 and -0.25 respectively. Emission intensity of corn ethanol, conventional crude oil

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Electricity Shortage in California: Issues for Petroleum and Natural Gas Supply  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report addresses the potential impact of rotating electrical outages on petroleum product and natural gas supply in California.

Information Center

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Natural Gas as a Fuel for Heavy Trucks: Issues and Incentives (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Environmental and energy security concerns related to petroleum use for transportation fuels, together with recent growth in U.S. proved reserves and technically recoverable natural gas resources, including shale gas, have sparked interest in policy proposals aimed at stimulating increased use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel, particularly for heavy trucks.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

This latest issues of the Ntrual Gas Montly (March 2004) contains estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Data for 2003 Natural Gas Data for 2003 Preliminary data for 2003 indicate that natural gas total supply and demand were down in 2003 by almost 5 percent compared to 2002. Dry natural gas production in 2003 was 19,068 billion cubic feet (Bcf) compared with 18,964 Bcf in 2002. The increase in the production level reflects the increased drilling for natural gas. However, although natural gas well completions increased by 26 percent in 2003 compared with the previous year, dry natural gas production increased by only 0.5 percent. Net imports went down in 2003 continuing the downward trend of 2002, which was the first decline since 1986. Total net imports were lower in each month of 2003 compared with 2002. Net imports in 2003 were 3,236 Bcf which is a decline of 263 Bcf from 2002 levels. Total pipeline imports

100

Experimental investigation of the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense relativistic electron rings in hydrogen gas and plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an experimental study on the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense, relativistic electron rings confined in Astron-like magnetic field geometries are presented. The work is subdivided into four sections: gas trapping; average ring electron energetics; plasma trapping, and hollow-beam cusp-injection into gas and plasma. The mechanisms by which the injected beam coalesces into a current ring in the existing Cornell RECE-Berta facility are considered. To investigate the nature of ring electron energy loss mechanisms following completion of the trapping process, a diagnostic was developed utilizing multi-foil X-ray absorption spectroscopy to analyze the Bremsstrahlung generated by the electrons as they impinge upon a thin tungsten wire target suspended in the circulating current. Finally, a set of preliminary experimental results is presented in which an annular electron beam was passed through a coaxial, non-adiabatic magnetic cusp located at one end of a magnetic mirror well.

Smith, A.C. Jr.

1977-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Issues in Energy Economics Led by Emerging Linkages between the Natural Gas and Power Sectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel prices in 2006 continued at record levels, with uranium continuing upward unabated and coal, SO{sub 2} emission allowances, and natural gas all softening. This softening did not continue for natural gas, however, whose prices rose, fell and rose again, first following weather influences and, by the second quarter of 2007, continuing at high levels without any support from fundamentals. This article reviews these trends and describes the remarkable increases in fuel expenses for power generation. By the end of 2005, natural gas claimed 55% of annual power sector fuel expenses, even though it was used for only 19% of electric generation. Although natural gas is enormously important to the power sector, the sector also is an important driver of the natural gas market-growing to over 28% of the market even as total use has declined. The article proceeds to discuss globalization, natural gas price risk, and technology developments. Forces of globalization are poised to affect the energy markets in new ways-new in not being only about oil. Of particular interest in the growth of intermodal traffic and its a little-understood impacts on rail traffic patterns and transportation costs, and expected rapidly expanding LNG imports toward the end of the decade. Two aspects of natural gas price risk are discussed: how understanding the use of gas in the power sector helps define price ceilings and floors for natural gas, and how the recent increase in the natural gas production after years of record drilling could alter the supply-demand balance for the better. The article cautions, however, that escalation in natural gas finding and development costs is countering the more positive developments that emerged during 2006. Regarding technology, the exploitation of unconventional natural gas was one highlight. So too was the queuing up of coal-fired power plants for the post-2010 period, a phenomenon that has come under great pressure with many consequences including increased pressures in the natural gas market. The most significant illustration of these forces was the early 2007 suspension of development plans by a large power company, well before the Supreme Court's ruling on CO{sub 2} as a tailpipe pollutant and President Bush's call for global goals on CO{sub 2} emissions.

Platt, Jeremy B. [AAPG EMD Energy Economics and Technology (United States)], E-mail: jplatt@epri.com

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Framing of Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling Issues in Pennsylvania Newspapers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thousands of articles on Marcellus Shale gas drilling and development were written in Pennsylvania newspapers from 2008-2012 (NewsBank, 2013). These stories can have an influence… (more)

Brown, Elise

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Statistical issues in the assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior to his untimely death, my friend Dave Wood gave me wise counsel about how best to organize a paper describing uses of statistics in oil and gas exploration. A preliminary reconnaissance of the literature alerted me ...

Kaufman, Gordon M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Small Gas Turbines for Distributed Generation Markets: Technology, Products, and Business Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small gas turbines (300 kW to 5 MW) offer an attractive way for utilities and energy service companies to generate electric power within distribution grids and for consumers to generate their own power. Distributed generation also benefits utilities by deferring or avoiding costly expansion of the power transmission and distribution system, which could allow them to offer customers lower cost power. Gas turbines process more power-generation cycle air per unit size and weight of machine than do reciproca...

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Material: Four turbine- based ventilators and nine conventional servo-valve compressed-gas ventilators were1 A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators Arnaud W. Thille,1 MD; Aissam Lyazidi,1 Biomed Eng MS; Jean-Christophe M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

106

Issues in gas load research: An industry perspective. A white paper, December 1992-August 1993  

SciTech Connect

An overview of recently computed and ongoing gas load metering programs (residential, commercial, and industrial) by North American utilities is presented. The project objectives, the methods used, availability of data, and problems encountered have been documented. The report provides a list of contacts in utilities with extensive metering program experience. To obtain the industry profile of current gas load research, a telephone survey was conducted, with special attention to identifying new load research applications and metering approaches in response to new technologies and structural changes in the industry.

Violette, D.M.; Brakken, R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Task 23 - background report on subsurface environmental issues relating to natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Topical report, February 1, 1994--February 28, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes information pertaining to environmental issues, toxicity, environmental transport, and fate of alkanolamines and glycols associated with natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Waste management associated with the operations is also discussed.

Sorensen, J.A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Integrated resource planning for local gas distribution companies: A critical review of regulatory policy issues  

SciTech Connect

According to the report, public utility commissions (PUCs) are increasingly adopting, or considering the adoption of integrated resource planning (IRP) for local gas distribution companies (LDCs). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requires PUCs to consider IRP for gas LDCs. This study has two major objectives: (1) to help PUCs develop appropriate regulatory approaches with regard to IRP for gas LDCs; and (2) to help PUCs respond to the EPAct directive. The study finds that it is appropriate for PUCs to pursue energy efficiency within the traditional regulatory framework of minimizing private costs of energy production and delivery; and PUCs should play a limited role in addressing environmental externalities. The study also finds that in promoting energy efficiency, PUCs should pursue policies that are incentive-based, procompetitive, and sensitive to rate impacts. The study evaluates a number of traditional and nontraditional ratemaking mechanisms on the basis of cost minimization, energy efficiency, competitiveness, and other criteria. The mechanisms evaluated include direct recovery of DSM expenses, lost revenue adjustments for DSM options, revenue decoupling mechanisms, sharing of DSM cost savings, performance-based rate of return for DSM, provision of DSM as a separate service, deregulation of DSM service, price caps, and deregulation of the noncore gas market. The study concludes with general recommendations for regulatory approaches and ratemaking mechanisms that PUCs may wish to consider in advancing IRP objectives.

Harunuzzaman, M.; Islam, M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

SR/OIAF/2006-01 Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Preface and Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. EIA provides timely, high-quality energy information and prepares objective, transparent analyses for use of Congress, the Administration and the public. EIA does not, however, take positions on policy issues. Because of EIA?s statutory independence with respect to the content of its energy information program, the analysis presented herein is strictly its own and should not be construed as representing the views of the U.S. Department of Energy or the Administration. The model projections in this report are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The reference case projections are businessas-usual trend forecasts, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral starting point that can be used to

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Greenhouse gas performance standards: From each according to his emission intensity or from each according to his emissions?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From each according to his emission intensity or fromeach according to his emissions? D. RajagopalFrom each according to his emission intensity or from each

Rajagopal, Deepak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE USE OF GAS-TO-LIQUID FUELS IN TRANSPORTATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

submitted manuscript has been submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE- AC05-96OR22464. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a non- exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes." ORNL/TM-1999/258 AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE USE OF GAS-TO-LIQUID FUELS IN TRANSPORTATION David L. Greene Center for Transportation Analysis Oak Ridge National Laboratory November 1999 Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP. for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . .

112

Investigation of flammable gas and thermal safety issues for retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this report is to identify and resolve some of the flammable gas and thermal safety issues potentially associated with the retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105 (AN-105), which is the first double-shell tank scheduled for waste retrieval at Hanford. The planned retrieval scenario includes the following steps in AN-105: (1) degas the tank using two submerged mixing pumps, (2) turn off the mixer pump(s) and allow any suspended solids to settle, (3) decant the supernatant to the intermediate feed staging tank(s) (IFSTs) (AP-102 and/or AP-104) using water/caustic dilution at the transfer pump inlet, (4) add the remaining dilution water/caustic to the slurry remaining in AN-105, (5) mix the tank with the mixer pump(s) until the soluble solids dissolve, (6) turn off the mixer pump(s) and let the insoluble solids settle, and (7) decant the new supernatant to the IFST(s), leaving the insoluble solids behind. Three waste retrieval safety issues are addressed in this report. They are (1) the controlled degassing of AN-105 to ensure that the headspace remains <25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), (2) an assessment of how dissolved gas (mainly ammonia) released during the transfer of the supernatant in AN-105 to the IFSTs and the water/caustic dilution of the remaining slurry in AN-105 will affect the flammability in these tanks; and (3) an assessment of the maximum waste temperatures that might occur in AN-105 during retrieval operations.

Caley, S.M.; Stewart, C.W.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Cuta, J.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Panisko, F.E.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Gas centrifuge enrichment plants inspection frequency and remote monitoring issues for advanced safeguards implementation  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect high enriched uranium (BEU) production with adequate probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared cylinders of uranium hexafluoride that are used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of how possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive analysis (DA) of samples could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We have also studied a few advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation and the level of performance needed from these systems to provide more effective safeguards. The analysis also considers how short notice random inspections, unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear material when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems. We also explore the effects of system failures and operator tampering on meeting safeguards goals for quantity and timeliness and the measures needed to recover from such failures and anomalies.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimold, Benjamin A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, Steven L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Howell, John [GLASGOW UNIV.

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

114

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Devonian shale  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to identify and examine potential public health and safety issues and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Devonian age shale. This document will serve as background data and information for planners within the government to assist in development of our new energy technologies in a timely and environmentally sound manner. This report describes the resource and the DOE eastern gas shales project in Section 2. Section 3 describes the new and developing recovery technologies associated with Devonian shale. An assessment of the environment, health and safety impacts associated with a typical fields is presented in Section 4. The typical field for this assessment occupies ten square miles and is developed on a 40-acre spacing (that is, there is a well in each 40-acre grid). This field thus has a total of 160 wells. Finally, Section 5 presents the conclusions and recommendations. A reference list is provided to give a greater plant. Based on the estimated plant cost and the various cases of operating income, an economic analysis was performed employing a profitability index criterion of discounted cash flow to determine an interest rate of return on the plant investment.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The effect of the operation modes of a gas discharge low-pressure amalgam lamp on the intensity of generation of 185 nm UV vacuum radiation  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the discharge current, mercury vapor pressure, and the inert gas pressure on the intensity and efficiency of the 185 nm line generation are considered. The spectra of the UV radiation (vacuum ultraviolet) transmission by protective coatings from the oxides of rare earth metals and aluminum are investigated.

Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute of High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Drozdov, L. A., E-mail: lit@npo.lit.ru; Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V. [ZAO LIT (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, N. N.; Sobur, D. A., E-mail: soburda@gmail.com [Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

CATHODES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOFC: ISSUES CONCERNING INTERFERENCE FROM INERT GAS ADSORPTION AND CHARGE TRANSFER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done on the project over the duration of the project, from October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2003, which includes a three month no-cost extension. Effort was directed in the following areas: (1) Fabrication of Sr-doped LaCoO3 (LSC) dense and porous samples. (2) Design and construction of a conductivity relaxation apparatus for the estimation of surface exchange coefficient, k{sub chem}, which depends on adsorption, and oxygen chemical diffusion coefficient, {tilde D}{sub 0}, the parameters which are thought to describe the cathodic activation polarization (overall charge transfer) in mixed ionic electronic conducting (MIEC) cathodes. (3) The measurement of and K{sub chem} and {tilde D}{sub 0} on LSC by conductivity relaxation, as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure, p{sub O{sub 2}}. (4) Fabrication of YSZ electrolyte discs with patterned LSM and LSC electrodes with three-phase boundary (TPB) length, l{sub TPB}, varying between 50 and 1200 cm{sup -1}. (5) The measurement of charge transfer resistance, R{sub ct}, and estimation of the charge transfer resistivity, {rho}{sub ct}, as a function of temperature and p{sub O{sub 2}}, and the incorporation of the adsorption step in the analysis. (6) Preliminary cell tests with oxidants having different inert gas diluents; N{sub 2}, Ar, and CO{sub 2}. Dense samples of LSC of thickness as small as 150 microns were fabricated by sintering followed by grinding. Porous samples of LSC were also fabricated wherein the porosity was {approx}30%. Both samples were used in conductivity relaxation experiments. Analysis of data from the dense samples gives both and k{sub chem} and {tilde D}{sub 0}, while that of porous samples gives k{sub chem}. It was observed that at a given temperature, k{sub chem} increases with increasing p{sub O{sub 2}}, while the {tilde D}{sub 0} is essentially a constant. The dependence of k{sub chem} on p{sub O{sub 2}} is attributed to the adsorption step. It was also observed that the porous samples gave a more accurate measurement of k{sub chem}, as the data were not influenced by {tilde D}{sub 0}. By contrast, the results on dense samples were influenced by {tilde D}{sub 0}, especially at lower temperatures. It is thus concluded that the use of porous samples is preferred for the measurement of k{sub chem}. In the case of composite electrodes, such as LSM + YSZ, the relevant parameters are the {rho}{sub ct} (or R{sub ct}) and the ionic resistivity of YSZ {rho}{sub i}, where 1/{rho}{sub ct} is analogous to k{sub chem} and 1/{rho}{sub i} is analogous to {tilde D}{sub 0}. LSM patterned electrodes were deposited on YSZ discs using photomicrolithography. The R{sub ct} was measured as a function of temperature and p{sub O{sub 2}}using complex impedance techniques, on samples with l{sub TPB} varying between 50 and 1200 cm{sup -1}. The plot of 1/R{sub ct} vs. l{sub TPB} was linear, consistent with the occurrence of charge transfer at TPB. Also, the data plotted on the assumption of dissociative adsorption was consistent with the model. The significance of the role of adsorption is discussed. Similar results were observed with LSC, indicating a similar role of adsorption. In the case of LSC, however, a significant transport of oxygen also occurs through the dense part of the electrode. Preliminary work was conducted on the testing of button cells with mixtures of O{sub 2} + N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} + Ar, and O{sub 2} + CO{sub 2} as oxidants, wherein the p{sub O{sub 2}} was varied between {approx}0.05 and {approx}1.0 atm. As expected, the results showed that the higher the p{sub O{sub 2}}, the better was the performance. In pure oxygen, the maximum power density at 800 C was {approx}2.9 W/cm{sup 2}. However, in 5% O{sub 2}, it was {approx}0.6 W/cm{sup 2}. This difference is attributed to adsorption, indicating that both charge transfer and adsorption needs to be addressed in order to improve cathode performance at lower temperatures and under high oxidant utilization (in low p{sub O{sub 2}} atmospheres). Data at low current dens

Anil V. Virkar

2004-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

117

Greenhouse gas performance standards: From each according to his emission intensity or from each according to his emissions?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Refining of Crude oil. Our dataset comprises of 89is then upgraded to crude oil for furthering refining. Forfuel sources such as coal, oil and natural gas and which are

Rajagopal, Deepak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Heat and mass transfer in a gas in a capillary induced by light with nonuniform intensity distribution over the beam cross section  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is presented of the heat and drift fluxes induced by velocity-selective light absorption in a single-component gas in a capillary tube. The light intensity distribution across the beam is assumed to have a Gaussian profile. Kinetic equations are solved numerically to calculate flux profiles and kinetic coefficients quantifying the contributions of surface and collisional mechanisms to light-induced transfer as functions of the Knudsen number, the ratio of the rate of radiative decay of the exited level and intermolecular collision frequency, accommodation coefficient, and the ratio of the tube radius to the light beam radius.

Chernyak, V. G., E-mail: vladimir.chernyak@usu.ru; Polikarpov, A. P., E-mail: alexey.polikarpov@usu.ru [Ural State University (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

An assessment of energy and environmental issues related to the use of gas-to-liquid fuels in transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent technological advances in processes for converting natural gas into liquid fuels, combined with a growing need for cleaner, low-sulfur distillate fuel to mitigate the environmental impacts of diesel engines have raised the possibility of a substantial global gas-to-liquids (G-T-L) industry. This report examines the implications of G-T-L supply for U.S. energy security and the environment. It appears that a G-T-L industry would increase competitiveness in world liquid fuels markets, even if OPEC states are major producers of G-T-L's. Cleaner G-T-L distillates would help reduce air pollution from diesel engines. Implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could be positive or negative, depending on the sources of natural gas, their alternative uses, and the degree of sequestration that can be achieved for CO{sub 2} emissions produced during the conversion process.

Greene, D.L.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: methane from coal seams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from the recovery of gas from coalbeds are identified and examined. The technology of methane recovery is described and economic and legal barriers to production are discussed. (ACR)

Ethridge, L.J.; Cowan, C.E.; Riedel, E.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Program on Technology Innovation: Literature Review of Issues Related to the Atmospheric Impacts of Natural Gas Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas is set to become an increasingly larger portion of the power generation fuel mix in the United States in upcoming years. The EIA estimates that 96.65 gigawatts (GW) of new electricity capacity will be added in the United States between 2009 and 2015. With the renewed interest in the use of this fuel in a variety of power plant designs, a review of recent research investigating the environmental impacts of natural gas power plantsin particular those from atmospheric emissionswas warranted. Thi...

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

123

Carbon Dioxide Storage: Geological Security and Environmental Issues – Case Study on the Sleipner Gas Field in Norway Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one option for mitigatining atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide and thereby contributes in actions for stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Carbon dioxide storage in geological formations has been in practice since early 1970s. Information and experience gained from the injection and/or storage of CO2 from a large number of existing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects indicate that it is feasible to safely store CO2 in geological formations as a CO2 mitigation option. Industrial analogues, including underground natural gas storage projects around the world and acid gas injection projects, provide additional indications that CO2 can be safely injected and stored at well-characterized and properly managed sites. Geological storage of CO 2 is in practice today beneath the North Sea, where nearly 1 MtCO2 has been successfully injected annually in the Utsira formation at the Sleipner Gas Field since 1996. The site is well characterized and the CO 2 injection process was monitored using seismic methods and this provided insights into the geometrical distribution of the injected CO 2. The injected CO2 will potentially be trapped geochemically pressure build up as a result of CO2 injection is unlikely to occur. Solubility and density dependence of CO2-water composition will become the controlling fluid parameters at Sleipner. The solubility trapping has the effect of eliminating the buoyant forces that drive CO2 upwards, and through time it can lead to mineral trapping, which is the most permanent and secure form of geological storage. Overall, the study at the Sleipner area demonstrates the geological security of carbon dioxide storage. The monitoring tools strengthen the verification of safe injection of CO2 in the Utsira formation. This proves that CO2 capture and storage is technically feasible and can be an effective method for greenhouse mitigation provided the site is well characterized and monitored properly. 1

Semere Solomon; The Bellona Foundation

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Combustion Turbine Combined Cycle Technology Developments, Reliability Issues, and Related Market Conditions: EPRI Gas Turbine Exper ience and Intelligence Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulating power generation markets worldwide present both business opportunities and challenges for combustion turbine (CT) plant owners, operators, and project developers. The "EPRI Gas Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report" (GTE&IR) provides concise, well-organized, up-to-date technical, strategic, and business information for combustion turbine (CT) power producers. This technical report assembles all of the content from the most recent three years of GTE&IR (seven editions) into a single docu...

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

125

Comprehensive Lifecycle Planning and Management System For Addressing Water Issues Associated With Shale Gas Development In New York, Pennsylvania, And West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a modeling system to allow operators and regulators to plan all aspects of water management activities associated with shale gas development in the target project area of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia (â??target areaâ?), including water supply, transport, storage, use, recycling, and disposal and which can be used for planning, managing, forecasting, permit tracking, and compliance monitoring. The proposed project is a breakthrough approach to represent the entire shale gas water lifecycle in one comprehensive system with the capability to analyze impacts and options for operational efficiency and regulatory tracking and compliance, and to plan for future water use and disposition. It will address all of the major water-related issues of concern associated with shale gas development in the target area, including water withdrawal, transport, storage, use, treatment, recycling, and disposal. It will analyze the costs, water use, and wastes associated with the available options, and incorporate constraints presented by permit requirements, agreements, local and state regulations, equipment and material availability, etc. By using the system to examine the water lifecycle from withdrawals through disposal, users will be able to perform scenario analysis to answer "what if" questions for various situations. The system will include regulatory requirements of the appropriate state and regional agencies and facilitate reporting and permit applications and tracking. These features will allow operators to plan for more cost effective resource production. Regulators will be able to analyze impacts of development over an entire area. Regulators can then make informed decisions about the protections and practices that should be required as development proceeds. This modeling system will have myriad benefits for industry, government, and the public. For industry, it will allow planning all water management operations for a project or an area as one entity to optimize water use and minimize costs subject to regulatory and other constraints. It will facilitate analysis of options and tradeoffs, and will also simplify permitting and reporting to regulatory agencies. The system will help regulators study cumulative impacts of development, conserve water resources, and manage disposal options across a region. It will also allow them to track permits and monitor compliance. The public will benefit from water conservation, improved environmental performance as better system wide decisions are made, and greater supply of natural gas, with attendant lower prices, as costs are reduced and development is assisted through better planning and scheduling. Altogether, better economics and fewer barriers will facilitate recovery of the more than 300 trillion cubic feet of estimated recoverable natural gas resource in the Marcellus Shale in a manner that protects the environment.

J. Daniel Arthur

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Overview of the Safety Issues Associated with the Compressed Natural Gas Fuel System and Electric Drive System in a Heavy Hybrid Electric Vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the hazards that are unique to a compressed-natural-gas (CNG)-fueled heavy hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) design compared with a conventional heavy vehicle. The unique design features of the heavy HEV are the CNG fuel system for the internal-combustion engine (ICE) and the electric drive system. This report addresses safety issues with the CNG fuel system and the electric drive system. Vehicles on U. S. highways have been propelled by ICEs for several decades. Heavy-duty vehicles have typically been fueled by diesel fuel, and light-duty vehicles have been fueled by gasoline. The hazards and risks posed by ICE vehicles are well understood and have been generally accepted by the public. The economy, durability, and safety of ICE vehicles have established a standard for other types of vehicles. Heavy-duty (i.e., heavy) HEVs have recently been introduced to U. S. roadways, and the hazards posed by these heavy HEVs can be compared with the hazards posed by ICE vehicles. The benefits of heavy HEV technology are based on their potential for reduced fuel consumption and lower exhaust emissions, while the disadvantages are the higher acquisition cost and the expected higher maintenance costs (i.e., battery packs). The heavy HEV is more suited for an urban drive cycle with stop-and-go driving conditions than for steady expressway speeds. With increasing highway congestion and the resulting increased idle time, the fuel consumption advantage for heavy HEVs (compared with conventional heavy vehicles) is enhanced by the HEVs' ability to shut down. Any increase in fuel cost obviously improves the economics of a heavy HEV. The propulsion system for a heavy HEV is more complex than the propulsion system for a conventional heavy vehicle. The heavy HEV evaluated in this study has in effect two propulsion systems: an ICE fueled by CNG and an electric drive system with additional complexity and failure modes. This additional equipment will result in a less reliable vehicle with a lower availability than a conventional heavy vehicle. Experience with heavy HEVs to date supports this observation. The key safety concern for the electric drive system is the higher voltages and currents that are required in the electric drive system. Faults that could expose personnel to these electric hazards must be considered, addressed, and minimized. The key issue for the CNG-fueled ICE is containment of the high-pressure natural gas. Events that can result in a release of natural gas with the possibility of subsequent ignition are of concern. These safety issues are discussed. The heavy HEV has the potential to have a safety record that is comparable to that of the conventional vehicle, but adequate attention to detail will be required.

Nelson, S.C.

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

127

CONTENTS Water Issues Dominate Oil and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Issues Dominate Oil and Gas Production ...1 Editor's Letter ...2 Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale...

128

NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

Russell, J.T.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

129

Energy Intensities for the Iron and Steel Industry (1985-1994)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

national level data on energy intensity issues on household energy use in the residential sector, energy intensity issues on manufacturing energy use in the ...

130

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utahâ??s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utahâ??s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water â?? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquiferâ??s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utahâ??s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utahâ??s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

BLACK ISSUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK ISSUES :: Your Portal To Diversity :: ::::::::::::::::::::::::::: http transactions in recent years include Viacom's acquisition of Black Entertainment Television, NBC's purchase Bookshelf Events Tech Briefs - more - #12;BLACK ISSUES :: Your Portal To Diversity

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

133

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Issues in Focus - U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity Issues in Focus U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administration’s Global Climate Change Initiative [99]. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output. AEO2004 projects energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, which represented approximately 83 percent of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2002. Projections for other greenhouse gases are based on projected rates of growth in their emissions, published in the U.S. Department of State’s Climate Action Report 2002 [100]. Table 19 combines the AEO2004 reference case projections for energy-related carbon dioxide emissions with the projections for other greenhouse gases.

134

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Full Report Tables National estimates and analysis of energy consumption by fuel (electricity, natural gas,...

135

Natural Gas 1995 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends iii Preface Natural Gas 1995: Issues and T rends has been prepared by the

136

Emerging energy security issues: Natural gas in the Gulf Nations, An overview of Middle East resources, export potentials, and markets. Report Series No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This paper proceeds with a presentation of the natural gas resource base of the Gulf nations of the Middle East. The resource base is put in the context of the world natural gas resource and trade flows. This is followed by a discussion of the existing and planned project to move Gulf natural gas to consuming regions. Then a discussion of the source of demand in the likely target markets for the Gulf resource follows. Next, the nature of LNG pricing is discussed. A brief summary concludes the paper.

Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Polarisation response of a gas medium in the field of a high-intensity ultrashort laser pulse: high order Kerr nonlinearities or plasma electron component?  

SciTech Connect

The polarisation response of quantum systems modelling silver and xenon atoms in the field of a high-intensity femtosecond Ti : sapphire laser (photon energy h{omega} Almost-Equal-To 1.5 eV), has been investigated by direct numerical integration of the Schroedinger equation. The applicability ranges of the perturbation theory and polarisation expansion in powers of field are determined. The contributions of excited atoms and electrons in the continuous-spectrum states to the polarisation response at the fundamental frequency, which arise as a result of excitation and photoionisation, are analysed. It is shown that specifically ionisation changes the sign of dielectric susceptibility with an increase in radiation intensity for the systems under consideration. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasmas)

Volkova, E A; Popov, Alexander M; Tikhonova, O V [D.V. Skobel'tsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Tutorial on Electric Utility Water Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issues in the News TJFClearwater031003 Three Things Power Plants Require 1) Access to transmission lines 2) Available fuel, e.g., coal or natural gas 3) Water...

139

Analysis of selected energy security issues related to US crude oil and natural gas exploration, development, production, transportation and processing. Final report, Task 13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 1989, President Bush directed the Secretary of Energy to initiate the development of a comprehensive National Energy Strategy (NES) built upon a national consensus. The overall principle for the NES, as defined by the President and articulated by the Economic Policy Council (EPC), is the continuation of the successful policy of market reliance, consistent with the following goals: Balancing of energy, economic, and environmental concerns; and reduced dependence by the US and its friends and allies on potentially unreliable energy suppliers. The analyses presented in this report draw upon a large body of work previously conducted for DOE/Office of Fossil Energy, the US Department of Interior/Minerals Management Service (DOI/MMS), and the Gas Research Institute (GRI), referenced throughout the text of this report. This work includes assessments in the following areas: the potential of advanced oil and gas extraction technologies as improved through R&D, along with the successful transfer of these technologies to the domestic petroleum industry; the economic and energy impacts of environmental regulations on domestic oil and gas exploration, production, and transportation; the potential of tax incentives to stimulate domestic oil and gas development and production; the potential environmental costs associated with various options for leasing for US oil and gas resources in the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS); and the economic impacts of environmental regulations affecting domestic crude oil refining.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Transportation Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Issues and Resolutions - Compilation of Laboratory Transportation Work Package Reports Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Compiled by Paul McConnell Sandia National Laboratories September 30, 2012 FCRD-UFD-2012-000342 Transportation Issues and Resolutions ii September 2012 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Open Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open Issues Open Issues Open Issues [PATCHED] python/2.7.4 gzip package fails September 24, 2013 by Doug Jacobsen | 0 Comments The modules version of python (python/2.7.4) had a bug in the default gzip python package. This was due to problems introduced in python 2.7.4 and fixed in python 2.7.5. Receiving a TypeError or structError upon opening and reading a gzip'ped file were the phenotypes of this bug. This has been corrected by installing the python 2.7.5 version of gzip.py into our python distribution. 0 comments | Read the full post [FIXED] JGI data loss in /projectb/sandbox area [purge] August 19, 2013 by Kjiersten Fagnan | 0 Comments We have discovered a serious bug in our purge scripts on /global/projectb. The */global/projectb/sandbox* areas are supposed to be immune from the

142

Open Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open Issues Open Issues Open Issues "error while loading shared libraries: libalpslli.so.0" with serial codes on login nodes December 13, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments Symptom: Dynamic executables built with compiler wrappers running directly on the external login nodes are getting the following error message: 0 comments | Read the full post Resolved: Running jobs error: "inet_arp_address_lookup" September 22, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments Symptom: After the Hopper August 14 maintenance, users reporting get the error message similar as follows occassionaly: 0 comments | Read the full post Resolved: qstat -a does not show correct hours in elpsed time for running jobs July 12, 2013 by Helen He | 0 Comments Sympton: After the Torque/Moab upgrade on 6/19, the elapsed run time display from

143

Interconnect Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interconnect Issues in NE Serge Khalife, 15 th April 2010 Agenda  About National Grid and Service territories  Scope and definitions  Interconnection Process Overview  Time Frames and Fees  Governmental Entity Exceptions  Net Metering Limit  Technical Issues  Observations and recommendations  Questions and Answers Service Territories Map Scope and definitions  The Distributed Generation Group at National Grid process interconnection applications on the distribution system typically 10 MW and under with a few exceptions.  ISO-NE process larger interconnection applications on the transmission system. Their timelines and procedures vary from National Grid's Distributed Generation process.  Governmental Entity : The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, or any

144

Issue Date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report on Financial Statements and Federal Single Audit Please find attached our report on the City of Issaquah’s financial statements and compliance with federal laws and regulations. We are issuing this report in order to provide information on the City’s financial condition.

Brian Sonntag; City Council; City Of Issaquah; Brian Sonntag Cgfm

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Launching a Cornell Examination of the Marcellus System The issues related to the development of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are emblematic of a whole family of extremely complicated Energy. The development plans for the Marcellus Shale are unfolding immediately in our backyards and require of different ways of developing the Marcellus Shale and the economics of not developing the Marcellus Shale. We

Angenent, Lars T.

146

Atomic gas temperature in a nonequilibrium high-intensity discharge lamp determined from the red wing of the resonance mercury line 254 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For developing low-wattage high intensity discharge (HID) lamps, a better understanding of the relatively unexplored nonequilibrium phenomena is essential. This needs interpretation of diagnostic results by methods free from equilibrium assumptions. In this paper, the atomic temperature is determined from the simulation of a quasistatic broadened resonance line by distinguishing between atomic temperature and excitation temperature in the equation of radiative transfer. The proposed method is applied to the red wing of the resonance mercury line 254 nm emitted from a HID lamp working on ac. The experimental results show severe deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium. More than one thousand degrees difference was obtained between atomic and electron temperatures at the maximum current phase.

Drakakis, E. [Technological Educational Institute, Department of Electrical Engineering, 71004 Heraklion (Greece); Karabourniotis, D. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Department of Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

President Issues  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

President Issues President Issues Executive Order on Alternative Fuels On December 13, 1996, President Clinton signed Exec- utive Order 13031, which calls on each Federal agency to develop and implement ways to meet the alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) acquisition requirements of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992. The executive order requires each agency to submit detailed reports within 60 days of the signing of the order to the Office of Management and Budget detailing its compliance with the EPAct sections regarding AFVs. Annual reports of the same nature must follow. "Our organization will care- fully track AFV acquisitions by the Federal agencies," said Phil Lampert, project coordinator at the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition. "If the states can operate all these

148

Inconvenient Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We dig carbon (i.e. fossil fuels—such as coal, oil, gas, etc) out of the ground and burn it to provide energy [1]. See Fig.(1). Burning of fossil fuels injects carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, and carbon dioxide is a major greenhouse gas. Increased greenhouse effects of the atmosphere can warm the earth. The global warming (or climate change) problem is very much in the news. The following is a succinct summary of current public discourse: 1. The people are ready to do something right now, but the politicians are cowards,.... Special interest groups are blocking actions; big oil is making unconscionable profits; fine the companies that emits the greenhouse gases! China has to do her share;... 2. Conservation! Use fluorescent bulbs, better insulations for buildings,.... Energy efficiency! Higher federal gas mileage standards for cars, hybrid cars,... 3. Biofuels (e.g. ethanol), windmills, solar energy,.... No fission nuclear energy (this is slowly changing). Carbon capture and sequestration! More research! Something will turn up... 4. The impact on the economy is tolerable—the global GDP may drop by about 1 %... Suppose we arrive at the conclusion that we should do something. What should we do [2]? Is the public being adequately informed?

Harvey Lam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Assessment of Impacts of Retrofit NOx Controls on Gas/Oil Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, when EPRI issued the version 2 of its Retrofit NOx Control Guidelines for Gas- and Oil-Fired Boilers (EPRI report TR-108181), it was thought the most common NOx controls installed on gas and oil-fired boilers would include low NOx burners; selective catalytic reduction (SCR); and other vendor supplied, hardware-intensive approaches. In the years that followed, however, most of the gas and oil power generating fleet opted for less hardware intensive, more cost-effective approaches, with Induced F...

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas  

SciTech Connect

We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Open Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Unable to open kgni version file /sys/class/gemini/kgni0/version" error "Unable to open kgni version file /sys/class/gemini/kgni0/version" error April 13, 2011 by Helen He | 0 Comments Symptom: Dynamic executables built with compiler wrappers running directly on the external login nodes are getting the following error message: 0 comments | Read the full post Resolved -- Default version not shown in "module avail module_name" command April 13, 2011 by Helen He | 0 Comments Symptom: The default software version is not shown when "module avail module_name" is issued. For example: 0 comments | Read the full post Job dependencies do not work as expected. Require additional string in job name April 8, 2011 by Katie Antypas | 0 Comments Symptom: submitting jobs which depend on other jobs does not work. 0 comments | Read the full post

152

Gas Turbine Optimum Operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many offshore installations are dependent on power generated by gas turbines and a critical issue is that these experience performance deterioration over time. Performance deterioration… (more)

Flesland, Synnøve Mangerud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

ends up in Clarington was delivered upstream. El Paso Natural Gas Pipeline issued an Emergency Critical Operating Condition Declaration for February 2 until further notice....

154

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

operational by April 1, 2010. Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company issued a notice of an emergency repair at its Compressor Station 827 near Alexandria, Louisiana. The pipeline...

155

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Energy End-Use Intensities 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating,...

157

Petroleum 1996: Issues and Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Distribution Category UC-950 Petroleum 1996 Issues and Trends September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration / Petroleum 1996: Issues and Trends iii Preface Contacts Petroleum 1996: Issues and Trends was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Office of Oil and Gas, Kenneth A. Vagts, Director (202/586-6401), and the EIA Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Webster C.

158

Strategies for the Commercialization & Deployment of GHG Intensity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies & Practices This report examines strategies of commercializing and deploying energy technologies that reduce greenhouse gas intensity. CDStratCompleteReport116092.pd...

159

Strategies for the Commercialization & Deployment of GHG Intensity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

examines strategies of commercializing and deploying energy technologies that reduce greenhouse gas intensity. CDStratCompleteReport116092.pdf More Documents & Publications...

160

Natural Gas Hydrates Update 1998-2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Significant events have transpired on the natural gas hydrate research and development front since "Future Supply Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates" appeared in Natural Gas 1998 Issues and Trends and in the Potential Gas Committee's 1998 biennial report.

David F. Morehouse

2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Short rise time intense electron beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

Olson, Craig L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Natural Gas - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy - Natural Gas. Short, timely articles with graphs about recent natural gas issues and trends : Monthly Reports : Monthly Energy Review - Natural Gas ...

163

Strategies for the Commercialization & Deployment of GHG Intensity-Reducing Technologies & Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report looks at the best methods of commercializing and deploying energy technologies that reduce greenhouse gas intensity.

164

Oil & Gas Research | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture and Storage Oil & Gas Methane Hydrate LNG Offshore Drilling Enhanced Oil Recovery Shale Gas Section 999 Report to Congress DOE issues the 2013 annual plan for the...

165

Method of enhancing cyclotron beam intensity  

SciTech Connect

When an easily ionized support gas such as xenon is added to the cold cathode in sources of the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, large beam enhancements are produced. For example, .sup.20 Ne.sup.7+ is increased from 0.05 enA to 27 enA, and .sup.16 O.sup.5+ intensities in excess of 35 e.mu.A have been extracted for periods up to 30 minutes. Approximately 0.15 cc/min of the easily ionized support gas is supplied to the ion source through a separate gas feed line and the primary gas flow is reduced by about 30%.

Hudson, Ed D. (Knoxville, TN); Mallory, Merrit L. (East Lansing, MI)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly highlights of activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry are presented. Feature articles for this issue are: Natural Gas Overview for Winter 1983-1984 by Karen A. Kelley; and an Analysis of Natural Gas Sales by John H. Herbert. (PSB)

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

OECD energy intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

to examine OECD countries' energy intensity levels (i.e., the ratio of energy ... steady-state or long-run distribution of energy intensity for the Organisation of ...

168

Edison Known issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 or 510-486-8611 Home For Users Computational Systems Retired Systems Edison Phase I - Retired 6242013 Known issues Known issues IPM Not Reporting the FLOPS...

169

A discussion of certain safety issues associated with the Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation mixing test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses certain safety issues associated with the Hanford Tank 241-SY 101 hydrogen mitigation mixing test. Specifically, the study, is concerned with the effect of pump shearing, jet mixing, and piling-up on the following areas: Gas generation; gas retention; gas release (immediate); gas release (long-term); and saltcake. The findings for each issue area of concern are addressed.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fail to meet this demand, the most likely alternatives will be heavy oil, oil sands, oil shale, and liquids from natural gas and coal. These are carbon-intensive fuels that would...

171

AGS intensity upgrades  

SciTech Connect

After the successful completion of the AGS Booster and several upgrades of the AGS, a new intensity record of 6.3 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse accelerated to 24 GeV was achieved. The high intensity slow-extracted beam program at the AGS typically serves about five production targets and about eight experiments including three rare Kaon decay experiments. Further intensity upgrades are being discussed that could increase the average delivered beam intensity by up to a factor of four.

Roser, T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Netlognews-April 2013-issue 29  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, Issue 30 3, Issue 30 New Breathalyzer Offers the Potential for Non-invasive Diabetes Monitoring page 3 NETL Scientist Named Finalist for Service to America Medal page 2 NETL Catalyst Produces Winner in Shale Gas Innovation Contest page 5 the ENERGY lab NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY 2 NETL Scientist Named Finalist for Service to America Medal __________________________________2 New Breathalyzer Offers the Potential for Non-invasive Diabetes Monitoring _____________________________3 Database to Aid Advanced Alloy Processing ___________4 NETL Catalyst Produces Winner in Shale Gas Innovation Contest ________________________________________4 NETL Research Highlights Potential Safety Concern of Nano-sized Aluminum Particles ___________5 NETL and NIST Collaborate to Study CO

173

Intensity Frontier Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes findings of the 2013 Snowmass Community Summer Study Instrumentation Frontier's subgroup on the Intensity Frontier. This report is directed at identifying instrumentation R&D needed to support particle physics research over the coming decades at the Intensity Frontier.

S. H. Kettell; R. A. Rameika; R. S. Tschirhart

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

174

Light intensity compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

6. State Regulators Promote Consumer Choice in Retail Gas Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends 113 6. State Regulators Promote Consumer Choice in Retail Gas Markets Restructur ...

176

Advanced Materials and Processes for Gas Turbines TABLE OF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Issues for the Design of Industrial Gas Turbines [pp. 3-13] ... French Developments of Superalloys for Gas Turbine Disks and Blades [pp. 17-28

177

Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends 181 Appendix C Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production Project

178

Marcellus natural gas production gains affect spreads between ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... issues, and trends. FAQs Glossary For ... Marcellus natural gas production gains affect spreads ... Supporting increased use of natural gas for power ...

179

Natural Gas - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy - Natural Gas. Short, timely articles with graphs about recent natural gas issues and trends . Annual Energy Outlook. Released: ...

180

EIA - AEO2010 - Issues in Focus  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Issues in Focus Issues in Focus Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Issues in Focus Introduction Each year, the Issues in Focus section of the AEO provides an in-depth discussion on topics of special interest, including significant changes in assumptions and recent developments in technologies for energy production, supply, and consumption. The first section compares the results of two cases that adopt different assumptions about the future course of existing energy policies. One case assumes the elimination of sunset provisions in existing energy policies. The other case assumes the extension of a selected group of existing policies—CAFE standards, appliance standards, and PTCs—in addition to the elimination of sunset provisions. Other sections include a discussion of end-use energy efficiency trends in AEO2010; an analysis of the impact of incentives on the use of natural gas in heavy freight trucks; factors affecting the relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices; the sensitivity of the projection results to variations in assumptions about the availability of U.S. shale gas resources; the implications of retiring nuclear plants after 60 years of operation; and issues related to accounting for CO2 emissions from biomass energy combustion.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Carbon Dioxide and Other Greenhouse Gas Reduction Metallurgy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE's Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge Solicitation to Support Development of Technologies to Reduce Energy Intensity and Greenhouse Gas  ...

182

ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

Gravois, Melanie

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

183

L This Issue:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Volume 92, Number 6, November-December 1987 Journal of Research of the National Bureau of Standards L This Issue: Departments ...

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Diversity Issues Committee - History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events leading to formation of Diversity Issues Committee Visit by American Physical Society Committee on the Status of Women in Physics (CSWP) to assess the work environment at...

185

Inside This Issue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inside This Issue 1995 CAT Calendar APS Compton Award Established APSUO Seeks Nominees for Steering Committee Beamline Commissioning Workshop Held Commissioning of User Beamlines...

186

Le Bail Intensity Extraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Le Bail Intensity Extraction Le Bail Intensity Extraction Presentation Goal Introduce the concepts behind LeBail fitting; why it is useful and how to perform a Le Bail fit with GSAS. Format: PDF slides or a RealPlayer video of the slides with accompanying audio and a demo video that shows how a Le Bail fit is performed. Presentation Outline What is the Le Bail method? Other approaches Why use the Le Bail method? Parameter fitting with Le Bail intensity extraction Le Bail refinement strategies Avoiding problems with background fitting: BKGEDIT Demo: an example Le Bail fit Links Le Bail lecture Slides (as PDF file) FlashMovie presentation with index (best viewed with 1024x768 or better screen resolution) FlashMovie file (800x600 pixels) Le Bail demo FlashMovie presentation with index (best viewed with 1024x768 or

187

Radiation intensity of lignite-fired oxy-fuel flames  

SciTech Connect

The radiative heat transfer in oxy-fuel flames is compared to corresponding conditions in air-fuel flames during combustion of lignite in the Chalmers 100 kW oxy-fuel test facility. In the oxy-fuel cases the flue-gas recycle rate was varied, so that, in principle, the same stoichiometry was kept in all cases, whereas the oxygen fraction in the recycled flue-gas mixture ranged from 25 to 29 vol.%. Radial profiles of gas concentration, temperature and total radiation intensity were measured in the furnace. The temperature, and thereby the total radiation intensity of the oxy-fuel flames, increases with decreasing flue-gas recycle rate. The ratio of gas and total radiation intensities increases under oxy-fuel conditions compared to air-firing. However, when radiation overlap between gas and particles is considered the ratios for air-firing and oxy-fuel conditions become more similar, since the gas-particle overlap is increased in the CO{sub 2}-rich atmosphere. A large fraction of the radiation in these lignite flames is emitted by particles whose radiation was not significantly influenced by oxy-fuel operation. Therefore, an increment of gas radiation due to higher CO{sub 2} concentration is not evident because of the background of particle radiation, and, the total radiation intensities are similar during oxy-fuel and air-fuel operation as long as the temperature distributions are similar. (author)

Andersson, Klas; Johansson, Robert; Hjaertstam, Stefan; Johnsson, Filip; Leckner, Bo [Department of Energy and Environment, Division of Energy Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE - 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

High intensity hadron accelerators  

SciTech Connect

This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

Teng, L.C.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Manpower planning and cycle-time reduction of a labor-intensive assembly line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for Gas Lift Mandrels(GLM) in the oil and gas industry is expected to increase over the next few years, requiring Schlumberger's GLM assembly line to increase their manufacturing capacity. Given the labor-intensive ...

Oh, Shao Chong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

PNNL: Pacific Northwest Technology Today - Issue Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Outreach Community Outreach Issue Archive Volume 7, Issue 2 Volume 7, Issue 1 Volume 6, Issue 6 Volume 6, Issue 5 Volume 6, Issue 4 Volume 6, Issue 3 Volume 6, Issue 2 Volume 6, Issue 1 Volume 5, Issue 5 Volume 5, Issue 4 Volume 5, Issue 3 Volume 5, Issue 2 Volume 5, Issue 1 Volume 4, Issue 4 Volume 4, Issue 5 Volume 4, Issue 4 Volume 4, Issue 3 Volume 3, Issue 2 Volume 3, Issue 1 Volume 2, Issue 8 Volume 2, Issue 7 Volume 2, Issue 6 Volume 2, Issue 5 Volume 2, Issue 4 Volume 2, Issue 3 Volume 2, Issue 2 Volume 2, Issue 1 Volume 1, Issue 4 Volume 1, Issue 3 Volume 1, Issue 2 Volume 1, Issue 1 Community & Regional Outreach Home Pacific Northwest Technology Today eNewsletter Current Issue Issue Archive Subscribe/Unsubscribe Inquiries Speakers and Seminars Community Science & Technology Seminar Series

191

A discussion of certain safety issues associated with the Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation mixing test. Letter report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses certain safety issues associated with the Hanford Tank 241-SY 101 hydrogen mitigation mixing test. Specifically, the study, is concerned with the effect of pump shearing, jet mixing, and piling-up on the following areas: Gas generation; gas retention; gas release (immediate); gas release (long-term); and saltcake. The findings for each issue area of concern are addressed.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy Intensity Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our presentation will cover how we began the journey of conserving energy at our facility. We’ll discuss a basic layout of our energy intensity plan and the impact our team has had on the process, what tools we’re using, what goals have been identified, how we structured the plan to include our team in the process and so on.

Rappolee, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:59pm Addthis High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting provides the highest efficacy and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting. Illustration of a high-intensity discharge (HID) lIllustration amp. The lamp is a tall cylindrical shape, and a cutout of the outer tube shows the materials inside. A long, thin cylinder called the arc tube runs through the lamp between two electrodes. The space around the arc tube is labeled as a vacuum. In a high-intensity discharge lamp, electricity arcs between two electrodes, creating an intensely bright light. Mercury, sodium, or metal halide gas

194

Greenhouse gas balances of biomass energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A full energy-cycle analysis of greenhouse gas emissions of biomass energy systems requires analysis well beyond the energy sector. For example, production of biomass fuels impacts on the global carbon cycle by altering the amount of carbon stored in the biosphere and often by producing a stream of by-products or co-products which substitute for other energy-intensive products like cement, steel, concrete or, in case of ethanol from corn, animal feed. It is necessary to distinguish between greenhouse gas emissions associated with the energy product as opposed to those associated with other products. Production of biomass fuels also has an opportunity cost because it uses large land areas which could have been used otherwise. Accounting for the greenhouse gas emissions from biomass fuels in an environment of credits and debits creates additional challenges because there are large nonlinearities in the carbon flows over time. This paper presents some of the technical challenges of comprehensive greenhouse gas accounting and distinguishes between technical and public policy issues.

Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schlamadinger, B. [Institute for Energy Research, Joanneum Research, Graz, (Austria)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Volume III, Issue 9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issue 9 September 2013 your connection to Brookhaven Lab's world-class science First NSLS-II Beamlines Begin to Take Shape BNL's National Synchrotron Light Source II will be a...

196

ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 0and Analysis Program Manual. LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 0the Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM): CATS database o

Gravois, Melanie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Biofuels Issues and Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Biofuels Issues and Trends Biofuels Issues and Trends October 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Biofuels Issues and Trends i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. October 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Biofuels Issues and Trends ii Table of Contents

198

Oil, Gas, and Mining Leases (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section contains rules on oil, gas, and mining leases, and grants authority to the State of Nebraska and local governments to issue leases for oil and gas mining and exploration on their lands.

199

CIM - compact intensity modulation.  

SciTech Connect

Compact intensity modulation (CIM), a new method to modulate the intensity of a neutron beam is demonstrated. CIM allows the production of arbitrary signals where the focus point can be chosen and changed without any constraints. A novel feature in this technique compared to spin echo techniques is that the neutron polarization is kept parallel or anti-parallel to the static fields during the passage through the magnetic fields and the beating pattern at the detector is produced by an amplitude modulation (AM) of the adiabatic RF-spin flippers rather than Larmor precession like in neutron spin echo (NSE) instruments; thus, the achievable contrast is very high and the instrument resolution can be changed very quickly. This gives the fascinating possibility at pulsed neutron sources to sweep the modulation frequency of the flippers in order to increase dynamic resolution range during the same neutron pulse.

Bleuel, M.; Lang, E.; Gahler, G.; Lal, J.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source; Inst. Lau Langevin

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

200

Unlocking energy intensive habits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy intensive habits energy intensive habits Presentation at LBL Oct 10, 2013 by Hal Wilhite Professor and Research Director University of Oslo Centre for Development and the Environment Source: WWF US EIA Outlook 2011 Conventional framing of the energy consumption and savings * Sovereign consumers * Economically rational and persistentely reflexive. * Uninfluenced by social and material conditions of everyday life * Focus on efficiency and not on size and volume which is for the most part treated as an indifferent variable Cognitive reductionism The change of frame * From individual to socio-material * From rational/reflexive experience-based (practical) knowledge * From efficiency to reduction A theory of habit * Acknowledges the role of lived experience (history, both cultural and personal) in forming

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Intense ion beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

Humphries, Jr., Stanley (Ithaca, NY); Sudan, Ravindra N. (Ithaca, NY)

1977-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2013 | Release Date: September 5, 4, 2013 | Release Date: September 5, 2013 | Next Release: September 12, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Low Natural Gas Prices Drive Industrial Natural Gas Consumption Industrial consumption of natural gas is poised to continue recent growth through the next several years, evidenced by planned expansions in gas-intensive industries, as well as by a major industrial indicator released this week by the Institute for Supply Management. Indicating an uptick in industrial activity, the recently released PMI (formerly the Purchasing Manager's Index) for August registered 55.7, the highest level in more than two years. The PMI is an indicator of whether manufacturers feel that business conditions are improving, staying the

203

Natural Gas - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

with graphs about recent natural gas issues and trends Monthly Reports Short-Term Energy Outlook - Natural Gas Section Released: August 6, 2013 Short-term forecasts of natural gas...

204

PETC review: Issue 9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since its beginning, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center`s (PETC) primary function has been to study and conduct research on coal and its uses and applications. PETC has also been investigating ways in which natural gas can be employed to enhance the use of coal and to convert natural gas into liquid products that can be more readily transported and stored. This review contains five articles which reflect PETC`s mission: State-of-the-Art High Performance Power Systems [HIPPS]; Unconventional Fuel Uses of Natural Gas; Micronized Magnetite -- Beneficiation and Benefits; Reburning for NO{sub x} Reduction; and An Update of PETC`s Process Research Facility.

Santore, R.R.; Friedman, S.; Reiss, J.; Waehner, M.J. [eds.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Netlognews-April 2013-issue 29  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rocks Demystified Rocks Demystified in Geomechanical Properties Lab page 2 Oxygen Carrier Successfully Prepared at Commercial Scale page 4 Coal Characterization Study Selected for Energy Sector Series page 5 the ENERGY lab NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY NETL's Quarterly R&D newsletter - January 2014, Issue 32 2 Rocks Demystified in Geomechanical Properties Lab __________________________________2 New Drilling Fluids Prepared for High-Temperature Drilling _________________________3 Oxygen Carrier Successfully Prepared at Commercial Scale ________________________________4 Coal Characterization Study Selected for Energy Sector Series ______________________________5 New Raman Gas Sensor Technology Measures Fuel Gas ________________________________________6 NETL-Developed Foamed Cement Helps Stabilize

206

Appendix C Selected Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Recurring Recurring Natural Gas Reports * Natural Gas Monthly, DOE/EIA-0130. Published monthly. Other Reports Covering Natural Gas, Natural Gas Liquids, and Other Energy Sources * Monthly Energy Review, DOE/EIA-0035. Published monthly. Provides national aggregate data for natural gas, natural gas liquids, and other energy sources. * Short-Term Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0202. Published quarterly. Provides forecasts for next six quarters for natural gas and other energy sources. * Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends, DOE/EIA- 0560(96), December 1996. * U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves -1996 Annual Report, DOE/EIA-0216(96)/Ad- vance Summary, September 1997. * Annual Energy Review 1996, DOE/ EIA-0384(96), July 1997. Published annually. * State Energy Data Report, Consumption Estimates, 1960- 1994, DOE/EIA-0214(94), October 1996. * Annual

207

The Gas/Electric Partnership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric and gas industries are each in the process of restructuring and "converging" toward one mission: providing energy. Use of natural gas in generating electric power and use of electricity in transporting natural gas will increase as this occurs. Through an Electric Power Research Institute initiative, an inter-industry organization, the Gas/Electric Partnership, has formed between the electric utilities and gas pipelines. The initial focus of this partnership is to explore issues of culture, technology, and economics in using electric motor driven compressors for moving gas to market.

Schmeal, W. R.; Royall, D.; Wrenn, K. F. Jr.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Natural gas sdtrategic plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s natural gas program is aimed at meeting simultaneously our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy The Natural Gas Strategic Plan for 1995 represents a Department-wide effort to articulate the key issues related to the expanded development and utilization of natural gas, and defines the roles of the federal government and US industry in partnering to accomplish the strategic goals defined. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Strategic Plan are to: foster the development of advanced natural gas technologies; encourage the adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets; support the removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets; and foster technologies and policies to maximize the environmental benefits of natural gas use. DOE`s proposed fiscal year (FY) 1996 budget represents a commitment to natural gas research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) from reservoir to end use. DOE has redirected and increased funding for its natural gas exploration, production, delivery and storage, processing, and utilization RD&D programs, shifting funds from other energy programs to programs that will enhance efficiency and advance the role of natural gas in our domestic energy resources portfolio.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Cogeneration Operational Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A great deal of the discussions concerning congeneration projects are focused on the "avoided cost" and other legal issues which effect these projects. These areas are extremely important and are essential to the success of the venture. Equally important, however, are the operational Issues which impact the utility and the cogenerator. This paper addresses the utility perspective in regard to possible impact of cogeneration systems on utility service to other customer, safety and substation operations. Other operational issues also include utility transmission planning, generation planning and fuel mix decisions. All of these operational problems have an impact on the ratepayer in regard to quality of electric service and future rates. Both the cogenerator and the utility have an interest in solving these problems.

Williams, M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Natural gas monthly, April 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Estimates extend through April 1998 for many data series. The report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, feature articles are presented designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This issue contains the special report, ``Natural Gas 1997: A Preliminary Summary.`` This report provides information on natural gas supply and disposition for the year 1997, based on monthly data through December from EIA surveys. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Flammable gas project topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

Johnson, G.D.

1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons  

SciTech Connect

The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented.

Weng, W.T.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Accelerating News Issue 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this spring issue, we look at developments towards higher luminosity and higher energy colliders. We report on the technology developed for the remote powering of the LHC magnets and studies of diagnostics based on higher order mode port signals. We also inform you about the main outcome of the TIARA survey on market needs for accelerator scientists.

Szeberenyi, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

In this issue  

SciTech Connect

The following topics are discussed in this issue: (1) review of a decade of research in plasma studies at Cornell, (2) reaching ignition temperature in a controlled thermonuclear reactor, (3) heating toroidal plasmas with electron beams, (4) new sources of very high power, and (5) an ion ring bottle for a fusion reactor. (MOW)

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A practical model to predict gas hydrate formation, dissociation and transportability in oil and gas flowlines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The oil and gas industry is facing very challenging production issues with offshore explorations in deeper and colder waters. Longer subsea tiebacks will be required… (more)

Zerpa, Luis Eduardo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Diversity Issues Committee - Mission Statement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diversity Issues Committee Mission Statement Investigate and study issues relating to diversity in the SUF workforce. Provide recommendations to SUF management to improve the work...

217

Intensity Frontier Instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

The fundamental origin of flavor in the Standard Model (SM) remains a mystery. Despite the roughly eighty years since Rabi asked “Who ordered that?” upon learning of the discovery of the muon, we have not understood the reason that there are three generations or, more recently, why the quark and neutrino mixing matrices and masses are so different. The solution to the flavor problem would give profound insights into physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) and tell us about the couplings and the mass scale at which the next level of insight can be found. The SM fails to explain all observed phenomena: new interactions and yet unseen particles must exist. They may manifest themselves by causing SM reactions to differ from often very precise predictions. The Intensity Frontier (1) explores these fundamental questions by searching for new physics in extremely rare processes or those forbidden in the SM. This often requires massive and/or extremely finely tuned detectors.

Kettell S.; Rameika, R.; Tshirhart, B.

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEC). 2000. California Natural Gas Analysis and Issues.2002. Average Price of Natural Gas Sold to Electric Utilityfor investments in natural gas and renewables to complement

Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Regional Report Issue Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unfolding effects of new technologies for oil and gas extraction from shale. Thus, the baseline forecast) of approximately $11.7 billion in state gross domestic product (state GDP) and total recovery and recon- struction damaged. This analysis measures impacts on state Gross Domestic Product (state GDP), total employment

220

GAS PHOTOTUBE CIRCUIT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent pertains to electronic circuits for measuring the intensity of light and is especially concerned with measurement between preset light thresholds. Such a circuit has application in connection with devices for reading-out information stored on punch cards or tapes where the cards and tapes are translucent. By the novel arrangement of this invention thc sensitivity of a gas phototube is maintained at a low value when the light intensity is below a first threshold level. If the light level rises above the first threshold level, the tube is rendered highly sensitive and an output signal will vary in proportion to the light intensity change. When the light level decreases below a second threshold level, the gas phototube is automatically rendered highly insensitive. Each of these threshold points is adjustable.

Richardson, J.H.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many of the operating flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems throughout the world, materials corrosion leads to considerable costs and downtime. Utilities are often required to maintain, repair, replace, and/or upgrade existing materials to combat corrosion issues. This document provides the results of a recent EPRI survey that examined the various types of corrosion and materials damage in FGD systems.

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

222

Volume III, Issue 11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

III, Issue 11 III, Issue 11 November 2013 your connection to Brookhaven Lab's world-class science Maximizing Energy Gains from Tiny Nanoparticles Sometimes big change comes from small begin- nings. That's especially true in the research of Anatoly Frenkel, a professor of phys- ics at Yeshiva University, who is working to reinvent the way we use and produce energy by unlocking the potential of some of the world's tiniest structures - nanoparticles. "The nanoparticle is the smallest unit in most novel materials, and all of its prop- erties are linked in one way or another to its structure," said Frenkel. "If we can un- derstand that connection, we can derive much more infor- mation about how it can be used for catalysis, energy, and other purposes."

223

Sample Changes and Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sample and Model Issues Sample and Model Issues Summary Our comprehensive review of the EIA 914 has confirmed that discrepancies can arise between estimates for December of one year and January of the next. These are most evident for Texas estimates between December 2008 and January 2009. Reports now available from HPDI show that production for all the companies we sampled in both 2008 and 2009 rose by about 60 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) in January and that total production in Texas rose by a similar amount. Our estimate was a decrease of 360 MMcf/d. Why the difference? Computationally, EIA-914 estimates depend on two factors: * Reports from the companies in the survey sample * An expansion factor to estimate total production from the sample's reported

224

Discussion of Process Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study and Study and Criteria for Designation of National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors March 29, 2006 Discussion of Process Issues David Meyer Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability US Department of Energy 2 Two Basic, Interdependent Issues Geographic Scope of National Corridors Appropriate Timing for Designation of a National Corridor Interdependent because route becomes more predictable as a proposed project is refined 3 New Term: Electric Transmission Constraint Area "Constraint Area" would refer to a problem in the transmission infrastructure Usually would not have a precise locus or boundaries By designating a Constraint Area, DOE could flag an important problem - and remain agnostic about how to solve it 4 Relationship of Constraint Areas

225

Emerging Protective Relay Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The synchrophasor technology gains industrywide interest and momentum. Thousands of phasor measurement units (PMUs) will be deployed in substations across the North American power grid in the next few years. However, the synchrophasor technology and associated industry standards are still under development and evolve every day. Utilities, particularly those that have ongoing synchrophasor projects, are facing various challenges and issues in the practical deployment and application of the technology. The...

2010-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

Issue Development sheet Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISSUE DEVELOPMENT SHEET INFORMATION ONLY The information provided below indicates that a potential concern for finding has been identified. Please provide any objective evidence you may have that could either alleviate the concern or eliminate the finding. If no objective evidence is available/can be provided by the end of this audit (at the scheduled end of field work), this information will be included in the audit report and reported as a concern or an audit finding as appropriate.

227

Natural gas monthly, June 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is the executive summary from Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Natural gas monthly, October 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article in this issue is a special report, ``Comparison of Natural Gas Storage Estimates from the EIA and AGA.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

230

Nuclear stimulation of gas fields  

SciTech Connect

From National Technical Canadian Gas Association; Calgary, Alberta, Canada (17 Oct 1973). The technical bases of the emerging technology of nuclear stimulation of natural gas fields, the potential of this method for increasing the gas supply of the US, and public issues related to this technology are discussed. A technical appendix is provided with information on: reservoir producing characteristics; explosive design, availability, and cost; firing and space of explosives; economic parameters; and tabulated statistics on past and current projects on nuclear stimulation. (LCL)

Randolph, P.L.

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Gas utilization technologies  

SciTech Connect

One of the constant challenges facing the research community is the identification of technology needs 5 to 15 years from now. A look back into history indicates that the forces driving natural gas research have changed from decade to decade. In the 1970s research was driven by concerns for adequate supply; in the 1980s research was aimed at creating new markets for natural gas. What then are the driving forces for the 1990s? Recent reports from the natural gas industry have helped define a new direction driven primarily by market demand for natural gas. A study prepared by the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America Foundation entitled ``Survey of Natural Research, Development, and Demonstration RD&D Priorities`` indicated that in the 1990s the highest research priority should be for natural gas utilization and that technology development efforts should not only address efficiency and cost, but environmental and regulatory issues as well. This study and others, such as the report by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.) entitled ``Strategic Vision for Natural Gas Through the Year 2000,`` clearly identify the market sectors driving today`s technology development needs. The biggest driver is the power generation market followed by the industrial, transportation, appliance, and gas cooling markets. This is best illustrated by the GRI 1994 Baseline Projection on market growth in various sectors between the year 1992 and 2010. This paper highlights some of the recent technology developments in each one of these sectors.

Biljetina, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hot Leg Piping Materials Issues  

SciTech Connect

With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) the reactor outlet piping was recognized to require a design that utilizes internal insulation (Reference c). The initial pipe design suggested ceramic fiber blanket as the insulation material based on requirements associated with service temperature capability within the expected range, very low thermal conductivity, and low density. Nevertheless, it was not considered to be well suited for internal insulation use because its very high surface area and proclivity for holding adsorbed gases, especially water, would make outgassing a source of contaminant gases in the He-Xe working fluid. Additionally, ceramic fiber blanket insulating materials become very friable after relatively short service periods at working temperatures and small pieces of fiber could be dislodged and contaminate the system. Consequently, alternative insulation materials were sought that would have comparable thermal properties and density but superior structural integrity and greatly reduced outgassing. This letter provides technical information regarding insulation and materials issues for the Hot Leg Piping preconceptual design developed for the Project Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP).

V. Munne

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

233

ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for energy-Intensive Processes (eIP) addresses the top technology opportunities to save energy and reduce carbon emissions across the industrial sector. the portfolio focuses the...

234

Maintenance simulation: Software issues  

SciTech Connect

The maintenance of a distributed software system in a production environment involves: (1) maintaining software integrity, (2) maintaining and database integrity, (3) adding new features, and (4) adding new systems. These issues will be discussed in general: what they are and how they are handled. This paper will present our experience with a distributed resource management system that accounts for resources consumed, in real-time, on a network of heterogenous computers. The simulated environments to maintain this system will be presented relate to the four maintenance areas.

Luk, C.H.; Jette, M.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Technology transfer issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testimony by Lawrence J. Brady, Commerce Assistant Secretary for Trade Administration, at Congressional hearings on the national security issues of technology transfers to the Soviet Union identified steps the US needs to take to deal effectively with the problem. These steps include an understanding of how the Soviet Union has and will benefit militarily by acquiring Western technology and efforts to work with other countries, counterintelligence agencies, and industries to stem the flow of technological information. Brady outlined changes in technology development that complicate the enforcement of transfer rules, and emphasized the importance of a close relationship between the business community and the Commerce Department. (DCK)

Jacobson, C.

1982-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

energy intensity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

intensity intensity Dataset Summary Description Energy intensity data and documentation published by the U.S. DOE's office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Energy intensity is defined as: amount of energy used in producing a given level of output or activity; expressed as energy per unit of output. This is the energy intensity of the the electricity sector, which is an energy consuming sector that generates electricity. Data are organized to separate electricity-only generators from combined heat and power (CHP) generators. Data is available for the period 1949 - 2004. Source EERE Date Released May 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Energy Consumption energy intensity fossil fuels renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon electricity_indicators.xls (xls, 2.1 MiB)

237

Environmental issues in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global concern about the environment is increasing, and the People's Republic of China (PRC) is not immune from such concerns. The Chinese face issues similar to those of many other developing nations. The US Department of Energy is particularly interested in national and world pollution issues, especially those that may infringe on other countries' economic growth and development. The DOE is also interested in any opportunities that might exist for US technical assistance and equipment in combating environmental problems. Our studies of articles in the China Daily, and English-language daily newspaper published by the Chinese government, show that population, pollution, and energy are major concerns of the Chinese Communist Party. Thus this report emphasizes the official Chinese government view. Supporting data were also obtained from other sources. Regardless of the severity of their various environmental problems, the Chinese will only try to remedy those problems with the greatest negative effects on its developing economy. They will be looking for foreign assistance, financial and informational, to help implement solutions. With the Chinese government seeking assistance, the United States has an opportunity to export basic technical information, especially in the areas of pollution control and monitoring, oil exploration methods, oil drilling technology, water and sewage treatment procedures, hazardous waste and nuclear waste handling techniques, and nuclear power plant safety procedures. In those areas the US has expertise and extensive technical experience, and by exporting the technologies the US would benefit both economically and politically. 59 refs., 3 figs.

Travis, P.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Reformulated gasoline quality issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One year ago, a panel of industry experts were interviewed in the November/December 1994 issue of Fuel Reformulation (Vol. 4, No. 6). With the focus then and now on refinery investments, the panelists were asked to forecast which refining processes would grow in importance. It is apparent from their response, and from other articles and discussions throughout the year, that hydroprocessing and catalytic conversion processes are synergistic in the overall refinery design, with flexibility and process objectives varying on a unit-by-unit case. To an extent, future refinery investments in downstream petrochemicals, such as for paraxylene production, are based on available catalytic reforming feedstock. Just a importantly, hydroprocessing units (hydrotreating, hydrocracking) needed for clean fuel production (gasoline, diesel, aviation fuel), are heavily dependent on hydrogen production from the catalytic reformer. Catalytic reforming`s significant influence in the refinery hydrogen balance, as well as its status as a significant naphtha conversion route to higher-quality fuels, make this unit a high-priority issue for engineers and planners striving for flexibility.

Gonzalez, R.G.; Felch, D.E.; Edgar, M.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

How Do Outer Spiral Rainbands Affect Tropical Cyclone Structure and Intensity?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-standing issue on how outer spiral rainbands affect the structure and intensity of tropical cyclones is studied through a series of numerical experiments using the cloud-resolving tropical cyclone model TCM4. Because diabatic heating due ...

Yuqing Wang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

New antitrust issues in a deregulated environment: access to pipelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deregulated environment of the Natural Gas Policy Act, (NGPA) will introduce new antitrust issues, one issue of particular concern and difficulty being access and utilization of gas transmission and distribution facilities. The authors disagree with the tendency to use the bottleneck monopoly/essential facility doctrine to suggest that access is required by the antitrust laws. Current trends in judicial and economic analysis of refusals to deal by monopolists supports the view that nonpredatory denials of access, based on such legitimate business considerations as efficiency and profitability, are appropriate and consistent with both antitrust policy and the competitive purposes of industry deregulation. 80 references.

Mahinka, S.P.; Johnson, J.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Gas well deliquification. 2nd. ed.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chapter 1: Introduction; Chapter 2: Recognizing Symptoms of Liquid Loading in Gas Wells; Chapter 3: Critical Velocity; Chapter 4: Systems Nodal Analysis; Chapter 5: Sizing Tubing; Chapter 6: Compression; Chapter 7: Plunger Lift; Chapter 8: Use of Foam to Deliquefy Gas Wells; Chapter 9: Hydraulic Pumping; Chapter 10: Use of Beam Pumps to Deliquefy Gas Wells; Chapter 11: Gas Lift; Chapter 12: Electric Submersible Pumps; Chapter 13: Progressing Cavity Pumps; Chapter 14: Coal Bed Methane; Chapter 15: Production Automation. Chapter 14, by David Simpson, based in the San Juan Basin, addresses issues in coal bed methane, low pressure operations, gas compression, gas measurement, oil field construction, gas well deliquification and project management.

James Lea; Henry Nickens; Mike Wells [Texas Technical University, TX (United States). Petroleum Engineering Department

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Issues in Focus  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Issues in Focus Issues in Focus Macroeconomic Forecasting with the Revised National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) Phasing Out MTBE in Gasoline World Oil Demand and Prices Distributed Electricity Generation Resources Natural Gas Supply Availability Restructuring of State Retail Markets for Electricity Carbon Dioxide Emissions in AEO2001 Macroeconomic Forecasting with the Revised National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) The NIPA Comprehensive Revision Economic activity is a key determinant of growth in U.S. energy supply and demand. The derivation of the forecast of economic activity is therefore a critical step in developing the energy forecast presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001). In turn, the forecast of economic activity is rooted fundamentally in the historical data series maintained by a

244

EM Issues Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SNF Transfer Shipments between SRS and INL - SNF Transfer Shipments between SRS and INL - Scott Declue, Federal Project Director, Savannah River Site * Completion of SNF Transfer results in: * Elimination of the entire SNF inventory at SRS * Reduction in the number of shipments of SNF from DOE Sites to the repository * Eliminates need for SRS to build/operate a SNF packaging and dry storage facility. * Integrated Project Team has been formed to work the issues * OCRWM has representation on IPT to ensure communications and transfer lessons learned to future RW activities * Plan to use GE-2000 and/or NAC-LWT casks (cask availability is not a constraint on the project at this time) * Shipments planned to start October 2009 * Stakeholder comments * Routing concerns include: * Use of southern route does not meet criteria for time in transit

245

SAFARI 2000 Special Issue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING 26 (19) INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING 26 (19) OCTOBER 10, 2005 Privette JL, Roy DP. Southern Africa as a remote sensing test bed: the SAFARI 2000 Special Issue overview. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING 26 (19): 4141-4158. Eckardt FD, Kuring N. SeaWiFS identifies dust sources in the Namib Desert. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING 26 (19): 4159-4167. Hao WM, Ward DE, Susott RA, et al. Comparison of aerosol optical thickness measurements by MODIS, AERONET sun photometers, and Forest Service handheld sun photometers in southern Africa during the SAFARI 2000 campaign. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING 26 (19): 4169-4183. Sa ACL, Pereira JMC, Silva JMN. Estimation of combustion completeness based on fire-induced spectral reflectance changes in a dambo grassland (Western Province, Zambia).

246

NIST Testimony on Computer Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Testimony on Computer Issues. 2010. Cita Furlani House Oversight Testimony Cloud Computing, July 1, 2010 Cloud ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

247

NIST Testimony on Earthquake Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Testimony on Earthquake Issues. 2009. The Reauthorization of the National Earthquake Hazards Program: R&D for ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

Accelerators for Intensity Frontier Research  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel identified three frontiers for research in high energy physics, the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. In this paper, I will describe how Fermilab is configuring and upgrading the accelerator complex, prior to the development of Project X, in support of the Intensity Frontier.

Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

249

Direct measurements improve estimates of dairy greenhouse-gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small quantity of Greenhouse gases measured enteric nitrousSC, Pain BF. 1994. Greenhouse gas emissions from intensiveE, Brose G. 2001. Greenhouse gas emissions from animal house

Mitloehner, Frank M; Sun, Huawei; Karlik, John F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

North American Natural Gas Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

International Energy Outlook - Environmental Issues and World Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environmental Issues and World Energy Use Environmental Issues and World Energy Use International Energy Outlook 2004 Environmental Issues and World Energy Use In the coming decades, responses to environmental issues could affect patterns of energy use around the world. Actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Two major environmental issues, global climate change and local or regional air pollution, could affect energy use throughout the world in the coming decades. Current and future policies and regulations designed to limit energy-related emissions of airborne pollutants, are likely to affect the composition and growth of global energy use. Future policy actions to limit anthropogenic (human-caused) carbon dioxide emissions as a means of reducing the potential impacts of climate change could also have significant energy implications.

253

Laser Propulsion Standardization Issues  

SciTech Connect

It is a relevant issue in the research on laser propulsion that experimental results are treated seriously and that meaningful scientific comparison is possible between groups using different equipment and measurement techniques. However, critical aspects of experimental measurements are sparsely addressed in the literature. In addition, few studies so far have the benefit of independent confirmation by other laser propulsion groups. In this paper, we recommend several approaches towards standardization of published laser propulsion experiments. Such standards are particularly important for the measurement of laser ablation pulse energy, laser spot area, imparted impulse or thrust, and mass removal during ablation. Related examples are presented from experiences of an actual scientific cooperation between NU and DLR. On the basis of a given standardization, researchers may better understand and contribute their findings more clearly in the future, and compare those findings confidently with those already published in the laser propulsion literature. Relevant ISO standards are analyzed, and revised formats are recommended for application to laser propulsion studies.

Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert [Institute of Technical Physics, German Aerospace Center (DLR), D-70569 Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40 (Germany); Roeser, Hans-Peter [Institute of Space Systems, University of Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31 (Germany); Sinko, John E. [Micro-Nano Global Center of Excellence, Nagoya University (Niue), Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603 (Japan); Sasoh, Akihiro [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603 (Japan)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

254

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Intense low energy positron beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

San Diego's carbon footprint : measuring and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Climate Change is one of the most pressing issues of our time. The best way to measure and mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions causing climate… (more)

Bushman, Tara Rose

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Gas Turbines of the Future: Hydrogen and Oxy-Combustion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Materials issues related to higher efficiency power plants, like hydrogen or oxy-fuel fired gas turbines, require materials with higher temperature  ...

258

Management of produced water in oil and gas operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Produced water handling has been an issue of concern for oil and gas producers as it is one of the major factors that cause abandonment… (more)

Patel, Chirag V.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview: Monday, June 04, 2001 Stock builds slowed from their recent pace, even though spot prices continued their downward trend to end the week at the Henry Hub at $3.71 per MMBtu, which is a Friday-to-Friday decline of $0.14 per MMBtu. The NYMEX contract price for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled Tuesday at $3.738, the lowest close-out of a near month contract since the May 2000 contract. The July contract price was $3.930 per MMBtu on Friday, $0.103 lower than a week earlier. Mild weather in the Northeast and Midwest continued to suppress prices on the Eastern Seaboard, while a short burst of warm temperatures in southern California early in the week had the opposite effect on prices in that region. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Net injections to storage for the week ended Friday, May 25 were 99 Bcf, breaking a 4-week string of 100-plus net injections.

260

Unconventional gas: truly a game changer?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If prices of natural gas justify and/or if concerns about climate change push conventional coal off the table, vast quantities of unconventional gas can be brought to market at reasonable prices. According to a report issued by PFC Energy, global unconventional natural gas resources that may be ultimately exploited with new technologies could be as much as 3,250,000 billion cubic feet. Current conventional natural gas resources are estimated around 620,000 billion cubic feet.

NONE

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

Joel Morrison

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

262

Regulatory and Permitting Issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., reviewed current state and federal regulations related to carbon dioxide capture and storage within geologic formations and enhanced carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. We have evaluated and summarized the current and possible future permitting requirements for the six states that comprise the West Coast Regional Partnership. Four options exist for CO{sub 2} injection into appropriate geologic formations, including storage in: (1) oil and gas reservoirs, (2) saline formations, (3) unmineable coal beds, and (4) salt caverns. Terrestrial CO{sub 2} sequestration involves improved carbon conservation management (e.g. reduction of deforestation), carbon substitution (e.g., substitution for fossil fuel-based products, energy conservation through urban forestry, biomass for energy generation), and improved carbon storage management (e.g., expanding the storage of carbon in forest ecosystems). The primary terrestrial options for the West Coast Region include: (1) reforestation of under-producing lands (including streamside forest restoration), (2) improved forest management, (3) forest protection and conservation, and (4) fuel treatments for the reduction of risk of uncharacteristically severe fires (potentially with associated biomass energy generation). The permits and/or contracts required for any land-use changes/disturbances and biomass energy generation that may occur as part of WESTCARB's activities have been summarized for each state.

Larry Myer

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Investing in Oil and Natural Gas A Few Key Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Top 20 IOCs and Top 20 NOCs Account for Over Half of E&P Spend Source: PFC Energy, Global E&P Surveys Oil Prices Rose, ...

264

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting provides the highest efficacy and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting.

265

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

266

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

High intensity protons in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

Montag, C.; Ahrens& #44; L.; Blaskiewicz& #44; M.; Brennan& #44; J.M.; Drees& #44; K.A.; Fischer& #44; W.; Huang& #44; H.; Minty& #44; M.; Robert-Demolaize& #44; G.; Thieberger& #44; P.; Yip& #44; K.

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Issues Impacting Refractory Service Life in Biomass/Waste Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different carbon sources are used, or are being considered, as feedstock for gasifiers; including natural gas, coal, petroleum coke, and biomass. Biomass has been used with limited success because of issues such as ash impurity interactions with the refractory liner, which will be discussed in this paper.

Bennett, J.P.; Kwong, K.-S.; Powell, C.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and at past market changes in the energy industry. Both electricity and natural gas distribution are regulated1 DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS Northwest Power Planning Council Issue Paper 94-41 August 11, 1994 Introduction Lower natural gas prices, apparently adequate gas supplies

273

Natural gas strategic plan and program crosscut plans  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas strategic plan recognizes the challenges and opportunities facing increased U.S. natural gas use. Focus areas of research include natural gas supply, delivery, and storage, power generation, industrial, residential and commercial, natural gas vehicles, and the environment. Historical aspects, mission, situation analysis, technology trends, strategic issues, performance indicators, technology program overviews, and forecasting in the above areas are described.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The important point is that whether natural gas or electricity is more energy efficient depends on specific1 DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS Northwest Power Planning Council Issue Paper 94-41 August 11, 1994 Introduction Lower natural gas prices, apparently adequate gas supplies

275

Understanding aging issues in Indonesia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study used combined methods of observations, interviews and document analysis to understand issues related to aging in Indonesia. The study describes relevant policy and… (more)

Napsiyah, Siti.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

EDITORIAL HPJ SPECIAL ISSUE DEDICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue is dedicated to the heroes and professionals who helped protect the world from nuclear disasters and to those who were displaced by these catastrophes.

Farfan, E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

PNNL: Breakthroughs Magazine - Past issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

enjoy Breakthroughs archived issues featuring science and technology conducted at PNNL. Breakthroughs Spring 2007 cover Spring 2007 Scientific Discovery Flash Version | HTML...

278

APS Diversity Issues Committee Members  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUF Diversity Issues Committee Members 2006 - 2008 Daniela Capatina (AES) Frederick Carter (AES) Diego Casa (XSD) Kathy Harkay, Chair (ASD) Quentin Hasse (IPNS) Jyotsana Lal (IPNS)...

279

Lithium-Ion Battery Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-Ion Battery Issues IEA Workshop on Battery Recycling Hoboken, Belgium September 26-27, 2011 Linda Gaines Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory...

280

FEMP Focus: Summer 2004 Issue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Postal Service (USPS) issued a delivery order under their Northern California Shared Energy Savings (SES) contract to Chevron Energy Solutions for comprehensive energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Smart-Grid Security Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TITLE: Smart-Grid Security Issues (Editorial Material, English) IEEE SECURITY & PRIVACY 8 (1). JAN-FEB 2010. p.81-85 IEEE COMPUTER SOC, LOS ALAMITOS

Khurana, Himanshu; Hadley, Mark D.; Lu, Ning; Frincke, Deborah A.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Harmonic generation at high intensities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic electrons subject to intense laser fields can absorb many photons, leading either to multiphoton ionization or the emission of a single, energetic photon which can be a high multiple of the laser frequency. The latter process, high-order harmonic generation, has been observed experimentally using a range of laser wavelengths and intensities over the past several years. Harmonic generation spectra have a generic form: a steep decline for the low order harmonics, followed by a plateau extending to high harmonic order, and finally an abrupt cutoff beyond which no harmonics are discernible. During the plateau the harmonic production is a very weak function of the process order. Harmonic generation is a promising source of coherent, tunable radiation in the XUV to soft X-ray range which could have a variety of scientific and possibly technological applications. Its conversion from an interesting multiphoton phenomenon to a useful laboratory radiation source requires a complete understanding of both its microscopic and macroscopic aspects. We present some recent results on the response of single atoms at intensities relevant to the short pulse experiments. The calculations employ time-dependent methods, which we briefly review in the next section. Following that we discuss the behavior of the harmonics as a function of laser intensity. Two features are notable: the slow scaling of the harmonic intensities with laser intensity, and the rapid variation in the phase of the individual harmonics with respect to harmonic order. We then give a simple empirical formula that predicts the extent of the plateau for a given ionization potential, wavelength and intensity.

Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.; Kulander, K.C.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell for a third consecutive week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 10-17), as temperatures for most of the nation continued to be moderate to seasonal. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, for the smallest week-on-week decrease in the nation. Spot gas traded there yesterday (Wednesday, November 17) at $6.06 per MMBtu. Price declines at the majority of market locations ranged from around a dime to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the price for the near-month natural gas futures contract (for December delivery) fell by almost 40 cents on the week, settling yesterday at $7.283 per MMBtu. EIA reported that working gas inventories in underground storage were 3,321 Bcf as of Friday, November 12, which is 9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined for a fourth consecutive week, dropping $1.85 per barrel ($0.32 per MMBtu), or nearly 4 percent, from last Wednesday's level, to trade yesterday at $46.85 per barrel ($8.08 per MMBtu).

285

ISRAELS OIL & GAS INDUSTRY NEWSLETTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISRAEL'S OIL & GAS INDUSTRY NEWSLETTER 2013 June Issue N o 6 A service provided by: U.S. Commercial Service - Israel Department of Commerce 06132013 We are pleased to send you...

286

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects - Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5152012 DE-NT0005671 Goal The goal of...

287

Analysis and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Title Analysis and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors de la du Can, Stephane Rue, Ali Hasanbeigi, and Jayant A. Sathaye Journal Energy Policy Volume 46 Pagination 234-245 Keywords california, co2 emissions, energy intensity, energy use Abstract In 2008, the gross domestic product (GDP) of California industry was larger than GDP of industry in any other U.S. states. This study analyses the energy use of and output from seventeen industry subsectors in California and performs decomposition analysis to assess the influence of different factors on California industry energy use. The logarithmic mean Divisia index method is used for the decomposition analysis. The decomposition analysis results show that the observed reduction of energy use in California industry since 2000 is the result of two main factors: the intensity effect and the structural effect. The intensity effect has started pushing final energy use downward in 2000 and has since amplified. The second large effect is the structural effect. The significant decrease of the energy-intensive "Oil and Gas Extraction" subsector's share of total industry value added, from 15% in 1997 to 5% in 2008, and the increase of the non-energy intensive "Electric and electronic equipment manufacturing" sector's share of value added, from 7% in 1997 to 30% in 2008, both contributed to a decrease in the energy intensity in the industry sector

288

Ethical Issues in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETillCAL ISSUES IN ETillCAL ISSUES IN OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM DOE Headquarters January 17, 2002 OH Ethical Issues * Autonomy * Confidentiality * Right to Know * Putcmalism * Informed Consent OH Ethical Issues * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others - Engineering controls - Exposure monitoring/ walk throughs - Health screening/ Health surveillance - Health promotion - Occupational Health Research Ethical Principles * Autonomy: The right to self-determination * Nonmaleficence: The duty to do no harm * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others * .Justice: Fairness or giving person what is due them OH Ethical Issues * Nonmale.ficence - High risk jobs - Second Party induced Hazards - Incompetent , wtethical, illegal practices

289

Internet Dial-In Infodisk E-Mail Diskette Natural Gas Annual,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Internet Internet Dial-In Infodisk E-Mail Diskette Natural Gas Annual, 1996 Provides information on supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Information is provided nationally, regionally, and by State for 1996. Historical Natural Gas Annual, 1930 through 1996 Contains historical information about supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level, as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from wellhead to burnertip. Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends Examines how industry restructuring continues to expand choices, and challenges, for industry, participants, and natural gas customers. Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends Addresses current issues affecting the natural gas industry and markets, and analyzes trends in the most recent natural gas data. Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends Provides an overview of the natural

290

HydrateNewsIssue2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the physical response of the gas hydrate to depressurization and thermal production stimulation. Cores are being taken from the well, and scientists hope to retrieve at least...

291

Issue Sheet_ED.qxd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Turbines Incorporated, a division of Caterpillar with customers in countries around the world, is a major supplier of mid-range, industrial gas turbine ...

2012-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Issues in Focus  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Issues in Focus Issues in Focus Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Issues in Focus Introduction Each year, this section of the AEO provides in-depth discussions on topics of special interest that may affect annual projections, including significant changes in assumptions and recent developments in technologies for energy production, supply, and consumption. In view of recent increases in construction costs, including the costs of constructing power plants, refineries, and other energy-related facilities, this year's topics include a discussion of cost trends and the implications for energy markets. Other issues discussed this year include the implications of increased reliance on natural gas in the electricity generation sector, warming weather trends and their effects on energy demand, LNG imports, and world oil prices and production trends.

293

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

295

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

Hurricane Maximum Intensity: Past and Present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane intensity forecasting has lagged far behind the forecasting of hurricane track. In an effort to improve the understanding of the hurricane intensity dilemma, several attempts have been made to compute an upper bound on the intensity of ...

J. Parks Camp; Michael T. Montgomery

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Materials Issues in Innovative Turbine Blade Designs - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Issues in Innovative Turbine Materials Issues in Innovative Turbine Blade Designs-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Background Gas turbine efficiency and service life are strongly affected by the turbine expansion process, where the working fluid's high thermal energy gas is converted into mechanical energy to drive the compressor and the electric generator. The most effective way to increase the efficiency of the expansion process is to raise the temperature of the turbine's working fluid.

298

Energy Management Issued: June 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, utilities refer to electric, natural gas, steam, and water. 2.8 Air Changes Per Hour: Measure for how many budget. Facilities Management pays the utility providers for the campus usage in four main areas: steam, electricity, natural gas, and water. Facilities Management is the main point of contact for each

299

FEMP Focus: Winter 2007 Issue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Executive Order requires agencies to reduce greenhouse gases through a reduction in energy intensity of 3 percent a year, or 30 percent by the end of fiscal year 2015...

300

Changes in Energy Intensity 1985-1991  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Changes in Energy Intensity Changes in Energy Intensity 1985-1991 Overview Full Report The focus is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

302

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

303

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

304

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

305

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

306

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

307

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

308

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

309

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

310

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

311

Petroleum 1996: Issues and Trends  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Examines historical trends and focuses on major petroleum issues and the events they represent. It analyzes different dimensions of the petroleum industry and related markets in terms of how they relate to the volatility in petroleum markets.

Information Center

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Issued by Sandia National Laboratories,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assume any legal liability

313

Proceedings: EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum  

SciTech Connect

The EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum covered a range of topics related to remediation and management of former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites, with emphasis on technological advances and current issues associated with site cleanup. In specific, the forum covered MGP coal-tar delineation, soil and groundwater remediation technologies, improvements in air monitoring, and ecological risk characterization/risk management tools.

None

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Allemann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to percolati on in single-shell tank (SST) waste forms. The much higher void being currently observed in SY-101 represents essentially a new crust configuration, and the mechanisms for sudden gas release need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the situation of gas bubbles in crust based on the previous work on gas bubble retention, migration, and release in simulants and actual waste. We have also conducted some visual observations of bubble migration through simulated crusts to help understand the interaction of the various mechanisms.

SD Rassat; PA Gauglitz; SM Caley; LA Mahoney; DP Mendoza

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

315

Liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation examines liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps and discusses them in relation to two recent cases that arose in Ventura County, California. Following a brief history of regulatory interest in oil drilling mud and its common hazardous substances, various cause of action arising from oil drilling mud deposits are enumerated, followed by defenses to these causes of action. Section 8002 (m) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is mentioned, as are constituents of oil and gas waste not inherent in petroleum and therefore not exempt from regulation under the petroleum exclusion in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act. Key legal words such as hazardous substance, release, public and private nuisance, trespass, responsible parties, joint and several liability, negligence, and strict liability are explained. The effects on liability of knowledge of the deposits, duty to restore land to its original condition, consent to the deposit of oil drilling mud, and noncompliance and compliance with permit conditions are analyzed. The state-of-the-art defense and research to establish this defense are mentioned. The newly created cause of action for fear of increased risk of cancer is discussed. Issues on transfer of property where oil drilling mud has been deposited are explored, such as knowledge of prior owners being imputed to later owners, claims of fraudulent concealment, and as is' clauses. The effects on the oil and gas industry of the California Court of Appeals for the Second District rulings in Dolan v. Humacid-MacLeod and Stevens v. McQueen are speculated.

Dillon, J.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The release day for the Natural Gas Weekly Market Update will shift from Monday to Thursday effective for the week of April 8-12. This is the last issue to be published on Monday. There will be no issue released on Monday, April 8. The next issue will be released on Thursday, April 11. The release day for the Natural Gas Weekly Market Update will shift from Monday to Thursday effective for the week of April 8-12. This is the last issue to be published on Monday. There will be no issue released on Monday, April 8. The next issue will be released on Thursday, April 11. Overview: Monday, April 1, 2002 Spot prices fell sharply after Tuesday, March 26, during last week's holiday-shortened trading, as unseasonably cold temperatures began to moderate around midweek in many high gas consumption areas. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) With the exception of the expiring near-month contract, futures contract prices also trended down, but the decreases were relatively modest. By Thursday's end of trading (both spot and futures markets were closed for Good Friday, March 29), the Henry Hub average spot price had declined by $0.35 per MMBtu since the previous Friday (March 22) to $3.19. The NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub expired on Tuesday on an upswing, gaining almost 15 cents in 2 days to close out trading at $3.472 per MMBtu. The new near-month contract (May delivery) ended trading on Thursday at $3.283 per MMBtu, down just over 9 cents in 2 days as the near-month contract. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil continued its steady rise, with modest gains early in the week punctuated by a 42-cent per barrel increase on Thursday. The WTI spot price at week's end was $26.21 per barrel ($4.52 per MMBtu), up $0.62 per barrel over the previous Friday. This is the highest price for WTI since the third week of September 2001.

317

Environmental issues related to biomass: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Now that public attention has grown increasingly focused on environmentalism and climate change, the commercial use of biomass could greatly accelerate. Renewable feedstocks like biomass can provide better environmentally balanced sources of energy and other nonfood products than fossil fuels. The future of biomass is uncertain, however, because public attention focuses on both its potential and its challenges. This paper is divided into five sections. Section 2 briefly addresses economic environmental issues. The extent to which externalities are accounted for in the market price of fuels plays a significant role in determining both the ultimate size of biofuel markets and the extent of the environmental benefits of feedstock cultivation and conversion processes. Sections 3 and 4 catalog the main hazards and benefits that are likely to arise in the large-scale commercialization of biomass fuel and note where the major uncertainties lay. Environmental issues arise with the cultivation of each feedstock and with each step in the process of its conversion to fuel. Feedstocks are discussed in Section 3 in terms of three main groups: wastes, energy crops, and traditional agricultural crops. In Section 4, conversion processes are also divided into three groups, on the basis of the end energy carrier: gas, liquid, and solid and electricity. Section 5 provides a conclusion and summary.

Hughes, M. [Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy; Ranney, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5b

319

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy

320

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7a

322

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table7c

323

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7b

324

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regulatory Authorities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Regulatory Authorities Regulatory Authorities About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Regulatory Authorities Beginning | Regulations Today | Coordinating Agencies | Regulation of Mergers and Acquisitions Beginning of Industry Restructuring In April 1992, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued its Order 636 and transformed the interstate natural gas transportation segment of the industry forever. Under it, interstate natural gas pipeline companies were required to restructure their operations by November 1993 and split-off any non-regulated merchant (sales) functions from their regulated transportation functions. This new requirement meant that interstate natural gas pipeline companies were allowed to only transport natural gas for their customers. The restructuring process and subsequent operations have been supervised closely by FERC and have led to extensive changes throughout the interstate natural gas transportation segment which have impacted other segments of the industry as well.

325

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

326

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

Polarization Issues in Run 2008  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC proton beam polarization has a strong dependence on intensity in Run 2008, whereas the dependence is almost absent in Run 2006. Meanwhile, the RHIC beam transverse emittance also has a dependence on intensity in Run 2008, but little in Run 2006. Using the emittance measurement at the AGS IPM and the BtA multiwires, the source of this difference between 2006 and 2008 runs is traced to the Booster. It is found that at least the degree of the vertical scraping in the Booster is different in 2006 and 2008. The effect of this scraping for the RHIC beam emittance and polarization is studied.

Zhang,S.Y.; Ahrens, L.; Huang, H.; Zeno, K.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Home Energy Saver: Reporting Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reporting Issues Reporting Issues Thank you for reporting your issue. We will log your query and tend to it at the earliest opportunity, but may not be able to respond personally to every question. Please use this form below only to report problems or errors on this website. If you have suggestions for new features, etc., we will be best able to respond to those if you log them here. For general questions about energy efficiency. Please visit this site. If you are commenting on a particular page, please include the URL or file name of that page. If you are reporting an error in the calculator, please include the session number, (assuming you got that far) so that we can reconstruct your data. You might also consider saving the last page you submitted (save as source) for later reference. Your aid in reporting problems is invaluable.

329

Electronics Industry: Markets & Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electronics Industry: Markets & Issues Electronics Industry: Markets & Issues Speaker(s): William M. Smith Date: March 17, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Electronics represents a unique opportunity to get in on the beginning of an incredible growth spurt, for an already huge industry; $400 billion/year in the U.S. now, moving up by 10%-20% per year in several sectors. This is quite unlike many other U.S. industrial sectors, which often involve mature businesses requiring assistance to stay afloat. The potential for forming business partnerships with electronics firms to deal with issues in energy efficiency, water availability/quality, air quality, productivity/yield, HVAC, power quality, wastewater, air emissions, etc., is staggering. The industrys oligopic nature provides serious opportunities

330

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

331

CO2 Capture and Storage Newsletter, Issue 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue of EPRI's CO2 Capture and Storage Newsletter includes highlights of these meetings: The DOE meeting for the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in October 2008 The Ninth Annual MIT Carbon Sequestration Forum, held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in October 2008 Stanford GCEP meeting held in Stanford, California in October 2008 The Ninth Greenhouse Gas Technology (GHGT9) conference held in Washington, DC in November 2008

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update Newsletter: June 2011 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of the GUA Update: Quarterly Summary Ongoing U.S. Energy Program Updates European Union Plans Support of Multiple CCS Projects News Items on Operating IGCC Plants U.S. IGCC Project Updates International IGCC Project Updates International Gasification Projects for Chemicals Biomass and Waste Gasification Projects Coal to SNG Coal to Liquids (CTL) Gas to Liquids (GTL) Underground Co...

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

333

Solving Natural Gas Loadflow Problems Using Electric Loadflow Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Methods to solve natural gas loadflow problems using electric loadflow techniques are presented. The motivation is to integrate a natural gas network with an electric power transmission network so that the network analysis for a combined natural gas and electric power distribution network can be performed in a consistent manner. The issues arising from solving gas loadflow problems are discussed for the sake of electrical engineers. The application method and related issues are demonstrated through a case study on a gas network with compressors. I.

Qing Li

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Issues in Focus - Lower 48  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lower 48 Natural Gas Supply Lower 48 Natural Gas Supply Issues in Focus Lower 48 Natural Gas Supply Production from domestic natural gas resources is projected to increase as demand grows. Much of the increase is expected to be met from unconventional resources, changing the overall mix of domestic natural gas supply. Of the 18.6 trillion cubic feet of lower 48 natural gas production in 2002, 42 percent was from conventional onshore resources, 32 percent was from unconventional resources, and 26 percent was from offshore resources. By 2025, 43 percent of total lower 48 natural gas production (21.3 trillion cubic feet) is projected to be met by unconventional resources (Figure 9). The volume of estimated technically recoverable resources is sufficient to support increased reliance on unconventional natural gas sources. Lower 48 remaining technically recoverable resources are identified in five categories (Figure 10):

335

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Environmental Issues and World Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

environmental.jpg (13264 bytes) environmental.jpg (13264 bytes) In the coming decades, global environmental issues could significantly affect patterns of energy use around the world. This chapter examines the factors that govern national levels of energy-related carbon emissions. In recent years, the principal international energy issues have shifted from supply interruptions and their implications for energy security and price stability to the impact of energy production and consumption on regional and global environments. Frequently, regional and global environmental goals are in conflict. For example, nuclear or hydropower energy projects may be opposed within a given country, while on a global scale they lessen emissions of carbon dioxide—the principal greenhouse gas. Although the focus of this analysis is on global environmental issues

336

Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

For the industrial sector, EIAs analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8 percent of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9 percent of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In AEO2006, energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50 percent of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

337

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

338

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

339

Smart-Grid Security Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although researchers have spent considerable time on smart-grid cybersecurity issues, major problems remain unsolved. This article presents a high-level review of authentication and encryption solutions for smart-grid architectures. Keywords: smart grid, computer security, security and privacy, electrical grid, authentication, encryption, SCADA

Himanshu Khurana; Mark Hadley; Ning Lu; Deborah A. Frincke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Data Administration Area: Date Issued  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Data Administration Policy Area: Date Issued: April, 1994 Title: Data Administration Last. INTRODUCTION The President established the Committee on Data Administration (CODA) in May, 1992, to advise him on policies in the area of data administration (attached as references Policy ADC 011 and TOR for CODA

Brownstone, Rob

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Special Issue: High Elevation Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resources, Colorado State University William Ciesla, Aerial Survey Coordinator, U.S. Forest Service (retired material for homes. They also capture, purify, and release water for our use. Recent aerial surveys confirmSpecial Issue: High Elevation Forests 2008 The Health of Colorado's Forests Report #12;David A

342

Technical Review of Externalities Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Externalities, once a term known only to students of economics, has become the catchword for a major experiment in electric utility regulation. It is very important for utilities and policy makers to understand the technical issues and arguments driving the externality experiment. This experiment has important implications for utility costs, competitive positions, environmental quality, and future regulations.

1995-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Machine Shop Investigates PQ Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI performed a power quality (PQ) audit to harden a machine shop against PQ-related issues. EPRI engineers investigated the various origins of existing PQ disturbances as well as the susceptibility of the plant equipment to these disturbances. This case study reports the findings of this detailed investigation.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Quality Issues in Combustion LES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion LES requires modelling of physics beyond the flow-field only. These additional models lead to further quality issues and an even stronger need to quantify simulation and modelling errors. We illustrate stability problems, the need for consistent ... Keywords: Combustion, Error landscape, LES, Large-Eddy simulation, Quality, Turbulence

A. M. Kempf; B. J. Geurts; T. Ma; M. W. Pettit; O. T. Stein

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

346

Business Case Slide 36: International Collaboration - Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Collaboration - Issues Issues Defining mutually acceptable tasks Have initial lists from recent workshop Getting JCCST approval So far, DU Uses R&D is a positive...

347

Issued Patents Covering the Multilayer Technology  

China Vacuum Flash Evaporated Polymer Composites 96197266.1 7/25/1996 Issued 4/24/2002 ZL 96197266.1 . ISSUED PATENTS COVERING THE MULTILAYER ...

348

Liquefied Natural Gas Safety Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

| May 2012 | May 2012 Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety Research | Page 1 Liquefied Natural Gas Safety Research Report to Congress May 2012 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | May 2012 Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety Research | Page i Message from the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy The Explanatory Statement accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008 1 and the House Report on the House of Representatives version of the related bill 2 requested the Department of Energy to submit a report to Congress addressing several key liquefied natural gas (LNG) research priorities. These issues are identified in the February 2007 Government Accountability Office Report (GAO Report 07-316), Public Safety Consequences of a Terrorist

349

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with freeze-depressed drilling fluids chilled to below 32 odrilling techniques, which allows maximum cooling of the coring fluid

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the sediments, and subsidence. The problem is at itsof pressure depletion on subsidence and stress is shown inand vertical displacement (subsidence) are approximately

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoirs. J. Canadian Petroleum Technology 44: 39-46.Journal of Marine and Petroleum Geology 27 (10). Anderson,Journal of Marine and Petroleum Geology 27 (10) Archer, D. ,

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be required to remove produced water in order maintain lowbe used for fuel, and the produced water could be used forand disposal of produced waters. Full assessment of these

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum System (TPS), including hydrocarbon source rocks (source-rock type and maturation and hydrocarbon generation

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, especially NOX. The project involved operating gas reburning technology combined with low NO, burner technology (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired utility boiler. Low NOX burners are designed to create less NOX than conventional burners. However, the NO, control achieved is in the range of 30-60-40, and typically 50%. At the higher NO, reduction levels, CO emissions tend to be higher than acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce the level of NO. in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. When combined, GR and LNBs work in harmony to both minimize NOX emissions and maintain an acceptable level of CO emissions. The demonstration was performed at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit 3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW. wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal and had a pre GR-LNB baseline NOX emission of 0.73 lb/1 Oe Btu. The target for the project was a reduction of 70 percent in NOX emissions. Project sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). EER conducted a comprehensive test demonstration program over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved. Intensive measurements were taken to quantify the reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability, and all factors influencing costs. The results showed that GR-LNB technology achieved excellent emission reductions. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was somewhat less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 180A. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at higher gas heat inputs. The impact on boiler equipment was determined to be very minimal. Toward the end of the testing, the flue gas recirculation (used to enhance gas penetration into the furnace) system was removed and new high pressure gas injectors were installed. Further, the low NOX burners were modified and gave better NO. reduction performance. These modifications resulted in a similar NO, reduction performance (64%) at a reduced level of gas heat input (-13Yo). In addition, the OFA injectors were re-designed to provide for better control of CO emissions. Although not a part of this project, the use of natural gas as the primary fuel with gas reburning was also tested. The gas/gas reburning tests demonstrated a reduction in NOX emissions of 43% (0.30 lb/1 OG Btu reduced to 0.17 lb/1 OG Btu) using 7% gas heat input. Economics are a key issue affecting technology development. Application of GR-LNB requires modifications to existing power plant equipment and as a result, the capital and operating costs depend largely on site-specific factors such as: gas availability at the site, gas to coal delivered price differential, sulfur dioxide removal requirements, windbox pressure, existing burner throat diameters, and reburn zone residence time available. Based on the results of this CCT project, EER expects that most GR-LNB installations will achieve at least 60% NOX control when firing 10-15% gas. The capital cost estimate for installing a GR-LNB system on a 300 MW, unit is approximately $25/kW. plus the cost of a gas pipeline (if required). Operating costs are almost entirely related to the differential cost of the natural gas compared to coal.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Influence of Steam on the Flammability Limits of Premixed Natural Gas/Oxygen/Steam Mixtures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of CO and H2, is an intermediate in a variety of industrial processes. Its production is energy and capital intensive.… (more)

Degges, Matthew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Safety research plan for gas-supply technologies. Final report, March 1982-February 1983  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to develop a multiyear research plan addressing the safety issues of the following gas supply technologies: conventional natural gas, including deep and sour gas wells; unconventional natural gas (Devonian shale, tight gas sands, coalbed methane, and geopressured methane); SNG from coal (surface and in situ), and SNG from biomass. A total of 51 safety issues were identified in the initial review. These safety issues were screened to eliminate those hazards which appeared to be relatively insignificant in terms of accident severity or frequency, or because the potential for resolving the problem through research was considered very low. Twenty-six remaining safety issues were prioritized, and of these, 9 were selected as priority research projects: two under conventional gas; one under unconventional natural gas; and six under SNG from coal. No safety research issues in the biomass area appear to warrant priority consideration.

Tipton, L.M.; Junkin, P.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Natural Gas Regulation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Natural Gas Regulation Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Natural Gas Regulation. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 14, 2011 CX-006821: Categorical Exclusion Determination ConocoPhillips Company CX(s) Applied: B5.7 Date: 10/14/2011 Location(s): Quintana Island, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, NNSA-Headquarters July 19, 2011 CX-006219: Categorical Exclusion Determination Freeport Liquefied Natural Gas Development, L.P. CX(s) Applied: B5.7 Date: 07/19/2011 Location(s): Freeport, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Regulation January 19, 2011 CX-005025: Categorical Exclusion Determination Eni USA Gas Marketing, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7 Date: 01/19/2011 Location(s): Cameron Parish, Louisiana

358

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet First Use/Ton of steel End Uses of Consumption Blue Bullet Total End Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet Total End Use/Ton of Steel Boiler Fuel as End Use Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Value of Production Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Ton of Steel Process Heating as End Use Blue Bullet Process Heating Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Process Heating /Value of Production Machine Drive as End Use Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel/Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel /Value of Production Expenditures Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Value of Production

359

A novel multi-scale intensity metric for evaluation of tropical cyclone intensity forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a new Multi-Scale Intensity (MSI) metric for evaluating Tropical Cyclone (TC) intensity forecasts is presented. The metric consists of the resolvable and observable, low wavenumber intensity represented by the sum of amplitudes of ...

Tomislava Vukicevic; Eric Uhlhorn; Paul Reasor; Bradley Klotz

360

Higher Hydroclimatic Intensity with Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of their dependence on water, natural and human systems are highly sensitive to changes in the hydrologic cycle. The authors introduce a new measure of hydroclimatic intensity (HY-INT), which integrates metrics of precipitation intensity ...

F. Giorgi; E.-S. Im; E. Coppola; N. S. Diffenbaugh; X. J. Gao; L. Mariotti; Y. Shi

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Environmental Control of Tropical Cyclone Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of various environmental factors on tropical cyclone intensity is explored using a simple coupled ocean–atmosphere model. It is first demonstrated that this model is capable of accurately replicating the intensity evolution of ...

Kerry Emanuel; Christopher DesAutels; Christopher Holloway; Robert Korty

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Renewable Energy Issues Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Hour of the day. Load(kW) Residential Electricity Demand Agriculture Demand Industry demand Total Load Typical Village Load Profile #2 Access to Rural Poor Load Factor 28% Rajamele WB Sustainability #12;GHG Emissions (Fuel Cycle Analysis) Coal Conventional Advanced Coal Oil Gas Nuclear Biomass PV

Banerjee, Rangan

363

STABILIZED HIGH INTENSITY SOURCE OF 80 kv  

SciTech Connect

With the change of the current load from 0 to 2.5 mamp and simultaneous change of incoming intensity from 270 to 190 v, the stabilized high-intensity source changes less than l%.. The stabilized intensity can be arranged in steps of 5 kv from 60 to 80 kv. The high-intensity stabilizer automatically switches on upon reaching 60 kv. (tr-auth)

Polivanov, V.V.; Izyurov, A.V.; Pyatakov, N.I.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Industrial type gas turbines for offshore applications  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses, with reference to the power generating gas turbines on the FRIGG TCP-2 platform, the specific and general requirements for offshore gas turbine, and how those sometimes conflicting requirements are met. Furthermore, interesting details of the particular installation on the FRIGG TCP-2 platform are described. The gas turbines on the FRIGG TCP-2 platform are the first ones to be installed in Norwegian water after the Norwegian regulations for ''Production and auxiliary systems on production installations, etc.'' were officially issued in April 1978. Some of these special regulations and their influence on the gas turbine design are discussed. Paper No. 79-GT-105.

Elmhed, G.; Ferm, S.; Svensson, S.O.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Hydrogen Delivery Options and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options and Issues Options and Issues Mark Paster DOE August, 2006 Scope * From the end point of central or distributed production (300 psi H2) to and including the dispenser at a refueling station or stationary power site - GH2 Pipelines and Trucks, LH2 Trucks, Carriers <$1.00/kg of Hydrogen by 2017 Hydrogen Delivery H2 Delivery Current Status * Technology - GH2 Tube Trailers: ~340 kg, ~2600 psi - LH2 Trucks: ~3900 kg - Pipelines: up to 1500 psi (~630 miles in the U.S.) - Refueling Site Operations (compression, storage dispensing): Demonstration projects * Cost (Does NOT include refueling Site Operations) - Trucks: $4-$12/kg - Pipeline: <$2/kg H2A Analysis * Consistent, comparable, transparent approach to hydrogen production and delivery cost analysis * Excel spreadsheet tools with common economic

367

FTCP Issue Paper Supplemental Competencies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplemental Competencies DOCUMENT NUMBER FTCP-12- 003 PROBLEM: There is no approved process for issuing supplemental competencies. BACKGROUND: Supplemental competencies cover important skills and abilities that are less than an entire function or position, and for which an entire Functional Area Qualification Standard (FAQS) is not appropriate. The Human Factors Engineering (HFE) competencies issued by the FTCP in March 2012 are an example. The FTCP established a working group to develop HFE competencies, and the Panel provided them for use. Another example is the Safety System Oversight (SSO) function, which does not have (or require) a dedicated FAQS, but does need some oversight-related supplemental competencies. It is likely that other disciplines or

368

Breakout Session I OCRWM Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I: OCRWM Issues I: OCRWM Issues Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Working Group Presented by: Frank Moussa Office of Logistics Management February 7, 2008 San Antonio, Texas 2 Topics of Discussion * National Transportation Plan (NTP) * Improving methods of communication and outreach * Section 180(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act 3 Development of the NTP * Developing the NTP is one of four strategic Program objectives * Elements of the plan include - Requirements - Infrastructure development - Stakeholder involvement - Operations planning * Stakeholder input has been incorporated - Impacts of FY 08 funding and future profiles are being incorporated - NTP will be published for public comment when integrated planning baseline decisions are finalized 4 Total HAZMAT Shipments Flammable/Combustible Liquid (Class 3) -

369

Uranium resources: Issues and facts  

SciTech Connect

Although there are several secondary issues, the most important uranium resource issue is, ``will there be enough uranium available at a cost which will allow nuclear power to be competitive in the future?`` This paper will attempt to answer this question by discussing uranium supply, demand, and economics from the perspective of the United States. The paper will discuss: how much uranium is available; the sensitivity of nuclear power costs to uranium price; the potential future demand for uranium in the Unites States, some of the options available to reduce this demand, the potential role of the Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (ALMR) in reducing uranium demand; and potential alternative uranium sources and technologies.

Delene, J.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Accounting-related transmission issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various initiatives have been undertaken by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to deregulate wholesale electric energy markets. These initiatives have focused on restructuring the transmission systems in the US and recently have culminated in a proposal requiring formation of and participation in regional transmission organizations. The overall form of regulation selected to determine rates for transmission entities as well as underlying regulatory decisions reached on key issues will have profound implications for transmission entities. For example, traditional cost-based regulation would require one set of accounting and reporting rules, while incentive-based regulation may not be subject to those same rules. An overview of some of the major accounting and financial reporting issues that will need to be considered is presented.

Niehaus, M.; Bjorn, P.; Pate, G.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

372

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

373

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

374

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

375

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

376

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

377

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

378

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

380

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

382

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

383

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

384

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

385

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

386

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

387

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

388

Analytical theory of intensity fluctuations in SASE  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in SASE experiments stimulate interest in quantitative comparison of measurements with theory. Extending the previous analysis of the SASE intensity in guided modes, the authors provide an analytical description of the intensity fluctuations by calculating intensity correlation functions in the frequency domain. Comparison of the results with experiment yields new insight into the SASE process.

Yu, L.H.; Krinsky, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) - Energy Information Administration - November  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SEE CURRENT NATURAL GAS MONTHLY UPDATE SEE CURRENT NATURAL GAS MONTHLY UPDATE Natural Gas Monthly Data for September 2013 | Release Date: December 12, 2013 | Next Release: January 7, 2014 | full report  | Previous Issues Month: October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 prior issues Go Table of Contentsall tables Tables 1 Summary of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2008-2013 XLS PDF CSV 2 Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 2008-2013 XLS PDF CSV 3 Selected National Average Natural Gas Prices, 2008-2013 XLS PDF CSV 4 U.S. Natural Gas Imports, 2011-2013 XLS PDF CSV 5 U.S. Natural Gas Exports, 2011-2013 XLS PDF CSV

390

Selection Intensity in Genetic Algorithms with Generation Gaps  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents calculations of the selection intensity of common selection and replacement methods used in genetic algorithms (GAs) with generation gaps. The selection intensity measures the increase of the average fitness of the population after selection, and it can be used to predict the average fitness of the population at each iteration as well as the number of steps until the population converges to a unique solution. In addition, the theory explains the fast convergence of some algorithms with small generation gaps. The accuracy of the calculations was verified experimentally with a simple test function. The results of this study facilitate comparisons between different algorithms, and provide a tool to adjust the selection pressure, which is indispensable to obtain robust algorithms.

Cantu-Paz, E.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

391

Issues and Future Research Directions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RFID technology is currently considered as a key enabler of supply chain transformation. However, very little has been written about the deployment and use of RFID in the dairy industry. Drawing on an extensive literature review and a case example, this exploratory study seeks to present current applications and issues related to RFID’s adoption in the dairy industry and discuss future research directions.

S. F. Wamba; Alison Wicks; Samuel Fosso Wamba, Ph.D.; Alison Wicks Ph. D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

GUA Update, December 2008 Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GUA Update is published quarterly. The following articles are featured in this issue of Gasification Users Association (GUA) Update: President Obama's Energy and Climate Agenda Outgoing Administration Energy Program Updates China's Coal Gasification Industry Continues to Expand U.S. IGCC Project Updates International IGCC and Gasification Projects IGCC and Gasification Technology News Items U.S. Coal to SNG Project Announcements 2008 Coal to Liquids (CTL) New content is in bold. Previous content fr...

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

Federal Energy Regulation Commission Issues Smart Grid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Energy Regulation Commission Issues Smart Grid Policy Statement. For Immediate Release: July 17, 2009. ...

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

394

NIST Testimony on Homeland Security Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Testimony on Homeland Security Issues. 2012. 050912 Saunders House Testimony 050912 Saunders House Testimony ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane andPropane  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogen economy is not possible if the safety standards currently applied to liquid hydrogen and hydrogen gas by many laboratories are applied to devices that use either liquid or gaseous hydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary people without the special training. This report asks, 'How is hydrogen different from flammable gasses that are commonly being used all over the world?' This report compares the properties of hydrogen, methane and propane and how these properties may relate to safety when they are used in both the liquid and gaseous state. Through such an analysis, sensible safety standards for the large-scale (or even small-scale) use of liquid and gaseous hydrogen systems can be developed. This paper is meant to promote discussion of issues related to hydrogen safety so that engineers designing equipment can factor sensible safety standards into their designs.

Green, Michael A.

2005-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane andPropane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen economy is not possible if the safety standards currently applied to liquid hydrogen and hydrogen gas by many laboratories are applied to devices that use either liquid or gaseous hydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary people without the special training. This report asks, 'How is hydrogen different from flammable gasses that are commonly being used all over the world?' This report compares the properties of hydrogen, methane and propane and how these properties may relate to safety when they are used in both the liquid and gaseous state. Through such an analysis, sensible safety standards for the large-scale (or even small-scale) use of liquid and gaseous hydrogen systems can be developed. This paper is meant to promote discussion of issues related to hydrogen safety so that engineers designing equipment can factor sensible safety standards into their designs.

Green, Michael A.

2005-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

397

Local heat transfer and film effectiveness of a film cooled gas turbine blade tip.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas turbine engines due to high operating temperatures undergo severe thermal stress and fatigue during operation. Cooling of these components is a very important issue… (more)

Adewusi, Adedapo Oluyomi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Analysis of a duo-selecting membrane reactor for the water-gas shift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The water-gas shift reaction is an exothermic and reversible catalytic process that converts carbon monoxide and water (steam) to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. In regard to energy-related issues, the water-gas shift is part ...

Hardy, AliciA Jillian Jackson, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Issue 5: High Interest in Hybrid Cars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Oregon Hybrid Gas-Electric Car Owners. July. U.S.of a qualifying gas-electric car, but because this is aor leasing a hybrid car (gas-electric)” (Baldassare, 2004).

Ong, Paul M.; Haselhoff, Kim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Images of Complex Interactions of an Intense Ion Beam with Plasma Electrons  

SciTech Connect

Ion beam propagation in a background plasma is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because plasma electrons move in strong electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Computer simulation images of plasma interaction with an intense ion beam pulse are presented.

Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Issues in Emerging Home Delivery Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

convenience stores and gas stations available for 24 hours,hour convenient stores or gas stations as local pick-up and

Park, Minyoung; Regan, Amelia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Biofuels Issues and Trends - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

403

JOM Devotes Full Issue to Energy Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 3, 2009 ... Particular emphasis is placed on separation of a gas mixture by distillation, absorption, adsorption, gas/solid reaction, membrane, ...

404

HydrateNewsIssue2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 T H E N A T I O N A L E N E R G Y T E C H N O L O G Y L A B O R A T O R Y M E T H A N E H Y D R A T E N E W S L E T T E R Announcements ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project Naturally Occurring Gas Hydrate Data Collection Workshop March 14-15, 2002, Adam's Mark Hotel, Houston, Texas The ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project (JIP), in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), will be holding a workshop to collect data on naturally occurring hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). All key contributors to the understanding of naturally occurring hydrates are invited to apply to participate in the first of three workshops sponsored by the JIP. The purpose of the workshop is to develop a clear understanding of what

405

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Issues in Focus  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage issues.gif (3353 bytes) Electricity: Renewable Portfolio Standards Electricity: Competitive Pricing Natural Gas: Industry Expansion Petroleum: Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Energy Use: Efficiency Standards Carbon Emissions in AEO2000 Macroeconomic Growth The Kyoto Protocol Electricity: Renewable Portfolio Standards In an increasingly competitive U.S. electricity market, regulators and legislators at both the State and Federal levels are looking for ways to stimulate the development of generating capacity that uses renewable energy sources. One approach that has received considerable attention is the imposition of a renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which would promote the use of renewables by establishing a minimum annual share of electricity generation (or sales) that must come from specified types of renewable facilities. Owners or operators of qualifying renewable facilities would receive credits for each kilowatthour they generated, and the credits could be used in the current year, held for future use (banked) or sold to others to ensure that their mix of power (portfolio) contained a specified share of renewable generation.

406

Steam Pressure Reduction, Opportunities, and Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam pressure reduction has the potential to reduce fuel consumption for a minimum capital investment. When the pressure at the boiler is reduced, fuel and steam are saved as a result of changes in the high-pressure side of the steam system from the boiler through the condensate return system. In the boiler plant, losses from combustion, boiler blowdown, radiation, and steam venting from condensate receivers would be reduced by reducing steam pressure. Similarly, in the steam distribution system, losses from radiation, flash steam vented from condensate receivers, and component and steam trap leakage would also be reduced. There are potential problems associated with steam pressure reduction, however. These may include increased boiler carryover, boiler water circulation problems in watertube boilers, increased steam velocity in piping, loss of power in steam turbines, and issues with pressure reducing valves. This paper is based a Steam Technical Brief sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc. (5). An example illustrates the use of DOE BestPractices Steam System Assessment Tool to model changes in steam, fuel, electricity generation, and makeup water and to estimate resulting economic benefits.

Berry, Jan [ORNL; Griffin, Mr. Bob [Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc.; Wright, Anthony L [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early with biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the boiler, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value, which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior.

Jay R. Gunderson; Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as methane clathrates or clathrate hydrates of natural gas, these substances are similar to ice accumulations of natural gas on Earth are in the form of gas hydrates (Collett, 1994) that occur mainly offshore water, concern over the potential hazard posed by gas hydrates has become an important issue. Chev- ron

Knapp, James Howard

409

a review of 2 Shale gas extraction in the UK: a review of hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas extraction in the UK: a review of hydraulic fracturing June 2012 #12;2 Shale gas extraction in the UK: a review of hydraulic fracturing This document can be viewed online at: royalsociety.org/policy/projects/shale-gas-extraction and raeng.org.uk/shale Shale gas extraction in the UK: a review of hydraulic fracturing Issued: June 2012

Rambaut, Andrew

410

Long-term safety issues associated with mixer pump operation  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we examine several long-term issues: the effect of pump operation on future gas release events (GREs), uncontrolled chemical reactions, chronic toxic gas releases, foaming, and erosion and corrosion. Heat load in excess of the design limit, uncontrolled chemical reactions, chronic toxic gas releases, foaming, and erosion and corrosion have been shown not to be safety concerns. The effect of pump operation on future GREs could not be quantified. The problem with evaluating the long-term effects of pump operation on GREs is a lack of knowledge and uncertainty. In particular, the phenomena governing gas retention, particle size distribution, and settling are not well understood, nor are the interactions among these factors understood. There is a possibility that changes in these factors could increase the size of future GREs. Bounding estimates of the potential increase in size of GREs are not possible because of a lack of engineering data. Proper management of the hazards can reduce, but not eliminate, the possibility of undesirable changes. Maintaining temperature within the historical limits can reduce the possibility of undesirable changes. A monitoring program to detect changes in the gas composition and crust thickness will help detect slowly occurring changes. Because pump operation has be shown to eliminate GREs, continued pump operation can eliminate the hazards associated with future GREs.

Kubic, W.L. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Cyber Security Issues and Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program (SGIG) Cyber Security Issues and Requirements Jeff Dagle November 19, 2009 Communication and Information Technology will be Central to Smart Grid Deployment Final Interim Smart Grid Roadmap, prepared by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cyber Security Requirements Associated with ARRA Projects Proposals were required to include:  Discussion of how cyber security risks will be mitigated  What criteria will be used for vendor and technology selection  Relevant cyber security standards that will be followed (or industry best practices)  How emerging smart grid cyber security standards that are currently being developed will be adopted Cyber Security Objectives for Smart

412

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

413

Second Major U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Major U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued Second Major U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued Second Major U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued July 10, 2007 - 2:54pm Addthis Report Evaluates the Emissions, Energy, and Economic Implications of Stabilizing Greenhouse Gas Concentrations WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of the second in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment (S&A) reports. Coordinated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this S&A 2.1 report is titled "Scenarios of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Atmospheric Concentrations, and Review of Integrated Scenario Development and Application," and provides a new long-term, global reference for greenhouse gas stabilization scenarios and an evaluation of

414

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in November 2012 on Form EIA-191, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage

417

Oil & Gas Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Research Oil & Gas Research Section 999 Report to Congress DOE issues the 2013 annual plan for the ultra-deepwater and unconventional fuels program. Read more DOE Signs MOU with Alaska New accord to help develop Alaska's potentially vast and important unconventional energy resources. Read more Methane Hydrate R&D DOE is conducting groundbreaking research to unlock the energy potential of gas hydrates. Read more LNG Safety Research Report This Report to Congress summarizes the progress of DOE's LNG safety research Read more FE's Office of Oil & Natural Gas supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas. Resource/Safety R&D Hydraulic Fracturing & Shale Gas Research. Natural gas from shales has the

418

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Issues in Focus  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Issues in Focus Issues in Focus Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Issues in Focus Introduction This section of the AEO provides in-depth discussions on topics of special interest that may affect the projections, including significant changes in assumptions and recent developments in technologies for energy production, energy consumption, and energy supply. In view of recent increases in energy prices, this year’s topics include discussions of the underlying cost factors in key industries and how consumers respond to higher energy prices. The potential impacts of developing oil and natural gas resources in the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), developments related to an Alaska natural gas pipeline, and key issues for the development of new nuclear and biomass-to-liquids technologies are also discussed.

419

The Galactic Halo's O VI Resonance Line Intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used FUSE to observe ultraviolet emission from diffuse O VI in the hot gas in the Galactic halo. By comparing our result with another, nearby observation blocked by an opaque cloud at a distance of 230 pc, we could subtract off the contribution from the Local Bubble, leading to an apparent halo intensity of I_{OVI} = 4680^{+570}_{-660} photons/cm^2/s/sr. A correction for foreground extinction leads to an intrinsic intensity that could be as much as twice this value. Assuming T ~ 3 x 10^5 K, we conclude that the electron density, n_e, is 0.01-0.02 /cm^3, the thermal pressure, p/k, is 7000-10,000 K/cm^3, and that the hot gas is spread over a length of 50-70 pc, implying a small filling factor for O VI-rich gas. ROSAT observations of emission at 1/4 keV in the same direction indicate that the X-rays are weaker by a factor of 1.1 to 4.7, depending on the foreground extinction. Simulated supernova remnants evolving in low density gas have similar O VI to X-ray ratios when the remnant plasma is approaching collisional ioinizational equilibrium and the physical structures are approaching dynamical ``middle age''. Alternatively, the plasma can be described by a temperature power-law. Assuming that the material is approximately isobaric and the length scales according to T^(beta) d(ln T), we find beta = 1.5+/-0.6 and an upper temperature cutoff of 10^{6.6(+0.3,-0.2)} K. The radiative cooling rate for the hot gas, including that which is too hot to hold O VI, is 6 x 10^{38} erg/s/kpc^2. This rate implies that ~70% of the energy produced in the disk and halo by SN and pre-SN winds is radiated by the hot gas in the halo.

Robin L. Shelton; Shauna M. Sallmen; Edward B. Jenkins

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

422

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Notice: Holiday Notice: Due to the federal holiday in observance of Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 21, 2002, the next issue of the Natural Gas Weekly Update will be published on Tuesday, January 22, 2002. Overview: Monday, January 14, 2002 Natural gas prices were generally lower last week as the fundamentals of ample working gas in storage and very little temperature-driven swing demand dominated the market. With little in the way of market-changing developments, trading in both the spot and futures markets tended to occur in relatively small price ranges throughout the week. The warming trend begun late in the previous week continued nearly unabated through last week, with the heavy gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast recording many of the greatest deviations above daily normal temperatures. Philadelphia, New York City, and Buffalo, NY had at least 3 days of temperatures that were 10 or more degrees above normal; Chicago's temperature reached an unusually warm 26 degrees above normal on Wednesday. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Spot prices at the Henry Hub moved down moderately from the previous week, ending trading on Friday at $2.31, down 5 cents from the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub declined by $0.071 from the previous Friday, settling on Friday, January 11 at $2.204 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil also fell, dipping below $20 per barrel for the first time in the New Year, ending trading last Friday at $19.67 per barrel, or $3.39 per MMBtu, down $1.80 per barrel, or $0.31 per MMBtu, from Friday, January 4.

423

Natural Gas Annual 2012 (NGA) - Energy Information Administration - With  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Natural Gas Annual With Data for 2012 | Release Date: December 12, 2013 | Next Release: December 2014 | full report Previous Issues of Natural Gas Annual Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 prior issues Go Data Tablesall tables Overview 1 Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, 2008-2012 PDF CSV 2 Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 2012 PDF CSV

424

Natural Gas Annual 2012 (NGA) - Energy Information Administration - With  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Natural Gas Annual With Data for 2012 | Release Date: December 12, 2013 | Next Release: December 2014 | full report Previous Issues of Natural Gas Annual Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 prior issues Go Data Tablesall tables Overview 1 Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, 2008-2012 PDF CSV 2 Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 2012 PDF CSV

425

Natural gas monthly, January 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication, the Natural Gas Monthly, presents the most recent data on natural gas supply, consumption, and prices from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Of special interest in this issue are two articles summarizing reports recently published by EIA. The articles are {open_quotes}Natural Gas Productive Capacity{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Outlook for Natural Gas Through 2015,{close_quotes} both of which precede the {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} section. With this issue, January 1997, changes have been made to the format of the Highlights section and to several of the tabular and graphical presentations throughout the publication. The changes to the Highlights affect the discussion of developments in the industry and the presentation of weekly storage data. An overview of the developments in the industry is now presented in a brief summary followed by specific discussions of supply, end-use consumption, and prices. Spot and futures prices are discussed as appropriate in the Price section, together with wellhead and consumer prices.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Thailand: Petroleum and natural gas industry profile. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report profiles the petroleum, natural gas, and petrochemical industries in Thailand. It covers: exploration production, consumption, trade, pipelines, industry structure, national energy policy, product marketing, refining, conservation/environmental issues, alternative energy sources, prices, transportation, and commercial opportunities.

1992-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

427

Help with gas contracts offered in manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A loose-leaf manual published by the Federal Programs Advisory Service, provides information on natural gas contracts. The manual consists of four chapters which treat four basic types of gas contracts: sales for resale, direct sales, transportation agreements, and brokerage/reseller agreements. Each chapter includes sample clauses, analyses of selected issues (such as price, quantity, quality, and delivery conditions) and references to court and agency divisions.

John, D.; Hengerer, E. (eds.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

429

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

430

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

431

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

432

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

433

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

434

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

435

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

436

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

437

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

438

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

439

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

440

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

442

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

443

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

444

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

445

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

446

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

447

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

448

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

449

Aggregating physical intensity indicators: results of applying the composite indicator approach to the Canadian industrial sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues surrounding the development, application and interpretation of energy intensity indicators are a continuing source of debate in the field of energy policy analysis. Although economic energy intensity indicators still dominate intensity/efficiency studies, the use of physical energy intensity indicators is on the rise. In the past, physical energy intensity indicators were not employed since it was often impossible to develop aggregate (sector-level or nation-wide) measures of physical energy intensity due to the difficulties associated with adding diverse physical products. This paper presents the results of research conducted specifically to address this ‘‘aggregation’ ’ problem. The research focused on the development of the Composite Indicator Approach, a simple, practical, alternative method for calculating aggregate physical energy intensity indicators. In this paper, the Composite Indicator Approach is used to develop physical energy intensity indicators for the Canadian industrial and manufacturing sectors, and is then compared to other existing methods of aggregation. The physical composite indicators developed using this approach are also evaluated in terms of their reliability and overall usefulness. Both comparisons suggest that the Composite Indicator Approach can be a useful, and ultimately suitable, way of addressing the aggregation problem typically associated with heterogeneous sectors of the economy. r

Mallika N; John Nyboer; Mark Jaccard

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to main content Science at Fermilab Frontiers of Particle Physics Experiments & Projects Energy Frontier Tevatron at Fermilab Fermilab and the LHC Intensity Frontier Cosmic...

451

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Primary Energy 1 by Census Region and Principal Building Activity, 1992-1999 (Million Btu per Worker)

452

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6b . ... Warehouse and Storage 42: 38 45: Other: 3. 154: 170 163: Vacant 28: 21 21: Total ...

453

Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

L. C. Cadwallader; J. S. Herring

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Herring, James Stephen

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Journal's Special Issue...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Journal's Special Issue Highlights New Frontier of X-ray Lasers By Glenn Roberts Jr. September 9, 2013 A special issue of a physics publication highlights the contributions of...

456

Back Issues of the Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal > Quarterly Coal Report > Quarterly Coal Report Back Issues Quarterly Coal Report Back Issues of the Quarterly Coal Report Year 4thquarter 3rdquarter 2ndquarter 1stquarter QCR...

457

Issues in Midterm Analysis and Forecasting  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Presents a series of eight papers, which cover topics in analysis and modeling that underlie the Annual Energy Outlook 1999, as well as other significant issues in midterm energy markets.

Information Center

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Data Intensive Architecture for Scalable Cyber Analytics  

SciTech Connect

Cyber analysts are tasked with the identification and mitigation of network exploits and threats. These compromises are difficult to identify due to the characteristics of cyber communication, the volume of traffic, and the duration of possible attack. It is necessary to have analytical tools to help analysts identify anomalies that span seconds, days, and weeks. Unfortunately, providing analytical tools effective access to the volumes of underlying data requires novel architectures, which is often overlooked in operational deployments. Our work is focused on a summary record of communication, called a flow. Flow records are intended to summarize a communication session between a source and a destination, providing a level of aggregation from the base data. Despite this aggregation, many enterprise network perimeter sensors store millions of network flow records per day. The volume of data makes analytics difficult, requiring the development of new techniques to efficiently identify temporal patterns and potential threats. The massive volume makes analytics difficult, but there are other characteristics in the data which compound the problem. Within the billions of records of communication that transact, there are millions of distinct IP addresses involved. Characterizing patterns of entity behavior is very difficult with the vast number of entities that exist in the data. Research has struggled to validate a model for typical network behavior with hopes it will enable the identification of atypical behavior. Complicating matters more, typically analysts are only able to visualize and interact with fractions of data and have the potential to miss long term trends and behaviors. Our analysis approach focuses on aggregate views and visualization techniques to enable flexible and efficient data exploration as well as the capability to view trends over long periods of time. Realizing that interactively exploring summary data allowed analysts to effectively identify events, we utilized multidimensional OLAP data cubes. The data cube structure supports interactive analysis of summary data across multiple dimensions, such as location, time, and protocol. Cube technology also allows the analyst to drill-down into the underlying data set, when events of interest are identified and detailed analysis is required. Unfortunately, when creating these cubes, we ran into significant performance issues with our initial architecture, caused by a combination of the data volume and attribute characteristics. Overcoming, these issues required us to develop a novel, data intensive computing infrastructure. In particular, we ended up combining a Netezza Twin Fin data warehouse appliance, a solid state Fusion IO ioDrive, and the Tableau Desktop business intelligence analytic software. Using this architecture, we were able to analyze a month's worth of flow records comprising 4.9B records, totaling approximately 600GB of data. This paper describes our architecture, the challenges that we encountered, and the work that remains to deploy a fully generalized cyber analytical infrastructure.

Olsen, Bryan K.; Johnson, John R.; Critchlow, Terence J.

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Petroleum 1996 - issues and trends  

SciTech Connect

Increasingly, users of the Energy Information Administration`s petroleum data and analytical reports have expressed an interest in a recurring report that takes a broad view of the petroleum sector. What is sought is some perspective on the complex interrelationships that comprise an industry and markets accounting for 40 percent of the energy consumed in the United States and ranging from the drilling rig in the oil field to the pump at the local gasoline station. This report comprehensively examines historical trends, and selectively focuses on major issues and the events they represent. It analyzes different dimensions of the industry and related markets in terms of how they relate to a common theme, in this case, the volatility in petroleum markets.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Diversity Issues Committee - Activities 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Subcommittee (K. Harkay, E. Moog) continued to contribute to ad-hoc APS Diversity Training Committee (see Activities 2003) (September 2003 - March 2004) Analyzed 2003 ANL Employee Survey broken out by gender. Identified items showing statistically significant differences between the responses by men vs. women as a function of job category. Reported to APS management at Management luncheon (includes first-line supervisors). Requested to investigate further to understand reasons for differences. (March - May) Met with D. Joyce (OTD), at his request, to discuss analysis of the survey data for APS (K. Harkay, E. Moog). Investigated issues relating to recruitment of a diverse workforce. Requested presentations by M. White (re: hiring experience at ORNL/SNS) and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Solar thermal electric hybridization issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal electric systems have an advantage over many other renewable energy technologies because the former use heat as an intermediate energy carrier. This is an advantage as it allows for a relatively simple method of hybridization by using heat from fossil-fuel. Hybridization of solar thermal electric systems is a topic that has recently generated significant interest and controversy and has led to many diverse opinions. This paper discusses many of the issues associated with hybridization of solar thermal electric systems such as what role hybridization should play; how it should be implemented; what are the efficiency, environmental, and cost implications; what solar fraction is appropriate; how hybrid systems compete with solar-only systems; and how hybridization can impact commercialization efforts for solar thermal electric systems.

Williams, T A; Bohn, M S; Price, H W

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The spatial scales, distribution, and intensity of natural marine hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial scales, distribution, and intensity of natural marine hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil pollution sources. A field of strong hydrocarbon seepage offshore of Coal Oil Point near Santa Barbara in the Coal Oil Point field to measure directly the atmospheric gas flux from three seeps of varying size

California at Santa Barbara, University of

463

Why did China's Energy Intensity Increase during 1998-2006: Decomposition and Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal-dependent consumption structure (Fig. 4) and low per capita energy endowments. China's coal use takes up about 70 percent of the total energy consumption. Per capita oil, natural gas and coal deposits). Moreover, industrial consumption increased more rapidly due to expansion in energy-intensive industries

Edwards, Paul N.

464

E-beam ionized channel guiding of an intense relativistic electron beam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An Intense Relativistic Electron Beam (IREB) is guided through a curved path by ionizing a channel in a gas with electrons from a filament, and confining the electrons to the center of the path with a magnetic field extending along the path. The magnetic field is preferably generated by a solenoid extending along the path.

Frost, C.A.; Godfrey, B.B.; Kiekel, P.D.; Shope, S.L.

1986-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

465

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intensity of coal- 89 based corn ethanol in gCO2e/liter GHGintensity of gas- 61 based corn ethanol in gCO2e/liter PriceIf a megajoule of corn ethanol reduces GHG emissions 18%

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Higher layer issues in cognitive radio network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cognitive radio networks are smart networks that automatically sense the channel and adjust the network parameters accordingly. Cognitive radio is an emerging technology that enables the dynamic deployment of highly adaptive radios that are built upon ... Keywords: cognitive radio network (CRN), issues, routing issues, security issues, software defined radio

Saed Alrabaee; Anjali Agarwal; Nishith Goel; Marzia Zaman; Mahmoud Khasawneh

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane and Propane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues with Methane and Propane Michael A. Green LawrenceSAFETY ISSUES WITH METHANE AND PROPANE M. A. Green Lawrencehydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary

Green, Michael A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Obama quickly signals He means business on Green issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

President Obama has indicated that the U.S. will join the international community to find a resolution to the critical issue of climate change, but has made it clear that all major emitters must join the effort for it to be effective. The US is likely to agree to cut its emissions by 80 percent by 2050. The toughest task will be to convince a reluctant U.S. Congress to agree to comprehensive carbon legislation and to abide by any agreements reached in Copenhagen. Companies investing in such goods and services as coal-fired power plants and gas guzzling cars could start to incur heavy economic penalties in the near future for their greenhouse gas output.

NONE

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early Overview Of The Data, Regional Patterns Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early Overview Of The Data, Regional Patterns Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Roving Automated Rare Gas Analysis (RARGA) lab of Berkeley's Physics Department was deployed in Yellowstone National Park for a 19 week period commencing in June, 1983. During this time 66 gas and water samples representing 19 different regions of hydrothermal activity within and around the Yellowstone caldera were analyzed on site. Routinely, the abundances of five stable noble gases and the isotopic compositions of He,

470

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

471

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

472

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

473

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

474

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

475

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

476

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

477

Gas lift systems make ideal offshore workers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With a low initial installation cost and small footprint, gas lift systems are well suited for offshore installations where compressed gas is usually already available. These systems are used on multiple and slimhole completions and handle sandy conditions well. They are also used to kick off wells that will flow naturally once the heavier completion fluids leave the production string. Gas lift itself is a mature workaday technology. Measurement and control of gas flow is an area of intense development in gas lift technology. One new control method involves production of multiple completions through a single wellbore. Typically, gas lift valves are opened and closed through tubing pressure. But downhole measurement technology does not yet yield information good enough for stable gas lift control of multiple completions. Gas lift is proving to be a useful AL technique in conjunction with electric submersible pumps (ESP). Located above the ESP pump, the gas lift can reduce the head and allow greater flow. This is helpful when small casing restricts the size of the downhole ESP pump. Wells can usually be produced by the gas lift alone in case of ESP failure, or by replacing the ESP where schedules, high repair costs or low prices rule out repair.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Gas Gas Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans Effective July 1, 2013, the Wyoming Partnership Challenge (Challenge) may issue loans to businesses for the cost of the engineering, design, real

480

Transverse instability in high intensity proton rings  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, many applications are being considered for low energy high intensity proton synchrotrons. Most high intensity proton rings are at low energy below transition. Several aspects of the beam dynamics of this kind of rings are different from the electron or high energy rings. The transverse microwave instabilities will be discussed in this article.

Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas intensity issues" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

482

Improved Heat Transfer and Performance of High Intensity Combustion Systems for Reformer Furnace Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developments over the past fifteen years have evolved new short flame, high intensity (1,000,000 BTU/HR/ft3 ) combustion systems for industrial uses. Such systems produce a more uniform and higher heat flux than conventional low intensity systems and should enable substantial capital cost savings in new furnace applications. Recent performance improvements established from tests of high intensity combustion systems are described along with advances made in the analytical prediction of design performance. High intensity combustion systems can operate at zero excess air conditions without generating undesirable constituents in the exhaust. A more uniform gas temperature and gas emissivity renders modeling and design of the furnace radiant heat transfer section more realistic. 'Over-design' to allow for the less determinate conditions typical of low intensity, turbulent diffusion oil flame systems should be avoidable. A model has been set up and results generated which indicate the potentialities of the above premise. The application of vortex stabilized high intensity burners for reformer furnaces in the petrochemical industry is then reviewed and emphasized.

Williams, F. D. M.; Kondratas, H. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

484

Analysis of a laser induced plasma in high pressure SF6 gas for high-voltage, high-current switching.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Laser Triggered Switch Program at Sandia National Laboratories is an intensive development study to understand and optimize the laser triggered gas switch (LTGS) for… (more)

Clark, Waylon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Landfill gas recovery: a technology status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas, which consists mainly of methane and carbon dioxide, can be recovered and used as a fuel. Processing will upgrade it to a high-Btu gas of pipeline quality. There are more than a dozen commercial landfill-gas recovery facilities in the US at present, all at relatively large sites. The amount of gas produced by a given site is a function of size, composition, and age of the landfill. Various techniques can be used to enhance gas production and yield, including controlled addition of moisture and nutrients; bacterial seeding and pH control also appear useful. Several computer models have been developed to examine the effects of various parameters on gas production and yield; these can aid in predicting optimum gas recovery and in maintaining the proper chemical balance within the producing portion of the landfill. Economically, a site's viability depends on its location and potential users, current competing energy costs, and legislation governing the site's operation. Legal problems of site operation can occur because of environmental and safety issues, as well as from questions of gas ownership, liability, and public utility commission considerations. Currently, R and D is under way to improve present recovery techniques and to develop new technologies and concepts. Cost comparisons and potential environmental impacts are being examined. Additional research is needed in the areas of gas enhancement, decompositional analysis, computer modeling, gas characterization, instrumentation, and engineering cost analysis. 77 references, 11 figures, 23 tables.

Zimmermann, R.E.; Lytwynyshyn, G.R.; Wilkey, M.L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

PMCO: Issue Resolution | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PMCO: Issue Resolution PMCO: Issue Resolution PMCO: Issue Resolution The expertise available within the Project Management Coordination Office (PMCO) team is regularly called upon to resolve issues that cut across technology offices and require prompt resolution. PMCO prioritizes these actions to ensure they are successfully brought to closure. Examples include: Management of Congressionally Directed Projects (CDPs) and CDP Portfolio Oversight; improving Financial Assistance Closeout performance; and developing and executing the application receipt, review and selection process for 48C tax credit requests. Responsi