National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gas inlet separators

  1. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, Arye

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  2. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, Arye Z. [Newton, MA

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  3. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  4. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  5. Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmann, H.F.; Paisley, M.A.

    1989-05-09

    A method is described for operating a gasifier which comprises: introducing inlet gas at a velocity of about 0.5 to 7 ft/sec to fluidize a bed in a gasifier vessel; forming the bed into a fluidized bed in a first space region by means of the inlet gas, the fluidized bed containing a circulating hot relatively fine and inert solid bed particle component; inputting and throughputting carbonaceous material into and through the first space region with fluidized bed at a rate from 500-4400 lbs/ft/sup 2/-hr; endothermally pyrolyzing the carbonaceous material by means of the circulating hot inert particle component so as to form a product gas; forming contiguous to and above the fluidized bed a lower average density entrained space region containing an entrained mixture of inert solid particles, char, and carbonaceous material and the product gas; gradually and continuously removing the entrained mixture and the product gas from the lower average density entrained space region of the gasifier to a separator, residence time of the carbonaceous material in the gasifier not exceeding 3 minutes on average; separating the entrained mixture from the product gas; passing the entrained mixture containing inert solid particles, char, and carbonaceous material through an exothermic reaction zone to add heat; and returning at least the inert solid particles to the first space region.

  6. Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feldmann, Herman F.; Paisley, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention discloses a novel method of operating a gasifier for production of fuel gas from carbonaceous fuels. The process disclosed enables operating in an entrained mode using inlet gas velocities of less than 7 feet per second, feedstock throughputs exceeding 4000 lbs/ft.sup.2 -hr, and pressures below 100 psia.

  7. Gas-separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toy, Lora G.; Pinnau, Ingo; Baker, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A process for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material.

  8. Enhanced membrane gas separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, R.

    1993-07-13

    An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

  9. Gas separation membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    A dry, fabric supported, polymeric gas separation membrane, such as cellulose acetate, is prepared by casting a solution of the polymer onto a shrinkable fabric preferably formed of synthetic polymers such as polyester or polyamide filaments before washing, stretching or calendering (so called griege goods). The supported membrane is then subjected to gelling, annealing, and drying by solvent exchange. During the processing steps, both the fabric support and the membrane shrink a preselected, controlled amount which prevents curling, wrinkling or cracking of the membrane in flat form or when spirally wound into a gas separation element.

  10. Gas-separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.; Baker, R.W.

    1994-01-25

    A process is described for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material. 6 figures.

  11. Polymide gas separation membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, Yong; Bikson, Benjamin; Nelson, Joyce Katz

    2004-09-14

    Soluble polyamic acid salt (PAAS) precursors comprised of tertiary and quaternary amines, ammonium cations, sulfonium cations, or phosphonium cations, are prepared and fabricated into membranes that are subsequently imidized and converted into rigid-rod polyimide articles, such as membranes with desirable gas separation properties. A method of enhancing solubility of PAAS polymers in alcohols is also disclosed.

  12. File:EIA-AK-CookInlet-Gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    applicationpdf) Description Alaska's Cook Inlet By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  13. Gas separation membrane module assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wynn, Nicholas P; Fulton, Donald A.

    2009-03-31

    A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

  14. Means for positively seating a piezoceramic element in a piezoelectric valve during inlet gas injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Kenneth E.

    1994-01-01

    A piezoelectric valve in a gas delivery system includes a piezoceramic element bonded to a valve seal and disposed over a valve seat, and retained in position by an O-ring and a retainer; an insulating ball normally biased by a preload spring against the piezoceramic element; an inlet gas port positioned such that upon admission of inlet gas into the valve, the piezoceramic element is positively seated. The inlet gas port is located only on the side of the piezoceramic element opposite the seal.

  15. Means for positively seating a piezoceramic element in a piezoelectric valve during inlet gas injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, K.E.

    1994-08-23

    A piezoelectric valve in a gas delivery system includes a piezoceramic element bonded to a valve seal and disposed over a valve seat, and retained in position by an O-ring and a retainer; an insulating ball normally biased by a preload spring against the piezoceramic element; an inlet gas port positioned such that upon admission of inlet gas into the valve, the piezoceramic element is positively seated. The inlet gas port is located only on the side of the piezoceramic element opposite the seal. 3 figs.

  16. Advantages of air conditioning and supercharging an LM6000 gas turbine inlet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolp, D.A.; Flye, W.M.; Guidotti, H.A.

    1995-07-01

    Of all the external factors affecting a gas turbine, inlet pressure and temperature have the greatest impact on performance. The effect of inlet temperature variations is especially pronounced in the new generation of high-efficiency gas turbines typified by the 40 MW GE LM6000. A reduction of 50 F (28 C) in inlet temperature can result in a 30 percent increase in power and a 4.5 percent improvement in heat rate. An elevation increase to 5,000 ft (1,524 m) above sea level decreases turbine output 17 percent; conversely supercharging can increase output more than 20 percent. This paper addresses various means of heating, cooling and supercharging LM6000 inlet air. An economic model is developed and sample cases are cited to illustrate the optimization of gas turbine inlet systems, taking into account site conditions, incremental equipment cost and subsequent performance enhancement.

  17. Multiple cup downwell gas separator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, J. R.

    1980-12-30

    A gas separator for a well pump for pumping well fluid. The gas separator includes a plurality of upwardly opening retention cups which are disposed in vertical spaced relationship one above the other above a reservoir chamber. Each retention cup has a retention chamber which provides a fluid retaining capacity sufficient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well so as to permit gas to escape from the fluid so retained and returned to the well. The difference in specific gravity between gassy well fluid and well fluid with gas removed creases circulation of well fluid through the retention cups and into the reservoir chamber, with each retention cup catching down falling well fluid that has been partially freed of entrained gas. Second stage separation of gas from well fluid is achieved by providing at least one opening or passageway from the reservoir chamber adapted to provide a gas exit between the well and the reservoir chamber.

  18. Phosphazene membranes for gas separations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frederick F.; Harrup, Mason K.; Orme, Christopher J.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2006-07-11

    A polyphosphazene having a glass transition temperature ("T.sub.g") of approximately -20.degree. C. or less. The polyphosphazene has at least one pendant group attached to a backbone of the polyphosphazene, wherein the pendant group has no halogen atoms. In addition, no aromatic groups are attached to an oxygen atom that is bound to a phosphorus atom of the backbone. The polyphosphazene may have a T.sub.g ranging from approximately -100.degree. C. to approximately -20.degree. C. The polyphosphazene may be selected from the group consisting of poly[bis-3-phenyl-1-propoxy)phosphazene], poly[bis-(2-phenyl-1-ethoxy)phosphazene], poly[bis-(dodecanoxypolyethoxy)-phosphazene], and poly[bis-(2-(2-(2-.omega.-undecylenyloxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)phosphazene]- . The polyphosphazene may be used in a separation membrane to selectively separate individual gases from a gas mixture, such as to separate polar gases from nonpolar gases in the gas mixture.

  19. Gas separations using ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, P.K.T.; Lin, C.L.; Flowers, D.L.; Wu, J.C.S.; Smith, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    Alcoa`s commercial membrane with 40{Angstrom} pore diameter has been identified as one of the potential candidates for high temperature gas separations. This asymmetric multiple layer membrane have been well characterized and evaluated. It has excellent thermal stability and acceptably hydrothermal stability at {approximately}650{degree}C or above. Gas separations with this membrane follow Knudsen diffusion. Its selectivity is suitable for bulk separations, or for reduction/elimination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} via selective removal of hydrogen. An improved separation efficiency with this membrane is highly desirable for applications involving hydrogen separation, and the removal of trace contaminants, such as H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. One of the effective avenues in improving the efficiency of the existing membrane is to narrow its pore size through surface modifications. Thus membranes with a smaller pore size can be readily available through minor modifications of the existing commercial product. In this paper focus is on the morphological characterization and performance evaluation of hydrogen-selective and zeolitic membranes developed from existing commercial membranes.

  20. Gas separations using ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, P.K.T.; Lin, C.L.; Flowers, D.L.; Wu, J.C.S.; Smith, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    Alcoa's commercial membrane with 40[Angstrom] pore diameter has been identified as one of the potential candidates for high temperature gas separations. This asymmetric multiple layer membrane have been well characterized and evaluated. It has excellent thermal stability and acceptably hydrothermal stability at [approximately]650[degree]C or above. Gas separations with this membrane follow Knudsen diffusion. Its selectivity is suitable for bulk separations, or for reduction/elimination of H[sub 2]S and NH[sub 3] via selective removal of hydrogen. An improved separation efficiency with this membrane is highly desirable for applications involving hydrogen separation, and the removal of trace contaminants, such as H[sub 2]S and NH[sub 3]. One of the effective avenues in improving the efficiency of the existing membrane is to narrow its pore size through surface modifications. Thus membranes with a smaller pore size can be readily available through minor modifications of the existing commercial product. In this paper focus is on the morphological characterization and performance evaluation of hydrogen-selective and zeolitic membranes developed from existing commercial membranes.

  1. About | Center for Gas Separations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Novel Adsorbent Synthesis A major thrust within the CGS is to design new adsorbents tuned to efficiently carry out a given gas separation. Research in the Center focuses heavily on metal-organic framework (MOF) adsorbents, which are a relatively new class of porous materials composed of metal ions connected by organic linkers in three dimensions. An essentially infinite library of possible metal and ligand combinations and their porous nature has rendered MOFs promising for specifically

  2. Resources | Center for Gas Separations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Outreach Center for Gas Separations: The Film by World Energy TV Carbon Capture Course Since 2011, Berend Smit and Jeffrey Reimer have taught a course on carbon capture in collaboration with four other researchers and lectures at UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. As part of the Berkeley Energy and Climate Lectures, the joint graduate/undergraduate course encompasses an informative and detailed survey of carbon capture, geological sequestration, and alternative

  3. Highlights | Center for Gas Separations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlights Date Title Graphic August 2016 Selective Gas Capture via Kinetic Trapping July 2016 An In Situ One-Pot Synthetic Approach towards Multivariate Zirconium MOFs June 2016 Reversible CO Scavenging via Adsorbate-Dependent Spin Transitions in an Fe(II)-Triazolate Metal-Organic Framework May 2016 Enhanced Separation and Mitigated Plasticization in Membranes using Metal-Organic Framework Nanoparticles April 2016 Systematic Tuning and Multi-Functionalization of Covalent Organic Polymers for

  4. Segmented inlet nozzle for gas turbine, and methods of installation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klompas, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle guide vane assembly is formed of individual arcuate nozzle segments. The arcuate nozzle segments are elastically joined to each other to form a complete ring, with edges abutted to prevent leakage. The resultant nozzle ring is included within the overall gas turbine stationary structure and secured by a mounting arrangement which permits relative radial movement at both the inner and outer mountings. A spline-type outer mounting provides circumferential retention. A complete rigid nozzle ring with freedom to "float" radially results. Specific structures are disclosed for the inner and outer mounting arrangements. A specific tie-rod structure is also disclosed for elastically joining the individual nozzle segments. Also disclosed is a method of assembling the nozzle ring subassembly-by-subassembly into a gas turbine employing temporary jacks.

  5. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition chamber and process with multiple gas inlets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming; Povolny, Henry S.

    2004-06-29

    A thin film deposition method uses a vacuum confinement cup that employs a dense hot filament and multiple gas inlets. At least one reactant gas is introduced into the confinement cup both near and spaced apart from the heated filament. An electrode inside the confinement cup is used to generate plasma for film deposition. The method is used to deposit advanced thin films (such as silicon based thin films) at a high quality and at a high deposition rate.

  6. Publications | Center for Gas Separations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications help Year Title Authors Citation PDF © 2016 The Center for Gas Separations Relevant to Clean Energy Technologies, an Energy Frontier Research Center Click here to select the number of publications visible per page. Filter publications by title, author, or any other part of the citation data. Click on a column header to sort by that column. Click again to toggle between ascending and descending order. Click on any row to see the abstract and ToC image for that entry. Click here for

  7. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shiaguo; Lu, Yonggi; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud

    2011-11-22

    Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

  8. Anisotropic membranes for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, Arye Z.

    1987-01-01

    A gas separation membrane has a dense separating layer about 10,000 Angstroms or less thick and a porous support layer 10 to 400 microns thick that is an integral unit with gradually and continuously decreasing pore size from the base of the support layer to the surface of the thin separating layer and is made from a casting solution comprising ethyl cellulose and ethyl cellulose-based blends, typically greater than 47.5 ethoxyl content ethyl cellulose blended with compatible second polymers, such as nitrocellulose. The polymer content of the casting solution is from about 10% to about 35% by weight of the total solution with up to about 50% of this polymer weight a compatible second polymer to the ethyl cellulose in a volatile solvent such as isopropanol, methylacetate, methanol, ethanol, and acetone. Typical nonsolvents for the casting solutions include water and formamide. The casting solution is cast in air from about zero to 10 seconds to allow the volatile solvent to evaporate and then quenched in a coagulation bath, typically water, at a temperature of 7.degree.-25.degree. C. and then air dried at ambient temperature, typically 10.degree.-30.degree. C.

  9. Anisotropic membranes for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1987-07-21

    A gas separation membrane has a dense separating layer about 10,000 Angstroms or less thick and a porous support layer 10 to 400 microns thick that is an integral unit with gradually and continuously decreasing pore size from the base of the support layer to the surface of the thin separating layer and is made from a casting solution comprising ethyl cellulose and ethyl cellulose-based blends, typically greater than 47.5 ethoxyl content ethyl cellulose blended with compatible second polymers, such as nitrocellulose. The polymer content of the casting solution is from about 10% to about 35% by weight of the total solution with up to about 50% of this polymer weight a compatible second polymer to the ethyl cellulose in a volatile solvent such as isopropanol, methylacetate, methanol, ethanol, and acetone. Typical nonsolvents for the casting solutions include water and formamide. The casting solution is cast in air from about zero to 10 seconds to allow the volatile solvent to evaporate and then quenched in a coagulation bath, typically water, at a temperature of 7--25 C and then air dried at ambient temperature, typically 10--30 C. 2 figs.

  10. Passive gas separator and accumulator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choe, H.; Fallas, T.T.

    1994-08-02

    A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gas-liquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use. 3 figs.

  11. Passive gas separator and accumulator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choe, Hwang; Fallas, Thomas T.

    1994-01-01

    A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gasliquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use.

  12. Inorganic Membranes for Refinery Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to push the performance limits of inorganic membranes for large-scale gas separations in refinery applications.

  13. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation Methods and systems for separating ...

  14. Mesoporous Carbon Membranes for Selective Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose focus is on translating a novel class of material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory—selfassembled mesoporous carbon—into robust, efficient membrane systems for selective industrial gas separations.

  15. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kusik, Charles L.; He, Bo X.

    1990-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from when it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel.

  16. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kusik, C.L.; He, B.X.

    1990-11-13

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from where it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel. 4 figs.

  17. Method and apparatus for the separation of a gas-solids mixture in a circulating fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, WanWang

    2010-08-10

    The system of the present invention includes a centripetal cyclone for separating particulate material from a particulate laden gas solids stream. The cyclone includes a housing defining a conduit extending between an upstream inlet and a downstream outlet. In operation, when a particulate laden gas-solids stream passes through the upstream housing inlet, the particulate laden gas-solids stream is directed through the conduit and at least a portion of the solids in the particulate laden gas-solids stream are subjected to a centripetal force within the conduit.

  18. Members | Center for Gas Separations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Members Novel MOFs Membranes Character-ization Compu-tation Alumni Admin-istration Novel MOFs Principal Investigators Jeffrey R. Long Omar M. Yaghi Hong-Cai (Joe) Zhou Researchers Gokhan Barin Postdoctoral Researcher University of California, Berkeley barin@berkeley.edu Development of high capacity porous organic polymers for toxic gas removal from air Ying-Pin Chen PhD Student Texas A&M University ying-pin.chen@chem.tamu.edu Investigation of CO2/CH4 adsorption behavior in MOFs and

  19. Separation of gas mixtures by thermoacoustic waves.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G. W.; Geller, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Imposing sound on a binary gas mixture in a duct separates the two gases along the acoustic-propagation axis. Mole-fraction differences as large as 10% and separation fluxes as high as 0.001 M-squared c, where M is Mach number and c is sound speed, are easily observed. We describe the accidental discovery of this phenomenon in a helium-xenon mixture, subsequent experiments with a helium-argon mixture, and theoretical developments. The phenomenon occurs because a thin layer of the gas adjacent to the wall is immobilized by viscosity while the rest of the gas moves back and forth with the wave, and the heat capacity of the wall holds this thin layer of the gas at constant temperature while the rest of the gas experiences temperature oscillations due to the wave's oscillating pressure. The oscillating temperature gradient causes the light and heavy atoms in the gas to take turns diffusing into and out of the immobilized layer, so that the oscillating motion of the wave outside the immobilized layer tends to carry light-enriched gas in one direction and heavy-enriched gas in the opposite direction. Experiment and theory are in very good agreement for the initial separation fluxes and the saturation mole-fraction differences.

  20. SEPARATION OF GAS MIXTURES BY THERMOACOUSTIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.W. SWIFT; D.A. GELLER; P.S. SPOOR

    2001-06-01

    Imposing sound on a binary gas mixture in a duct separates the two gases along the acoustic-propagation axis. Mole-fraction differences as large as 10% and separation fluxes as high as 0.001 M-squared c, where M is Mach number and c is sound speed, are easily observed. We describe the accidental discovery of this phenomenon in a helium-xenon mixture, subsequent experiments with a helium-argon mixture, and theoretical developments. The phenomenon occurs because a thin layer of the gas adjacent to the wall is immobilized by viscosity while the rest of the gas moves back and forth with the wave, and the heat capacity of the wall holds this thin layer of the gas at constant temperature while the rest of the gas experiences temperature oscillations due to the wave's oscillating pressure. The oscillating temperature gradient causes the light and heavy atoms in the gas to take turns diffusing into and out of the immobilized layer, so that the oscillating motion of the wave outside the immobilized layer tends to carry light-enriched gas in one direction and heavy-enriched gas in the opposite direction. Experiment and theory are in very good agreement for the initial separation fluxes and the saturation mole-fraction differences.

  1. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  2. ,"Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  3. ,"Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  4. ,"Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  5. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  6. ,"Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... 1","Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  7. Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer Search Results Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption Title: Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption Gases are stored, ...

  8. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  9. ,"Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  10. ,"Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  11. ,"Lower 48 States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... 48 States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  12. ,"Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  13. ,"Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  14. ,"Kansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  15. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  16. ,"Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  17. ,"Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  18. ,"Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... 1","Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  19. ,"Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  20. ,"Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  1. ,"Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  2. ,"Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  3. ,"Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  4. ,"Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  5. ,"Kansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  6. ,"Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... 1","Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  7. ,"Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click ... Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  8. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  9. ,"Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  10. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  11. ,"Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  12. ,"Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  13. ,"West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  14. ,"Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  15. ,"Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... 1","Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  16. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  17. ,"Pennsylvania Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  18. ,"Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  19. ,"U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  20. Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore ...

  1. ,"Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...

  2. Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 TX, State Offshore ...

  3. ,"Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ... to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...

  4. New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New Mexico Natural ...

  5. New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade ...

  6. New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade ...

  7. North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves ... Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North ...

  8. ,"Louisiana - North Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana - North Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana - North Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...

  9. North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North Dakota ...

  10. Louisiana - North Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North Louisiana ...

  11. Crosslinked Polybenzimidazole Membrane For Gas Separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Young, Jennifer S.; Espinoza, Brent F.

    2005-09-20

    A cross-linked, supported polybenzimidazole membrane for gas separation is prepared by layering a solution of polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a,a'dibromo-p-xylene onto a porous support and evaporating solvent. A supported membrane of cross-linked poly-2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole unexpectedly exhibits an enhanced gas permeability compared to the non-cross linked analog at temperatures over 265° C.

  12. Crosslinked Polybenzimidazole Membrane For Gas Separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Young, Jennifer S. (Los Alamos, NM); Espinoza, Brent F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-09-20

    A cross-linked, supported polybenzimidazole membrane for gas separation is prepared by layering a solution of polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a,a'dibromo-p-xylene onto a porous support and evaporating solvent. A supported membrane of cross-linked poly-2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole unexpectedly exhibits an enhanced gas permeability compared to the non-cross linked analog at temperatures over 265° C.

  13. Metal oxide membranes for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.; Webster, E.T.; Xu, Q.

    1994-08-30

    A method for formation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation. 4 figs.

  14. Metal oxide membranes for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A.; Webster, Elizabeth T.; Xu, Qunyin

    1994-01-01

    A method for permformation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation.

  15. Gas separation using ultrasound and light absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2012-07-31

    An apparatus and method for separating a chosen gas from a mixture of gases having no moving parts and utilizing no chemical processing is described. The separation of particulates from fluid carriers thereof has been observed using ultrasound. In a similar manner, molecular species may be separated from carrier species. It is also known that light-induced drift may separate light-absorbing species from carrier species. Therefore, the combination of temporally pulsed absorption of light with ultrasonic concentration is expected to significantly increase the efficiency of separation by ultrasonic concentration alone. Additionally, breaking the spatial symmetry of a cylindrical acoustic concentrator decreases the spatial distribution of the concentrated particles, and increases the concentration efficiency.

  16. New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas, ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New York Natural ...

  17. Separation of Flue-Gas Scrubber Sludge into Marketable Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-28

    The reduction of sulfur oxides from high sulfur coal burning utility companies has resulted in the production of huge quantities of wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge. A typical 400 MW power station burning a coal containing 3.5% sulfur by weight and using a limestone absorbent would produce approximately 177,000 tons (dry weight) of scrubber sludge per year. This brownish colored, finely divided material contains calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2 H{sub 2}O), calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O), unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), and various other impurities such as fly-ash and iron oxide particles. The physical separation of the components of scrubber sludge would result in the re-use of this material. The primary use would be conversion to a highly pure synthetic gypsum. This technical report concentrates on the effect of baffle configuration on the separation of calcium sulfite/sulfate from limestone. The position of the baffles as they related to the feed inlet, and the quantity of the baffles were examined. A clean calcium sulfite/sulfate (less than 2.0% limestone by weight) was achieved with the combination of water-only cyclone and horizontally baffled column.

  18. Four-port gas separation membrane module assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wynn, Nicholas P.; Fulton, Donald A.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    2010-07-20

    A gas-separation membrane assembly, and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly incorporates multiple gas-separation membranes in an array within a single vessel or housing, and is equipped with two permeate ports, enabling permeate gas to be withdrawn from both ends of the membrane module permeate pipes.

  19. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Fout

    2007-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer is used for the increase of absorption rate, and plays the role of transportation of CO{sub 2}. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the

  20. Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Currier, Robert P; Obrey, Stephen J; Devlin, David J; Sansinena, Jose Maria

    2013-05-28

    Gases are stored, separated, and/or concentrated. An electric field is applied across a porous dielectric adsorbent material. A gas component from a gas mixture may be selectively separated inside the energized dielectric. Gas is stored in the energized dielectric for as long as the dielectric is energized. The energized dielectric selectively separates, or concentrates, a gas component of the gas mixture. When the potential is removed, gas from inside the dielectric is released.

  1. New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion...

  2. Low-Cost, Robust Ceramic Membranes for Gas Separation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Ceramic membranes offer great potential for industrial gas separation. Without a ceramic membrane, gases must be cooled before separation. Unfortunately, even though ceramic membranes can improve...

  3. New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New ...

  4. New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New ...

  5. Task 6.5 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Task 6.5 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Task 6.5 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup You are accessing a document from the ...

  6. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, Benjamin R.

    2009-07-21

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  7. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, Benjamin R.

    2004-09-28

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  8. Immobilized fluid membranes for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-03-18

    Provided herein are immobilized liquid membranes for gas separation, methods of preparing such membranes and uses thereof. In one example, the immobilized membrane includes a porous metallic host matrix and an immobilized liquid fluid (such as a silicone oil) that is immobilized within one or more pores included within the porous metallic host matrix. The immobilized liquid membrane is capable of selective permeation of one type of molecule (such as oxygen) over another type of molecule (such as water). In some examples, the selective membrane is incorporated into a device to supply oxygen from ambient air to the device for electrochemical reactions, and at the same time, to block water penetration and electrolyte loss from the device.

  9. Gas-liquid separator and method of operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Whitt, David Brandon

    2009-07-14

    A system for gas-liquid separation in electrolysis processes is provided. The system includes a first compartment having a liquid carrier including a first gas therein and a second compartment having the liquid carrier including a second gas therein. The system also includes a gas-liquid separator fluidically coupled to the first and second compartments for separating the liquid carrier from the first and second gases.

  10. Spheroid-Encapsulated Ionic Liquids for Gas Separation - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Spheroid-Encapsulated Ionic Liquids for Gas Separation National Energy Technology Laboratory Contact NETL About This Technology...

  11. Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henning, Carl D.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

  12. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, Carol T.; Bender, Donald A.; Bowman, Barry R.; Burnham, Alan K.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Comfort, III, William J.; Guymon, Lloyd G.; Henning, Carl D.; Pedersen, Knud B.; Sefcik, Joseph A.; Smith, Joseph A.; Strauch, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  13. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  14. Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves,

  15. Integration of air separation membrane and coalescing filter for use on an inlet air system of an engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moncelle, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    An intake air separation system suitable for combustion air of an internal combustion engine. An air separation device of the system includes a plurality of fibers, each fiber having a tube with a permeation barrier layer on the outer surface thereof and a coalescing layer on the inner surface thereof, to restrict fluid droplets from contacting the permeation barrier layer.

  16. Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Babcock, Walter C.; Edlund, David J.; Lyon, David K.; Miller, Warren K.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  17. Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation in metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li, Yuguang Ma, M. Colin McCarthy, Julian Sculley, Jiamei Yu,...

  18. Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural

  19. Center for Gas Separations Relevant to Clean Energy Technologies (CGS) |

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Gas Separations Relevant to Clean Energy Technologies (CGS) Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers EFRC External Websites Research Science Highlights News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home Centers Center for Gas Separations Relevant to Clean Energy Technologies (CGS) Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page CGS Header Director Jeffrey Long Lead Institution University of California, Berkeley Year Established 2009 Mission

  20. Application of microturbines to control emissions from associated gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Darren D.

    2013-04-16

    A system for controlling the emission of associated gas produced from a reservoir. In an embodiment, the system comprises a gas compressor including a gas inlet in fluid communication with an associated gas source and a gas outlet. The gas compressor adjusts the pressure of the associated gas to produce a pressure-regulated associated gas. In addition, the system comprises a gas cleaner including a gas inlet in fluid communication with the outlet of the gas compressor, a fuel gas outlet, and a waste product outlet. The gas cleaner separates at least a portion of the sulfur and the water from the associated gas to produce a fuel gas. Further, the system comprises a gas turbine including a fuel gas inlet in fluid communication with the fuel gas outlet of the gas cleaner and an air inlet. Still further, the system comprises a choke in fluid communication with the air inlet.

  1. Functionalized inorganic membranes for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ku, Anthony Yu-Chung; Ruud, James Anthony; Molaison, Jennifer Lynn; Schick, Louis Andrew ,; Ramaswamy, Vidya

    2008-07-08

    A porous membrane for separation of carbon dioxide from a fluid stream at a temperature higher than about 200.degree. C. with selectivity higher than Knudsen diffusion selectivity. The porous membrane comprises a porous support layer comprising alumina, silica, zirconia or stabilized zirconia; a porous separation layer comprising alumina, silica, zirconia or stabilized zirconia, and a functional layer comprising a ceramic oxide contactable with the fluid stream to preferentially transport carbon dioxide. In particular, the functional layer may be MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, La.sub.2O.sub.3, CeO.sub.2, ATiO.sub.3, AZrO.sub.3, AAl.sub.2O.sub.4, A.sup.1FeO.sub.3, A.sup.1MnO.sub.3, A.sup.1CoO.sub.3, A.sup.1NiO.sub.3, A.sup.2HfO.sub.3, A.sup.3CeO.sub.3, Li.sub.2ZrO.sub.3, Li.sub.2SiO.sub.3, Li.sub.2TiO.sub.3 or a mixture thereof; wherein A is Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.1 is La, Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.2 is Ca, Sr or Ba; and A.sup.3 is Sr or Ba.

  2. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

  3. Fast gas chromatographic separation of biodiesel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    A high-speed gas chromatographic method has been developed to determine the FAME distribution of B100 biodiesel. The capillary column used in this work has dimensions of 20 m x 0.100 mm and is coated with a polyethylene glycol film. Analysis times are typically on the order of 4-5 min depending upon the composition of the B100. The application of this method to a variety of vegetable and animal derived B100 is demonstrated. Quantitative results obtained with this method were in close agreement with those obtained by a more conventional approach on a 100 m column. The method, coupled with solid-phase extraction, was also found suitable to determine the B100 content of biodiesel-diesel blends.

  4. ,"U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet ... 1","U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic ...

  5. New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves ... Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas ...

  6. Absorptive separation of NO from dilute off-gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zapfel, W.; Marr, R.; Siebenhofer, M.

    1999-04-01

    With regard to its negligible absorption properties, the separation of nitrogen monoxide from dilute off-gas is limited to bench-scale experiments. Investigation has been centered on improving the rate of absorption by the use of complex-forming additives based on iron(II) compounds. Further efforts have been made to improve the separation efficiency by the use of reactive additives. Due to the low reactivity of nitrogen monoxide, these attempts did not succeed. The oxidation of moderately concentrated off-gas with ozone and the absorption of the so-formed nitrogen dioxide have been reported. Technical as well as economical considerations do not permit the application of the process to the treatment of dilute off-gas. The principle underlying this process led to the investigation of direct oxidation of the off-gas under electrical discharge followed by absorption with aqueous diamide solution. Temperature and moisture of the off-gas have been considered, in addition to various feed contents of nitrogen monoxide. The results of this investigation show that direct oxidation of nitrogen monoxide by corona discharge is possible. The rate of conversion increases with increasing gas velocity, accompanied by a decreasing specific energy consumption. Applied to tunnel off-gas purification, the direct oxidation route seems to offer promising technical boundaries as it is accompanied by efficient particle separation.

  7. Advanced Sorbents as a Versatile Platform for Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neil Stephenson

    2003-09-30

    The program objective was to develop materials and processes for industrial gas separations to reduce energy use and enable waste reduction. The approach chosen combined novel oxygen selective adsorbents and pressure swing adsorption (PSA) processes. Preliminary materials development and process simulation results indicated that oxygen selective adsorbents could provide a versatile platform for industrial gas separations. If fully successful, this new technology offered the potential for reducing the cost of producing nitrogen/oxygen co-products, high purity nitrogen, argon, and possibly oxygen. The potential energy savings for the gas separations are appreciable, but the end users are the main beneficiaries. Lowering the cost of industrial gases expands their use in applications that can employ them for reducing energy consumption and emissions.

  8. Porous liquids: A promising class of media for gas separation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Jinshui; Chai, Song -Hai; Qiao, Zhen -An; Mahurin, Shannon M.; Chen, Jihua; Fang, Youxing; Wan, Shun; Nelson, Kimberly; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2014-11-17

    In porous liquids with empty cavities we successfully has been successfully fabricated by surface engineering of hollow structures with suitable corona and canopy species. By taking advantage of the liquid-like polymeric matrices as a separation medium and the empty cavities as gas transport pathway, this unique porous liquid can function as a promising candidate for gas separation. A facile synthetic strategy can be further extended to other types of nanostructure-based porous liquid fabrication, opening up new opportunities for preparation of porous liquids with attractive properties for specific tasks.

  9. Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 733 1980's 883 758 719 824 774 689 577 569 491 432 1990's 408 437 352 328 357 326 347 281 228 227 2000's 214 159 214 269 193 153 192 179 148 77 2010's 72 77 94 125 108

  10. Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 156 1980's 180 193 74 81 77 77 136 66 84 87 1990's 72 76 93 96 67 69 68 44 39 67 2000's 42 83 100 134 110 132 139 241 272 349 2010's 363 393 233 188 185 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  11. Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 142 1980's 146 181 47 50 63 52 95 53 56 48 1990's 50 62 82 87 56 37 40 13 22 13 2000's 23 64 80 120 98 118 120 226 263 271 2010's 353 270 219 169 167 - = No Data

  12. Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 67 1980's 73 66 74 80 114 105 66 61 71 105 1990's 126 108 85 53 43 27 47 51 47 31 2000's 35 26 33 27 20 20 21 30 45 38 2010's 36 62 62 43 58 - = No Data Reported; --

  13. Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 51 1980's 122 89 81 108 77 91 98 97 101 68 1990's 86 66 61 53 55 53 51 42 52 67 2000's 70 85 94 112 130 161 195 219 197 312 2010's 302 270 289 304 325 - = No Data

  14. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 786 1980's 1,186 1,247 789 813 748 793 725 704 733 821 1990's 834 782 814 631 672 739 755 727 737 784 2000's 822 822 820 956 872 837 874 848 817 681 2010's 657 522 327 286 361 - = No Data

  15. Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,038 1980's 1,374 1,228 1,060 959 867 710 691 691 616 581 1990's 573 572 624 502 611 879 824 850 794 713 2000's 652 488 561 450 362 384 347 365 223 362 2010's 334 318

  16. Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 13 1980's 23 25 1990's 25 23 30 46 56 44 38 30 28 27 2000's 29 26 31 32 32 29 18 20 19 29 2010's 38 48 100 46 141 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  17. Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 166 1980's 194 184 174 194 189 157 150 145 157 145 1990's 67 136 133 93 85 104 89 56 38 41 2000's 39 30 38 37 40 46 44 37 12 20 2010's 29 46 82 135 189 - = No Data

  18. California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 395 1980's 330 325 384 405 284 277 275 255 232 238 1990's 232 231 215 201 205 163 168 176 118 233 2000's 244 185 197 174 196 277 214 212 151 169 2010's 180 173 305 284 277 - = No Data

  19. California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,881 1980's 1,792 1,424 1,230 1,120 1,006 1990's 911 901 799 817 808 736 610 570 453 355 2000's 754 842 796 759 767 799 780 686 621 612 2010's 503 510 272 247 273 - = No Data Reported;

  20. California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 234 1980's 166 256 254 243 235 1990's 194 60 63 65 63 59 49 56 44 77 2000's 91 85 91 83 87 90 90 83 57 57 2010's 66 82 66 75 76 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  1. Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 108 1980's 122 99 86 64 90 81 69 62 69 57 1990's 53 45 55 59 117 110 119 112 106 100 2000's 93 96 102 92 88 87 50 110 1 7 2010's 30 2 0 1 0 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  2. Florida Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 108 1980's 122 99 86 64 90 81 69 62 69 57 1990's 53 45 55 59 117 110 119 112 106 100 2000's 93 96 102 92 88 87 50 110 1 7 2010's 56 6 16 15 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  3. Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 26 4 16 14 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  4. Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 11 14 12 19 17 13 17 19 19 22 1990's 8 10 8 6 47 27 24 26 20 29 2000's 27 25 25 25 19 30 36 34 34 32 2010's 111 98 93 44 49 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  5. Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 432 1980's 282 165 158 396 364 395 522 477 749 686 1990's 844 805 780 763 780 699 715 594 548 777 2000's 717 631 772 823 767 714 801 926 886 799 2010's 742 684 1,012 2,887 6,985 - = No Data Reported; --

  6. Pennsylvania Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 9 1980's 11 14 14 21 78 67 22 21 8 19 1990's 23 20 10 8 9 36 47 92 79 96 2000's 157 168 137 164 125 134 151 130 127 133 2010's 144 134 125 269 299 - = No Data

  7. Sulfolane-Cross-Polybenzimidazole Membrane For Gas Separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Jennifer S.; Long, Gregory S.; Espinoza, Brent F.

    2006-02-14

    A cross-linked, supported polybenzimidazole membrane for gas separation is prepared by reacting polybenzimidazole (PBI) with the sulfone-containing crosslinking agent 3,4-dichloro-tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1-dioxide. The cross-linked reaction product exhibits enhanced gas permeability to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and methane as compared to the unmodified analog, without significant loss of selectivity, at temperatures from about 20 degrees Celsius to about 400 degrees Celsius.

  8. Separation of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Using Ion Pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R; Bourcier, W L; Johnson, M R

    2006-04-21

    We are developing a new way of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas based on ionic pumping of carbonate ions dissolved in water. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, which can be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a nearly pure gas. This novel approach to increasing the concentration of the extracted gas permits new approaches to treating flue gas. The slightly basic water used as the extraction medium is impervious to trace acid gases that destroy existing solvents, and no pre-separation is necessary. The simple, robust nature of the process lends itself to small separation plants. Although the energy cost of the ion pump is significant, we anticipate that it will be compete favorably with the current 35% energy penalty of chemical stripping systems in use at power plants. There is the distinct possibility that this simple method could be significantly more efficient than existing processes.

  9. Process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas using sweep-based membrane separation and absorption steps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Baker, Richard W.; Merkel, Timothy C.

    2012-08-21

    A gas separation process for treating flue gases from combustion processes, and combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the flue gas stream to be treated to an absorption-based carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the flue gas across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas to the combustor.

  10. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Knight, R.C.; Precechtel, D.R.; Smith, B.G.

    1985-09-09

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  11. Separation of polychlorinated biphenyls by fast gas chromatography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarado, J. S.; Silzer, J.; Lemley, F.; Erickson, M. D.; Environmental Research

    1997-12-01

    The separation of commercially available polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by fast gas chromatography (fast GC) has been studied. Aroclor 1254 was separated by using two column types: DB-1 and SPB-608. The fast GC used a split-splitless injector to introduce the sample, followed by a cold trap at -90 C to focus the sample. Rapid heating was used to introduce the sample into the short chromatographic column to decrease band broadening. Hydrogen was the carrier gas at velocities of 100 to 125 cm s-1. Analyses were performed by using an electron capture detector (ECD). Separation was achieved with both columns in less than 6 min. With the greatly shortened run times, reproducibility can be tested quickly and consequently with low cost.

  12. Gas adsorption and gas mixture separations using mixed-ligand MOF material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Mulfort, Karen L.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2011-01-04

    A method of separating a mixture of carbon dioxiode and hydrocarbon gas using a mixed-ligand, metal-organic framework (MOF) material having metal ions coordinated to carboxylate ligands and pyridyl ligands.

  13. Gas adsorption and gas mixture separations using carborane-based MOF material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Bae, Youn-Sang; Snurr, Randall Q.; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2010-06-29

    A method of separating a mixture of carbon dioxide and a hydrocarbon gas using a metal-organic framework (MOF) material having a three-dimensional carborane ligand structure.

  14. Carbon Molecular Sieve Membranes for High Performance Gas Separations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Pyung-Soo; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2016-01-01

    Thin carbon molecular sieve membranes (more »performance characteristics were obtained using 20 cP phenolic resin solutions. The fabricated CMSM showed good separation factor for He/N2 (462), CO2/N2 (97), and O2/N2 (15.4). As the viscosity of polymer precursor solution was reduced from 20 cP to 15 cP, gas permeance values almost doubled with somewhat lower separation factor He/N2 (156), CO2/N2 (88), and O2/N2 (7.7).« less

  15. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  16. Metal spray apparatus with a U-shaped electric inlet gas heater and a one-piece electric heater surrounding a nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glovan, Ronald J.; Tierney, John C.; McLean, Leroy L.; Johnson, Lawrence L.; Verbael, David J.

    1995-01-01

    An electrically heated metal spray apparatus is provided with a supersonic nozzle. Molten metal is injected into a gas stream flowing through the nozzle under pressure. By varying the pressure of the injected metal, the droplet can be made in various selected sizes with each selected size having a high degree of size uniformity. A unique one piece graphite heater provides easily controlled uniformity of temperature in the nozzle and an attached tundish which holds the pressurized molten metal. A unique U-shaped gas heater provides extremely hot inlet gas temperatures to the nozzle. A particularly useful application of the spray apparatus is coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. This permits a fastener to be easily inserted and removed but provides for a secure locking of the fastener in high temperature environments.

  17. Metal spray apparatus with a U-shaped electric inlet gas heater and a one-piece electric heater surrounding a nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glovan, R.J.; Tierney, J.C.; McLean, L.L.; Johnson, L.L.; Verbael, D.J.

    1995-10-17

    An electrically heated metal spray apparatus is provided with a supersonic nozzle. Molten metal is injected into a gas stream flowing through the nozzle under pressure. By varying the pressure of the injected metal, the droplet can be made in various selected sizes with each selected size having a high degree of size uniformity. A unique one piece graphite heater provides easily controlled uniformity of temperature in the nozzle and an attached tundish which holds the pressurized molten metal. A unique U-shaped gas heater provides extremely hot inlet gas temperatures to the nozzle. A particularly useful application of the spray apparatus is coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. This permits a fastener to be easily inserted and removed but provides for a secure locking of the fastener in high temperature environments. 12 figs.

  18. Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,580 1980's 13,407 13,049 12,153 11,553 10,650 10,120 9,416 9,024 8,969 8,934 1990's 8,492 7,846 7,019 6,219 6,558 6,166 6,105 6,137 5,966 5,858 2000's 5,447 5,341 4,395 3,874 3,557 3,478 3,473 3,463

  19. Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,360 2,391 2,128 1,794 1,741 1990's 1,554 1,394 1,167 926 980 1,001 1,039 1,016 911 979 2000's 807 796 670 586 557 588 561 641 1,235 1,072 2010's 679 639 773 870 908

  20. Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 19,676 13,334 12,852 12,620 12,912 1990's 12,151 11,363 10,227 9,541 10,145 9,891 10,077 10,036 9,480 9,646 2000's 9,512 10,040 9,190 9,538 9,792 10,679 10,710 10,292 11,816 20,970 2010's 29,517 30,545 22,135 20,389 23,258 - = No Data Reported;

  1. Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 16,316 10,943 10,724 10,826 11,171 1990's 10,597 9,969 9,060 8,615 9,165 8,890 9,038 9,020 8,569 8,667 2000's 8,704 9,245 8,520 8,952 9,235 10,091 10,149 9,651 10,581 19,898 2010's 28,838

  2. Lower 48 States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 143,852 1980's 139,421 143,515 142,984 143,469 141,226 138,464 139,070 135,256 141,211 139,798 1990's 141,941 140,584 138,883 136,953 138,213 139,369 141,136 140,382 139,015

  3. Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 601 1980's 668 494 481 529 419 375 665 1,002 943 1,011 1990's 922 967 938 890 1,022 1,018 1,778 1,975 2,158 2,086 2000's 2,558 2,873 3,097 3,219 2,961 2,808 2,925 3,512 3,105 2,728 2010's

  4. Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,511 1980's 1,776 2,042 1,803 1,603 1,496 1,364 1,304 1,223 1,146 1,108 1990's 1,129 1,061 873 800 653 667 634 583 662 681 2000's 620 663 746 748 692 758 816 958 1,035 922 2010's 858 868 612 600 563 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  5. Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,444 1980's 1,703 1,976 1,729 1,523 1,382 1,259 1,238 1,162 1,075 1,003 1990's 1,003 953 788 747 610 640 587 532 615 650 2000's 585 637 713 721 672 738 795 928 990 884 2010's 822 806

  6. Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 837 1980's 1,308 1,336 870 921 825 884 823 801 834 889 1990's 920 848 875 684 727 792 806 769 789 851 2000's 892 907 914 1,068 1,002 998 1,069 1,067 1,014 993 2010's 959 792 616 590 686 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  7. Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 650 1980's 870 1,722 1,928 2,112 1,984 1,897 1,795 1,870 1,509 1,498 1990's 1,432 1,532 1,709 1,909 1,631 1,424 1,446 1,695 2,293 3,050 2000's 4,125 4,450 3,915 3,318 3,661 4,051 4,894 6,095 6,393 6,810

  8. Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 122 175 216 235 253 248 230 217 1990's 138 225 904 1,322 1,833 1,836 1,930 2,446 1,973 2,017 2000's 1,704 1,752 1,673 1,717 1,742 2,018 2,302 2,529 2,378 3,091 2010's 3,215 2,832 2,579 2,373 2,800 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  9. Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 122 175 216 235 253 248 230 217 1990's 138 225 904 1,322 1,833 1,836 1,930 1,923 1,973 2,017 2000's 1,704 1,752 1,673 1,717 1,742 2,018 2,302 2,529 2,378 3,091 2010's 3,215 2,832 2,579

  10. West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,669 1980's 2,559 1,944 2,252 2,324 2,246 2,177 2,272 2,360 2,440 2,342 1990's 2,329 2,672 2,491 2,598 2,702 2,588 2,793 2,946 2,968 3,040 2000's 3,062 2,825 3,498 3,399 3,509 4,572 4,654 4,881 5,266 6,090 2010's 7,163 10,532

  11. West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,593 1980's 2,437 1,881 2,169 2,238 2,173 2,104 2,207 2,210 2,299 2,244 1990's 2,243 2,513 2,293 2,408 2,569 2,514 2,722 2,887 2,925 2,952 2000's 2,929 2,777 3,477 3,376 3,489 4,553

  12. Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7,834 1980's 9,413 9,659 10,155 10,728 11,014 11,229 10,393 10,572 10,903 11,276 1990's 10,433 10,433 11,305 11,387 11,351 12,712 13,084 14,321 14,371 14,809 2000's 17,211 19,399 21,531 22,716 23,640 24,722 24,463 30,896 32,399 36,748 2010's

  13. Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 6,796 1980's 8,039 8,431 9,095 9,769 10,147 10,519 9,702 9,881 10,287 10,695 1990's 9,860 9,861 10,681 10,885 10,740 11,833 12,260 13,471 13,577 14,096 2000's 16,559 18,911 20,970 22,266

  14. Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 693 1980's 682 683 1990's 4,184 5,460 5,870 5,212 4,898 4,930 5,100 5,013 4,643 4,365 2000's 4,269 3,958 3,922 4,345 4,159 4,006 3,963 4,036 3,379 2,948 2010's 2,724 2,570 2,304 1,670 2,121 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  15. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 680 1980's 659 658 1990's 4,159 5,437 5,840 5,166 4,842 4,886 5,062 4,983 4,615 4,338 2000's 4,241 3,931 3,891 4,313 4,127 3,977 3,945 4,016 3,360 2,919 2010's 2,686 2,522 2,204 1,624 1,980

  16. Alaska Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 32,275 1980's 33,395 33,049 35,002 34,291 34,476 34,223 33,355 33,715 9,179 9,019 1990's 9,393 9,653 9,725 9,986 9,813 9,575 9,296 10,673 10,043 9,855 2000's 9,331 8,901 8,533 8,348 8,473 8,237 10,333 12,022 7,766 9,183 2010's 8,917 9,511 9,667

  17. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,058 1980's 4,828 4,373 4,188 3,883 4,120 3,131 2,462 2,983 2,910 2,821 1990's 2,466 2,924 3,002 3,492 3,326 3,310 3,216 2,957 2,768 2,646 2000's 2,564 2,309 2,157 2,081 2,004 1,875 1,447

  18. Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,725 1980's 1,796 1,821 1,974 2,081 2,240 2,032 2,011 2,018 2,000 1,782 1990's 1,739 1,672 1,752 1,555 1,610 1,566 1,472 1,479 1,332 1,546 2000's 1,584 1,619 1,654 1,666 1,837 1,967 2,271 3,306 5,628 10,872 2010's 14,181 16,374 11,039 13,524

  19. Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,559 1980's 1,602 1,637 1,800 1,887 2,051 1,875 1,861 1,873 1,843 1,637 1990's 1,672 1,536 1,619 1,462 1,525 1,462 1,383 1,423 1,294 1,505 2000's 1,545 1,589 1,616 1,629 1,797 1,921 2,227

  20. California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,961 1980's 3,345 2,660 2,663 2,546 2,507 1990's 2,400 2,213 2,093 1,982 1,698 1,619 1,583 1,820 1,879 2,150 2000's 2,198 1,922 1,900 1,810 2,006 2,585 2,155 2,193

  1. California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 322 1980's 414 1,337 1,466 1,570 1,519 1990's 1,469 1,174 1,136 1,123 1,187 1,289 1,266 556 489 536 2000's 576 540 515 511 459 825 811 805 705 740 2010's 725 711 652 264 243 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  2. California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,842 1980's 5,137 4,084 3,893 3,666 3,513 1990's 3,311 3,114 2,892 2,799 2,506 2,355 2,193 2,390 2,332 2,505 2000's 2,952 2,763 2,696 2,569 2,773 3,384 2,935 2,879 2,538 2,926 2010's 2,785 3,042 2,119 2,023 2,260 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  3. Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 181 1980's 200 259 206 173 208 167 190 219 177 236 1990's 510 682 762 1,162 1,088 1,072 1,055 533 772 781 2000's 960 1,025 1,097 1,186 1,293 1,326 1,541 1,838 2,010

  4. Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,838 1980's 3,170 3,228 3,551 3,373 3,140 3,095 3,198 3,131 3,749 4,526 1990's 4,759 6,011 6,463 6,979 7,036 7,592 8,064 7,160 8,208 9,372 2000's 10,837 12,949 14,348 15,893 15,249 17,122 17,682 22,480 24,169 24,081 2010's 25,372 26,151 21,674

  5. Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,657 1980's 2,970 2,969 3,345 3,200 2,932 2,928 3,008 2,912 3,572 4,290 1990's 4,249 5,329 5,701 5,817 5,948 6,520 7,009 6,627 7,436 8,591 2000's 9,877 11,924 13,251 14,707 13,956 15,796

  6. Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 10,824 1980's 10,065 10,443 10,128 10,183 9,981 9,844 11,093 11,089 10,530 10,509 1990's 10,004 9,946 10,302 9,872 9,705 9,093 8,145 7,328 6,862 6,248 2000's 5,682 5,460 5,329 5,143 5,003 4,598 4,197 4,248 3,795 3,500 2010's 3,937 3,747 3,557

  7. Kansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 10,657 1980's 9,880 10,304 10,016 10,051 9,871 9,729 10,961 10,974 10,427 10,408 1990's 9,890 9,831 10,208 9,779 9,630 9,026 8,063 7,277 6,802 6,196 2000's 5,641 5,355 5,263 5,058 4,923 4,515

  8. Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 504 1980's 536 561 592 600 647 806 883 940 957 1,015 1990's 1,047 1,187 1,126 1,036 1,025 1,102 1,046 1,429 1,295 1,530 2000's 1,837 1,950 1,999 1,971 1,982 2,240 2,369 2,588 2,846 2,919 2010's 2,785 2,128 1,515 1,794 1,753 - = No Data Reported;

  9. Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 502 1980's 525 547 580 581 630 793 866 921 938 993 1990's 1,039 1,177 1,118 1,030 978 1,075 1,022 1,403 1,275 1,501 2000's 1,810 1,925 1,974 1,946 1,963 2,210 2,333 2,554 2,812 2,887 2010's

  10. Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 46,803 46,620 44,319 42,192 41,404 41,554 1990's 41,411 39,288 38,141 37,847 39,020 39,736 41,592 41,108 40,793 43,350 2000's 45,419 46,462 47,491 48,717 53,275 60,178 65,805 76,357 81,843 85,034 2010's 94,287 104,454 93,475 97,921 105,955 - = No

  11. Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 35,971 35,867 34,584 32,852 32,309 32,349 1990's 32,412 30,729 29,474 29,967 31,071 31,949 33,432 33,322 33,429 35,470 2000's 38,585 40,376 41,104 42,280 46,728 53,175 58,736 68,827 74,284

  12. Oklahoma Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,246 1980's 2,252 2,441 2,426 2,269 2,244 2,149 2,191 2,017 1,894 1,785 1990's 1,820 1,406 1,483 1,550 1,342 1,228 1,023 1,015 1,196 1,238 2000's 1,113 1,109 1,177

  13. Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,545 1980's 13,908 15,507 17,140 17,261 17,102 17,078 17,779 17,703 17,450 16,733 1990's 16,967 15,518 14,732 14,099 14,323 14,295 13,952 14,311 14,517 13,490 2000's 14,543 14,366 15,753 16,231 17,200 18,146 18,535 20,184 22,113 24,207 2010's

  14. Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 12,299 1980's 11,656 13,066 14,714 14,992 14,858 14,929 15,588 15,686 15,556 14,948 1990's 15,147 14,112 13,249 12,549 12,981 13,067 12,929 13,296 13,321 12,252 2000's 13,430 13,256 14,576

  15. Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,516 1980's 951 1,265 1,430 1,882 1,576 1,618 1,562 1,650 2,074 1,644 1990's 1,722 1,631 1,533 1,722 1,806 1,488 1,702 1,861 1,848 1,780 2000's 1,740 1,782 2,225 2,497 2,371 2,793 3,064 3,377 3,594 7,018 2010's 14,068 26,719 36,543

  16. Pennsylvania Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,507 1980's 940 1,251 1,416 1,861 1,498 1,551 1,540 1,629 2,066 1,625 1990's 1,699 1,611 1,523 1,714 1,797 1,452 1,655 1,769 1,769 1,684 2000's 1,583 1,614 2,088 2,333 2,246 2,659

  17. Phosphazene Membranes for Gas Separations - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phosphazene Membranes for Gas Separations Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary INL has developed novel membrane materials for the selective removal of polar gases from non-polar gases, such as methane. These phosphazene membranes are mechanically durable, as well as flexible, permitting their application for a wide variety of uses. They are effective when used in challenging environments, such as high temperatures (stable at approximately 300

  18. The use of gas separation membranes for pollution control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logsdon, B.W.; Stull, D.; Pellegrino, J.

    1993-04-01

    Rocky Flats is considering the use of a fluidized bed oxidation unit (FBU) for the destruction of mixed waste. Public concerns about the health effects of such destruction have been intense. In order to allay such concerns and minimize the possible health impacts of the proposed mixed waste destruction, RFP has been investigating novel methods of air pollution control. Among the most promising of these techniques is the use of gas separation membranes, which is described in this report.

  19. Gas separation device based on electrical swing adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-10-26

    A method and apparatus for separating one constituent, especially carbon dioxide, from a fluid mixture, such as natural gas. The fluid mixture flows through an adsorbent member having an affinity for molecules of the one constituent, the molecules being adsorbed on the adsorbent member. A voltage is applied to the adsorbent member, the voltage imparting a current flow which causes the molecules of the one constituent to be desorbed from the adsorbent member.

  20. Use of exhaust gas as sweep flow to enhance air separation membrane performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutart, Charles H.; Choi, Cathy Y.

    2003-01-01

    An intake air separation system for an internal combustion engine is provided with purge gas or sweep flow on the permeate side of separation membranes in the air separation device. Exhaust gas from the engine is used as a purge gas flow, to increase oxygen flux in the separation device without increasing the nitrogen flux.

  1. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1997-08-31

    A tremendous amount of wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge (estimated 20 million metric tons per year in the US) is currently being landfilled at a huge cost to utility companies. Scrubber sludge is the solid precipitate produced during desulfurization of flue-gas from burning high sulfur coal. The amount of this sludge is expected to increase in the near future due to ever increasing governmental regulation concerning the amount of sulfur emissions. Scrubber sludge is a fine, grey colored powder that contains calcium sulfite hemihydrate (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}), calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O), limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), silicates, and iron oxides. This material can continue to be landfilled at a steadily increasing cost, or an alternative for utilizing this material can be developed. This study explores the characteristics of a naturally oxidized wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge and uses these characteristics to develop alternatives for recycling this material. In order for scrubber sludge to be used as a feed material for various markets, it was necessary to process it to meet the specifications of these markets. A physical separation process was therefore needed to separate the components of this sludge into useful products at a low cost. There are several physical separation techniques available to separate fine particulates. These techniques can be divided into four major groups: magnetic separation, electrostatic separation, physico-chemical separation, and density-based separation. The properties of this material indicated that two methods of separation were feasible: water-only cycloning (density-based separation), and froth flotation (physico-chemical separation). These processes could be used either separately, or in combination. The goal of this study was to reduce the limestone impurity in this scrubber sludge from 5.6% by weight to below 2.0% by weight. The resulting clean calcium

  2. Oxygen-permeable ceramic membranes for gas separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.; Ma, B.; Maiya, P.S.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L.; Picciolo, J.J.

    1998-02-01

    Mixed-conducting oxides have a wide range of applications, including fuel cells, gas separation systems, sensors, and electrocatalytic equipment. Dense ceramic membranes made of mixed-conducting oxides are particularly attractive for gas separation and methane conversion processes. Membranes made of Sr-Fe-Co oxide, which exhibits high combined electronic and oxygen ionic conductivities, can be used to selectively transport oxygen during the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas, i.e., CO + H{sub 2}). The authors have fabricated tubular Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes and tested them (some for more than 1,000 h) in a methane conversion reactor that was operating at 850--950 C. An oxygen permeation flux of {approx} 10 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained at 900 C in a tubular membrane with a wall thickness of 0.75 mm. Using a gas-tight electrochemical cell, the authors have also measured the steady-state oxygen permeability of flat Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure(pO{sub 2}). Steady-state oxygen permeability increases with increasing temperature and with the difference in pO{sub 2} on the two sides of the membrane. At 900 C, an oxygen permeability of {approx} 2.5 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained in a 2.9-mm-thick membrane. This value agrees with that obtained in methane conversion reactor experiments. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics determined in the gas-tight cell indicate that bulk effect, rather than surface exchange effect, is the main limiting factor for oxygen permeation of {approx} 1-mm-thick Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes at elevated temperatures (> 650 C).

  3. Inert Gas Buffered Milling and Particle Size Separation of μm...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Size Separation of m-Scale Superconducting Precursor Powders Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Inert Gas Buffered Milling and Particle Size Separation of ...

  4. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for ... Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2014,"06301979" ...

  5. Selectivity trend of gas separation through nanoporous graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Hongjun; Chen, Zhongfang; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2014-01-29

    We demonstrate that porous graphene can efficiently separate gases according to their molecular sizes using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations,. The flux sequence from the classical MD simulation is H2>CO2>>N2>Ar>CH4, which generally follows the trend in the kinetic diameters. Moreover, this trend is also confirmed from the fluxes based on the computed free energy barriers for gas permeation using the umbrella sampling method and kinetic theory of gases. Both brute-force MD simulations and free-energy calcualtions lead to the flux trend consistent with experiments. Case studies of two compositions of CO2/N2 mixtures further demonstrate the separation capability of nanoporous graphene.

  6. Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  7. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matson, Stephen L.; Lee, Eric K. L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kelly, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

  8. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1989-04-25

    There is disclosed a composite immobilized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation. 3 figs.

  9. ,"U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...

  10. Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,334 1980's 1,551 1,252 1,200 1,353 1,193 1,064 1,242 1,571 1,434 1,443 1990's 1,330 1,404 1,290 1,218 1,379 1,344 2,125 2,256 2,386 2,313 2000's 2,772 3,032 3,311 3,488 3,154 2,961 3,117 3,691 3,253 2,805 2010's 2,975 2,549 1,781 1,839 1,873 -

  11. Development of mixed-conducting oxides for gas separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.; Ma, B.; Maiya, P.S.

    1997-08-01

    Mixed-conducting oxides have been used in many applications, including fuel cells, gas separation membranes, sensors, and electrocatalysis. The authors are developing a mixed-conducting, dense ceramic membrane for selectively transporting oxygen and hydrogen. Ceramic membranes made of Sr-Fe-Co oxide, which has high combined electronic and oxygen ionic conductions, can be used to selectively transport oxygen during the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas, CO + H{sub 2}). The authors have measured the steady-state oxygen permeability of SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} as a function of oxygen-partial-pressure gradient and temperature. At 900{degrees}C, oxygen permeability was {approx}2.5 scc{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}min{sup {minus}1} for a 2.9-mm-thick membrane and this value increases as membrane thickness decreases. The authors have fabricated tubular SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} membranes and operated them at 900{degrees}C for >1000 h during conversion of methane into syngas. The hydrogen ion (proton) transport properties of yttria-doped BaCeO{sub 3} were investigated by impedance spectroscopy and open-cell voltage measurements. High proton conductivity and a high protonic transference number make yttria-doped BaCeO{sub 3} a potential membrane for hydrogen separation.

  12. Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuthill, Richard Sterling; Bechtel, II, William Theodore; Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur; Black, Stephen Hugh; Bland, Robert James; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne; Meyer, Stefan Martin; Taura, Joseph Charles; Battaglioli, John Luigi

    2002-01-01

    A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

  13. Mixed-conducting dense ceramics for gas separation applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Dusek, J. T.; Guan, J.; Liu, M.; Ma, B.; Maiya, P. S.; Picciolo, J. J.

    1999-06-22

    Mixed-conducting (electronic and ionic conducting) dense ceramics are used in many applications, including fuel cells, gas separation membranes, batteries, sensors, and electrocatalysis. This paper describes mixed-conducting ceramic membranes that are being developed to selectively remove oxygen and hydrogen from gas streams in a nongalvanic mode of operation (i.e., with no electrodes or external power supply). Ceramic membranes made of Sr-Fe-Co oxide (SFC), which exhibits high combined electronic and oxygen ionic conductivities, can be used for high-purity oxygen separation and/or partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}). The electronic and ionic conductivities of SFC were found to be comparable in magnitude. Steady-state oxygen permeability of SFC has been measured as a function of oxygen-partial-pressure gradient and temperature. For an {approx}3-mm-thick membrane, the oxygen permeability was {approx}2.5 scc{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}min{sup {minus}1} at 900 C. Oxygen permeation increases as membrane thickness decreases. Tubular SFC membranes have been fabricated and operated at 900 C for {approx}1000 h in converting methane into syngas. The oxygen permeated through the membrane reacted with methane in the presence of a catalyst and produced syngas. We also studied the transport properties of yttria-doped BaCeO{sub 3{minus}{delta}} (BCY) by impedance spectroscopy and open-cell voltage (OCV) measurement. Total conductivity of the BCY sample increased from {approx}5 x 10{sup {minus}3} {Omega}{sup {minus}1}{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}1} to {approx}2 x 10{sup {minus}2} {Omega}{sup {minus}1}{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}1}, whereas the protonic transference number decreased from 0.87 to 0.63 and the oxygen transference number increased from 0.03 to 0.15 as temperature increased from 600 to 800 C. Unlike SFC, in which the ionic and electronic conductivities are nearly equivalent BCY exhibits protonic conductivity that

  14. Analysis of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotopes and optimal feed position

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuntong Ying; Hongjiang Wu; Mingsheng Zhou; Yuguang Nie; Guangjun Liu

    1997-10-01

    Analysis of the concentration distribution in a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures is different from that in a cascade for separation of two-component mixtures. This paper presents the governing equations for a multicomponent isotope separation cascade. Numerically predicted separation factors for the gas centrifuge cascade agree well with the experimental data. A theoretical optimal feed position is derived for a short square cascade for a two-component mixture in a close-separation case. The optimal feed position for a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent mixture is discussed.

  15. Highlights | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Link to article Sep 6, 2012 Enhanced Separation and Mitigated Plasticization in Membranes using Metal-Organic Framework Nanoparticles Enhanced Separation and Mitigated ...

  16. ,"North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet ... 9:32:06 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet ...

  17. Falling microbead counter-flow process for separating gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hornbostel, Marc D.; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2015-10-27

    A method and reactor for removing a component from a gas stream is provided. In one embodiment, the method includes providing the gas stream containing the component that is to be removed and adsorbing the component out of the gas stream as the gas stream rises via microbeads of a sorbent falling down an adsorber section of a reactor.

  18. Falling microbead counter-flow process for separating gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hornbostel, Marc D.; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2015-07-07

    A method and reactor for removing a component from a gas stream is provided. In one embodiment, the method includes providing the gas stream containing the component that is to be removed and adsorbing the component out of the gas stream as the gas stream rises via microbeads of a sorbent falling down an adsorber section of a reactor.

  19. October 24, 2012 | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foundry, LBNL) Structure and Properties of Gas Adsorbed Metal-Organic Frameworks Stephen Geier (Department of Chemistry, UC Berkeley) Adsorption and Separation of Small...

  20. Gokhan Barin | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Such features become particularly useful in challenging applications such as toxic gas (ammonia) removal from air and metal ion separations in aqueous media. My research...

  1. U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) ...

  2. U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic ...

  3. Ceramic-zeolite Composite Membranes and Use for Separation of Vapor-gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mixtures - Energy Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Ceramic-zeolite Composite Membranes and Use for Separation of Vapor-gas Mixtures University of Colorado Contact CU About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryHaving both high selectivity and high permeability, the zeolite membranes have great potential for highly selective separation of vapor/gas and gas/gas mixtures and for

  4. ,"Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After ... 7:19:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  5. ,"Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After ... 7:19:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  6. ,"Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After ... 7:19:08 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  7. ,"Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After ... 7:19:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  8. ,"Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After ... 7:19:08 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  9. ,"Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After ... 7:19:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  10. Jeffrey Kortright | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Kortright group is developing novel soft x-ray based techniques for probing gas adsorption in MOFs. EFRC publications: Drisdell, Walter S.; and Kortright, Jeffrey B Gas cell...

  11. ,"New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... 8:56:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  12. ,"New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... 8:57:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  13. ,"New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... 8:57:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  14. ,"New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... 8:56:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  15. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... 8:56:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  16. ,"New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... 8:56:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  17. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... 9:30:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  18. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D

    2015-03-31

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  19. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D.

    2013-03-12

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  20. Chen (Beverly) Zhang | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface exhibit unique transport and separation properties and can serve as selective membranes for carbon capturing. While molecularly defined nanoporous inorganic and organic...

  1. Krishna | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Krishna, Rajamani; and Long, Jeffrey R Separation of Hexane Isomers in a Metal-Organic Framework with Triangular Channels, Science, 340, 960-964 (2013). 10.1126...

  2. Hiroyasu Furukawa | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kim, Jaheon; and Yaghi, Omar M Introduction of Functionality, Selection of Topology, and Enhancement of Gas Adsorption in Multivariate Metal-Organic Framework-177, J. Am. Chem. ...

  3. Lorenzo Maserati | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design consists of ultra thin MOF coatings on polymer supports that allow for high permeability while maintaining high gas selectivity. My efforts span membrane fabrication and...

  4. Stepped inlet optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.

    2001-01-01

    An optical panel includes stacked optical waveguides having stepped inlet facets collectively defining an inlet face for receiving image light, and having beveled outlet faces collectively defining a display screen for displaying the image light channeled through the waveguides by internal reflection.

  5. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, R.W.; Bell, C.M.; Chow, P.; Louie, J.; Mohr, J.M.; Peinemann, K.V.; Pinnau, I.; Wijmans, J.G.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    The production of hydrogen from synthesis gas made by gasification of coal is expensive. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the total process. In this report we describe the results of a program aimed at the development of membranes and membrane modules for the separation and purification of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The performance properties of the developed membranes were used in an economic evaluation of membrane gas separation systems in the coal gasification process. Membranes tested were polyetherimide and a polyamide copolymer. The work began with an examination of the chemical separations required to produce hydrogen from synthesis gas, identification of three specific separations where membranes might be applicable. A range of membrane fabrication techniques and module configurations were investigated to optimize the separation properties of the membrane materials. Parametric data obtained were used to develop the economic comparison of processes incorporating membranes with a base-case system without membranes. The computer calculations for the economic analysis were designed and executed. Finally, we briefly investigated alternative methods of performing the three separations in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The three potential opportunities for membranes in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas are: (1) separation of hydrogen from nitrogen as the final separation in a air-blown or oxygen-enriched air-blown gasification process, (2) separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to reduce or eliminate the conventional ethanolamine acid gas removal unit, and (3) separation of hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide form carbon monoxide prior to the shift reactor to influence the shift reaction. 28 refs., 54 figs., 40 tabs.

  6. Matthew T. Kapelewski | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EFRC research: My research pertains to the separation of hydrocarbons in metal-organic ... Open metal coordination sites within the framework pores are a primary way in which we ...

  7. Mitsuharu Suzuki | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (MTV-MOFs) for efficient gas capture and storage. An MTV-MOF comprises multiple types of organic ... Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture in the Presence of ...

  8. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, G.T.

    1991-04-08

    This report describes an off-gas stack for a melter, furnace or reaction vessel comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes prevents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  9. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, George T.

    1992-01-01

    An off-gas stack for a melter comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes pervents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  10. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Separations | Center for GasSeparationsR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal-Organic Frameworks for Separations Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li , Julian Sculley , and Hong-Cai Zhou, Chem. Rev., 2012, 112 (2), pp 869-932 DOI: 10.1021cr200190s Journal...