National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gas industry expansion

  1. Static gas expansion cooler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

  2. Natural Gas Industrial Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground

  3. Natural Gas Pipeline and System Expansions

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    This special report examines recent expansions to the North American natural gas pipeline network and the nature and type of proposed pipeline projects announced or approved for construction during the next several years in the United States. It includes those projects in Canada and Mexico that tie in with U.S. markets or projects.

  4. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Expansion Process Flow Diagram

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Development & Expansion > Development and Expansion Process Figure About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Development and Expansion Process For Natural Gas Pipeline Projects Figure showing the expansion process

  5. Industrial Gas Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature,...

  6. Natural gas industry directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-11-01

    This directory has information on the following: associations and organizations; exploration and production; gas compression; gas processors; gathering and transmission companies; liquefied natural gas; local distribution companies; marketing firms; regulatory agencies; service companies; suppliers and manufacturers; and regional buyer`s guide.

  7. Fission gas retention and axial expansion of irradiated metallic fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.; Johanson, E.W.

    1986-05-01

    Out-of-reactor experiments utilizing direct electrical heating and infrared heating techniques were performed on irradiated metallic fuel. The results indicate accelerated expansion can occur during thermal transients and that the accelerated expansion is driven by retained fission gases. The results also demonstrate gas retention and, hence, expansion behavior is a function of axial position within the pin.

  8. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  9. Energy recovery during expansion of compressed gas using power plant low-quality heat sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

    2006-03-07

    A method of recovering energy from a cool compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid is disclosed which includes incrementally expanding the compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid through a plurality of expansion engines and heating the gas, vapor, compressed liquid, or supercritical fluid entering at least one of the expansion engines with a low quality heat source. Expansion engines such as turbines and multiple expansions with heating are disclosed.

  10. Natural Gas Industry and Markets

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This special report provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2004 and is intended as a supplement to the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Natural Gas Annual 2004 (NGA). Unless otherwise stated, all data and figures in this report are based on summary statistics published in the NGA 2004.

  11. Electric and Gas Industries Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Industries Association Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electric and Gas Industries Association Place: Sacramento, CA Zip: 95821 Website: www.egia.org Coordinates:...

  12. Natural gas industry's response to transaction costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulherin, J.H.

    1985-07-25

    Legislators and regulators have historically viewed the organizational features in the natural gas industry as noncompetitive. Challenging recent suggestions that the contractual arrangements in the industry are in violation of antitrust statutes, the author states that the methods of organization such as long-term contracts, take-or-pay provisions, and most-favored nation clauses are competitive responses to the costs of transacting in the natural gas industry. These arrangements lower transaction costs by mitigating the opportunistic behavior that can potentially arise in long-term relations involving specialized assets. If policymakers want to enable cost reductions in the industry to reduce the price burden felt by users of gas, an accompaniment of price decontrol by overall deregulation is in order.

  13. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindley, R.A.

    1993-10-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  14. Rotary gas expander for energy recovery from natural gas expansion. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-15

    The specific purpose of this project was to develop a positive-displacement rotary expansion device (based on the Wankel Engine principle) and demonstrate that it could be used as an economical alternative to sophisticated turboexpanders for low gas flow and small pressure differential stations. The positive-displacement rotary expander would operate at much lower speeds than conventional turboexpanders. It would therefore be more efficient at lower pressure differentials and gas flows, and could cost significantly less because inefficient and costly gear-reduction equipment would not be required. Another purpose of this project was to develop a fail safe control system for operation in hazardous atmospheres. Design considerations for the rotary gas expander and the control system are discussed. A projection is made of the electrical generation potential and the economics of recovering the energy present in the high temperature gas. (MCW)

  15. ConEd (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate and Commercial and Industrial Custom Efficiency Programs offer incentives to gas customers in good standing who contribute to the system benefits...

  16. NIPSCO Custom Commercial and Industrial Gas and Electric Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Custom Electric and Natural Gas Incentive Program offers financial incentives to qualifying large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and...

  17. Expansion of the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Additions in 2008 and Projects through 2011. This report examines new natural gas pipeline capacity added to the U.S. natural gas pipeline system during 2008. In addition, it discusses and analyzes proposed natural gas pipeline projects that may be developed between 2009 and 2011, and the market factors supporting these initiatives.

  18. Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems This fact sheet describes ten effective ways to save energy and money in industrial process heating systems by making some changes in equipment, operations, and maintenance. PDF icon Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems (September 2007) More Documents & Publications Load Preheating Using Flue Gases from a Fuel-Fired

  19. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  20. High temperature, low expansion, corrosion resistant ceramic and gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauch, Sr., Harry W. (Lionville, PA)

    1981-01-01

    The present invention relates to ZrO.sub.2 -MgO-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -SiO.sub.2 ceramic materials having improved thermal stability and corrosion resistant properties. The utilization of these ceramic materials as heat exchangers for gas turbine engines is also disclosed.

  1. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","1...

  2. ,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 12:15:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Massachusetts Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035MA3"...

  3. ,"United States Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12292015 2:57:56 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: United States Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  4. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  5. ,"United States Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: United States Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  6. Industrial Utility Webinar: Natural Gas Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-15

    The Industrial Utility Webinars focus on providing utilities with information on how to develop sucessful energy efficeincy programs for industrial energy consumers.

  7. Peoples Gas- Commercial & Industrial Prescriptive Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chicagoland Natural Gas Savings Program is funded by customers of Peoples Gas, through a line item on the bill called the Enhanced Efficiency Program. The Program is guided by Peoples Gas, the...

  8. Natural Gas and U.S. Industrial Production: A Closer Look at Four Industries

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas and U.S. Industrial Production: A Closer Look at Four Industries Vipin Arora and Elizabeth Sendich August 30, 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. WORKING PAPER SERIES Natural Gas and U.S. Industrial

  9. Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Administrator Philadelphia Gas Works Website http:www.pgwenergysense.comdownloads.html State Pennsylvania Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Boilers: 800 -...

  10. District of Columbia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2002 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2003 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2004 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2005 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2006 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2007 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2008 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2009 -- -- -- -- --

  11. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035KS3"...

  12. ,"Texas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:25 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035TX3" "Date","Texas...

  13. ,"Idaho Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:36 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035ID3" "Date","Idaho...

  14. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 12:15:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035MS3" "Date","Mississippi...

  15. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maryland Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035MD3" "Date","Maryland...

  16. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:04 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035NE3" "Date","Nebraska...

  17. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:20 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035AL3" "Date","Alabama...

  18. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035VA3" "Date","Virginia...

  19. ,"Montana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:59 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035MT3" "Date","Montana...

  20. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 12:16:24 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035TN3" "Date","Tennessee...

  1. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 12:15:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035LA3" "Date","Louisiana...

  2. ,"Maine Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:49 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maine Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035ME3" "Date","Maine...

  3. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 12:15:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035CT3" "Date","Connecticut...

  4. ,"Iowa Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:35 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Iowa Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035IA3" "Date","Iowa Natural...

  5. ,"Oregon Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:16 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035OR3" "Date","Oregon...

  6. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035MO3" "Date","Missouri...

  7. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 12:15:53 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035MN3" "Date","Minnesota...

  8. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:18 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035AK3" "Date","Alaska...

  9. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035KS3" "Date","Kansas...

  10. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:52 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035MI3" "Date","Michigan...

  11. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Illinois Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035IL3" "Date","Illinois...

  12. ,"Florida Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035FL3" "Date","Florida...

  13. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:37 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035WY3" "Date","Wyoming...

  14. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035AL3" "Date","Alabama...

  15. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:30 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035VA3" "Date","Virginia...

  16. ,"Utah Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035UT3" "Date","Utah Natural...

  17. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035KY3" "Date","Kentucky...

  18. ,"California Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 12:15:24 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035CA3" "Date","California...

  19. ,"Vermont Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Vermont Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035VT3" "Date","Vermont...

  20. ,"Arizona Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:23 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035AZ3" "Date","Arizona...

  1. ,"Washington Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 12:16:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035WA3" "Date","Washington...

  2. ,"Ohio Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:13 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035OH3" "Date","Ohio Natural...

  3. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 12:16:18 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035PA3" "Date","Pennsylvania...

  4. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035KY3" "Date","Kentucky...

  5. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:15 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035OK3" "Date","Oklahoma...

  6. ,"Delaware Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035DE3" "Date","Delaware...

  7. ,"Arizona Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:22 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035AZ3" "Date","Arizona...

  8. ,"Georgia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035GA3" "Date","Georgia...

  9. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:25 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035CO3" "Date","Colorado...

  10. ,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 12:16:34 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035WI3" "Date","Wisconsin...

  11. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035IN3" "Date","Indiana...

  12. ,"Idaho Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:37 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035ID3" "Date","Idaho...

  13. ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:34 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035HI3" "Date","Hawaii...

  14. ,"Ohio Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:14 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035OH3" "Date","Ohio Natural...

  15. ,"Montana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:58 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035MT3" "Date","Montana...

  16. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035IN3" "Date","Indiana...

  17. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035AR3" "Date","Arkansas...

  18. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:51 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035MI3" "Date","Michigan...

  19. ,"Maine Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:50 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maine Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035ME3" "Date","Maine...

  20. Philadelphia Gas Works- Commercial and Industrial Efficient Building Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Philadelphia Gas Works' (PGW) Commercial and Industrial Efficient Building Grant Program is part of PGW's EnergySense program. This program offers incentives up to $75,000 for multifamily,...

  1. Secretary Bodman Addresses Turkmenistan Industrial Oil and Gas Exhibition |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Turkmenistan Industrial Oil and Gas Exhibition Secretary Bodman Addresses Turkmenistan Industrial Oil and Gas Exhibition November 16, 2007 - 4:31pm Addthis Holds Bilateral Discussion with President of Turkmenistan on Opening of Markets, Increased Investment, and Multiple Trade Routes ASHGABAT, TURKMENISTAN - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today held bilateral energy discussions with the President of Turkmenistan and other senior Turkmenistan officials and

  2. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 27 26 29 2000's 28 28 29 29 29 28 26 27 27 25 2010's 24 24 22 22 23 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Industrial

  3. Meeting State Carbon Emission Requirements through Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study describes the Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User program, which helps large industrial customers increase energy efficiency and reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  4. Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems. Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Trifold Brochure).

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems Industrial Technologies Program DOE/GO-102007-2413 September 2007 A Strong Energy Portfolio for a Strong America Energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy will mean a stronger economy, a cleaner environment, and greater energy independence for America. Working with a wide array of state, community, industry, and university partners, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invests in a

  5. Oil, gas tanker industry responding to demand, contract changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1998-03-02

    Steady if slower growth in demand for crude oil and natural gas, low levels of scrapping, and a moderate newbuilding pace bode well for the world`s petroleum and natural-gas shipping industries. At year-end 1997, several studies of worldwide demand patterns and shipping fleets expressed short and medium-term optimism for seaborne oil and gas trade and fleet growth. The paper discusses steady demand and shifting patterns, the aging fleet, the slowing products traffic, the world`s fleet, gas carriers, LPG demand, and LPG vessels.

  6. Commercial national accounts program is a gas industry revenue builder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskitis, T.L.

    1984-04-01

    The need for gas distributors to implement revenue-generating strategies is clearly evident in the commercial sector - their fastest growing market. One strategy is A.G.A.'s commercial national accounts marketing program, designed to establish working relationships with national and regional food, hotel, and retail chains and with the firms that design energy systems for them. The program supplies these chains with information on gas industry services and research aimed at increasing energy utilization efficiency. Regular communications and coordinated sales calls by gas utility executives on chain headquarters often produce increased gas sales, even of traditionally all-electric chains, as illustrated by several case histories.

  7. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10 11 8 1990's 8 8 10 11 11 9 202 7 7 9 2000's 9 8 9 9 10 12 11 11 6 3 2010's 3 5 3 3 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas

  8. PROJECT RULISON A GOVERNMENT- INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 O

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    A GOVERNMENT- INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 O N S T I M U L A T I O N EXPERIMENT U S I N G A NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE Issued By PROJECT RULISON JOINT OFFICE OF INFORMATION U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION - AUSTRAL OIL COMPANY, INCORPORATED THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR - CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION May 1, 1969 OBSERVATION AREA J SURFACE GROUND ZERO AREA S C A L E - I inch e q u a l s approximatly I 2 m i l e s Project Rulison Area Map PROJECT RULISON A N INDUSTRY-GOVERNMENT NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 ON

  9. Water retention and gas relative permeability of two industrial concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Wei; Liu Jian; Brue, Flore; Skoczylas, Frederic; Davy, C.A.; Bourbon, Xavier; Talandier, Jean

    2012-07-15

    This experimental study aims at identifying the water retention properties of two industrial concretes to be used for long term underground nuclear waste storage structures. Together with water retention, gas transfer properties are identified at varying water saturation level, i.e. relative gas permeability is assessed directly as a function of water saturation level S{sub w}. The influence of the initial de-sorption path and of the subsequent re-saturation are analysed both in terms of water retention and gas transfer properties. Also, the influence of concrete microstructure upon water retention and relative gas permeability is assessed, using porosity measurements, analysis of the BET theory from water retention properties, and MIP. Finally, a single relative gas permeability curve is proposed for each concrete, based on Van Genuchten-Mualem's statistical model, to be used for continuous modelling approaches of concrete structures, both during drying and imbibition.

  10. Value of Underground Storage in Today's Natural Gas Industry, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This report explores the significant and changing role of storage in the industry by examining the value of natural gas storage; short-term relationships between prices, storage levels, and weather; and some longer term impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) Order 636.

  11. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 358 344 354 1990's 526 532 532 526 519 530 534 480 514 555 2000's 526 504 488 450 414 425 439 395 383 390 2010's 368 371 379 383 386 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  12. Montana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 435 435 428 1990's 457 452 459 462 453 463 466 462 454 397 2000's 71 73 439 412 593 716 711 693 693 396 2010's 384 381 372 372 369 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  13. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 93 98 100 1990's 100 113 114 117 119 120 121 93 93 109 2000's 90 90 96 97 179 192 207 220 189 192 2010's 184 177 177 195 218 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  14. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 153 295 376 1990's 364 361 344 334 324 332 367 385 389 417 2000's 432 331 437 550 305 397 421 578 5,298 155 2010's 306 362 466 403 326 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016

  15. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 138 148 151 1990's 165 170 171 174 186 189 206 216 404 226 2000's 192 203 223 234 241 239 241 253 271 279 2010's 307 259 260 266 269 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016

  16. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,158 1,152 1,122 1990's 1,135 1,107 1,096 1,066 1,064 359 363 336 325 302 2000's 317 283 54 236 223 223 245 256 243 260 2010's 249 245 248 271 266 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  17. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 261 267 270 1990's 275 283 319 355 381 396 444 481 464 445 2000's 416 402 533 526 475 542 528 548 598 598 2010's 580 556 574 566 575 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016

  18. Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 551 627 550 1990's 1,508 631 783 345 252 713 923 3,379 3,597 3,625 2000's 3,576 3,535 949 924 312 191 274 278 313 293 2010's 293 286 302 323 328 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release

  19. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 22 21 14 1990's 15 13 18 20 24 23 27 30 36 37 2000's 38 36 38 41 43 41 35 37 35 36 2010's 38 36 38 13 13 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  20. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 241 233 235 1990's 240 243 248 249 252 253 250 265 257 264 2000's 297 316 182 184 186 179 170 185 165 112 2010's 114 129 134 138 141 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  1. Florida Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 575 552 460 1990's 452 377 388 433 481 515 517 561 574 573 2000's 520 518 451 421 398 432 475 467 449 607 2010's 581 630 507 528 520 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  2. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 219 132 64 1990's 62 65 66 75 144 167 183 189 203 200 2000's 217 198 194 191 196 195 192 188 199 187 2010's 184 178 179 183 189 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  3. Maine Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 73 73 74 1990's 80 81 80 66 89 74 87 81 110 108 2000's 178 233 66 65 69 69 73 76 82 85 2010's 94 102 108 120 126 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring

  4. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 463 208 211 1990's 182 198 159 197 191 192 182 173 217 147 2000's 207 213 184 142 137 145 155 114 109 101 2010's 102 94 97 95 92 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next

  5. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 190 200 230 1990's 284 228 244 194 135 126 170 194 317 314 2000's 308 295 877 179 121 127 133 133 155 130 2010's 120 123 127 132 131 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  6. Meeting State Carbon Emission Requirements through Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Southern California Gas Companys Industrial End User Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This case study describes the Southern California Gas Companys Industrial End User program that helps large industrial customers increase energy efficiency and reduce energy use and GHG emissions.

  7. A guide for the gas and oil industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This guide has been prepared to assist those in the natural gas and oil industry who may not be familiar with how the Federal government, particularly the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or Department), does business with private sector companies. Basic information is provided on what DOE is trying to do, why it wants to work with the natural gas and oil industry, how it can work with companies, who to contact, and where to inquire for further information. This last item is noteworthy because it is important for users of this guide to be able to access information about subjects that may interest them. Selected other Federal agencies and their activities related to those of DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy (FE or Fossil Energy) also are included in this document as Appendix A. This guide provides an address and/or phone number for every topic covered to prevent any information impasse. If a question is not adequately answered by the guide, please do not hesitate to contact the appropriate person or office. It is hoped that the information provided in this guide will lead to a better understanding of the mission, roles, and procedures of DOE and result in more and better cooperative working relationships between the natural gas and oil industry and DOE. Such relationships will provide a significant benefit to our Nation`s economic, technological, and energy security.

  8. Impact of the 2008 Hurricane Season on the Natural Gas Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season and its impacts on the natural gas industry

  9. Gas/solvent-induced transformation and expansion of a nonporous solid to 1:1 host guest form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Atwood, Jerry L.

    2008-07-01

    Herein we report the gas (CO2, N2O and propane) and solvent (CS2 and acetone) induced transformation and expansion of guest free thermodynamic form of a p-tert-butylcalix [4]arene to 1:1 host guest form.

  10. NORM Management in the Oil and Gas Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowie, Michael; Mously, Khalid; Fageeha, Osama; Nassar, Rafat

    2008-08-07

    It has been established that Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) accumulates at various locations along the oil/gas production process. Components such as wellheads, separation vessels, pumps, and other processing equipment can become NORM contaminated, and NORM can accumulate in sludge and other waste media. Improper handling and disposal of NORM contaminated equipment and waste can create a potential radiation hazard to workers and the environment. Saudi Aramco Environmental Protection Department initiated a program to identify the extent, form and level of NORM contamination associated with the company operations. Once identified the challenge of managing operations which had a NORM hazard was addressed in a manner that gave due consideration to workers and environmental protection as well as operations' efficiency and productivity. The benefits of shared knowledge, practice and experience across the oil and gas industry are seen as key to the establishment of common guidance on NORM management. This paper outlines Saudi Aramco's experience in the development of a NORM management strategy and its goals of establishing common guidance throughout the oil and gas industry.

  11. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2 2,313 2,293 2,380 1990's 2,431 2,523 2,509 2,458 2,477 2,491 2,512 2,496 2,464 2,620 2000's 2,792 2,781 2,730 2,743 2,799 2,787 2,735 2,704 2,757 3,057 2010's 3,039 2,988 3,045 3,143 3,244 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  12. Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.28 2.23 2.38 2.27 2.36 2.39 2.53 2000's 2.46 2.11 2.13 2.22 2.25 2.29 2.30 2.26 2.13 2.13 2010's 2.12 2.19 2.38 2.42 2.46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring

  13. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1 1,410 1,151 1,412 1990's 1,396 1,367 1,319 1,364 1,417 1,366 1,488 1,336 1,300 1,393 2000's 1,414 1,122 1,407 1,269 1,223 1,120 1,120 1,055 1,104 1,025 2010's 1,079 1,133 990 1,020 1,009 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  14. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,626 7,199 13,057 1990's 6,539 5,006 8,723 7,283 8,019 10,447 10,952 11,058 11,245 8,027 2000's 8,794 9,750 9,090 11,272 10,949 12,019 12,456 12,678 36,928 19,208 2010's 12,751 10,721 10,840 11,063 10,946 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld

  15. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10,885 11,117 11,452 1990's 11,500 11,446 11,460 11,425 11,308 11,454 11,848 12,233 11,888 14,527 2000's 11,384 11,210 10,468 10,378 10,088 10,049 9,885 9,728 10,563 18,186 2010's 9,332 9,088 8,833 8,497 8,156 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  16. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,585 2,670 2,638 1990's 2,574 2,486 2,515 2,477 2,592 2,531 2,564 2,233 2,188 2,267 2000's 2,025 1,996 2,029 2,074 2,040 1,432 1,257 1,146 1,131 2,039 2010's 2,106 1,770 1,793 1,870 1,878 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  17. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,312 1,263 1,282 1990's 1,317 1,314 1,327 1,324 1,313 1,298 1,241 1,199 1,165 1,246 2000's 1,199 1,214 1,083 1,161 996 1,205 1,181 1,346 1,132 1,141 2010's 980 982 936 933 943 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  18. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,832 2,880 3,063 1990's 3,140 3,096 2,989 3,040 3,115 3,033 3,408 3,097 3,151 3,152 2000's 3,094 3,085 2,935 3,115 3,600 3,545 3,548 3,511 3,514 3,573 2010's 3,541 3,307 3,692 3,538 3,497 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  19. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 675 684 702 1990's 712 718 696 718 766 2,432 2,234 11,553 10,673 10,342 2000's 10,161 10,504 9,156 9,022 8,463 7,973 7,697 7,668 11,627 7,863 2010's 7,912 7,955 8,160 8,495 8,791 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  20. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,236 3,196 3,381 1990's 2,802 3,506 3,119 2,664 3,401 3,652 3,973 5,375 6,228 5,672 2000's 5,288 2,962 3,200 3,101 3,021 2,891 2,701 2,991 2,984 2,384 2010's 2,457 2,468 2,525 2,567 2,596 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  1. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,929 8,163 8,356 1990's 8,301 8,479 8,573 8,678 8,655 8,650 8,672 7,779 8,112 8,136 2000's 8,267 8,515 8,111 8,098 7,899 8,328 6,929 6,858 6,806 6,712 2010's 6,571 6,482 6,381 6,554 6,526 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  2. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,772 2,689 2,877 1990's 2,889 2,840 2,859 2,912 2,853 2,845 2,843 2,531 3,295 3,040 2000's 2,821 3,403 3,438 3,367 3,283 2,855 2,811 2,822 2,920 2,618 2010's 2,731 2,733 2,872 2,958 3,063 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  3. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 676 1,034 738 1990's 699 787 740 696 765 791 799 704 695 718 2000's 717 821 842 926 907 1,118 1,060 1,136 1,075 1,051 2010's 1,053 1,066 1,076 1,085 1,099 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016

  4. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,089 6,070 6,023 1990's 6,238 6,344 6,496 6,407 6,388 6,328 6,441 6,492 6,736 7,080 2000's 6,330 6,159 5,880 5,577 5,726 5,577 5,241 4,868 4,772 4,745 2010's 4,624 5,007 5,066 5,024 5,084 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  5. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,256 1,273 1,307 1990's 1,384 1,400 1,568 1,625 1,928 1,802 1,759 1,764 1,728 1,768 2000's 1,715 1,702 1,563 1,574 1,528 1,535 1,528 1,472 1,426 1,358 2010's 1,325 1,329 1,435 1,452 1,426 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  6. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,206 2,151 2,555 1990's 2,361 2,369 2,425 2,512 2,440 2,393 2,306 2,382 5,149 2,159 2000's 2,386 2,704 2,657 2,755 2,738 2,498 2,545 2,656 2,650 2,717 2010's 2,702 2,729 2,679 2,581 2,595 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  7. Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,852 4,427 13,383 1990's 13,659 13,770 5,481 5,823 5,222 9,043 8,796 5,339 5,318 5,655 2000's 11,613 10,047 9,143 9,015 9,359 9,136 8,664 11,063 5,568 8,581 2010's 8,779 8,713 8,953 8,525 8,406 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  8. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 877 895 895 1990's 929 1,156 1,101 2,706 2,740 2,812 2,822 2,391 2,469 2,984 2000's 1,749 1,261 1,526 1,517 1,217 1,402 1,256 1,271 1,205 1,126 2010's 1,059 1,103 1,132 1,132 1,123 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  9. Washington Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,355 3,564 3,365 1990's 3,428 3,495 3,490 3,448 3,586 3,544 3,587 3,748 3,848 4,040 2000's 4,007 3,898 3,928 3,775 3,992 3,489 3,428 3,630 3,483 3,428 2010's 3,372 3,353 3,338 3,320 3,355 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  10. California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 31 44,764 44,680 46,243 1990's 46,048 44,865 40,528 42,748 38,750 38,457 36,613 35,830 36,235 36,435 2000's 35,391 34,893 33,725 34,617 41,487 40,226 38,637 39,134 39,591 38,746 2010's 38,006 37,575 37,686 37,996 37,548 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  11. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1 896 923 976 1990's 1,018 1,074 1,108 1,032 1,176 1,528 2,099 2,923 3,349 4,727 2000's 4,994 4,729 4,337 4,054 4,175 4,318 4,472 4,592 4,816 5,084 2010's 6,232 6,529 6,906 7,293 7,823 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  12. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2 2,709 2,818 2,908 1990's 3,061 2,921 2,923 2,952 3,754 3,705 3,435 3,459 3,441 3,465 2000's 3,683 3,881 3,716 3,625 3,470 3,437 3,393 3,317 3,196 3,138 2010's 3,063 3,062 3,148 4,454 4,217 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  13. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3 3,034 3,144 3,079 1990's 3,153 3,124 3,186 3,302 3,277 3,261 3,310 3,310 3,262 5,580 2000's 3,294 3,330 3,219 3,326 3,161 3,543 3,053 2,913 2,890 2,254 2010's 2,174 2,184 2,112 2,242 2,481 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  14. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 19,460 20,015 25,161 1990's 25,991 26,489 27,178 27,807 25,788 25,929 29,493 28,472 28,063 27,605 2000's 27,348 27,421 27,477 26,698 29,187 29,887 26,109 24,000 23,737 23,857 2010's 25,043 23,722 23,390 23,804 23,829 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  15. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,033 1,937 1,895 1990's 1,883 1,866 1,835 1,903 1,957 1,957 2,066 1,839 1,862 1,797 2000's 1,831 1,830 1,855 1,791 1,746 1,744 1,670 1,651 1,652 1,626 2010's 1,528 1,465 1,469 1,491 1,572 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  16. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,440 4,314 4,366 1990's 4,357 3,445 3,296 4,369 3,560 3,079 2,988 7,014 10,706 5,861 2000's 8,833 9,341 9,891 9,295 8,955 8,300 8,152 8,327 8,098 7,793 2010's 7,664 7,954 7,970 7,877 7,429 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  17. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,391 1,436 1,443 1990's 1,544 1,587 1,608 1,585 1,621 1,630 1,633 1,698 1,864 1,813 2000's 1,801 1,701 1,785 1,695 1,672 1,698 1,658 1,599 1,585 1,715 2010's 1,742 1,705 1,720 1,767 1,780 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  18. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,617 1,503 1,531 1990's 1,504 1,469 1,452 1,592 1,737 1,383 1,444 1,406 1,380 1,397 2000's 1,318 1,440 1,357 1,291 1,460 1,086 962 945 988 954 2010's 942 920 963 916 883 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  19. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,222 5,397 5,570 1990's 5,646 520 514 496 516 481 430 479 1,472 536 2000's 329 795 1,434 1,361 1,354 1,325 1,340 1,333 1,225 1,234 2010's 1,255 1,226 1,163 1,173 1,179 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  20. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,411 7,218 7,307 1990's 7,154 7,194 7,396 7,979 7,342 6,454 5,861 8,346 9,158 9,756 2000's 9,630 9,864 9,648 10,138 10,190 8,484 5,707 5,999 5,969 6,396 2010's 6,413 6,376 6,581 6,677 7,000 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  1. Maine Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,331 855 872 874 1,248 616 552 696 891 1,135 1,160 701 2002 464 2,399 466 2,084 2,025 3,030 24 2,661 20 3,011 3,868 3,620 2003 434 338 282 234 210 206 283 222 219 273 323 291 2004 1,931 1,739 1,589 1,316 1,158 941 1,111 1,057 1,087 1,332 1,384 1,589 2005 750 578 653 478 481 397 386 504 636 561 513 563 2006 1,206 1,426 2,121 1,243

  2. Full hoop casing for midframe of industrial gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Gerald A.; Charron, Richard C.

    2015-12-01

    A can annular industrial gas turbine engine, including: a single-piece rotor shaft spanning a compressor section (82), a combustion section (84), a turbine section (86); and a combustion section casing (10) having a section (28) configured as a full hoop. When the combustion section casing is detached from the engine and moved to a maintenance position to allow access to an interior of the engine, a positioning jig (98) is used to support the compressor section casing (83) and turbine section casing (87).

  3. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1?atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1?atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  4. Expansion of decline curve parameters for tight gas sands with massive hydraulic fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, T.

    1995-12-31

    With the advances in modern hydrocarbon technology and expansion of geologic settings for development, it is necessary to make changes to the conventional wisdoms that accompany production technology. This paper discusses some possible changes that necessitate implementation as observed both empirically and analytically. Specifically it discusses the time at which a decline curve can be implemented for production forecasting, the need for a dual decline model, and the severity of the decline variable that may be used for this model. It is the point of this paper to prove that for fight gas sands with massive hydraulic fractures that it is not only feasible to use decline variables that are greater than the traditional limit of harmonic or 1.0, but that the decline curve may also be implemented in the transient flow period of the well and decline both hyperbolically and exponentially. These ideas were not only proven through field study, but were additionally modeled with a fracture flow simulator. In order to prove these points this paper first introduces the Red Fork Formation and the development of an initial field model curve for this formation. After the initial model was developed, questions arose as to its feasibility. These questions were first addressed with a literature survey and further comparisons were made to test the models accuracy using pressure decline analysis and a fracture flow simulator. All of these methods were used to justify the implementation of a decline exponent as high as 2.1 for a hyperbolic curve during the early transient flow period, and regressing this hyperbolic into an exponential decline in the pseudo-steady state period.

  5. Hawaii Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Hawaii Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 51 43 44 47 46 46 50 47 39 41 37 42 2002 42 40 39 42 43 36 47 42 36 35 35 37 2003 40 36 40 38 35 36 38 37 36 36 34 39 2004 37 36 39 38 33 38 38 38 35 36 40 37 2005 38 35 38 36 40 38 34 37 34 35 36 38 2006 39 34 37 34 38 37 36 38 45 40 35 37 2007 46 29 37 34 48 44 47 37 33 50 51 45 2008 40 36 45 45 41 42 46 34 27 26 23 27 2009 25 28 29 36 27 28

  6. Georgia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 11,025 10,991 12,416 12,284 10,980 10,558 10,974 12,062 11,624 12,533 11,239 11,212 2002 12,320 11,739 13,039 11,629 11,929 11,381 11,441 12,306 11,390 11,650 12,080 12,247 2003 14,903 14,274 13,044 13,382 13,121 11,350 11,925 12,763 12,912 14,159 13,309 14,265 2004 14,458 14,427 13,755 13,178 12,893 12,329 12,563 12,941 12,907

  7. Delaware Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,989 2,006 1,830 1,718 1,229 1,429 1,454 1,433 1,557 1,971 1,804 1,639 2002 1,550 1,301 1,328 1,111 857 804 1,053 1,166 1,778 1,965 2,120 2,600 2003 2,167 1,702 1,251 847 748 850 828 969 1,095 1,212 1,668 1,836 2004 1,938 1,515 1,466 1,176 1,290 964 1,027 911 1,043 1,164 1,571 1,960 2005 2,068 1,465 1,558 1,055 1,185 825 804 930

  8. Connecticut Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 2,225 2,099 2,243 2,115 2,331 2,168 2,517 1,977 1,952 2,104 2,118 1,773 2002 2,982 2,873 2,953 2,080 2,249 2,098 2,273 1,936 2,029 2,388 2,516 2,673 2003 2,442 2,098 2,170 2,119 1,737 1,511 1,686 1,897 1,715 2,072 1,813 2,294 2004 2,264 2,166 2,044 1,742 1,431 1,342 1,330 1,300 1,519 1,483 2,003 1,906 2005 2,172 2,173 2,136

  9. Iowa Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,174 8,509 8,666 7,687 7,439 6,610 6,490 6,582 6,852 7,846 8,268 8,465 2002 8,979 8,036 8,306 7,943 7,429 6,094 6,095 6,628 6,589 7,622 9,370 9,132 2003 8,957 10,155 8,270 7,315 7,108 6,661 6,665 6,380 7,288 7,710 8,640 8,708 2004 9,207 9,312 8,522 7,541 6,876 6,676 6,354 6,568 6,673 7,660 9,564 8,936 2005 10,425 10,143 7,559 8,502

  10. Idaho Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3,074 2,803 2,755 2,621 2,499 2,410 2,413 2,093 2,150 2,413 2,536 2,669 2002 2,888 2,668 2,675 2,483 2,400 2,157 1,830 1,872 2,281 2,490 2,451 2,533 2003 2,492 2,203 2,403 2,209 2,008 2,005 1,632 1,544 1,909 2,062 2,109 2,113 2004 2,435 2,255 2,117 2,006 1,694 1,885 1,724 1,618 1,736 2,215 2,081 2,142 2005 2,269 2,201 1,970 1,920

  11. Minnesota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,110 8,557 8,841 7,676 6,052 6,046 6,202 7,183 7,926 7,945 9,056 7,858 2002 9,366 8,391 9,188 7,661 7,001 6,431 6,011 7,494 6,376 8,535 9,542 9,675 2003 9,539 9,625 8,206 7,310 6,802 6,487 6,575 6,769 6,284 8,202 9,271 9,703 2004 9,787 8,941 8,594 7,829 6,637 7,549 6,968 6,623 7,309 7,714 9,582 9,571 2005 10,057 8,561 7,940 6,667

  12. Massachusetts Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,223 9,199 6,246 8,282 6,935 5,213 5,613 6,996 5,547 6,493 4,811 6,625 2002 8,237 8,719 9,197 7,344 6,115 6,321 4,184 7,865 6,085 6,264 7,442 8,179 2003 6,407 5,586 5,349 4,041 3,162 2,280 1,505 1,400 1,279 6,410 2,015 4,694 2004 5,947 6,303 5,074 4,289 2,798 2,262 1,946 1,570 1,779 2,266 5,077 4,234 2005 6,342 6,707 6,262

  13. Arkansas Oklahoma Gas Company (AOG)- Commerial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Arkansas Oklahoma Gas (AOG) programs are available to all commercial and industrial AOG customers in Arkansas. The Commercial and Industrial Prescriptive program offers rebates for the instal...

  14. Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid | Department of Energy Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid The undersigned members of the natural gas industry are pleased to submit for your consideration the following comments in response to the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's

  15. 15th US-China Oil and Gas Industry Forum Opens in Chongqing, China |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 15th US-China Oil and Gas Industry Forum Opens in Chongqing, China 15th US-China Oil and Gas Industry Forum Opens in Chongqing, China September 17, 2015 - 9:17am Addthis 15th US-China Oil and Gas Industry Forum Opens in Chongqing, China This morning, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Chris Smith, along with Zhang Yuqing, Deputy Administrator of China's National Energy Administration (NEA), opened the 15th US-China Oil and Gas Industry Forum (OGIF) in Chongqing,

  16. Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

    2009-09-30

    PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOE??s goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar Turbines, Incorporated Saturn engine rig. High pressure single-injector rig and modified engine rig tests demonstrated NOx less than 2 ppm and CO less than 10 ppm over a wide flame temperature operating regime with low combustion noise (<0.15% peak-to-peak). Minimum NOx for the optimized engine retrofit Full RCL® designs was less than 1 ppm with CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Durability testing of the substrate and catalyst material was successfully demonstrated at pressure and temperature showing long term stable performance of the catalytic reactor element. Stable performance of the reactor element was achieved when subjected to durability tests (>5000 hours) at simulated engine conditions (P=15 atm, Tin=400C/750F.). Cyclic tests simulating engine trips was also demonstrated for catalyst reliability. In addition to catalyst tests, substrate oxidation testing was also performed for downselected substrate candidates for over 25,000 hours. At the end of the program, an RCL® catalytic pilot system has been developed and demonstrated to produce NOx emissions of less than 3 ppm (corrected to 15% O2) for 100% and 50% load operation in a production engine operating on natural gas. In addition, a Full RCL® combustor has been designed and demonstrated less than 2 ppm NOx (with potential to achieve 1 ppm) in single injector and modified engine testing. The catalyst/substrate combination has been shown to be stable up to 5500 hrs in simulated engine conditions.

  17. Hawaii Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Hawaii Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 11.65 11.84 11.04 11.08 11.23 11.17 11.07 10.89 10.62 11.18 10.76 10.56 2002 8.59 10.48 9.85 9.66 9.97 10.63 10.22 10.43 10.65 10.24 10.98 10.71 2003 10.62 10.92 11.35 12.15 12.35 12.19 11.82 12.14 12.15 12.29 12.17 11.93 2004 12.10 12.37 12.14 12.29 13.18 13.31 13.20 13.15 13.79 14.06 14.30 14.84 2005 14.68 14.45 14.65 15.04

  18. Georgia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 10.05 9.35 7.56 6.07 5.80 5.01 4.55 4.21 3.78 3.00 4.52 3.39 2002 4.07 3.67 3.48 4.65 6.74 5.02 5.11 4.84 4.98 4.92 5.48 5.74 2003 6.56 7.08 9.43 6.70 6.43 7.31 6.62 5.86 5.85 6.10 6.32 6.54 2004 7.95 7.97 6.88 6.96 7.27 8.03 7.89 7.47 6.69 7.22 9.07 7.20 2005 8.99 8.10 8.90 8.37 8.32 8.01 8.52 8.85 11.71 13.33 13.71 14.78 2006

  19. the District of Columbia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feet) the District of Columbia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0

  20. Delaware Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7.37 4.61 11.53 7.36 8.20 6.89 6.65 6.54 6.29 6.19 5.68 6.11 2002 6.58 6.02 6.11 6.16 5.47 7.23 6.29 6.47 6.68 6.34 5.84 5.53 2003 5.33 5.80 7.15 6.71 6.71 6.78 6.38 6.70 7.27 5.95 6.08 6.75 2004 6.39 7.89 6.75 7.26 7.28 7.46 8.39 8.59 8.40 7.30 8.83 8.47 2005 8.85 9.59 9.28 11.33 10.93 10.46 10.46 9.33 10.77 11.27 13.11 14.05

  1. Colorado Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,268 13,981 12,731 14,667 10,985 9,633 9,063 9,888 8,555 8,139 11,955 10,843 2002 10,256 10,606 12,835 11,039 9,828 10,392 12,914 9,205 9,597 12,317 9,933 11,415 2003 11,626 11,414 9,920 7,462 10,331 7,436 9,508 9,023 7,330 7,354 9,958 10,976 2004 11,434 10,376 8,694 9,635 8,728 7,987 8,460 8,200 7,683 8,441 8,231 14,305 2005 12,086 10,602

  2. Colorado Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.36 10.07 10.38 7.40 6.89 6.77 6.64 6.64 6.70 5.59 4.12 5.12 2002 6.99 7.76 5.79 5.13 4.85 4.66 4.30 4.21 4.40 4.65 5.49 6.17 2003 7.12 8.22 4.75 4.13 4.15 4.26 4.00 3.95 4.00 6.28 7.97 9.22 2004 9.06 9.91 7.06 6.62 6.59 6.58 6.49 5.88 6.51 7.29 8.08 10.51 2005 7.53 7.58 7.88 7.91 8.19 8.73 8.66 8.95 8.56 8.40 9.99 11.41 2006

  3. Florida Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,915 7,333 7,528 7,465 8,401 7,285 8,899 7,721 8,196 8,140 7,811 8,016 2002 7,262 7,044 7,671 8,047 7,119 5,988 6,469 6,798 6,548 7,102 6,751 6,768 2003 6,976 6,327 6,236 6,325 6,434 5,724 5,837 5,951 5,864 6,209 5,645 5,805 2004 5,990 5,630 6,086 5,814 5,716 4,795 4,979 5,118 4,135 4,753 4,918 5,668 2005 6,333 5,502 5,781 6,271 5,999 5,194

  4. Florida Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 8.27 8.02 9.74 8.61 6.66 7.56 6.92 6.22 5.76 5.66 4.51 4.24 2002 5.51 5.35 5.41 4.67 5.27 5.58 5.25 5.17 5.29 5.40 5.30 5.91 2003 5.32 6.03 5.59 7.11 6.97 6.62 7.08 8.14 8.03 7.88 7.25 7.67 2004 7.62 7.91 8.36 8.02 8.00 8.56 9.34 8.95 8.12 8.29 7.64 8.48 2005 9.57 8.52 7.99 8.37 8.42 8.99 8.43 9.99 9.03 12.11 12.07 11.24 2006

  5. Connecticut Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 10.11 11.82 8.37 8.23 7.19 6.24 3.13 4.62 5.22 4.61 5.15 5.92 2002 5.31 4.97 4.95 4.15 4.88 4.74 4.08 4.10 4.89 4.87 5.56 6.09 2003 7.67 8.43 9.08 8.54 7.03 7.61 7.10 6.50 6.83 6.61 6.56 7.52 2004 12.70 9.38 9.03 8.09 8.00 8.28 7.80 7.86 7.77 7.85 11.27 11.09 2005 9.85 10.02 10.36 10.81 9.51 8.73 9.55 10.51 13.43 17.16 16.27

  6. Iowa Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.54 8.44 9.52 7.96 6.35 8.08 5.35 5.74 5.26 3.87 4.25 3.42 2002 4.97 4.57 4.89 4.97 5.35 5.37 5.22 4.93 5.11 5.69 6.24 7.14 2003 6.43 6.25 7.71 5.55 6.61 6.87 7.22 5.12 6.15 5.92 6.32 7.20 2004 7.17 6.68 6.80 6.97 7.87 8.32 8.60 8.21 7.12 6.42 7.00 8.44 2005 8.17 7.80 8.09 7.66 8.11 7.65 7.92 9.24 10.27 11.53 12.18 12.05 2006 10.95

  7. Louisiana Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 59,442 59,434 64,182 60,893 56,959 53,080 57,884 64,447 64,571 69,233 69,913 73,048 2002 70,512 65,911 67,135 60,540 59,376 59,591 64,331 64,681 62,517 67,104 76,062 77,070 2003 72,726 62,959 66,109 65,699 64,719 53,203 61,688 63,784 62,246 62,280 64,440 70,346 2004 71,841 68,808 68,634 66,085 66,036 63,882 68,547 67,912 66,218 68,354 69,066

  8. Louisiana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.70 6.97 5.81 5.77 5.43 5.18 4.49 4.18 4.12 3.54 3.85 3.59 2002 3.36 2.97 3.29 3.41 3.67 3.52 3.62 3.29 3.95 4.00 4.40 4.44 2003 5.15 5.98 8.01 5.35 5.34 6.07 5.53 4.84 5.09 4.98 4.91 5.47 2004 6.60 5.98 5.60 5.81 6.31 6.88 6.33 6.42 5.59 6.44 7.91 8.07 2005 6.86 7.31 6.81 7.81 7.14 6.88 7.69 8.45 11.78 14.71 13.93 12.54 2006

  9. Kansas Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,002 8,035 8,007 7,187 5,497 6,335 8,627 10,037 9,467 6,721 7,176 7,259 2002 7,922 7,346 7,976 6,741 7,964 7,812 9,890 13,216 11,270 8,045 10,155 10,049 2003 10,045 9,012 8,326 7,215 8,177 7,265 10,127 9,127 10,209 8,954 7,754 8,580 2004 8,778 7,435 7,869 7,557 7,828 7,713 8,023 8,936 8,734 10,148 8,704 9,084 2005 9,237 8,405 7,922 7,223 7,497

  10. Kansas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 8.77 10.38 7.59 7.09 6.09 5.29 4.78 4.48 4.65 3.29 3.09 3.99 2002 4.67 4.36 3.55 3.54 3.53 3.43 3.39 3.32 3.47 4.08 4.84 4.67 2003 5.44 5.49 6.14 5.94 4.79 5.27 4.89 4.63 4.47 4.61 4.92 5.39 2004 7.30 7.93 6.36 5.82 5.83 6.42 6.50 6.44 5.85 6.64 7.42 8.41 2005 8.81 8.69 8.62 8.33 7.27 6.61 7.10 7.26 7.83 10.44 10.55 11.14 2006

  11. Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 11,054 8,742 7,395 9,901 6,629 6,460 6,740 6,597 7,074 7,364 8,090 8,851 2002 10,214 9,404 9,297 8,186 8,277 7,314 7,074 6,669 7,743 9,145 9,856 9,932 2003 11,702 9,996 8,913 7,847 7,552 6,781 6,777 7,226 7,568 8,569 8,686 10,655 2004 11,629 10,760 10,598 9,045 8,910 8,413 8,094 8,712 8,332 9,496 9,776 10,526 2005 11,242 10,146 10,519 9,307

  12. Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 8.55 8.47 8.09 7.29 6.31 5.90 5.58 5.10 4.29 4.78 5.09 4.77 2002 4.88 4.69 4.15 4.57 4.50 4.26 4.14 3.99 4.25 4.66 5.46 5.36 2003 5.80 6.30 8.68 6.38 6.42 6.88 6.54 6.03 6.40 5.88 6.42 6.92 2004 7.65 7.53 6.89 6.77 6.84 7.39 7.27 7.21 6.61 6.97 8.58 8.08 2005 7.92 8.11 7.89 8.38 8.17 7.79 8.32 8.91 11.11 13.42 14.35 12.71 2006

  13. Illinois Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 30,126 27,294 28,116 22,192 19,913 18,238 19,905 20,406 19,383 24,125 23,899 23,695 2002 28,312 26,992 27,788 25,387 23,234 20,581 20,901 19,953 18,993 24,645 25,907 27,786 2003 31,254 28,899 26,298 21,911 19,034 17,861 17,230 18,104 18,657 20,858 24,087 26,077 2004 29,852 27,792 26,094 21,637 18,997 17,420 17,806 17,754 17,735 20,119 22,025

  14. Illinois Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 10.56 9.55 8.26 7.06 6.31 6.24 4.99 5.18 4.53 3.70 3.54 4.34 2002 4.00 4.45 4.24 4.64 5.77 5.43 4.97 5.13 4.95 5.15 5.77 5.79 2003 6.28 6.86 8.79 7.38 6.63 8.25 8.12 7.27 7.19 6.90 6.69 7.45 2004 7.69 7.94 7.40 8.13 8.03 8.55 8.07 8.44 8.32 7.80 8.45 8.76 2005 8.47 7.86 8.25 9.39 9.65 9.40 8.39 9.08 10.25 12.31 12.71 13.07 2006

  15. Indiana Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,677 23,164 24,258 19,456 18,831 18,369 17,553 20,171 17,971 21,014 20,330 22,971 2002 24,441 23,170 23,714 20,750 18,770 17,297 19,398 20,664 19,688 22,268 23,322 25,579 2003 27,047 24,384 21,994 19,376 18,238 16,652 16,774 17,813 18,398 20,589 22,780 24,621 2004 28,155 25,447 25,012 21,558 19,052 18,264 18,325 19,767 19,514 20,781 22,067

  16. Indiana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.25 8.48 12.91 9.81 10.26 9.21 12.67 9.57 5.46 3.85 7.01 3.34 2002 7.27 5.92 4.39 6.85 7.28 5.89 5.22 4.81 4.22 4.17 5.16 5.88 2003 6.85 8.02 10.84 10.03 7.84 10.46 9.36 8.56 5.98 10.73 6.50 9.40 2004 11.18 9.96 7.96 10.35 7.42 9.65 6.55 6.70 5.84 5.87 5.77 7.19 2005 7.83 10.43 8.06 10.90 10.16 8.75 9.36 8.94 10.85 11.53 10.54

  17. Mississippi Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 10,677 6,909 9,399 8,347 8,233 7,961 7,703 7,984 8,097 7,304 8,146 8,580 2002 8,485 8,021 8,941 7,960 8,002 7,800 8,401 8,207 7,668 8,724 8,987 9,761 2003 9,949 8,529 7,392 7,250 6,818 7,414 6,619 6,544 6,475 7,002 7,111 8,618 2004 8,198 8,208 9,033 8,529 8,545 8,657 8,384 8,535 7,419 7,376 8,781 9,338 2005 9,767 8,472 8,624 8,362 8,012

  18. Mississippi Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 11.59 7.72 6.09 6.16 6.13 4.61 4.85 4.27 4.04 3.79 4.68 3.72 2002 4.10 3.85 3.73 4.37 4.96 4.39 4.45 4.29 4.36 4.95 5.41 5.50 2003 5.39 6.84 8.53 5.36 5.80 6.49 5.86 5.69 6.52 6.23 6.87 6.36 2004 7.34 7.68 5.64 5.31 6.29 7.05 6.44 6.42 5.59 5.81 8.02 7.70 2005 6.34 7.37 7.39 8.13 7.67 7.40 7.55 8.42 9.87 13.41 14.54 13.10

  19. Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 8,526 7,720 5,601 5,511 4,509 4,386 4,772 4,809 4,386 4,954 5,329 7,342 2002 7,089 5,945 6,709 5,703 5,620 4,458 4,410 4,486 4,255 6,007 5,966 6,319 2003 7,084 6,868 6,028 4,820 4,273 3,942 3,396 4,833 4,317 4,659 5,254 6,070 2004 7,377 6,846 5,989 5,220 4,565 4,624 4,193 4,543 4,470 4,690 5,183 6,783 2005 7,534 6,457 6,449 5,350 4,758 4,701

  20. Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7.92 10.53 10.14 9.45 8.91 8.70 8.15 8.20 7.78 7.63 7.61 2.74 2002 6.13 5.43 5.13 6.03 6.10 6.07 6.45 6.24 6.18 6.44 6.62 6.94 2003 7.03 7.47 7.77 9.41 8.41 7.97 7.24 8.18 8.15 8.31 8.31 8.34 2004 8.42 8.82 8.06 8.44 8.38 8.85 9.33 8.72 8.70 8.61 10.04 9.58 2005 9.60 9.80 10.04 10.18 10.14 10.06 10.11 10.08 10.90 12.07 13.25

  1. Montana Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 2,448 2,226 2,224 1,871 1,230 1,230 1,497 1,337 1,241 1,558 2,089 1,972 2002 2,134 2,136 1,938 2,296 1,672 1,554 1,351 1,409 1,696 1,920 2,215 1,547 2003 2,105 1,990 1,859 1,842 1,310 1,413 1,122 1,086 1,234 1,701 2,238 2,294 2004 2,487 2,030 1,804 1,456 1,444 1,206 1,129 1,277 1,387 1,883 2,095 2,283 2005 2,438 1,968 2,138 1,678 1,466 1,274

  2. Montana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 4.63 5.95 4.89 4.79 4.96 5.90 6.07 6.56 6.56 5.79 4.84 4.68 2002 3.01 2.73 2.61 2.51 2.39 2.62 3.20 3.60 3.27 2.89 2.59 2.81 2003 3.67 3.75 3.93 3.60 3.90 4.05 5.23 6.50 6.66 6.39 5.85 5.80 2004 6.14 6.32 6.62 7.02 6.03 6.19 6.37 7.11 6.73 6.10 6.11 6.35 2005 7.94 7.34 7.19 6.84 7.31 7.48 7.76 8.94 9.06 9.83 10.08 10.24 2006

  3. Maine Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.56 9.56 9.83 9.95 9.13 7.98 8.06 6.65 8.25 5.75 4.42 4.60 2002 9.38 8.81 8.44 8.08 7.33 7.65 6.64 7.60 7.45 7.61 9.77 10.02 2003 9.83 9.48 9.50 10.29 10.26 9.36 9.49 9.80 8.70 9.64 10.49 9.72 2004 10.84 11.76 10.46 9.86 9.38 10.33 9.04 8.78 8.67 9.27 11.96 12.32 2005 12.81 13.04 13.11 12.85 10.21 11.15 10.89 11.50 15.21 15.31

  4. Maryland Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 2,601 2,365 2,538 2,053 2,019 2,312 2,204 2,437 1,999 2,117 2,701 2,065 2002 2,389 2,374 2,739 2,107 1,755 2,047 2,242 2,271 1,836 2,161 2,776 2,485 2003 2,121 2,157 2,041 2,422 1,445 1,361 1,395 1,420 1,487 1,373 2,102 2,505 2004 2,595 2,075 2,209 1,837 1,694 1,943 1,767 1,711 1,518 1,818 1,933 2,261 2005 2,150 2,038 2,319 1,477 2,034 1,988

  5. Maryland Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 11.60 14.47 10.27 9.58 8.95 8.49 6.31 6.06 6.20 6.00 7.00 6.62 2002 8.10 6.51 7.18 6.55 8.66 8.76 7.01 8.03 6.93 7.29 7.31 7.43 2003 8.41 8.62 11.37 11.41 10.93 11.70 9.64 12.04 9.18 8.72 9.57 7.49 2004 9.40 11.11 10.69 10.62 10.65 11.49 12.39 11.28 10.70 10.82 10.40 10.37 2005 10.46 10.85 10.19 11.38 10.68 10.33 10.99 10.95

  6. Massachusetts Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 8.04 8.71 11.80 11.09 10.44 9.23 8.98 8.99 9.79 7.62 7.95 8.07 2002 8.18 7.38 7.18 6.95 7.56 6.02 5.26 5.57 7.53 5.83 6.87 9.52 2003 11.26 12.64 13.31 15.04 13.98 11.25 12.10 12.34 13.23 1.71 12.47 13.92 2004 10.82 12.38 12.13 12.62 12.25 11.44 10.15 14.04 13.85 12.37 13.64 13.82 2005 12.91 12.27 12.23 12.93 12.49

  7. Michigan Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 25,494 22,752 22,291 20,181 16,240 15,260 16,263 15,666 14,433 16,600 18,669 20,006 2002 23,016 23,762 20,891 21,878 19,293 18,230 17,903 17,019 15,021 15,825 19,810 23,485 2003 26,081 25,855 22,526 19,100 15,427 13,472 13,400 14,298 13,093 14,244 16,883 18,873 2004 24,023 23,433 23,399 18,226 15,843 14,028 13,355 13,293 13,411 13,883 17,417

  8. Michigan Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 4.35 4.40 4.46 4.40 5.76 5.77 5.32 5.24 5.18 5.15 5.17 5.14 2002 4.95 5.02 4.99 4.83 4.95 5.13 6.26 5.44 5.26 5.19 5.05 3.71 2003 4.76 4.90 5.31 5.46 5.87 6.51 6.36 6.73 6.59 6.00 5.41 6.42 2004 6.48 6.63 6.32 6.28 6.38 7.41 7.91 7.82 7.63 7.41 7.86 7.74 2005 7.59 7.25 7.34 8.16 8.21 8.95 9.15 9.69 9.91 11.32 10.87 10.74 2006

  9. North Shore Gas- Commercial & Industrial Prescriptive Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Shore Gas offers the Chicagoland Natural Gas Savings Program to help non-residential customers purchase energy efficient equipment. Rebates are available on energy efficient furnaces, boilers...

  10. Laclede Gas Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Gas Steamer: 475 Food Service Gas Fryer: 350 Food Service Griddle: 400 Food Service Convection Oven: 200 Kitchen Low-Flow Spray Nozzle: 100 Program Info Sector Name Utility...

  11. North Dakota Industrial Commission, Oil and Gas Divisioin | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Bismarck, North Dakota. About The Oil and Gas Division regulates the drilling and production of oil and gas in North Dakota. Our mission is to encourage and promote the...

  12. Expansion and Change on the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... to the 2000-2001 energy crisis in that region, resulted ... New U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Systems, 1990 - 2002 Major transfers of pipeline assets occurred in 2002 as the financial ...

  13. Laclede Gas Company- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial and Industrial customers can receive rebates for various energy efficiency measures. Customers implementing specified efficiency measures can receive prescriptive rebates. All other...

  14. Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    commercial location per year, 5,000 per industrial location per year Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Austin Utilities Website http:www.austinutilities.compages...

  15. Natural Gas Industry Restructuring and EIA Data Collection

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Reserves and Natural Gas Division has undertaken an in-depth reevaluation of its programs in an effort to improve the focus and quality of the natural gas data that it gathers and reports. This article is to inform natural gas data users of proposed changes and of the opportunity to provide comments and input on the direction that EIA is taking to improve its data.

  16. Gas reburn retrofit on an industrial cyclone boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzan, H.; Latham, C.E.; Maringo, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Eastman Kodak Company`s cyclone boiler (Unit No. 43), located in Rochester, New York, is being retrofitted with the gas reburning technology developed by Babcock & Wilcox (B & W) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in order to comply with the Title I, ozone nonattainment, of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. The required NO{sub x} reduction from baseline levels necessary to meet the presumptive limit set in New York`s regulation is about 47%. Eastman Kodak and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) are cosponsoring this project. B & W is the prime contractor and contract negotiations with Chevron as the gas supplier are presently being finalized. Equipment installation for the gas reburn system is scheduled for a September 1995 outage. No. 43 Boiler`s maximum continuous rating (MCR) is 550,000 pounds per hour of steam flow or approximately equivalent to 60 MW{sub e}. Because of the compact boiler design, there is insufficient gas residence time to use pulverized coal or oil as the reburn fuel, thus making it a prime candidate for gas reburn. Kodak currently has four cyclone boilers. Based on successful completion of this gas reburn project, modifying the other three cyclone boilers with gas reburn technology is anticipated. The paper will describe B & W`s gas reburn data from a cyclone-equipped pilot facility (B & W`s Small Boiler Simulator), gas reburn design information specific to Eastman Kodak No. 43 Boiler, and numerical modeling experiences based on the pilot-scale Small Boiler Simulator (SBS) results along with those from a full-scale commercial boiler.

  17. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (CLFP) offers incentives tocommercial and industrial gas customers who install energy efficient equipment inexisting buildings. Incentives are available for boilers...

  18. DOE to Launch Collaborative Effort with Industry to Improve Natural Gas

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Systems | Department of Energy to Launch Collaborative Effort with Industry to Improve Natural Gas Systems DOE to Launch Collaborative Effort with Industry to Improve Natural Gas Systems July 30, 2014 - 1:10pm Addthis UPDATE - NOVEMBER 19, 2014: The agenda, participant list, and presentations from the workshop are now available. Immediately after a Capstone Methane Stakeholder Roundtable hosted by the White House and the Department of Energy on July 29th, DOE announced a series of actions,

  19. The impact of corrosion on the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kermani, M.B.; Harrop, D.

    1996-08-01

    The impact of corrosion on the oil industry has been viewed in terms of its effect on both capital and operational expenditures (CAPEX and OPEX) and health, safety, and the environment (HSE). To fight against the high cost and the impact of corrosion within the oil industry, an overview of topical research and engineering activities is presented. This covers corrosion and metallurgy issues related to drilling, production, transportation, and refinery activities.

  20. The impact of corrosion on oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kermani, M.B.; Harrop, D.

    1995-11-01

    The impact of corrosion on the oil industry has been viewed in terms of its effect on both capital and operational expenditures (CAPEX and OPEX) and health, safety and the environment (HSE). To fight against the high cost and the impact of corrosion within the oil industry, an overview of topical research and engineering activities is presented. This covers corrosion and metallurgy issues related to drilling, production, transportation and refinery activities.

  1. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010

  2. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History U.S.

  3. RG&E (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficiency equipment who pay a natural gas Systems Benefits Charge (SBC). Both prescriptive rebates and custom...

  4. High-resolution thermal expansion measurements under helium-gas pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manna, Rudra Sekhar; Wolf, Bernd; Souza, Mariano de; Lang, Michael

    2012-08-15

    We report on the realization of a capacitive dilatometer, designed for high-resolution measurements of length changes of a material for temperatures 1.4 K Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To T Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 300 K and hydrostatic pressure P Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 250 MPa. Helium ({sup 4}He) is used as a pressure-transmitting medium, ensuring hydrostatic-pressure conditions. Special emphasis has been given to guarantee, to a good approximation, constant-pressure conditions during temperature sweeps. The performance of the dilatometer is demonstrated by measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion at pressures P Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.1 MPa (ambient pressure) and 104 MPa on a single crystal of azurite, Cu{sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, a quasi-one-dimensional spin S = 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet. The results indicate a strong effect of pressure on the magnetic interactions in this system.

  5. Opportunities for Micropower and Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Systems in Industrial Applications - Volume I

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities for Micropower and Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Systems in Industrial Applications Volume I: Main Text Subcontract No. 85X-TA009V Final Report to Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation and the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies January 2000 Notice: This report was prepared by Arthur D. Little for the account of Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation and the DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies. This report represents Arthur D. Little's best judgment in light of

  6. Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Nelson

    2009-10-01

    This report is a preliminary comparison of conventional and potential HTGR-integrated processesa in several common industrial areas: ? Producing electricity via a traditional power cycle ? Producing hydrogen ? Producing ammonia and ammonia-derived products, such as fertilizer ? Producing gasoline and diesel from natural gas or coal ? Producing substitute natural gas from coal, and ? Steam-assisted gravity drainage (extracting oil from tar sands).

  7. FERC hears gas industry concerns, announces Transco settlement. [Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, L.M.

    1991-07-01

    This article examines the industry comments on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) notice of proposed rulemaking on natural gas pipeline function and comparability of service and the resolution of a charge of violations of regulations against the Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corporation by the FERC's Office of the General Council.

  8. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

  9. Wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry: Assessment, conclusions, and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkey, P.L.; Sundell, R.C.; Bailey, K.A.; Hayes, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    Wetland mitigation banks are already in existence in the United States, and the number is increasing. To date, most of these banks have been created and operated for mitigation of impacts arising from highway or commercial development and have not been associated with the oil and gas industry. Argonne National Laboratory evaluated the positive and negative aspects of wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry by examining banks already created for other uses by federal, state, and private entities. Specific issues addressed in this study include (1) the economic, ecological, and technical effectiveness of existing banks; (2) the changing nature of local, state, and federal jurisdiction; and (3) the unique regulatory and jurisdictional problems affecting bank developments associated with the oil and gas industry.

  10. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; When, C.S.

    1992-06-01

    This report covers the activity during the period from 2 June 1991 to 1 June 1992. The major areas of work include: the combustor sub-scale and full size testing, cleanup, coal fuel specification and processing, the Hot End Simulation rig and design of the engine parts required for use with the coal-fueled combustor island. To date Solar has demonstrated: Stable and efficient combustion burning coal-water mixtures using the Two Stage Slagging Combustor; Molten slag removal of over 97% using the slagging primary and the particulate removal impact separator; and on-site preparation of CWM is feasible. During the past year the following tasks were completed: The feasibility of on-site CWM preparation was demonstrated on the subscale TSSC. A water-cooled impactor was evaluated on the subscale TSSC; three tests were completed on the full size TSSC, the last one incorporating the PRIS; a total of 27 hours of operation on CWM at design temperature were accumulated using candle filters supplied by Refraction through Industrial Pump Filter; a target fuel specification was established and a fuel cost model developed which can identify sensitivities of specification parameters; analyses of the effects of slag on refractory materials were conducted; and modifications continued on the Hot End Simulation Rig to allow extended test times.

  11. NOx reduction technology for natural-gas-industry prime movers. Special report, August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaldini, C.

    1990-08-01

    The applicability, performance, and costs are summarized for state-of-the-art NOx emission controls for prime movers used by the natural gas industry to drive pipeline compressors. Nearly 7700 prime movers of 300 hp or greater are in operation at compressor stations. NOx control technologies for application to reciprocating engines are catalytic reduction, engine modification, exhaust gas recirculation, and pre-stratified charge. Technologies discussed for application to gas turbines are catalytic reduction, water or steam injection, and low-NOx combustors.

  12. Derivatives and Risk Management in the Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Electricity Industries

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    In February 2002 the Secretary of Energy directed the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to prepare a report on the nature and use of derivative contracts in the petroleum, natural gas, and electricity industries. Derivatives are contracts ('financial instruments') that are used to manage risk, especially price risk.

  13. Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Nelson

    2011-09-01

    This report is a summary of analyses performed by the NGNP project to determine whether it is technically and economically feasible to integrate high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) technology into industrial processes. To avoid an overly optimistic environmental and economic baseline for comparing nuclear integrated and conventional processes, a conservative approach was used for the assumptions and calculations.

  14. DOE to Launch Collaborative Effort with Industry to Improve Natural Gas Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE will launch a collaborative effort with industry to evaluate and scope high-impact manufacturing R&D to improve natural gas systems efficiency and leak reduction. The goal of this effort is to establish an advanced manufacturing initiative. AMO will lead this effort.

  15. Curbing Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Industrial Boilers in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo; Price, Lynn K; Lu, Hongyou; Liu, Xu; Tsen, Katherine; Xiangyang, Wei; Yunpeng, Zhang; Jian, Guan; Rui, Hou; Junfeng, Zhang; Yuqun, Zhuo; Shumao, Xia; Yafeng, Han; Manzhi, Liu

    2015-10-28

    China’s industrial boiler systems consume 700 million tons of coal annually, accounting for 18% of the nation’s total coal consumption. Together these boiler systems are one of the major sources of China’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, producing approximately 1.3 gigatons (Gt) of carbon dioxide (CO2) annually. These boiler systems are also responsible for 33% and 27% of total soot and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions in China, respectively, making a substantial contribution to China’s local environmental degradation. The Chinese government - at both the national and local level - is taking actions to mitigate the significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and air pollution related to the country’s extensive use of coal-fired industrial boilers. The United States and China are pursuing a collaborative effort under the U.S.-China Climate Change Working Group to conduct a comprehensive assessment of China’s coal-fired industrial boilers and to develop an implementation roadmap that will improve industrial boiler efficiency and maximize fuel-switching opportunities. Two Chinese cities – Ningbo and Xi’an – have been selected for the assessment. These cities represent coastal areas with access to liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and inland regions with access to interprovincial natural gas pipelines, respectively.

  16. Human resource needs and development for the gas industry of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klass, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    The natural gas industry will confront many challenges in the 1990s and beyond, one of which is the development of human resources to meet future needs. An efficient, trained work force in this era of environmental concern, high technology, and alternative fuels is essential for the industry to continue to meet the competition and to safely deliver our product and service to all customers. Unfortunately, during this period there will be an increasing shortfall of technical personnel to replace those lost to attrition and a steady decline in the availability of new employees who are able to read, write, and perform simple math. Technological and government developments that will impact the industry and the skill levels needed by the industry employees are reviewed. In-house and external training of professional and nonprofessional personnel and the benefits and disadvantages of selected advanced training methods are discussed. Recommendations are presented that can help improve the training of gas industry employees to meet future needs. 22 refs.

  17. Antitrust Enforcement in the Electricity and Gas Industries: Problems and Solutions for the EU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leveque, Francois

    2006-06-15

    Antitrust enforcement in the electricity and gas industries raises specific problems that call for specific solutions. Among the issues: How can the anticompetitive effects of mergers be assessed in a changing regulatory environment? Should long-term agreements in energy purchasing be prohibited? What are the benefits of preventive action such as competition advocacy and market surveillance committees? Should Article 82 (a) of the EC Treaty be used to curb excessive pricing?. (author)

  18. The value of underground storage in today`s natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The report consists of three chapters and four appendices. Chapter 1 provides basic information on the role of storage in today`s marketplace where natural gas is treated as a commodity. Chapter 2 provides statistical analyses of the relationship between storage and spot prices on both a monthly and daily basis. For the daily analysis, temperature data were used a proxy for storage withdrawals, providing a new means of examining the short-term relationship between storage and spot prices. Chapter 3 analyzes recent trends in storage management and use, as well as plans for additions to storage capacity. It also reviews the status of the new uses of storage resulting from Order 636, that is, market-based rates and capacity release. Appendix A serves as a stand-along primer on storage operations, and Appendix B provides further data on plans for the expansion of storage capacity. Appendix C explains recent revisions made to working gas and base gas capacity on the part of several storage operators in 1991 through 1993. The revisions were significant, and this appendix provides a consistent historical data series that reflects these changes. Finally, Appendix D presents more information on the regression analysis presented in Chapter 2. 19 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, W.H.

    1997-06-30

    This report encompasses the second year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on fundamental research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (1) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (2) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. The results of this work are expected to enhance utilization of LNG as a transportation fuel. The paper discusses the following topics: (A) Fueling Delivery to the Engine, Engine Considerations, and Emissions: (1) Atomization and/or vaporization of LNG for direct injection diesel-type natural gas engines; (2) Fundamentals of direct replacement of diesel fuel by LNG in simulated combustion; (3) Distribution of nitric oxide and emissions formation from natural gas injection; and (B) Short and long term storage: (1) Modification by partial direct conversion of natural gas composition for improved storage characteristics; (2) LNG vent gas adsorption and recovery using activate carbon and modified adsorbents; (3) LNG storage at moderate conditions.

  20. The structural design of air and gas ducts for power stations and industrial boiler applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the new American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) book entitled, The Structural Design of Air and Gas Ducts for Power Stations and Industrial Boiler Applications. This 312 page book was published by the ASCE in August of 1995. This ASCE publication was created to assist structural engineers in performing the structural analysis and design of air and flue-gas ducts. The structural behavior of steel ductwork can be difficult to understand for structural engineers inexperienced in ductwork analysis and design. Because of this needed expertise, the ASCE committee that created this document highly recommends that the structural analysis and design of ducts be performed by qualified structural engineers, not be technicians, designers or drafters. There is a history within the power industry of failures and major degradation of flue-gas ductwork. There are many reasons for these failures or degradation, but in many cases, the problems may have been voided by a better initial design. This book attempts to help the structural engineer with this task. This book is not intended to be used to size or configure ductwork for flow and pressure drop considerations. But it does recommend that the ductwork system arrangement consider the structural supports and the structural behavior of the duct system.

  1. U.S. Natural Gas Average Consumption per Industrial Consumer (Thousand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Industrial Consumer (Thousand Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Average Consumption per Industrial Consumer (Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 39,245 37,530 30,909 29,915 24,309 30,956 29,057 30,423 32,071 30,248 1990's 32,144 33,395 35,908 38,067 40,244 40,973 43,050 36,239 36,785 35,384 2000's 36,968 33,840 36,458 34,793 34,645 31,991 33,597 33,561 29,639 29,705 2010's 35,418 36,947 38,159

  2. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,265 6,123 6,079 1990's 5,976 8,444 11,474 11,224 10,608 10,362 10,139 17,625 16,282 10,089 2000's 9,686 9,247 8,473 9,027 8,947 8,500 8,245 8,036 7,680 7,871 2010's 7,505 7,391 7,290 7,216 7,157 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  3. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,703 1,668 1,653 1990's 1,407 1,337 141 152 1,097 1,065 1,365 1,366 1,549 1,482 2000's 1,517 1,875 1,356 1,270 1,164 988 1,062 470 383 471 2010's 438 360 121 123 116 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  4. New York Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 23,276 24,654 27,426 1990's 25,008 28,837 28,198 23,833 21,833 22,484 15,300 23,099 5,294 6,136 2000's 6,553 6,501 3,068 2,984 2,963 3,752 3,642 7,484 7,080 6,634 2010's 6,236 6,609 5,910 6,311 6,313 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  5. U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Industrial Delivered for the Account of Others

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Percent) Industrial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Industrial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 63.1 1990's 64.8 67.3 69.7 70.7 74.8 76.0 80.6 81.9 83.9 81.3 2000's 80.2 79.2 77.3 77.9 76.3 75.9 76.6 77.8 79.6 81.2 2010's 82.8 83.7 83.8 83.4 84.1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  6. U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Industrial Consumers for the Account of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Industrial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Industrial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 867,124 1,087,737 1,559,503 1,839,611 2,240,381 3,128,899 3,663,187 4,297,693 1990's 4,544,535 4,863,923 5,248,609 5,644,894 6,112,919 6,517,352 7,151,885 6,969,318 6,984,012 6,564,492 2000's 6,529,240 5,813,726

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 195,544 199,041 225,346 1990's 218,341 216,529 209,616 209,666 202,940 209,398 206,049 234,855 226,191 228,331 2000's 220,251 217,026 205,915 205,514 209,058 206,223 193,830 198,289 225,044 207,624 2010's 192,730 189,301 189,372 192,288 192,135 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  8. Strategies implemented by the textile industry in response to natural-gas curtailments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreibeis, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    An examination is made of specific activities undertaken by textile firms in North and South Carolina and Georgia to insulate themselves against production losses resulting from natural gas curtailments. Results of the research effort focusing on investigating patterns or trends of precautionary activities undertaken by the textile industry in response to fuel interruptions are presented. Chapter II delineates the scope of the project, research design, and nature of the textile industry. One hundred candidate firms for detailed study were identified and 34 discussed their alternate fuel strategies. Information obtained was analyzed by means of two statistical analysis techniques. Methods employed and results are described in Chapter III. Overall results are presented in Chapter IV. Variations in the strategies implemented by various concerns were accounted for in terms of geographic location, plant size, plant type, and the duration and extent of curtailment impacts. Ranges of expenditures for short- and long-term strategies are identified.

  9. The role of IRP in the natural gas industry: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J.A.; Brockman, L.; Herman, P.

    1994-09-29

    The natural gas industry has changed radically over the last decade. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Order 636 completed plans to unbundle interstate pipeline services and create open access for distribution companies and their customers. There has also been increasing competition for local distribution companies (LDCs) from fuel oil, electricity and unregulated energy service companies. Meanwhile, the Energy Policy Act of 1992 includes provisions that encourage energy efficiency and promote reliance on competitive forces. In response to these changes, coupled with growing environmental concerns and the need for increased energy efficiency, a number of state public utility commissions and LDCs took an interest in integrated resource planning (IRP) for gas utilities. Gas IRP was in its formative stages and a variety of regulatory approaches were being considered when this project began. In response, this project originated with the total project scope being to define, implement and institutionalize an IRP process for the Gas Customer Service Business Unit of Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (NMGas).

  10. Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine industrial plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

    1992-07-01

    Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100{degrees}F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600{degrees}F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

  11. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  12. Optimum Reactor Outlet Temperatures for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Integrated with Industrial Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee O. Nelson

    2011-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a temperature sensitivity study conducted to identify the optimum reactor operating temperatures for producing the heat and hydrogen required for industrial processes associated with the proposed new high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This study assumed that primary steam outputs of the reactor were delivered at 17 MPa and 540C and the helium coolant was delivered at 7 MPa at 625925C. The secondary outputs of were electricity and hydrogen. For the power generation analysis, it was assumed that the power cycle efficiency was 66% of the maximum theoretical efficiency of the Carnot thermodynamic cycle. Hydrogen was generated via the hightemperature steam electrolysis or the steam methane reforming process. The study indicates that optimum or a range of reactor outlet temperatures could be identified to further refine the process evaluations that were developed for high temperature gas-cooled reactor-integrated production of synthetic transportation fuels, ammonia, and ammonia derivatives, oil from unconventional sources, and substitute natural gas from coal.

  13. Development of a transonic front stage of an axial flow compressor for industrial gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katoh, Y.; Ishii, H.; Tsuda, Y.; Yanagida, M. . Mechanical Engineering Research Lab.); Kashiwabara, Y. . Dept. of Mechanical Systems Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the aerodynamic blade design of a highly loaded three-stage compressor, which is a model compressor for the front stage of an industrial gas turbine. Test results are presented that confirm design performance. Some surge and rotating stall measurement results are also discussed. The first stator blade in this test compressor operates in the high subsonic range at the inlet. To reduce the pressure loss due to blade surface shock waves, a shock-free airfoil is designed to replace the first stator blade in an NACA-65 airfoil in a three-stage compressor. Comparison of the performance of both blades shows that the shock-free airfoil blade reduces pressure loss. This paper also presents some experimental results for MCA (multicircular arc) airfoils, which are used for first rotor blades.

  14. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Sales (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Sales (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 182,424 157,050 2000's 157,806 152,974 143,177 142,816 151,386 146,450 135,070 2010's 129,119 124,552 121,821 123,124 122,182 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  15. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Transported (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Transported (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Transported (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 49,014 71,281 2000's 75,826 64,052 62,738 62,698 57,672 59,773 58,760 2010's 63,611 64,749 67,551 69,164 69,953 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  16. Applicability issues and compliance strategies for the proposed oil and gas industry hazardous air pollutant standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tandon, N.; Winborn, K.A.; Grygar, W.W. II

    1999-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has targeted oil and natural gas transmission and storage facilities located across the United States for regulation under the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) program (proposed in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 63 [40 CFR 63], Subparts HH and HHH). The proposed NESHAP were published in the February 6, 1998 Federal Register and are expected to be promulgated in May 1999. These rules are intended to reduce Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) emitted from oil and gas facilities. It is expected that these rules will require more than 400 major sources and more than 500 non-major sources (also referred to as area sources) to meet maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards defined in the NESHAP. The rules would regulate HAP emission from glycol dehydration units, storage vessels and various fugitive leak sources. This technical paper addresses the applicability issues and compliance strategies related to the proposed NESHAP. The applicability criteria for both rules differ from those promulgated for other source categories under 40 CFR 63. For example, individual unit throughput and/or HAP emission thresholds may exempt specific units from the MACT standards in the NESHAP. The proposed Subpart HH would apply not only to major sources, but also to triethylene glycol (TEC) dehydration units at area sources located in urban areas. For both proposed NESHAP all 199 HAP must be considered for the major source determinations, but only 15 specific HAP are targeted for control under the proposed standards. An overview of the HAP control requirements, exemption criteria, as well as initial and continued compliance determination strategies are presented. Several industry examples are included to assist industry develop compliance strategies.

  17. The feasibility of effluent trading in the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-09-01

    In January 1996, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a policy statement endorsing wastewater effluent trading in watersheds, hoping to promote additional interest in the subject. The policy describes five types of effluent trades - point source/point source, point source/nonpoint source, pretreatment, intraplant, and nonpoint source/nonpoint source. This paper evaluates the feasibility of effluent trading for facilities in the oil and gas industry. The evaluation leads to the conclusion that potential for effluent trading is very low in the exploration and production and distribution and marketing sectors; trading potential is moderate for the refining sector except for intraplant trades, for which the potential is high. Good potential also exists for other types of water-related trades that do not directly involve effluents (e.g., wetlands mitigation banking). The potential for effluent trading in the energy industries and in other sectors would be enhanced if Congress amended the Clean Water Act (CWA) to formally authorize such trading.

  18. Development of a Low NOx Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbine Operating on Hydrogen-Rich Renewable and Opportunity Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-11-01

    Solar Turbines Inc., in collaboration with Pennsylvania State University and the University of Southern California, will develop injector technologies for gas turbine use of high-hydrogen content renewable and opportunity fuels derived from coal, biomass, industrial process waste, or byproducts. This project will develop low-emission technology for alternate fuels with high-hydrogen content, thereby reducing natural gas requirements and lowering carbon intensity.

  19. Bond Coating Performance of Thermal Barrier Coatings for Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Ian G; Pint, Bruce A

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are intended to work in conjunction with internal cooling schemes to reduce the metal temperature of critical hot gas path components in gas turbine engines. The thermal resistance is typically provided by a 100--250 {mu}m thick layer of ceramic (most usually zirconia stabilized with an addition of 7--8 wt% of yttria), and this is deposited on to an approximately 50 {mu} thick, metallic bond coating that is intended to anchor the ceramic to the metallic surface, to provide some degree of mechanical compliance, and to act as a reservoir of protective scale-forming elements (Al) to protect the underlying superalloy from high-temperature corrosion. A feature of importance to the durability of thermal barrier coatings is the early establishment of a continuous, protective oxide layer (preferably {alpha}-alumina) at the bond coating-ceramic interface. Because zirconia is permeable to oxygen, this oxide layer continues to grow during service. Some superalloys are inherently resistant to high-temperature oxidation, so a separate bond coating may not be needed in those cases. Thermal barrier coatings have been in service in aeroengines for a number of years, and the use of this technology for increasing the durability and/or efficiency of industrial gas turbines is currently of significant interest. The data presented were taken from an investigation of routes to optimize bond coating performance, and the focus of the paper is on the influences of reactive elements and Pt on the oxidation behaviour of NiAl-based alloys determined in studies using cast versions of bond coating compositions.

  20. Portugal`s Petrogal eyes expansion amid continuing privatization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-16

    Portugal`s recently privatized state oil company Petrogal is about to embark on a major expansion worldwide. That comes against the backdrop of major change in Portugal`s energy sector and the rocky road to Petrogal`s partial privatization. Despite the controversy, there remain opportunities for foreign companies investing in Portugal`s energy sector. The most attractive opportunities are in Portugal`s downstream petroleum sector and in the country`s continuing campaign to develop its natural gas industry. Typical of the latter is Portugal`s participation in the Trans-Maghreb gas pipeline megaproject. The paper discusses the background to privatization, its current status, Petrogal strategy, modernization of refineries, a joint partnership with Venezuela, constraints, energy policy program, gas pipeline privatization, and concerns of the gas industry.

  1. Industrial Compositional Streamline Simulation for Efficient and Accurate Prediction of Gas Injection and WAG Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margot Gerritsen

    2008-10-31

    Gas-injection processes are widely and increasingly used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In the United States, for example, EOR production by gas injection accounts for approximately 45% of total EOR production and has tripled since 1986. The understanding of the multiphase, multicomponent flow taking place in any displacement process is essential for successful design of gas-injection projects. Due to complex reservoir geometry, reservoir fluid properties and phase behavior, the design of accurate and efficient numerical simulations for the multiphase, multicomponent flow governing these processes is nontrivial. In this work, we developed, implemented and tested a streamline based solver for gas injection processes that is computationally very attractive: as compared to traditional Eulerian solvers in use by industry it computes solutions with a computational speed orders of magnitude higher and a comparable accuracy provided that cross-flow effects do not dominate. We contributed to the development of compositional streamline solvers in three significant ways: improvement of the overall framework allowing improved streamline coverage and partial streamline tracing, amongst others; parallelization of the streamline code, which significantly improves wall clock time; and development of new compositional solvers that can be implemented along streamlines as well as in existing Eulerian codes used by industry. We designed several novel ideas in the streamline framework. First, we developed an adaptive streamline coverage algorithm. Adding streamlines locally can reduce computational costs by concentrating computational efforts where needed, and reduce mapping errors. Adapting streamline coverage effectively controls mass balance errors that mostly result from the mapping from streamlines to pressure grid. We also introduced the concept of partial streamlines: streamlines that do not necessarily start and/or end at wells. This allows more efficient coverage and avoids the redundant work generally done in the near-well regions. We improved the accuracy of the streamline simulator with a higher order mapping from pressure grid to streamlines that significantly reduces smoothing errors, and a Kriging algorithm is used to map from the streamlines to the background grid. The higher accuracy of the Kriging mapping means that it is not essential for grid blocks to be crossed by one or more streamlines. The higher accuracy comes at the price of increased computational costs, but allows coarser coverage and so does not generally increase the overall costs of the computations. To reduce errors associated with fixing the pressure field between pressure updates, we developed a higher order global time-stepping method that allows the use of larger global time steps. Third-order ENO schemes are suggested to propagate components along streamlines. Both in the two-phase and three-phase experiments these ENO schemes outperform other (higher order) upwind schemes. Application of the third order ENO scheme leads to overall computational savings because the computational grid used can be coarsened. Grid adaptivity along streamlines is implemented to allow sharp but efficient resolution of solution fronts at reduced computational costs when displacement fronts are sufficiently separated. A correction for Volume Change On Mixing (VCOM) is implemented that is very effective at handling this effect. Finally, a specialized gravity operator splitting method is proposed for use in compositional streamline methods that gives an effective correction of gravity segregation. A significant part of our effort went into the development of a parallelization strategy for streamline solvers on the next generation shared memory machines. We found in this work that the built-in dynamic scheduling strategies of OpenMP lead to parallel efficiencies that are comparable to optimal schedules obtained with customized explicit load balancing strategies as long as the ratio of number of streamlines to number of threads is sufficiently high, which is the case in real-fie

  2. INTERNAL REPAIR OF GAS PIPLINES SURVEY OF OPERATOR EXPERIENCE AND INDUSTRY NEEDS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian D. Harris

    2003-09-01

    A repair method that can be applied from the inside of a gas transmission pipeline (i.e., a trenchless repair) is an attractive alternative to conventional repair methods since the need to excavate the pipeline is precluded. This is particularly true for pipelines in environmentally sensitive and highly populated areas. The objectives of the project are to evaluate, develop, demonstrate, and validate internal repair methods for pipelines; develop a functional specification for an internal pipeline repair system; and prepare a recommended practice for internal repair of pipelines. The purpose of this survey is to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. A total of fifty-six surveys were sent to pipeline operators. A total of twenty completed surveys were returned, representing a 36% response rate, which is considered very good given the fact that tailored surveys are known in the marketing industry to seldom attract more than a 10% response rate. The twenty survey responses produced the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water (e.g., lakes and swamps) in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. All these areas tend to be very difficult and very costly if, and where, conventional excavated repairs may be currently used. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem in a water/river crossing. (3) The typical travel distances required can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). In concept, these groups require pig-based systems; despooled umbilical systems could be considered for the first two groups. For the last group a self-propelled system with an onboard self-contained power and welding system is required. (4) Pipe size range requirements range from 50.8 mm (2 in.) through 1,219.2 mm (48 in.) in diameter. The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm to 762 mm (20 in. to 30 in.) diameter, with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) diameter pipe.

  3. Image is all: Deregulation, restructuring and reputation in the natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    Does image affect how one views his local utility company--or energy supplier? Does one value his utility companies more if one sees a lot of image advertising and public relations stories about community involvement, environmental action and charitable work? Or does one view utilities as faceless and anonymous entities that provide necessary services one thinks little about until there`s a problem? And, more important, what is the role of utility image in an era of deregulation, as companies begin a new scramble for customers? To find an answer to these questions, American Gas and Christopher Bonner Consultants conducted a survey of A.G.A. member companies to learn what, if anything, utility companies are doing in the areas of image assessment and change. The survey was sent to more than 200 A.G.A. member companies; written responses were received from 35. In addition, 13 follow-up telephone interviews were conducted, including four with companies that had not responded in writing. The picture that emerges if of an industry that is starting to pay greater and greater attention to image. And, as utilities reorganize and redefine themselves, they are also reexamining the ways they communicate with key audiences, including employees, customers, legislators, the financial community and the news media.

  4. The NEPA mandate and federal regulation of the natural gas industry. [NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoecker, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Utility regulators increasingly take responsibility for the [open quotes]extemalities[close quotes] associated with their decisions, meaning the economic and social costs related to rate decisions or other kinds of authorizations. Yet, when Congress adopted the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), it intervened to ensure protection of the natural environment, not from abuses by the citizenry but from the activities of the federal government itself. Comprised of action forcing procedures, NEPA was designed to infuse the decisional processes of federal agencies with a broad awareness of the environmental consequences of their actions. NEPA encourages decisionmakers to counterbalance the organic statutory and political missions of their departments or agencies with a sensitivity to the ecological consequences of their directives and authorizations. This paper examines how the requirements of NEPA have fared in the environment of classical public utility regulation at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Commission proceedings did not evidence any widely held opinion that economic regulation of the gas industry is hostile to the NEPA process.

  5. Natural gas monthly, April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are present3ed each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas pipeline and system expansions.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  6. Upstream Financial Review of the Global Oil and Natural Gas Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    This analysis focuses on financial and operating trends of the oil and natural gas production business segment, often referred to as upstream operations, of 42 global oil and natural gas producing companies

  7. Overview of the effect of Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on the natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Child, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    The regulation of hazardous air pollutants by Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 has a potential wide-ranging impact for the natural gas industry. Title III includes a list of 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) which are targeted for reduction. Under Title III, HAP emissions from major sources will be reduced by the implementation of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards. If the source is defined as a major source, it must also comply with Title V (operating permit) and Title VII (enhanced monitoring) requirements. This presentation will review Title III`s effect on the natural gas industry by discussing the regulatory requirements and schedules associated with MACT as well as the control technology options available for affected sources.

  8. Cooperative Research and Development for Advanced Materials in Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramesh Subramanian

    2006-04-19

    Evaluation of the performance of innovative thermal barrier coating systems for applications at high temperatures in advanced industrical gas turbines.

  9. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  10. FERC approves Northwest pipeline expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-15

    Northwest Pipeline Co., Salt Lake City, Utah, received a final permit from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for a $373.4 million main gas line expansion. This paper reports that it plans to begin construction of the 443 MMcfd expansion in mid-July after obtaining further federal, state, and local permits. The expanded system is to be fully operational by second quarter 1993. When the expansion is complete, total Northwest system mileage will be 3,936 miles and system capacity about 2.49 bcfd.

  11. Projections of the impact of expansion of domestic heavy oil production on the U.S. refining industry from 1990 to 2010. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Strycker, A.R.; Guariguata, G.; Salmen, F.G.

    1994-12-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production. This report provides a compendium of the United States refining industry and analyzes the industry by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) and by ten smaller refining areas. The refining capacity, oil source and oil quality are analyzed, and projections are made for the U.S. refining industry for the years 1990 to 2010. The study used publicly available data as background. A linear program model of the U.S. refining industry was constructed and validated using 1990 U.S. refinery performance. Projections of domestic oil production (decline) and import of crude oil (increases) were balanced to meet anticipated demand to establish a base case for years 1990 through 2010. The impact of additional domestic heavy oil production, (300 MB/D to 900 MB/D, originating in select areas of the U.S.) on the U.S. refining complex was evaluated. This heavy oil could reduce the import rate and the balance of payments by displacing some imported, principally Mid-east, medium crude. The construction cost for refining units to accommodate this additional domestic heavy oil production in both the low and high volume scenarios is about 7 billion dollars for bottoms conversion capacity (delayed coking) with about 50% of the cost attributed to compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990.

  12. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

    2010-05-21

    The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

  13. EIS-0071: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuels Gas Demonstration Plant, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a 3,155-ton-per-day capacity facility, which will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the Memphis Division of Light, Gas and Water coal gasification plant at Memphis, Tennessee.

  14. Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MER also provides rebates to commercial and industrial customers for an energy audit which provides a walk-through of the premise and a report on energy saving opportunities, and estimated costs...

  15. Effect of asphaltene deposition on the internal corrosion in the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palacios T, C.A.; Morales, J.L.; Viloria, A.

    1997-08-01

    Crude oil from Norte de Monagas field, in Venezuela, contains large amounts of asphaltenes. Some of them are very unstable with a tendency to precipitate. Because liquid is carried over from the separation process in the flow stations, asphaltenes are also present in the gas gathering and transmission lines, precipitating on the inner wall of pipelines. The gas gathering and transmission lines contain gas with high partial pressures of CO{sub 2}, some H{sub 2}S and are water saturated; therefore, inhibitors are used to control internal corrosion. There is uncertainty on how inhibitors perform in the presence of asphaltene deposition. The purpose of this paper is to describe the causes that enhance asphaltene deposition in gas pipelines and present some results from an ongoing research project carried out by the Venezuelan Oil Companies.

  16. NO{sub x} control using natural gas reburn on an industrial cyclone boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzan, H.; Maringo, G.J.; Beard, C.T.; Weed, G.E.; Pratapas, J.

    1996-12-31

    Eastman Kodak Company`s cyclone boiler (Unit No. 43), located in Rochester, New York, has been retrofitted with the gas reburn technology developed by the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Company to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in order to comply with the New York State regulations adopted in conformance with the Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. At the peak load, the ozone nonattainment required NO{sub x} reduction from baseline levels necessary to meet the presumptive limit for cyclone boilers in this regulation is 56%. Eastman Kodak Company and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) are co-sponsoring this project. Chevron has supplied the natural gas. Equipment installation for the gas reburn system was performed in a September 1995 outage. Boiler No. 43`s maximum continuous rating (MCR) is 550,000 pounds per hour of steam flow (or approximately equivalent to 60 MW{sub e}). Because of the compact boiler design, there is insufficient furnace residence time to use coal or oil as the reburn fuel, thus making it a prime candidate for gas reburn. Kodak currently has four cyclone boilers. Contingent upon successful completion of this gas reburn project, modification of Kodak`s other cyclone boilers to include reburn technology will be consideredd. The paper will describe B and W`s gas reburn data from a cyclone-equipped pilot facility (B and W`s Small Boiler Simulator), gas reburn system design, manufacturing, and installation information specific to Kodak`s Unit No. 43. In addition, the paper will discuss numerical modeling and the full-scale commercial boiler test results.

  17. NO{sub x} control using natural gas reburn on an industrial cyclone boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzan, H.; Maringo, G.J.; Beard, C.T.; Weed, G.E.; Pratapas, J.

    1997-07-01

    Eastman Kodak Company`s cyclone boiler (Unit No. 43), located in Rochester, New York, has been retrofitted with the gas reburn. technology developed by the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Company to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in order to comply with the New York State regulations adopted in conformance with the Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. At the peak load, the ozone nonattainment required NO{sub x} reduction from baseline levels necessary to meet the presumptive limit for cyclone boilers in this regulation is 56%. Eastman Kodak Company and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) are co-sponsoring this project. Chevron has supplied the natural gas. Equipment installation for the gas reburn system was performed in a September 1995 outage. Boiler No. 43`s maximum continuous rating (MCR) is 550,000 pounds per hour of steam flow (or approximately equivalent to 60 MW{sub e}). Because of the compact boiler design, there is insufficient furnace residence time to use coal or oil as the reburn fuel, thus making it a prime candidate for gas reburn. Kodak currently has four cyclone boilers. Contingent upon successful completion of this gas reburn project, modification of Kodak`s other cyclone boilers to include reburn technology will be considered. The paper will describe B&W`s gas reburn data from a cyclone-equipped pilot facility (B&W`s Small Boiler Simulator), gas reburn system design, manufacturing, and installation information specific to Kodak`s Unit No. 43. In addition, the paper will discuss numerical modeling and the full-scale commercial boiler test results.

  18. Competition in the natural gas pipeline industry: An economic policy analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallick, E.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) currently regulates the price at which natural gas can be sold by regulated interstate natural gas pipelines. Whether pipelines should be deregulated depends, to an important extent, on the competitive nature of the market. The key question is whether pipelines can successfully raise price (i.e., the transport fee) and reduce output if the market is deregulated. In most natural gas pipeline markets, there are a small number of current suppliers. Opponents of deregulation argue that the unrestrained market power of pipelines in many local markets will introduce inefficiencies in the sale of natural gas. Implicit in their arguments is a narrow view of competition: the number of current suppliers. The competitive effect of potential entry is largely ignored. These commentators would argue that without potential entry, it may be true that the net social cost of deregulation exceeds the costs of maintaining present regulation. A study was conducted to determine the extent to which potential entry might constrain the exercise of market power by natural gas pipelines if price and entry regulation is removed. Potential entrants are defined in the context of antitrust markets. That is, these markets are consistent with the Department of Justice (DOJ) Merger Guidelines. The study attempts to quantify the effects of potential entry on the market power of current suppliers. The selection of potential entrants therefore considers a number of factors (such as the size of the nearby supplier and the distance to the market) that are expected to affect the likelihood of collision in a deregulated market. The policy implications of the study are reviewed.

  19. Hydrodynamic modeling for corrosion control in the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palacios, C.A.; Morales, J.L.

    1995-10-01

    This article describes a methodology used to select and establish corrosion control programs. These include corrosion rate predictions using well known correlations for flowing systems, materials selection, optimization of inhibitors and corrosion monitoring techniques. The methodology characterizes internal corrosion phenomenon integrating the hydrodynamic conditions of the flow (flow velocities, flow pattern, liquid holdups, and where the condensation is taking place within a pipeline) with those that predict corrosion rates. It can be applied in the whole oil/gas production system, including subsurface and surface equipment. The methodology uses single and two phase flow modeling techniques to: (1) optimize the entire production system to obtain the most efficient objective flow rate, taking into consideration the corrosive/erosive nature of the produced fluids and (2) characterize the corrosion nature of oil and gas transmission lines. As an example of its use, a characterization of corrosion nature of a gas transmission line is described. The hydrodynamic simulation was performed using commercially available simulators, and the corrosion rates were determined using published correlations. Results using this methodology allowed for corrosion control strategies, protection and monitoring criteria, and inhibition optimization.

  20. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Development &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expansion Pipelinesk > Development & Expansion About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipeline Development and Expansion Timing | Determining Market Interest | Expansion Options | Obtaining Approval | Prefiling Process | Approval | Construction | Commissioning Timing and Steps for a New Project An interstate natural gas pipeline construction or expansion project takes an average of about three years

  1. Energy Department Authorizes Sabine Pass Liquefaction's Expansion Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Export Liquefied Natural Gas | Department of Energy Sabine Pass Liquefaction's Expansion Project to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Sabine Pass Liquefaction's Expansion Project to Export Liquefied Natural Gas June 26, 2015 - 1:01pm Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department announced today that it has issued a final authorization for Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC's Expansion Project (Sabine Pass) to export domestically produced

  2. Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Gas Compressors, Notice of Public Meeting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    natural gas compressors is an action issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document. 1 [6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 431 [Docket No. EERE-2014-BT-STD-0051] RIN 1904-AD40

  3. Systematic expansion of porous crystals to include large molecules | Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Systematic expansion of porous crystals to include large molecules

  4. The Northwest Infrared (NWIR) gas-phase spectral database of industrial and environmental chemicals: Recent updates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Blake, Thomas A.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Tonkyn, Russell G.

    2014-05-22

    With continuing improvements in both standoff- and point-sensing techniques, there is an ongoing need for high-quality infrared spectral databases. The Northwest Infrared Database (NWIR) contains quantitative, gas-phase infrared spectra of nearly 500 pure chemical species that can be used for a variety of applications such as atmospheric monitoring, biomass burning studies, etc. The data, recorded at 0.1 cm-1 resolution, are pressure broadened to one atmosphere (N2) in order to mimic atmospheric conditions. Each spectrum is a composite composed of multiple individual measurements. Recent updates to the database include over 60 molecules that are known or suspected biomass-burning effluents. Examples from this set of measurements will be presented and experimental details will be discussed in the context of the utility of NWIR for environmental applications.

  5. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system particle removal system development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, M.

    1994-03-01

    Solar Turbines developed a direct coal-fueled turbine system (DCFT) and tested each component in subscale facilities and the combustion system was tested at full-scale. The combustion system was comprised of a two-stage slagging combustor with an impact separator between the two combustors. Greater than 90 percent of the native ash in the coal was removed as liquid slag with this system. In the first combustor, coal water slurry mixture (CWM) was injected into a combustion chamber which was operated loan to suppress NO{sub x} formation. The slurry was introduced through four fuel injectors that created a toroidal vortex because of the combustor geometry and angle of orientation of the injectors. The liquid slag that was formed was directed downward toward an impaction plate made of a refractory material. Sixty to seventy percent of the coal-borne ash was collected in this fashion. An impact separator was used to remove additional slag that had escaped the primary combustor. The combined particulate collection efficiency from both combustors was above 95 percent. Unfortunately, a great deal of the original sulfur from the coal still remained in the gas stream and needed to be separated. To accomplish this, dolomite or hydrated lime were injected in the secondary combustor to react with the sulfur dioxide and form calcium sulfite and sulfates. This solution for the sulfur problem increased the dust concentrations to as much as 6000 ppmw. A downstream particulate control system was required, and one that could operate at 150 psia, 1850-1900{degrees}F and with low pressure drop. Solar designed and tested a particulate rejection system to remove essentially all particulate from the high temperature, high pressure gas stream. A thorough research and development program was aimed at identifying candidate technologies and testing them with Solar`s coal-fired system. This topical report summarizes these activities over a period beginning in 1987 and ending in 1992.

  6. Chrysler: Save Energy Now Assessment Enables a Vehicle Assembly Complex to Achieve Significant Natural Gas Savings; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Save Energy Now Case Study.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    powerhouse at Chrysler's St. Louis Assembly Complex provides steam, chilled water, and compressed air to both the north and south plants. Chrysler: Save Energy Now Assessment Enables a Vehicle Assembly Complex to Achieve Significant Natural Gas Savings Industrial Technologies Program Case Study Benefits * Achieves annual energy savings of $627,000 * Achieves annual natural gas savings of more than 70,000 MMBtu * Yields a simple payback of just over 2 months Key Findings * Independent evaluations

  7. Terra nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment. Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Save Energy Now Case Study.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Terra Nitrogen plant in Verdigris, Oklahoma. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment Industrial Technologies Program Case Study Benefits * Saves approximately $3.5 million annually * Achieves annual natural gas savings of 497,000 MMBtu * Achieves a simple payback of 11 months Key Findings * Accurately quantifying potential energy savings can provide renewed impetus to reduce energy use. * Although Terra Nitrogen actively managed

  8. The California greenhouse gas initiative and its implications to the automotive industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, B. C.; Miller, R. T.; Center for Automotive Research

    2006-05-31

    CAR undertook this investigation to better understand the costs and challenges of a local (state) regulation necessitating the implementation of alternative or advanced powertrain technology. CAR will attempt to add insight into the challenges that local regulations present to the automotive industry, and to contribute further to the discussion of how advanced powertrain technology may be used to meet such regulation. Any local law that (directly or indirectly) affects light duty motor vehicle fuel economy creates what in effect is a specialty market for powertrain technology. As such these small markets present significant challenges for automotive manufacturers. First, a small market with unique standards presents significant challenges to an industry that has sustained growth by relying on large volumes to achieve scale economies and deliver products at a cost acceptable to the consumer. Further, the challenges of the additional technology make it likely that any powertrain capable of meeting the stringent emissions standards will include costly additional components, and thus will be more costly to manufacture. It is likely that manufacturers would consider the following actions as steps to deliver products to meet the pending California regulatory requirements anticipated as a result of prior California legislation: (1) Substituting more fuel efficient vehicles: Bring in more efficient vehicles from global operations, while likely dropping existing domestic products. (2) Substituting powertrains: Add existing downsized engines (i.e. turbocharged versions, etc.) into California market-bound vehicles. (3) Powertrain enhancements: Add technology to current engine and transmission offerings to improve efficiency and reduce emissions. (4) Incorporating alternative powertrains into existing vehicle platforms: Develop a hybrid or other type of powertrain for an existing vehicle. (5) New powertrains and new platforms: Develop vehicles specifically intended to incorporate new powertrain technologies, materials and/or design (e.g. the General Motors EV1 or the Toyota Prius). These five actions represent the gamut from the least complicated solution to the most complex. They also generally represent the least expensive response to the most expensive. It is possible that the least expensive responses may be least likely to meet market demands while achieving required GHG emission limits. At the same time, the most expensive option may produce a vehicle that satisfies the GHG reduction requirements and meets some consumer requirements, but is far too costly to manufacture and sell profitably. The response of a manufacturer would certainly have to take market size, consumer acceptance, technology implication and cost, as well as internal capacities and constraints, into consideration. It is important to understand that individual companies may respond differently in the short term. However, it is probable that there would be a more consistent industry-wide response in the longer term. Options 1 and 2 present the simplest responses. A company may reach into its global portfolio to deliver vehicles that are more fuel-efficient. These vehicles are usually much smaller and significantly less powerful than current U.S. offerings. Industry respondents indicated that such a strategy may be possible but would likely be met with less than positive reaction from the buying public. A general estimate for the cost to homologize a vehicle--that is, to prepare an existing vehicle for entry into the United States provided all business conditions were met (reasonable product, capacity availability, etc.), would be approximately $50 million. Assuming an estimated cost for homologation to meet U.S. standards of $50 million and a 20,000 vehicle per year sales volume in California, the company would then incur a $2,500 per-vehicle cost to bring them into the market. A manufacturer may also choose to incorporate a more efficient powertrain into a vehicle already sold in the market. The costs associated with such a strategy would include reengineering the vehicle engine compartment to accept the new powertrain, and developing, engineering and manufacturing those parts unique to the vehicle. Costs would also be incurred to achieve emission certification. Total costs per vehicle, if sold only in California would be similar to nationally averaged costs per vehicle when bringing a new vehicle into the national market. While companies may consider the importation of a more fuel-efficient vehicle from their current global portfolio, or the addition of a powertrain from another market, it is likely that these would be seen as stop-gap responses to the legislation. Many of the candidate vehicles and powertrains would likely not meet California consumer expectations, and may not provide enough fuel savings to achieve more severe emission regulations, thus offering only a step toward any solution.

  9. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1991--June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; When, C.S.

    1992-06-01

    This report covers the activity during the period from 2 June 1991 to 1 June 1992. The major areas of work include: the combustor sub-scale and full size testing, cleanup, coal fuel specification and processing, the Hot End Simulation rig and design of the engine parts required for use with the coal-fueled combustor island. To date Solar has demonstrated: Stable and efficient combustion burning coal-water mixtures using the Two Stage Slagging Combustor; Molten slag removal of over 97% using the slagging primary and the particulate removal impact separator; and on-site preparation of CWM is feasible. During the past year the following tasks were completed: The feasibility of on-site CWM preparation was demonstrated on the subscale TSSC. A water-cooled impactor was evaluated on the subscale TSSC; three tests were completed on the full size TSSC, the last one incorporating the PRIS; a total of 27 hours of operation on CWM at design temperature were accumulated using candle filters supplied by Refraction through Industrial Pump & Filter; a target fuel specification was established and a fuel cost model developed which can identify sensitivities of specification parameters; analyses of the effects of slag on refractory materials were conducted; and modifications continued on the Hot End Simulation Rig to allow extended test times.

  10. Partial Oxidation Gas Turbine for Power and Hydrogen Co-Production from Coal-Derived Fuel in Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Rabovitser

    2009-06-30

    The report presents a feasibility study of a new type of gas turbine. A partial oxidation gas turbine (POGT) shows potential for really high efficiency power generation and ultra low emissions. There are two main features that distinguish a POGT from a conventional gas turbine. These are associated with the design arrangement and the thermodynamic processes used in operation. A primary design difference of the POGT is utilization of a non?catalytic partial oxidation reactor (POR) in place of a conventional combustor. Another important distinction is that a much smaller compressor is required, one that typically supplies less than half of the air flow required in a conventional gas turbine. From an operational and thermodynamic point of view a key distinguishing feature is that the working fluid, fuel gas provided by the OR, has a much higher specific heat than lean combustion products and more energy per unit mass of fluid can be extracted by the POGT expander than in the conventional systems. The POGT exhaust stream contains unreacted fuel that can be combusted in different bottoming ycle or used as syngas for hydrogen or other chemicals production. POGT studies include feasibility design for conversion a conventional turbine to POGT duty, and system analyses of POGT based units for production of power solely, and combined production of power and yngas/hydrogen for different applications. Retrofit design study was completed for three engines, SGT 800, SGT 400, and SGT 100, and includes: replacing the combustor with the POR, compressor downsizing for about 50% design flow rate, generator replacement with 60 90% ower output increase, and overall unit integration, and extensive testing. POGT performances for four turbines with power output up to 350 MW in POGT mode were calculated. With a POGT as the topping cycle for power generation systems, the power output from the POGT ould be increased up to 90% compared to conventional engine keeping hot section temperatures, pressures, and volumetric flows practically identical. In POGT mode, the turbine specific power (turbine net power per lb mass flow from expander exhaust) is twice the value of the onventional turbine. POGT based IGCC plant conceptual design was developed and major components have been identified. Fuel flexible fluid bed gasifier, and novel POGT unit are the key components of the 100 MW IGCC plant for co producing electricity, hydrogen and/or yngas. Plant performances were calculated for bituminous coal and oxygen blown versions. Various POGT based, natural gas fueled systems for production of electricity only, coproduction of electricity and hydrogen, and co production of electricity and syngas for gas to liquid and hemical processes were developed and evaluated. Performance calculations for several versions of these systems were conducted. 64.6 % LHV efficiency for fuel to electricity in combined cycle was achieved. Such a high efficiency arise from using of syngas from POGT exhaust s a fuel that can provide required temperature level for superheated steam generation in HRSG, as well as combustion air preheating. Studies of POGT materials and combustion instabilities in POR were conducted and results reported. Preliminary market assessment was performed, and recommendations for POGT systems applications in oil industry were defined. POGT technology is ready to proceed to the engineering prototype stage, which is recommended.

  11. Development of a Low NOx Medium sized Industrial Gas Turbine Operating on Hydrogen-Rich Renewable and Opportunity Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Ram

    2013-07-31

    This report presents the accomplishments at the completion of the DOE sponsored project (Contract # DE-FC26-09NT05873) undertaken by Solar Turbines Incorporated. The objective of this 54-month project was to develop a low NOx combustion system for a medium sized industrial gas turbine engine operating on Hydrogen-rich renewable and opportunity Fuels. The work in this project was focused on development of a combustion system sized for 15MW Titan 130 gas turbine engine based on design analysis and rig test results. Although detailed engine evaluation of the complete system is required prior to commercial application, those tasks were beyond the scope of this DOE sponsored project. The project tasks were organized in three stages, Stages 2 through 4. In Stage 2 of this project, Solar Turbines Incorporated characterized the low emission capability of current Titan 130 SoLoNOx fuel injector while operating on a matrix of fuel blends with varying Hydrogen concentration. The mapping in this phase was performed on a fuel injector designed for natural gas operation. Favorable test results were obtained in this phase on emissions and operability. However, the resulting fuel supply pressure needed to operate the engine with the lower Wobbe Index opportunity fuels would require additional gas compression, resulting in parasitic load and reduced thermal efficiency. In Stage 3, Solar characterized the pressure loss in the fuel injector and developed modifications to the fuel injection system through detailed network analysis. In this modification, only the fuel delivery flowpath was modified and the air-side of the injector and the premixing passages were not altered. The modified injector was fabricated and tested and verified to produce similar operability and emissions as the Stage 2 results. In parallel, Solar also fabricated a dual fuel capable injector with the same air-side flowpath to improve commercialization potential. This injector was also test verified to produce 15-ppm NOx capability on high Hydrogen fuels. In Stage 4, Solar fabricated a complete set of injectors and a combustor liner to test the system capability in a full-scale atmospheric rig. Extensive high-pressure single injector rig test results show that 15-ppm NOx guarantee is achievable from 50% to 100% Load with fuel blends containing up to 65% Hydrogen. Because of safety limitations in Solar Test Facility, the atmospheric rig tests were limited to methane-based fuel blends. Further work to validate the durability and installed engine capability would require long-term engine field test.

  12. Natural Gas Industrial Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 5.49 5.13 3.88 4.64 5.55 3.84 1997-2015 Alabama 6.64 5.57 4.35 4.98 5.49 3.94 1997-2015 Alaska 4.23 3.84 5.11 8.16 7.97 7.21 1997-2015 Arizona 7.54 6.86 5.78 6.29 7.52 NA 1997-2015 Arkansas 7.28 7.44 6.38 6.74 6.99 6.97 1997-2015 California 7.02 7.04 5.77 6.57 7.65 6.35 1997-2015 Colorado

  13. Natural Gas Industrial Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 5.49 5.13 3.88 4.64 5.55 3.84 1997-2015 Alabama 6.64 5.57 4.35 4.98 5.49 3.94 1997-2015 Alaska 4.23 3.84 5.11 8.16 7.97 7.21 1997-2015 Arizona 7.54 6.86 5.78 6.29 7.52 NA 1997-2015 Arkansas 7.28 7.44 6.38 6.74 6.99 6.97 1997-2015 California 7.02 7.04 5.77 6.57 7.65 6.35 1997-2015 Colorado

  14. Natural Gas Industrial Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    67 3.73 3.58 3.46 3.18 3.38 2001-2015 Alabama 3.82 3.91 3.68 3.48 3.33 3.48 2001-2015 Alaska 7.17 7.17 7.17 7.17 7.17 7.24 2001-2015 Arizona 6.80 NA 6.62 6.36 6.35 6.43 2001-2015 Arkansas 6.71 6.62 6.47 6.46 6.02 5.67 2001-2015 California 6.02 6.07 6.09 5.88 5.77 6.92 2001-2015 Colorado 7.28 6.53 6.11 5.95 5.14 4.46 2001-2015 Connecticut 5.88 5.66 6.59 5.76 5.87 6.60 2001-2015 Delaware 8.82 11.38 11.40 11.15 9.62 8.32 2001-2015 District of Columbia -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2015 Florida 6.69 6.02

  15. Analysis of an industrial cogeneration unit driven by a gas engine. Part 1: Experimental testing under full and part-load operating conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Lucia, M.; Lanfranchi, C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes and analyzes an industrial cogeneration plant driven by a gas fueled reciprocating engine installed in a textile factory. It presents the results of experimental testing conducted under full and part-load operating conditions, as well as first-law energy considerations. The experimental tests conducted on the cogeneration unit proved the validity of the plant design and also enabled evaluation of part-load performance, which is the most common operating mode in cogeneration plants in the small-size industries which typical of central Italy.

  16. Opportunities for Micropower and Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Systems in Industrial Applications- Volume II (Appendices), January 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appendices related to quantification of the total market for onsite power generation within the Industries of the Future

  17. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Advancing a Novel Microbial Reverse Electrodialysis Electrolytic System. Many current manufacturing processes produce both low-grade waste heat and wastewater effuents which contain organic materials. A microbial reverse electrodialysis electrolytic cell, designed to integrate

  18. Recovery Act: Innovative CO2 Sequestration from Flue Gas Using Industrial Sources and Innovative Concept for Beneficial CO2 Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dando, Neal; Gershenzon, Mike; Ghosh, Rajat

    2012-07-31

    field testing of a biomimetic in-duct scrubbing system for the capture of gaseous CO2 coupled with sequestration of captured carbon by carbonation of alkaline industrial wastes. The Phase 2 project, reported on here, combined efforts in enzyme development, scrubber optimization, and sequestrant evaluations to perform an economic feasibility study of technology deployment. The optimization of carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme reactivity and stability are critical steps in deployment of this technology. A variety of CA enzyme variants were evaluated for reactivity and stability in both bench scale and in laboratory pilot scale testing to determine current limits in enzyme performance. Optimization of scrubber design allowed for improved process economics while maintaining desired capture efficiencies. A range of configurations, materials, and operating conditions were examined at the Alcoa Technical Center on a pilot scale scrubber. This work indicated that a cross current flow utilizing a specialized gas-liquid contactor offered the lowest system operating energy. Various industrial waste materials were evaluated as sources of alkalinity for the scrubber feed solution and as sources of calcium for precipitation of carbonate. Solids were mixed with a simulated sodium bicarbonate scrubber blowdown to comparatively examine reactivity. Supernatant solutions and post-test solids were analyzed to quantify and model the sequestration reactions. The best performing solids were found to sequester between 2.3 and 2.9 moles of CO2 per kg of dry solid in 1-4 hours of reaction time. These best performing solids were cement kiln dust, circulating dry scrubber ash, and spray dryer absorber ash. A techno-economic analysis was performed to evaluate the commercial viability of the proposed carbon capture and sequestration process in full-scale at an aluminum smelter and a refinery location. For both cases the in-duct scrubber technology was compared to traditional amine- based capture. Incorporation of the laboratory results showed that for the application at the aluminum smelter, the in-duct scrubber system is more economical than traditional methods. However, the reverse is true for the refinery case, where the bauxite residue is not effective enough as a sequestrant, combined with challenges related to contaminants in the bauxite residue accumulating in and fouling the scrubber absorbent. Sensitivity analyses showed that the critical variables by which process economics could be improved are enzyme concentration, efficiency, and half-life. At the end of the first part of the Phase 2 project, a gate review (DOE Decision Zero Gate Point) was conducted to decide on the next stages of the project. The original plan was to follow the pre-testing phase with a detailed design for the field testing. Unfavorable process economics, however, resulted in a decision to conclude the project before moving to field testing. It is noted that CO2 Solutions proposed an initial solution to reduce process costs through more advanced enzyme management, however, DOE program requirements restricting any technology development extending beyond 2014 as commercial deployment timeline did not allow this solution to be undertaken.

  19. Low thermal expansion seal ring support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewis, David W. (San Diego, CA); Glezer, Boris (Del Mar, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Today, the trend is to increase the temperature of operation of gas turbine engines. To cool the components with compressor discharge air, robs air which could otherwise be used for combustion and creates a less efficient gas turbine engine. The present low thermal expansion sealing ring support system reduces the quantity of cooling air required while maintaining life and longevity of the components. Additionally, the low thermal expansion sealing ring reduces the clearance "C","C'" demanded between the interface between the sealing surface and the tip of the plurality of turbine blades. The sealing ring is supported by a plurality of support members in a manner in which the sealing ring and the plurality of support members independently expand and contract relative to each other and to other gas turbine engine components.

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    by 14.4 percent. During this period, U.S. manufacturers used less petroleum and coal in manufacturing processes. This expansion of gas use occurred although natural gas prices to...

  1. Optimal Electric Utility Expansion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1989-10-10

    SAGE-WASP is designed to find the optimal generation expansion policy for an electrical utility system. New units can be automatically selected from a user-supplied list of expansion candidates which can include hydroelectric and pumped storage projects. The existing system is modeled. The calculational procedure takes into account user restrictions to limit generation configurations to an area of economic interest. The optimization program reports whether the restrictions acted as a constraint on the solution. All expansionmore » configurations considered are required to pass a user supplied reliability criterion. The discount rate and escalation rate are treated separately for each expansion candidate and for each fuel type. All expenditures are separated into local and foreign accounts, and a weighting factor can be applied to foreign expenditures.« less

  2. Industrial co-generation through use of a medium BTU gas from biomass produced in a high throughput reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmann, H.F.; Ball, D.A.; Paisley, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    A high-throughput gasification system has been developed for the steam gasification of woody biomass to produce a fuel gas with a heating value of 475 to 500 Btu/SCF without using oxygen. Recent developments have focused on the use of bark and sawdust as feedstocks in addition to wood chips and the testing of a new reactor concept, the so-called controlled turbulent zone (CTZ) reactor to increase gas production per unit of wood fed. Operating data from the original gasification system and the CTZ system are used to examine the preliminary economics of biomass gasification/gas turbine cogeneration systems. In addition, a ''generic'' pressurized oxygen-blown gasification system is evaluated. The economics of these gasification systems are compared with a conventional wood boiler/steam turbine cogeneration system.

  3. Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8<//td> 1989 2,319,630 1,542,083 637,423 [ –] 803,754 5,302,890 37,398 4

  4. Preliminary draft industrial siting administration permit application: Socioeconomic factors technical report. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project in Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Under the with-project scenario, WyCoalGas is projected to make a difference in the long-range future of Converse County. Because of the size of the proposed construction and operations work forces, the projected changes in employment, income, labor force, and population will alter Converse County's economic role in the region. Specifically, as growth occurs, Converse County will begin to satisfy a larger portion of its own higher-ordered demands, those that are currently being satisfied by the economy of Casper. Business-serving and household-serving activities, currently absent, will find the larger income and population base forecast to occur with the WyCoalGas project desirable. Converse County's economy will begin to mature, moving away from strict dependence on extractive industries to a more sophisticated structure that could eventually appeal to national, and certainly, regional markets. The technical demand of the WyCoalGas plant will mean a significant influx of varying occupations and skills. The creation of basic manufacturing, advanced trade and service sectors, and concomitant finance and transportation firms will make Converse County more economically autonomous. The county will also begin to serve market center functions for the smaller counties of eastern Wyoming that currently rely on Casper, Cheyenne or other distant market centers. The projected conditions expected to exist in the absence of the WyCoalGas project, the socioeconomic conditions that would accompany the project, and the differences between the two scenarios are considered. The analysis is keyed to the linkages between Converse County and Natrona County.

  5. DOE to Launch Collaborative Effort with Industry to Improve Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE to Launch Collaborative Effort with Industry to Improve Natural Gas Systems DOE to Launch Collaborative Effort with Industry to Improve Natural Gas Systems July 30, 2014 -...

  6. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagner, Lawrence M. (San Jose, CA); Strum, Michael J. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components.

  7. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-12-15

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig.

  8. Industrial Applications for Micropower: A Market Assessment,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and reciprocating engines offers promise to renew growth in the U.S. industrial sector. ... Opportunities for Micropower and Fuel CellGas Turbine Hybrid Systems in Industrial ...

  9. Stateline Expansion Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stateline Expansion Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Stateline Expansion Wind Farm Facility Stateline Expansion Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  10. EIS-0498: Magnolia LNG and Lake Charles Expansion Projects; Calcasieu

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Parish, Louisiana | Department of Energy 8: Magnolia LNG and Lake Charles Expansion Projects; Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana EIS-0498: Magnolia LNG and Lake Charles Expansion Projects; Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana Summary The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission prepared an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the proposed Magnolia LNG Project, an on-land liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal and associated facilities near Lake Charles, Louisiana.

  11. Process studies for a new method of removing H/sub 2/S from industrial gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumann, D.W.; Lynn, S.

    1986-07-01

    A process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal-derived gas streams has been developed. The basis for the process is the absorption of H/sub 2/S into a polar organic solvent where it is reacted with dissolved sulfur dioxide to form elemental sulfur. After sulfur is crystallized from solution, the solvent is stripped to remove dissolved gases and water formed by the reaction. The SO/sub 2/ is generated by burning a portion of the sulfur in a furnace where the heat of combustion is used to generate high pressure steam. The SO/sub 2/ is absorbed into part of the lean solvent to form the solution necessary for the first step. The kinetics of the reaction between H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/ dissolved in mixtures of N,N-Dimethylaniline (DMA)/ Diethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether and DMA/Triethylene Glycol Dimethyl Ether was studied by following the temperature rise in an adiabatic calorimeter. This irreversible reaction was found to be first-order in both H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/, with an approximates heat of reaction of 28 kcal/mole of SO/sub 2/. The sole products of the reaction appear to be elemental sulfur and water. The presence of DMA increases the value of the second-order rate constant by an order of magnitude over that obtained in the glycol ethers alone. Addition of other tertiary aromatic amines enhances the observed kinetics; heterocyclic amines (e.g., pyridine derivatives) have been found to be 10 to 100 times more effective as catalysts when compared to DMA.

  12. Cryogenic expansion machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pallaver, Carl B. (Woodridge, IL); Morgan, Michael W. (Palos Park, IL)

    1978-01-01

    A cryogenic expansion engine includes intake and exhaust poppet valves each controlled by a cam having adjustable dwell, the valve seats for the valves being threaded inserts in the valve block. Each cam includes a cam base and a ring-shaped cam insert disposed at an exterior corner of the cam base, the cam base and cam insert being generally circular but including an enlarged cam dwell, the circumferential configuration of the cam base and cam dwell being identical, the cam insert being rotatable with respect to the cam base. GI CONTRACTUAL ORIGIN OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION.

  13. GasHighWay Best Practices | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This website provides a compilation of best practices and experiences in the use of natural gas vehicles, the production of biogas and natural gas, and the expansion of...

  14. (Gas) Commercial and Industrial Gas Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: All equipment must be installed on or after January 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015. The documentation must be received no later than March 31, 2016. 

  15. natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

  16. Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report, May 10, 1994--December 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    This report encompasses the first year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on LNG research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (i) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (ii) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. Since this work was for fundamental research in a number of related areas to the use of LNG as a transportation fuel for long haul trucking, many of those results have appeared in numerous refereed journal and conference papers, and significant graduate training experiences (including at least one M.S. thesis and one Ph.D. dissertation) in the first year of this project. In addition, a potential new utilization of LNG fuel has been found, as a part of this work on the fundamental nature of adsorption of LNG vent gases in higher hydrocarbons; follow on research for this and other related applications and transfer of technology are proceeding at this time.

  17. EIA - Natural Gas Analysis Basics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    natural gas industry restructuring in each state, focusing on the residential customer class. About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines State Energy Profiles What role does liquefied...

  18. Industrial Green | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Green Industrial Green - This giant bag may not look green, but it keeps a potent greenhouse gas from being released into the atmosphere. It's part of a system at the Free-Electron Laser that retains sulfur hexafluoride gas when it isn't being used in the FEL's gun test stand. The concept received a 2011 Virginia Governor's Environmental Excellence Program Gold Award. Industrial Green On behalf of work done by Kevin Jordan, a senior engineer in the Free-Electron Laser Division, and

  19. Novel single stripper with side-draw to remove ammonia and sour gas simultaneously for coal-gasification wastewater treatment and the industrial implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, D.C.; Yu, Z.J.; Chen, Y.; Qian, Y.

    2009-06-15

    A large amount of wastewater is produced in the Lurgi coal-gasification process with the complex compounds carbon dioxide, ammonia, phenol, etc., which cause a serious environmental problem. In this paper, a novel stripper operated at elevated pressure is designed to improve the pretreatment process. In this technology, two noticeable improvements were established. First, the carbon dioxide and ammonia were removed simultaneously in a single stripper where sour gas (mainly carbon dioxide) is removed from the tower top and the ammonia vapor is drawn from the side and recovered by partial condensation. Second, the ammonia is removed before the phenol recovery to reduce the pH value of the subsequent extraction units, so as the phenol removal performance of the extraction is greatly improved. To ensure the operational efficiency, some key operational parameters are analyzed and optimized though simulation. It is shown that when the top temperature is kept at 40 C and the weight ratio of the side draw to the feed is above 9%, the elevated pressures can ensure the removal efficiency of NH{sub 3} and carbon dioxide and the desired purified water as the bottom product of the unit is obtained. A real industrial application demonstrates the attractiveness of the new technique: it removes 99.9% CO{sub 2} and 99.6% ammonia, compared to known techniques which remove 66.5% and 94.4%, respectively. As a result, the pH value of the wastewater is reduced from above 9 to below 7. This ensures that the phenol removal ratio is above 93% in the following extraction units. The operating cost is lower than that of known techniques, and the operation is simplified.

  20. Natural gas monthly, July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This document presents information pertaining to the natural gas industry. Data are included on production, consumption, distribution, and pipeline activities.

  1. Industrial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Industrial Manufacturing Buildings Industrialmanufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey...

  2. Clocking the Early Universe's Expansion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clocking the Early Universe Clocking the Early Universe's Expansion Calculations Performed at NERSC Help Scientists Close in on the Nature of Dark Energy April 17, 2014 Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 7421 NERSC PI: David Schlegel Lead Institution: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Project Title: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey NERSC Resources Used: Hopper DOE Program Office: High Energy Physics Astronomers have made the most accurate calculation yet of the expansion rate of

  3. RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2002-09-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

  4. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Major Natural Gas Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corridors Major Natural Gas Transportation Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Major Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Corridors from the Southwest | From Canada | From Rocky Mountain Area | Details about Transportation Corridors The national natural gas delivery network is intricate and expansive, but most of the major transportation routes can be broadly categorized into 11 distinct corridors or flow

  5. Studies on the impact, detection, and control of microbiology influenced corrosion related to pitting failures in the Russian oil and gas industry. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehst, D.

    2006-09-30

    The objectives of the Project are: (1) to design effective anti-corrosion preparations (biocides, inhibitors, penetrants and their combinations) for gas- and oil-exploration industries; (2) to study a possibility of development of environmentally beneficial ('green') biocides and inhibitors of the new generation; (3) to develop chemical and microbiological methods of monitoring of sites at risk of corrosion; and (4) to evaluate potentialities in terms of technology, raw materials and material and technical basis to set up a production of effective anti-corrosion preparations of new generation in Russia. During the four years of the project 228 compounds and formulations were synthesized and studied in respect to their corrosion inhibiting activity. A series of compounds which were according to the Bubble tests more efficient (by a factor of 10-100) than the reference inhibitor SXT-1102, some possessing the similar activity or slightly better activity than new inhibitor ??-1154? (company ONDEO/Nalco). Two synthetic routes for the synthesis of mercaptopyrimidines as perspective corrosion inhibitors were developed. Mercaptopyrimidine derivatives can be obtained in one or two steps from cheap and easily available precursors. The cost for their synthesis is not high and can be further reduced after the optimization of the production processes. A new approach for lignin utilization was proposed. Water-soluble derivative of lignin can by transformed to corrosion protective layer by its electropolymerization on a steel surface. Varying lignosulfonates from different sources, as well as conditions of electrooxidation we proved, that drop in current at high anodic potentials is due to electropolymerization of lignin derivative at steel electrode surface. The electropolymerization potential can be sufficiently decreased by an increase in ionic strength of the growing solution. The lignosulfonate electropolymerization led to the considerable corrosion protection effect of carbon steel. More than three times decrease of corrosion rate on steel surface was observed after lignosulfonate electropolymerization, exceeding protective effect of standard commercially available corrosion inhibitor. Solikamsky lignin could be a promising candidate as a base for the development of the future green corrosion inhibitor. A protective effect of isothiazolones in compositions with other biocides and inhibitors was investigated. Additionally to high biocidal properties, combination of kathon 893 and copper sulfate may also produce a strong anticorrosion effect depending on concentrations of the biocides. Based on its joint biocidal and anticorrosion properties, this combination can be recommended for protection of pipelines against carbon dioxide-induced corrosion. By means of linear polarization resistance test, corrosion properties of biocides of different classes were studied. Isothiazolones can be recommended for treating oil-processing waters in Tatarstan to curb carbon dioxide - induced corrosion. A laboratory research on evaluation of the efficiency of biocides, inhibitors and penetrants by biological and physical-and-chemical methods has been carried out. It was shown that action of corrosion inhibitors and biocides strongly depends on character of their interaction with mineral substances available in waters on oil-exploration sites. It was found that one of approaches to designing environmentally safe ('green') antimicrobial formulations may be the use of synergetic combinations, which allow one to significantly decrease concentrations of biocides. It was shown that the efficacy of biocides and inhibitors depends on physicochemical characteristics of the environment. Anticorrosion and antimicrobial effects of biocides and inhibitors depended in much on the type of medium and aeration regimen. Effects of different biocides, corrosion inhibitors. penetrants and their combinations on the biofilm were investigated. It has been shown that minimal inhibiting concentrations of the reagents for the biofilm are much higher than those for aquatic mic

  6. NIPSCO Prescriptive Electric and Natural Gas Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Prescriptive Natural Gas & Electric Program offers rebates to NIPSCO's large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and institutional customers, who...

  7. Method of Liquifying a gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, William T.; Bingham, Dennis N.; McKellar, Michael G.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Klingler, Kerry M.

    2006-02-14

    A method of liquefying a gas is disclosed and which includes the steps of pressurizing a liquid; mixing a reactant composition with the pressurized liquid to generate a high pressure gas; supplying the high pressure gas to an expansion engine which produces a gas having a reduced pressure and temperature, and which further generates a power and/or work output; coupling the expansion engine in fluid flowing relation relative to a refrigeration assembly, and wherein the gas having the reduced temperature is provided to the refrigeration assembly; and energizing and/or actuating the refrigeration assembly, at least in part, by supplying the power and/or work output generated by the expansion engine to the refrigeration assembly, the refrigeration assembly further reducing the temperature of the gas to liquefy same.

  8. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Users The facility has been used for more than a decade by a virtual Who's Who of the semiconductor industry to simulate the potential failures posed by cosmic-ray-induced neutrons upon miniature electronic devices, such as chips that help control aircraft or complex integrated circuits in automobiles. Industrial User Information The Neutron and Nuclear Science (WNR) Facility welcomes proposals for beam time experiments from industry users. Proprietary and non-proprietary industrial

  9. World NGL markets continue rapid expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otto, K.; Gist, R.; Whitley, C.; Haun, R.

    1998-06-08

    The international LPG industry has expanded rapidly during the 1990s and undergone significant changes. LPG consumption has expanded at nearly twice the rate of world petroleum demand. In particular, LPG use in residential and commercial markets has more than doubled in many developing countries. Markets for LPG and other petroleum products have been opened in many countries, accelerating demand growth and creating investment opportunities in all downstream segments. This has led to an overall strengthening of global LPG pricing and the development of many new export gas-processing projects. The paper discusses world LPG demand in residential and commercial markets and in petrochemicals, world LPG supply, regional increases, international trade, the US situation in natural gas, NGL supply, and NGL demand.

  10. account for intercalation-induced expansion/contraction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expansion/contraction - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  11. EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    natural gas industry restructuring in each state, focusing on the residential customer class. (Status by State as of December 2009) 2009 Revisions in Natural Gas Monthly...

  12. EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Storage

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry....

  13. Mining Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These mined minerals include coal, metals such as iron, copper, or zinc, and industrial minerals such as potash, limestone, and other crushed rocks. Oil and natural gas extraction ...

  14. Oxygen-Enriched Combustion; Industrial Technologies Program ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... appli- cation is a PHAST analysis of a forging furnace where the flue gas temperature is ... Reference Improving Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry. DOE and ...

  15. Natural gas marketing and transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book covers: Overview of the natural gas industry; Federal regulation of marketing and transportation; State regulation of transportation; Fundamentals of gas marketing contracts; Gas marketing options and strategies; End user agreements; Transportation on interstate pipelines; Administration of natural gas contracts; Structuring transactions with the nonconventional source fuels credit; Take-or-pay wars- a cautionary analysis for the future; Antitrust pitfalls in the natural gas industry; Producer imbalances; Natural gas futures for the complete novice; State non-utility regulation of production, transportation and marketing; Natural gas processing agreements and Disproportionate sales, gas balancing, and accounting to royalty owners.

  16. Where is the coiled tubing wave headed. [The increased use of coiled tube drilling equipment in the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K. )

    1994-09-01

    In the late 1980s, the coiled tubing (CT) service market began a wave of growth and expansion unparalleled by other oil field services. In 1989, market growth was so rapid it was referred to as a ''CT revolution.'' The trend has continued through the early 1990s with annual growth rates of 20%--30%, while other oil field service markets have been stagnant or even shrinking. With the recent advent of open-hole CT drilling (CTD) and CT completions (CTC), the wave's momentum is increasing with no end in sight. Advances in CT manufacturing, fatigue prediction, larger-diameter tubing, CT logging and other CT equipment made in the late 1980s improved the reliability and effectiveness of CT services, triggering this wave of activity. The status of this technology is discussed along with the performance and reliability of coiled tubing drills.

  17. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2014-10-18

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industrys projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantial investments.

  18. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industrys projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantial investments.

  19. Aussie LNG players target NE Asia in expansion bid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-28

    Australia's natural gas players, keen to increase their presence in world liquefied natural gas trade, see Asia as their major LNG market in the decades to come. That's despite the fact that two spot cargoes of Australian Northwest Shelf LNG were shipped to Europe during the last 12 months and more are likely in 1994. Opportunities for growth are foreseen within the confines of the existing Northwest Shelf gas project for the rest of the 1990s. But the main focus for potential new grassroots project developers and expansions of the existing LNG plant in Australia is the expected shortfall in contract volumes of LNG to Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan during 2000--2010. Traditionally the price of crude oil has been used as a basis for calculating LNG prices. This means the economics of any new 21st century supply arrangements are delicately poised because of the current low world oil prices, a trend the market believes is likely to continue. In a bid to lessen the effect of high initial capital outlays and still meet projected demand using LNG from new projects and expansion of the existing plant, Australia's gas producers are working toward greater cooperation with prospective Asian buyers.

  20. Shale Gas Spreads to the South | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of techniques of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing (also known as "fracking") have allowed the expansion of production capacity of oil and natural gas in...

  1. Supply contracts for Italy prompt expansions, new construction plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1998-02-23

    Italy`s natural-gas demand is growing faster than that of any other European country, according to Italian gas-transmission operator SNAM S.p.A., Milan. Gas demand in Italy, as a share of total energy demand, is likely to grow from slightly more than a quarter in 1996 to more than a third by 2010. As a result, SNAM is actively negotiating and signing new gas contracts with existing and new suppliers to ensure and diversify gas supply to the peninsula over that period. This article concludes a two-part series on gas supplies and pipeline infrastructure development for Europe`s two southern peninsulas. Part 1 set forth pipeline construction and gas-movement developments on the Iberian peninsula. For European supplies to Italy, expansions on two major cross-country pipelines will have been completed by 2001 along with a third new line in France that will tie into an existing line from The Netherlands. Additionally, early in the next decade, SNAM could be on its way to laying yet another pipeline across the Mediterranean Sea, setting again yet another deepwater pipelay record.

  2. High thermal expansion, sealing glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.

    1993-11-16

    A glass composition is described for hermetically sealing to high thermal expansion materials such as aluminum alloys, stainless steels, copper, and copper/beryllium alloys, which includes between about 10 and about 25 mole percent Na[sub 2]O, between about 10 and about 25 mole percent K[sub 2]O, between about 5 and about 15 mole percent Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], between about 35 and about 50 mole percent P[sub 2]O[sub 5] and between about 5 and about 15 mole percent of one of PbO, BaO, and mixtures thereof. The composition, which may also include between 0 and about 5 mole percent Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] and between 0 and about 10 mole percent B[sub 2]O[sub 3], has a thermal expansion coefficient in a range of between about 160 and 210[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C and a dissolution rate in a range of between about 2[times]10[sup [minus]7] and 2[times]10[sup [minus]9]g/cm[sup 2]-min. This composition is suitable to hermetically seal to metallic electrical components which will be subjected to humid environments over an extended period of time.

  3. High thermal expansion, sealing glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); Kovacic, Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A glass composition for hermetically sealing to high thermal expansion materials such as aluminum alloys, stainless steels, copper, and copper/beryllium alloys, which includes between about 10 and about 25 mole percent Na.sub.2 O, between about 10 and about 25 mole percent K.sub.2 O, between about 5 and about 15 mole percent Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, between about 35 and about 50 mole percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and between about 5 and about 15 mole percent of one of PbO, BaO, and mixtures thereof. The composition, which may also include between 0 and about 5 mole percent Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and between 0 and about 10 mole percent B.sub.2 O.sub.3, has a thermal expansion coefficient in a range of between about 160 and 210.times.10-7/.degree.C. and a dissolution rate in a range of between about 2.times.10.sup.- 7 and 2.times.10.sup.-9 g/cm.sup.2 -min. This composition is suitable to hermetically seal to metallic electrical components which will be subjected to humid environments over an extended period of time.

  4. Stetson Wind Expansion Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stetson Wind Expansion Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Stetson Wind Expansion Wind Farm Facility Stetson Wind Expansion Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale...

  5. Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, Donald C.

    1985-06-04

    A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power.

  6. Natural Gas Value-Chain and Network Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobos, Peter H.; Outkin, Alexander V.; Beyeler, Walter E.; Walker, LaTonya Nicole; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Myerly, Melissa M.; Vargas, Vanessa N.; Tenney, Craig M.; Borns, David J.

    2015-09-01

    The current expansion of natural gas (NG) development in the United States requires an understanding of how this change will affect the natural gas industry, downstream consumers, and economic growth in order to promote effective planning and policy development. The impact of this expansion may propagate through the NG system and US economy via changes in manufacturing, electric power generation, transportation, commerce, and increased exports of liquefied natural gas. We conceptualize this problem as supply shock propagation that pushes the NG system and the economy away from its current state of infrastructure development and level of natural gas use. To illustrate this, the project developed two core modeling approaches. The first is an Agent-Based Modeling (ABM) approach which addresses shock propagation throughout the existing natural gas distribution system. The second approach uses a System Dynamics-based model to illustrate the feedback mechanisms related to finding new supplies of natural gas - notably shale gas - and how those mechanisms affect exploration investments in the natural gas market with respect to proven reserves. The ABM illustrates several stylized scenarios of large liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports from the U.S. The ABM preliminary results demonstrate that such scenario is likely to have substantial effects on NG prices and on pipeline capacity utilization. Our preliminary results indicate that the price of natural gas in the U.S. may rise by about 50% when the LNG exports represent 15% of the system-wide demand. The main findings of the System Dynamics model indicate that proven reserves for coalbed methane, conventional gas and now shale gas can be adequately modeled based on a combination of geologic, economic and technology-based variables. A base case scenario matches historical proven reserves data for these three types of natural gas. An environmental scenario, based on implementing a $50/tonne CO 2 tax results in less proven reserves being developed in the coming years while demand may decrease in the absence of acceptable substitutes, incentives or changes in consumer behavior. An increase in demand of 25% increases proven reserves being developed by a very small amount by the end of the forecast period of 2025.

  7. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  8. ARM - Methane Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methane Gas Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Methane Gas Methane gas is another naturally occurring greenhouse gas. It is produced as a result of microbial activity in the absence of oxygen. Pre-industrial concentrations of methane were about 700 ppb and in 1994 they were up

  9. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

    2009-02-02

    Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

  10. Industrial Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Permit Industrial Permit The Industrial Permit authorizes the Laboratory to discharge point-source effluents under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. October 15, 2012 Outfall from the Laboratory's Data Communications Center cooling towers Intermittent flow of discharged water from the Laboratory's Data Communications Center eventually reaches perennial segment of Sandia Canyon during storm events (Outfall 03A199). Contact Environmental Communication & Public

  11. Industry Economists

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry Economists The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Industry Economist, whose work is associated with the performance of economic analyses using economic techniques. Responsibilities: Industry Economists perform or participate in one or more of the following

  12. OTHER INDUSTRIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO funded research results in novel technologies in diverse industries beyond the most energy intensive ones within the U.S. Manufacturing sector. These technologies offer quantifiable energy...

  13. Assistance to Oil and Gas State Agencies and Industry through Continuation of Environmental and Production Data Management and a Water Regulatory Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grunewald, Ben; Arthur, Dan; Langhus, Bruce; Gillespie, Tom; Binder, Ben; Warner, Don; Roberts, Jim; Cox, D.O.

    2002-05-31

    This grant project was a major step toward completion of the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) project. Additionally the project addresses the needs identified during the projects initial phases. By implementing this project, the following outcomes were sought: (1) State regulatory agencies implemented more formalized environmental risk management practices as they pertain to the production of oil and gas, and injection via Class II wells. (2) Enhancement of oil and gas production by implementing a management system supporting the saving of abandoned or idle wells located in areas with a relatively low environmental risk of endangering underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) in a particular state. (3) Verification that protection of USDWs is adequate and additional restrictions of requirements are not necessary in areas with a relatively low environmental risk. (4) Standardization of data and information maintained by state regulatory agencies and decrease the regulatory cost burden on producers operating in multiple states, and (5) Development of a system for electronic data transfer among operators and state regulatory agencies and reduction of overall operator reporting burdens.

  14. Theoretical model for plasma expansion generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming Zhang, Dongjiang; Long, Renrong; Chen, Li; Huang, Fenglei; Gong, Zizheng

    2014-09-15

    The hypervelocity impact experiments of spherical LY12 aluminum projectile diameter of 6.4?mm on LY12 aluminum target thickness of 23?mm have been conducted using a two-stage light gas gun. The impact velocity of the projectile is 5.2, 5.7, and 6.3?km/s, respectively. The experimental results show that the plasma phase transition appears under the current experiment conditions, and the plasma expansion consists of accumulation, equilibrium, and attenuation. The plasma characteristic parameters decrease as the plasma expands outward and are proportional with the third power of the impact velocity, i.e., (T{sub e}, n{sub e})???v{sub p}{sup 3}. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model on the plasma expansion is developed and the theoretical results are consistent with the experimental data.

  15. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Users - Media Publications and Information The Invisible Neutron Threat Neutron-Induced Failures in Semiconductor Devices Nuclear Science Research at the LANSCE-WNR Facility Links About WNR Industrial Users 4FP30L-A/ICE House 4FP30R/ICE II Media

  16. National Institute of Economic and Industry Research

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    scale export of East Coast Australia natural gas: Unintended consequences National Institute of Economic and Industry Research 1 This note summarizes the major conclusions of the NIEIR study referenced here. Many major projects to export Liquefied Natural Gas from Eastern Australia have been approved and will start to operate over the next several years. This will significantly impact the domestic supply of natural gas. The National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) has done an

  17. Pressurized electrolysis stack with thermal expansion capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Richard Scott

    2015-07-14

    The present techniques provide systems and methods for mounting an electrolyzer stack in an outer shell so as to allow for differential thermal expansion of the electrolyzer stack and shell. Generally, an electrolyzer stack may be formed from a material with a high coefficient of thermal expansion, while the shell may be formed from a material having a lower coefficient of thermal expansion. The differences between the coefficients of thermal expansion may lead to damage to the electrolyzer stack as the shell may restrain the thermal expansion of the electrolyzer stack. To allow for the differences in thermal expansion, the electrolyzer stack may be mounted within the shell leaving a space between the electrolyzer stack and shell. The space between the electrolyzer stack and the shell may be filled with a non-conductive fluid to further equalize pressure inside and outside of the electrolyzer stack.

  18. ARM - Lesson Plans: Thermal Expansion of Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Expansion of Water Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Thermal Expansion of Water Objective The objective of this activity is to demonstrate the concept of thermal expansion of water when heated. Materials Each student or group of students will need the

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    levels and 25 percent below the 5-year average. Natural gas prices are likely to stay high as long as above-normal storage injection demand competes with industrial and...

  20. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This document highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Data presented include volume and price, production, consumption, underground storage, and interstate pipeline activities.

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    by 14.4 percent. During this period, U.S. manufacturers used less petroleum and coal in manufacturing processes. This expansion of gas use occurred although natural gas prices to...

  2. Expansion Capital Partners LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Product: Venture capital firm that invests in expansion-stage, clean technology enterprises Year Founded: 2001 Phone Number: (415) 788-8802 Website: www.expansioncapital.com...

  3. Industry Economist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will report to the Manager of Load Forecasting and Analysis of the Customer Services Organization. He/she serves as an industry economist engaged in load...

  4. Industry @ ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS ALS, Molecular Foundry, and aBeam Technologies Collaborate to Make Metrology History Print Thursday, 21 January 2016 12:47 A collaboration between Bay Area company aBeam Technologies, the ALS, and the Molecular Foundry is bringing cutting-edge metrology instrumentation to the semiconductor market, which will enable a new level of quality control. Summary Slide Read more... Takeda Advances Diabetes Drug Development at the ALS Print Tuesday, 19 May 2015 12:25 Type 2

  5. Expansion techniques for collisionless stellar dynamical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meiron, Yohai; Li, Baile; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-09-10

    We present graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations of two fast force calculation methods based on series expansions of the Poisson equation. One method is the self-consistent field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other method is the multipole expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field methods and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a 'pure' expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; thus, MEX is capable of capturing radial structure easily, while SCF needs a large number of radial terms. We show that despite the expansion bias, these methods are more accurate than direct techniques for the same number of particles. The performance of our GPU code, which we call ETICS, is profiled and compared to a CPU implementation. On the tested GPU hardware, a full force calculation for one million particles took ?0.1 s (depending on expansion cutoff), making simulations with as many as 10{sup 8} particles fast for a comparatively small number of nodes.

  6. Multipole expansion method for supernova neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Huaiyu; Shalgar, Shashank, E-mail: duan@unm.edu, E-mail: shashankshalgar@unm.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a multipole expansion method to calculate collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae using the neutrino bulb model. We show that it is much more efficient to solve multi-angle neutrino oscillations in multipole basis than in angle basis. The multipole expansion method also provides interesting insights into multi-angle calculations that were accomplished previously in angle basis.

  7. Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics The industrial sector is vital to the U.S. economy, but at the same time consumes the most energy in the country to manufacture products we use every day. Among the most energy-intensive industries are aluminum, chemicals, forest product, glass, metal casting, mining, petroleum refining, and steel. The energy supply chain begins with electricity, steam, natural gas, coal, and other fuels supplied to a manufacturing plant

  8. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, B.

    1995-04-11

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow there between. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow. 8 figures.

  9. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Blake (4650 Almond Cir., Livermore, CA 94550)

    1995-01-01

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow therebetween. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow.

  10. Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The petroleum-based transportation fuel system is complex and highly developed, in contrast to the nascent low-petroleum, low-carbon alternative fuel system. This report examines how expansion of the low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure could contribute to deep reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across the U.S. transportation sector. Three low-carbon scenarios, each using a different combination of low-carbon fuels, were developed to explore infrastructure expansion trends consistent with a study goal of reducing transportation sector GHG emissions to 80% less than 2005 levels by 2050.These scenarios were compared to a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and were evaluated with respect to four criteria: fuel cost estimates, resource availability, fuel production capacity expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion.

  11. Opportunities for Micropower and Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Micropower and Fuel CellGas Turbine Hybrid Systems in Industrial Applications - Volume II (Appendices), January 2000 Opportunities for Micropower and Fuel CellGas Turbine Hybrid...

  12. Natural Gas Compressor for Residential Use ---- Inventor Robert...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gas compression to ultra-high pressures, which is required in many industrial and automotive processes. Gas compression, to pressures above about 100 psig, generally requires...

  13. Natural Gas Citygate Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground

  14. Commercial / Industrial Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Commercial Program Development Commercial Current Promotions Industrial Federal Agriculture Commercial & Industrial Lighting Efficiency Program The Commercial & Industrial...

  15. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion.

  16. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-08-24

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion. 3 figs.

  17. Gas supplies of interstate/natural gas pipeline companies 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-18

    This publication provides information on the interstate pipeline companies' supply of natural gas during calendar year 1989, for use by the FERC for regulatory purposes. It also provides information to other Government agencies, the natural gas industry, as well as policy makers, analysts, and consumers interested in current levels of interstate supplies of natural gas and trends over recent years. 5 figs., 18 tabs.

  18. Natural gas monthly, May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is ``Restructuring energy industries: Lessons from natural gas.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. Petroleum industry in Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farideh, A.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the oil industry in Iran from the early discovery of oil nearly two hundred years ago in Mazandaran (north part) to the development of a giant modern industry in the twentieth century. Chapter I presents a brief historical setting to introduce the reader to the importance of oil in Iran. It focuses on the economic implications of the early oil concessions in the period 1901 to 1951. Chapter II discusses the nationalization of the Iranian oil industry and creation of NIOC in 1951 and the international political and economic implication of these activities. Chapter III explains the activities of NIOC in Iran. Exploration and drilling, production, exports, refineries, natural gas, petrochemicals and internal distributions are studied. Chapter IV discusses the role of the development planning of Iran. A brief presentation of the First Development Plan through the Fifth Development Plan is given. Sources and uses of funds by plan organization during these Five Plans is studied. The Iran and Iraq War is also studied briefly, but the uncertainty of its resolution prevents any close analysis of its impact on the Iranian oil industry. One conclusion, however, is certain; oil has been a vital resource in Iran's past and it will remain the lifetime of its economic development in the future.

  20. Low expansion superalloy with improved toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, D.F.; Stein, L.I.; Hwang, I.S.

    1995-06-20

    A high strength, low coefficient of thermal expansion superalloy exhibiting improved toughness over a broad temperature range down to about 4 K is disclosed. The composition is adapted for use with wrought superconducting sheathing.

  1. Low expansion superalloy with improved toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Darrell F. (Huntington, WV); Stein, Larry I. (Huntington, WV); Hwang, Il S. (Seoul, KR)

    1995-01-01

    A high strength, low coefficient of thermal expansion superalloy exhibiting improved toughness over a broad temperature range down to about 4.degree. K. The composition is adapted for use with wrought superconducting sheathing.

  2. DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear Power Plants DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse ...

  3. Solar Trackers Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Trackers Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2010 - 2020 Home > Groups > Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency John55364's picture...

  4. EA-1997: Construction Landfill Expansion, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 7: Construction Landfill Expansion, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas EA-1997: Construction Landfill Expansion, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas SUMMARY Construction Landfill Expansion, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

  5. Gas revenue increasingly significant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Megill, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    This paper briefly describes the wellhead prices of natural gas compared to crude oil over the past 70 years. Although natural gas prices have never reached price parity with crude oil, the relative value of a gas BTU has been increasing. It is one of the reasons that the total amount of money coming from natural gas wells is becoming more significant. From 1920 to 1955 the revenue at the wellhead for natural gas was only about 10% of the money received by producers. Most of the money needed for exploration, development, and production came from crude oil. At present, however, over 40% of the money from the upstream portion of the petroleum industry is from natural gas. As a result, in a few short years natural gas may become 50% of the money revenues generated from wellhead production facilities.

  6. Global gas processing will strengthen to meet expanding markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haun, R.R.; Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C.; Gist, R.L.

    1996-07-01

    The worldwide LPG industry continues to expand faster than the petroleum industry -- 4%/year for LPG vs. 2%/year for petroleum in 1995 and less than 1%/year in the early 1990s. This rapid expansion of LPG markets is occurring in virtually every region of the world, including such developing countries as China. The Far East is the focus of much of the LPG industry`s attention, but many opportunities exist in other regions such as the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. The investment climate is improving in all phases of downstream LPG marketing, including terminaling, storage, and wholesale and retail distribution. The world LPG supply/demand balance has been relatively tight since the Gulf War and should remain so. Base demand (the portion of demand that is not highly price-sensitive) is expanding more rapidly than supplies. As a result, the proportion of total LPG supplies available for price-sensitive petrochemical feedstock markets is declining, at least in the short term. The paper discusses importers, price patterns, world LPG demand, world LPG supply, US NGL supply, US gas processing, ethane and propane supply, butane, isobutane, and natural gasoline supply, and US NGL demand.

  7. Improve Overall Plant Efficiency and Fuel Use, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01

    This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program combined heat and power (CHP) tool can help identify energy savings in gas turbine-driven systems.

  8. Eigenfunction Expansion of the Space-Time Dependent Neutron Survival...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Eigenfunction Expansion of the Space-Time Dependent Neutron Survival Probability. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Eigenfunction Expansion of the Space-Time Dependent...

  9. Heat Flow Database Expansion for NGDS Data Development, Collection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Flow Database Expansion for NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance (SMU) Heat Flow Database Expansion for NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance (SMU) ...

  10. Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (July 2013) Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (July 2013) The Year-in-Review (YIR): 2012 Energy...

  11. HTGR Industrial Application Functional and Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. E. Demick

    2010-08-01

    This document specifies the functional and performance requirements to be used in the development of the conceptual design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) based plant supplying energy to a typical industrial facility. These requirements were developed from collaboration with industry and HTGR suppliers over the preceding three years to identify the energy needs of industrial processes for which the HTGR technology is technically and economically viable. The functional and performance requirements specified herein are an effective representation of the industrial sector energy needs and an effective basis for developing a conceptual design of the plant that will serve the broadest range of industrial applications.

  12. Natural gas annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  13. Uncertainty Quantification in CO{sub 2} Sequestration Using Surrogate Models from Polynomial Chaos Expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yan; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.

    2013-04-06

    In this paper, surrogate models are iteratively built using polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) and detailed numerical simulations of a carbon sequestration system. Output variables from a numerical simulator are approximated as polynomial functions of uncertain parameters. Once generated, PCE representations can be used in place of the numerical simulator and often decrease simulation times by several orders of magnitude. However, PCE models are expensive to derive unless the number of terms in the expansion is moderate, which requires a relatively small number of uncertain variables and a low degree of expansion. To cope with this limitation, instead of using a classical full expansion at each step of an iterative PCE construction method, we introduce a mixed-integer programming (MIP) formulation to identify the best subset of basis terms in the expansion. This approach makes it possible to keep the number of terms small in the expansion. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is then performed by substituting the values of the uncertain parameters into the closed-form polynomial functions. Based on the results of MC simulation, the uncertainties of injecting CO{sub 2} underground are quantified for a saline aquifer. Moreover, based on the PCE model, we formulate an optimization problem to determine the optimal CO{sub 2} injection rate so as to maximize the gas saturation (residual trapping) during injection, and thereby minimize the chance of leakage.

  14. NYSEG (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: As of March 2016, the incentives for program year 2016 are being updated. Please check the program website for updated information. 

  15. Number of Natural Gas Industrial Sales Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    129,119 124,552 121,821 123,124 122,182 1998-2014 Alabama 2,758 2,725 2,783 2,876 2,973 1998-2014 Alaska 2 2 3 2 1 1998-2014 Arizona 261 266 261 257 256 1998-2014 Arkansas 580 554 523 513 531 1998-2014 California 33,914 32,673 32,372 32,662 32,266 1998-2014 Colorado 882 1,011 960 946 986 1998-2014 Connecticut 2,110 2,086 2,162 3,360 3,340 1998-2014 Delaware 40 35 29 28 28 1998-2014 Florida 129 162 170 166 165 1998-2014 Georgia 892 928 886 984 887 1998-2014 Hawaii 24 24 22 22 23 1998-2014 Idaho

  16. Number of Natural Gas Industrial Transported Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    63,611 64,749 67,551 69,164 69,953 1998-2014 Alabama 281 263 262 267 271 1998-2014 Alaska 1 3 0 1 0 1998-2014 Arizona 107 105 118 126 130 1998-2014 Arkansas 499 579 467 507 478 1998-2014 California 4,092 4,902 5,314 5,334 5,282 1998-2014 Colorado 5,350 5,518 5,946 6,347 6,837 1998-2014 Connecticut 953 976 986 1,094 877 1998-2014 Delaware 74 94 105 110 113 1998-2014 Florida 452 468 337 362 355 1998-2014 Georgia 1,282 1,256 1,226 1,258 1,594 1998-2014 Idaho 76 75 74 74 74 1998-2014 Illinois 9,729

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Industrial Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6,826,192 6,994,120 7,226,215 7,425,452 7,623,826 7,508,093 1997-2015 Alabama 144,938 153,358 171,729 179,511 187,661 186,213 1997-2015 Alaska 6,408 6,769 6,357 4,065 4,847 4,545 1997-2015 Arizona 19,245 21,724 22,657 22,153 22,489 19,991 1997-2015 Arkansas 83,061 85,437 81,597 87,077 88,797 84,464 1997-2015 California 703,536 706,350 735,925 775,969 788,817 780,616 1997-2015 Colorado 114,295 74,407 73,028 78,280 78,323 78,174 1997-2015 Connecticut 24,117 26,258 26,932 29,965 28,371 25,943

  18. Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on energy saving opportunities, and estimated costs and savings. Free facility benchmarking services which analyze energy usage are available as well. Applications for audits...

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Industrial Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    590,889 597,420 576,724 611,594 636,533 669,085 2001-2015 Alabama 15,749 15,311 14,897 15,292 15,100 15,670 2001-2015 Alaska 359 375 323 348 354 393 2001-2015 Arizona 1,468 1,457 1,417 1,572 1,844 1,988 2001-2015 Arkansas 6,345 6,370 6,286 6,790 7,098 7,148 2001-2015 California 70,121 71,776 66,196 64,699 63,799 67,213 2001-2015 Colorado 4,997 4,987 4,790 5,823 7,640 8,931 2001-2015 Connecticut 1,758 1,826 1,734 1,916 2,035 2,222 2001-2015 Delaware 2,669 2,636 2,448 2,590 2,682 3,040 2001-2015

  20. Washington Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 111,159 133,106 124,371 2000's 83,748 75,017 67,717 65,884 67,812 66,874 70,758 73,572 75,748...

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Industrial Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6,826,192 6,994,120 7,226,215 7,425,452 7,623,826 7,508,093 1997-2015 Alabama 144,938 153,358 171,729 179,511 187,661 186,213 1997-2015 Alaska 6,408 6,769 6,357 4,065 4,847 4,545 1997-2015 Arizona 19,245 21,724 22,657 22,153 22,489 19,991 1997-2015 Arkansas 83,061 85,437 81,597 87,077 88,797 84,464 1997-2015 California 703,536 706,350 735,925 775,969 788,817 780,616 1997-2015 Colorado 114,295 74,407 73,028 78,280 78,323 78,174 1997-2015 Connecticut 24,117 26,258 26,932 29,965 28,371 25,943

  2. Average Natural Gas Consumption per Industrial Consumer

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    29,705 35,418 36,947 38,159 38,616 39,680 1973-2014 Alabama 42,927 47,693 51,325 56,397 57,114 57,849 1973-2014 Alaska 2,211,756 2,135,975 1,353,819 2,118,957 1,354,889 4,847,208 1973-2014 Arizona 46,020 52,297 58,554 59,780 57,841 58,262 1973-2014 Arkansas 75,693 76,980 75,408 82,422 85,370 88,005 1973-2014 California 18,225 18,511 18,798 19,528 20,422 21,008 1973-2014 Colorado 22,341 18,340 11,396 10,575 10,734 10,012 1973-2014 Connecticut 7,835 7,874 8,576 8,555 6,728 6,728 1973-2014 Delaware

  3. Number of Natural Gas Industrial Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    207,624 192,730 189,301 189,372 192,288 192,135 1987-2014 Alabama 3,057 3,039 2,988 3,045 3,143 3,244 1986-2014 Alaska 3 3 5 3 3 1 1987-2014 Arizona 390 368 371 379 383 386 1987-2014 Arkansas 1,025 1,079 1,133 990 1,020 1,009 1986-2014 California 38,746 38,006 37,575 37,686 37,996 37,548 1986-2014 Colorado 5,084 6,232 6,529 6,906 7,293 7,823 1986-2014 Connecticut 3,138 3,063 3,062 3,148 4,454 4,217 1986-2014 Delaware 112 114 129 134 138 141 1987-2014 Florida 607 581 630 507 528 520 1987-2014

  4. Connecticut Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 34,554 32,498 32,039 2000's 32,162 25,622 29,051 23,553 20,529 20,469 21,670 22,794 22,539...

  5. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","122015" ,"Release Date:","2292016" ,"Next Release Date:","3312016" ,"Excel ... 40224,2222 40252,2183 40283,1995 40313,2013 40344,2042 40374,2216 40405,2324 ...

  6. Industrial Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6,167,371 6,826,192 6,994,120 7,226,215 7,425,452 7,623,826 1997-2014 Alabama 131,228 144,938 153,358 171,729 179,511 187,661 1997-2014 Alaska 6,635 6,408 6,769 6,357 4,065 4,847...

  7. Industrial Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    574,422 590,889 597,420 576,698 611,594 636,533 2001-2015 Alabama 14,619 15,749 15,311 14,897 15,292 15,100 2001-2015 Alaska 352 359 375 323 348 354 2001-2015 Arizona 1,481 1,468...

  8. Natural gas 1996 - issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This publication presents a summary of the latest data and information relating to the U.S. natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission, consumption, and financial aspects of the industry.

  9. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    10-161-LNG | Department of Energy 0-161-LNG Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 10-161-LNG On May 17, 2013, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Department of Energy (DOE/FE) issued Order No. 3282 (FLEX I Conditional Order) to Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, pursuant to section 3(a) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA). As discussed in the below PDF, DOE/FE subsequently amended Order No. 3282 to add FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG

  10. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    11-161-LNG | Department of Energy 1-161-LNG Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 11-161-LNG On November 15, 2013, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Department of Energy (DOE/FE) issued Order No. 3357 (FLEX II Conditional Order) to Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC, and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC (collectively, FLEX) pursuant to section 3(a) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA). As discussed in the PDF below, DOE/FE

  11. Natural gas monthly, June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-22

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  12. Natural gas monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-27

    The Natural Gas Monthly NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  13. Natural gas monthly, September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-27

    The (NGM) Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  14. Natural gas monthly, April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-27

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

  15. Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Stakeholders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initiatives » Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse » Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Stakeholders Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Stakeholders Regulators EMATRIX Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Natural Gas Star program Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) Industry groups American Gas Association (AGA) American Gas Foundation (AGF)

  16. Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends provides a summary of the latest data and information relating to the US natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission, consumption, and the financial and environmental aspects of the industry. The report consists of seven chapters and five appendices. Chapter 1 presents a summary of various data trends and key issues in today`s natural gas industry and examines some of the emerging trends. Chapters 2 through 7 focus on specific areas or segments of the industry, highlighting some of the issues associated with the impact of natural gas operations on the environment. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. Natural Gas: A Preliminary Summary 1998

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This special report provides preliminary natural gas data for 1998 which were reported on monthly surveys of the industry through December.

  18. Natural Gas: A Preliminary Summary 1999

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This special report provides preliminary natural gas data for 1999 which were reported on monthly surveys of the industry through December.

  19. Berkshire Gas- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Berkshire Gas Company (BCG) provides rebates for its commercial and industrial customers to pursue energy efficient improvements to their facilities. As a part of their energy efficiency program,...

  20. Gas Shale Plays? The Global Transition

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    wells, and install the extensive surface infrastructure needed to transport product to market. Industry is cautious regarding China's likely pace of shale gas development. Even...

  1. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    were to convene industry and other stakeholders to share current status and state-of-the-art technologies for natural gas and hydrogen infrastructure; identify key challenges, both...

  2. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  3. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regulatory Authorities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulatory Authorities About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Regulatory Authorities Beginning | Regulations Today | Coordinating Agencies | Regulation of Mergers and Acquisitions Beginning of Industry Restructuring In April 1992, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued its Order 636 and transformed the interstate natural gas transportation segment of the industry forever. Under it,

  4. Natural gas monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highhghts activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  5. Natural gas monthly, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-06

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. There are two feature articles in this issue: Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends, Executive summary; and Special report: Natural gas 1998: A preliminary summary. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  6. Natural gas monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-27

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  7. Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, D.C.

    1985-06-04

    A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power. 1 fig.

  8. Combustion instabilities in sudden expansion oxy-fuel flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ditaranto, Mario; Hals, Joergen

    2006-08-15

    An experimental study on combustion instability is presented with focus on oxy-fuel type combustion. Oxidants composed of CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and methane are the reactants flowing through a premixer-combustor system. The reaction starts downstream a symmetric sudden expansion and is at the origin of different instability patterns depending on oxygen concentration and Reynolds number. The analysis has been conducted through measurement of pressure, CH* chemiluminescence, and velocity. As far as stability is concerned, oxy-fuel combustion with oxygen concentration similar to that found in air combustion cannot be sustained, but requires at least 30% oxygen to perform in a comparable manner. Under these conditions and for the sudden expansion configuration used in this study, the instability is at low frequency and low amplitude, controlled by the flame length inside the combustion chamber. Above a threshold concentration in oxygen dependent on equivalence ratio, the flame becomes organized and concentrated in the near field. Strong thermoacoustic instability is then triggered at characteristic acoustic modes of the system. Different modes can be triggered depending on the ratio of flame speed to inlet velocity, but for all types of instability encountered, the heat release and pressure fluctuations are linked by a variation in mass-flow rate. An acoustic model of the system coupled with a time-lag-based flame model made it possible to elucidate the acoustic mode selection in the system as a function of laminar flame speed and Reynolds number. The overall work brings elements of reflection concerning the potential risk of strong pressure oscillations in future gas turbine combustors for oxy-fuel gas cycles. (author)

  9. Natural Gas Citygate Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From

  10. Climate Science: Tropical Expansion by Ocean Swing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    The tropical belt has become wider over the past decades, but climate models fall short of capturing the full rate of the expansion. The latest analysis of the climate simulations suggests that a long-term swing of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is the main missing cause.

  11. Resonant state expansion of the resolvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, T.; Lind, P. )

    1993-02-01

    An analytic method of generating resonant state expansions from the standard completeness relation of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is described and shown to reproduce the generalized completeness relations, earlier derived, involving resonant states. The method is then applied to the expansion of the resolvent (the complete Green's function), the symmetry properties of which [ital seem] to be destroyed if a conventional application of the completeness relations is made. These forms of expansions have a continuum term which contains symmetry-restoring contributions and can therefore never vanish identically, nor can it be neglected. The symmetry-conserving form of the expansion has a set of discrete terms which are identical in form to those of the Mittag-Leffler series for the resolvent. In addition, it contains a continuum contribution which in some cases vanishes identically, but in general does not. We illustrate these findings with numerical applictions in which the potential (a square well) is chosen so as to permit analytic evaluation of practically all functions and quantities involved.

  12. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD); Tiller, Dale B. (Lincoln, NE); Wienhold, Paul D. (Baltimore, MD); Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD)

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  13. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  14. 216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA.

  15. New York Marcellus Shale: Industry boom put on hold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercurio, Angelique

    2012-01-16

    Key catalysts for Marcellus Shale drilling in New York were identified. New York remains the only state in the nation with a legislative moratorium on high-volume hydraulic fracturing, as regulators and state lawmakers work to balance the advantages of potential economic benefits while protecting public drinking water resources and the environment. New York is being particularly careful to work on implementing sufficiently strict regulations to mitigate the environmental impacts Pennsylvania has already seen, such as methane gas releases, fracturing fluid releases, flowback water and brine controls, and total dissolved solids discharges. In addition to economic and environmental lessons learned, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) also acknowledges impacts to housing markets, security, and other local issues, and may impose stringent measures to mitigate potential risks to local communities. Despite the moratorium, New York has the opportunity to take advantage of increased capital investment, tax revenue generation, and job creation opportunities by increasing shale gas activity. The combination of economic benefits, industry pressure, and recent technological advances will drive the pursuit of natural gas drilling in New York. We identify four principal catalysts as follows: Catalyst 1: Pressure from Within the State. Although high-volume hydraulic fracturing has become a nationally controversial technology, shale fracturing activity is common in every U.S. state except New York. The regulatory process has delayed potential economic opportunities for state and local economies, as well as many industry stakeholders. In 2010, shale gas production accounted for $18.6 billion in federal royalty and local, state, and federal tax revenues. (1) This is expected to continue to grow substantially. The DEC is under increased pressure to open the state to the same opportunities that Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming are pursuing. Positive labor market impacts are another major economic draw. According to the Revised Draft SGEIS on the Oil, Gas and Solution Mining Regulatory Program (September 2011), hydraulic fracturing would create between 4,408 and 17,634 full-time equivalent (FTE) direct construction jobs in New York State. Indirect employment in other sectors would add an additional 29,174 FTE jobs. Furthermore, the SGEIS analysis suggests that drilling activities could add an estimated $621.9 million to $2.5 billion in employee earnings (direct and indirect) per year, depending upon how much of the shale is developed. The state would also receive direct tax receipts from leasing land, and has the potential to see an increase in generated indirect revenue. Estimates range from $31 million to $125 million per year in personal income tax receipts, and local governments would benefit from revenue sharing. Some landowner groups say the continued delay in drilling is costing tens of thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in growth for New York, especially in the economically stunted upstate. A number of New York counties near Pennsylvania, such as Chemung, NY, have experienced economic uptick from Pennsylvania drilling activity just across the border. Chemung officials reported that approximately 1,300 county residents are currently employed by the drilling industry in Pennsylvania. The Marcellus shale boom is expected to continue over the next decade and beyond. By 2015, gas drilling activity could bring 20,000 jobs to New York State alone. Other states, such as Pennsylvania and West Virginia, are also expected to see a significant increase in the number of jobs. Catalyst 2: Political Reality of the Moratorium. Oil and gas drilling has taken place in New York since the 19th century, and it remains an important industry with more than 13,000 currently active wells. The use of hydraulic fracturing in particular has been employed for decades. Yet, as technological advancements have enabled access to gas in areas where drilling is not common practice, public concern has ballooned. Opponents argue that more oversight is necessary to protect the environment and public health, while supporters believe the industry is already adequately regulated. Although it is important for New York to complete a thorough environmental and regulatory review, an extended ban could lead to litigation by property owners who have been stripped of the ability to lease their mineral rights. Other states are moving forward by implementing legislative guidelines or rules created by commissions to ensure that resources are developed safely. One of the most controversial issues in other states to date has revolved around the public disclosure of chemical additives in drilling fluid. While the industry is hesitant to reveal trade secrets, the public and many officials want the security of knowing what chemicals are pumped into the ground. Industry transparency could help mitigate the public concern and controversy that is delaying a lift of the moratorium. Currently, at least five other states have set chemical disclosure rules. Arkansas, Michigan, Montana, Texas, and Wyoming require disclosure of the chemical components of drilling fluid. Colorado has the most stringent rules, requiring not just the disclosure of the additives but of their concentrations as well. As more states continue to allow hydraulic fracturing, New York will likely lift the moratorium and instead implement more stringent regulations that help to alleviate public concern surrounding hydraulic fracturing. This will allow the state to safely pursue the expansive opportunities offered by the Marcellus shale without falling behind economically. Catalyst 3: Energy and Infrastructure Benefits. Natural gas provides a key source of energy in the Northeast. The DEC estimates the Marcellus shale gas resource potential to be between 168-516 Tcf. Even at the low end of this range, Marcellus alone could supply seven years of total U.S. energy consumption, and it would provide a local resource for New York. One report suggests that savings from lower natural gas costs would result in an average annual savings of $926 per household. (4) Industry growth is leading to lower natural gas and electric power prices, while decreasing reliance on Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) imports and enhancing domestic energy security. This makes development of the resources an even more attractive commitment to New York. In addition, the natural gas business is predominantly regional in scope. Drilling companies would be required to build new pipelines for gas development in New York, therefore State regulators face valuable ancillary benefits of natural gas development such as infrastructure improvements. Catalyst 4: Technology Improvements. Lastly, the moratorium itself does not prevent the use of alternative drilling technologies, such as non-hydraulic fracturing, for shale gas production. Developers are already using new systems in Texas and Canada, as well as in France where hydraulic fracturing is banned country-wide. Commercial viability of these new technologies could ultimately provide an alternative to jumpstart shale drilling in New York if necessary. The potential benefits from development of the Marcellus shale in New York are undeniable, though regulators are still working to balance the need to stimulate the economy with environmental protection and public health. Since closing the public comment period in January, the DEC has signaled that much more work is needed, making no promises to near-term completion. While, neighboring states are feeling the economic benefits of drilling, the political environment and the recession continues adding pressure to the process in New York state.

  16. GAS COOLED NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Long, E.; Rodwell, W.

    1958-06-10

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor consisting of a graphite reacting core and reflector structure supported in a containing vessel is described. A gas sealing means is included for sealing between the walls of the graphite structure and containing vessel to prevent the gas coolant by-passing the reacting core. The reacting core is a multi-sided right prismatic structure having a pair of parallel slots around its periphery. The containing vessel is cylindrical and has a rib on its internal surface which supports two continuous ring shaped flexible web members with their radially innermost ends in sealing engagement within the radially outermost portion of the slots. The core structure is supported on ball bearings. This design permits thermal expansion of the core stracture and vessel while maintainirg a peripheral seal between the tvo elements.

  17. Deregulation-restructuring: Evidence for individual industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, K.W.; Graniere, R.J.

    1997-05-01

    Several studies have measured the effects of regulation on a particular industry. These studies range widely in sophistication, from simple observation (comparison) of pre-transformation and post-transformation actual industry performance to econometric analysis that attempt to separate the effects of deregulation from other factors in explaining changes in an industry`s performance. The major problem with observation studies is that they are unable to measure the effect of one particular event, such as deregulation, on an industry`s performance. For example, at the same time that the United Kingdom privatized its electric power industry, it also radically restructured the industry to encourage competition and instituted a price-cap mechanism to regulate the prices of transmission, distribution, and bundled retail services. Subsequent to these changes in 1991, real prices for most UK electricity customers have fallen. It is not certain however, which of these factors was most important or even contributed to the decline in price. In any event, one must be cautious in interpreting the results of studies that attempt to measure the effect of deregulation per se for a specific industry. This report highlights major outcomes for five industries undergoing deregulation or major regulatory and restructuring reforms. These include the natural gas, transportation, UK electric power, financial, and telecommunications industries. Particular attention was given to the historical development of events in the telecommunications industry.

  18. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION EXPANSION PROJECT REGARDING

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION EXPANSION PROJECT REGARDING SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC, APPLICATIONS SEEKING DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FROM SABINE PASS LNG TERMINAL TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 1501.6 of the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), 40 CFR 1501.6, the U.S.

  19. Industrial Technologies Program - A Clean, Secure Energy Future via Industrial Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-05-01

    The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) leads the national effort to save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the largest energy-using sector of the U.S. economy. ITP drives energy efficiency improvements and carbon dioxide reductions throughout the manufacturing supply chain, helping develop and deploy innovative technologies that transform the way industry uses energy.

  20. Forward Expansion Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser Alliant- Wisconsin Public Service-Madison Gas & Electric- Wisconsin Public Power Location Dodge and Fond du...

  1. Ocotillo Wind I Expansion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Construction Owner Pattern Energy Developer Pattern Energy Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Ocotillo CA Coordinates 32.76302656, -116.0466957 Show Map...

  2. Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

    2010-06-16

    Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

  3. Secretary Chu Tasks Environmental, Industry and State Leaders to Recommend

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Best Practices for Safe, Responsible Development of America's Onshore Natural Gas Resources | Department of Energy Tasks Environmental, Industry and State Leaders to Recommend Best Practices for Safe, Responsible Development of America's Onshore Natural Gas Resources Secretary Chu Tasks Environmental, Industry and State Leaders to Recommend Best Practices for Safe, Responsible Development of America's Onshore Natural Gas Resources May 5, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. -- U.S. Energy

  4. Natural gas 1995: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends addresses current issues affecting the natural gas industry and markets. Highlights of recent trends include: Natural gas wellhead prices generally declined throughout 1994 and for 1995 averages 22% below the year-earlier level; Seasonal patterns of natural gas production and wellhead prices have been significantly reduced during the past three year; Natural gas production rose 15% from 1985 through 1994, reaching 18.8 trillion cubic feet; Increasing amounts of natural gas have been imported; Since 1985, lower costs of producing and transporting natural gas have benefitted consumers; Consumers may see additional benefits as States examine regulatory changes aimed at increasing efficiency; and, The electric industry is being restructured in a fashion similar to the recent restructuring of the natural gas industry.

  5. Frostless heat pump having thermal expansion valves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Fang C. (Knoxville, TN); Mei, Viung C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-10-22

    A heat pump system having an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant and further having a compressor, an interior heat exchanger, an exterior heat exchanger, a heat pump reversing valve, an accumulator, a thermal expansion valve having a remote sensing bulb disposed in heat transferable contact with the refrigerant piping section between said accumulator and said reversing valve, an outdoor temperature sensor, and a first means for heating said remote sensing bulb in response to said outdoor temperature sensor thereby opening said thermal expansion valve to raise suction pressure in order to mitigate defrosting of said exterior heat exchanger wherein said heat pump continues to operate in a heating mode.

  6. Locally-smeared operator product expansions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostantinos

    2014-12-01

    We propose a "locally-smeared Operator Product Expansion" (sOPE) to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of locally-smeared operators. The sOPE formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements of smeared degrees of freedom, determined numerically using the gradient flow, to non-local operators in the continuum. The nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale prevents a simple connection to the standard operator product expansion and therefore requires the construction of a two-scale formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach using the example of real scalar field theory.

  7. Derivative expansion of the effective action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheyette, O.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes some methods for calculating derivative terms in the one loop effective action for a quantum field theory. The functional approach and background field method are first used to derive the general form of the one loop determinant. Then the determinant is expanded in powers of derivatives of the background fields. The form of this expansion is described for the simple case of an interacting scalar field, and then for the more complicated problem of a non-abelian gauge field. Finally, the expansion is applied to the task of calculating Higgs mass dependent effects in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model, and all terms which grow with the Higgs mass M/sub H/ are found in the one loop approximation. The result of this calculation is used to find the dependence of the gauge boson mass ratio rho on M/sub H/, and also to estimate the size of corrections to W and Z scattering theorems.

  8. Pole EXpansion and Selected Inversion (PEXSI)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-03-01

    The Pole EXpansion and Selected Inversion method (PEXSI) is a fast method for evaluating certain selected elements of a matrix function. PEXSI is highly scalable on distributed memory parallel machines. For sparse matrices, the PEXSI method can be more efficient than the widely used diagonalization method for evaluating matrix functions, especially when a relatively large number of eigenpairs are needed to be computed in the diagonalization methond

  9. Natural gas monthly, August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-05

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector oganizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 33 tabs.

  10. Natural gas monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-03

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary is included. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

  11. Natural gas monthly, August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-24

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature article is on US Natural Gas Imports and Exports 1994.

  12. Natural Gas Monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-10

    The (NGM) Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature articles are: US Production of Natural Gas from Tight Reservoirs: and Expanding Rule of Underground Storage.

  13. Natural gas monthly, December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The article this month is entitled ``Recent Trends in Natural Gas Spot Prices.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  14. Natural gas monthly, March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas analysis and geographic information systems.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  15. Natural gas monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured articles for this month are: Opportunities with fuel cells, and revisions to monthly natural gas data.

  16. Frequency dependent thermal expansion in binary viscoelasticcomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-01

    The effective thermal expansion coefficient beta* of abinary viscoelastic composite is shown to be frequency dependent even ifthe thermal expansion coefficients beta A and beta B of both constituentsare themselves frequency independent. Exact calculations for binaryviscoelastic systems show that beta* is related to constituent valuesbeta A, beta B, volume fractions, and bulk moduli KA, KB, as well as tothe overall bulk modulus K* of the composite system. Then, beta* isdetermined for isotropic systems by first bounding (or measuring) K* andtherefore beta*. For anisotropic systems with hexagonal symmetry, theprincipal values of the thermal expansion beta*perp and beta*para can bedetermined exactly when the constituents form a layered system. In allthe examples studied, it is shown explicitly that the eigenvectors of thethermoviscoelastic system possess non-negative dissipation -- despite thecomplicated analytical behavior of the frequency dependent thermalexpansivities themselves. Methods presented have a variety ofapplications from fluid-fluid mixtures to fluid-solid suspensions, andfrom fluid-saturated porous media to viscoelastic solid-solidcomposites.

  17. Natural gas monthly, October 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-05

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. 16 figs., 33 tabs.

  18. Partnerships For Industry - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    115.jpg Partnerships For Industry Connect With JCAP Contact Us Partnerships For Researchers Partnerships For Industry Visit JCAP Connect with JCAP Contact Us Partnerships For Researchers Partnerships For Industry Visit JCAP partnerships for industry JCAP has established an Industrial Partnership Program. For more information on Industrial Partnership Program or to learn more about other modes of industrial interactions with JCAP, please contact: California Institute of Technology Office of

  19. Natural gas 1994: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry in 1993 and early 1994 (Chapter 1), focusing on the overall ability to deliver gas under the new regulatory mandates of Order 636. In addition, the report highlights a range of issues affecting the industry, including: restructuring under Order 636 (Chapter 2); adjustments in natural gas contracting (Chapter 3); increased use of underground storage (Chapter 4); effects of the new market on the financial performance of the industry (Chapter 5); continued impacts of major regulatory and legislative changes on the natural gas market (Appendix A).

  20. Natural gas monthly, October 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-23

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary of the terms used in this report is provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication. 6 figs., 30 tabs.

  1. Natural gas monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-25

    The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The NGM also features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  2. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground

  3. Natural gas monthly, February 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  4. Natural gas monthly, March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The March 1998 edition of the Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. This report also features an article on the correction of errors in the drilling activity estimates series, and in-depth drilling activity data. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  5. Natural gas monthly, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-24

    The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  6. Expansion/De-expansion Tool to Quantify the Accuracy of Prostate Contours

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Eugene; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Evans, Cheryl; Narayana, Vrinda; McLaughlin, Patrick W.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of the prostate gland on computed tomography (CT) remains a persistent challenge and continues to introduce geometric uncertainty into the planning and delivery of external beam radiotherapy. We, therefore, developed an expansion/de-expansion tool to quantify the contour errors and determine the location of the deviations. Methods and Materials: A planning CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging scan were prospectively acquired for 10 patients with prostate cancer. The prostate glands were contoured by 3 independent observers using the CT data sets with instructions to contour the prostate without underestimation but to minimize overestimation. The standard prostate for each patient was defined using magnetic resonance imaging and CT on multiple planes. After registration of the CT and magnetic resonance imaging data sets, the CT-defined prostates were scored for accuracy. The contours were defined as ideal if they were within a 2.5-mm expansion of the standard without underestimation, acceptable if they were within a 5.0-mm expansion and a 2.5-mm de-expansion, and unacceptable if they extended >5.0 mm or underestimated the prostate by >2.5 mm. Results: A total of 636 CT slices were individually analyzed, with the vast majority scored as ideal or acceptable. However, none of the 30 prostate contour sets had all the contours scored as ideal or acceptable. For all 3 observers, the unacceptable contours were more likely from underestimation than overestimation of the prostate. The errors were more common at the base and apex than the mid-gland. Conclusions: The expansion/de-expansion tool allows for directed feedback on the location of contour deviations, as well as the determination of over- or underestimation of the prostate. This metric might help improve the accuracy of prostate contours.

  7. Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M.

    2012-01-27

    The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

  8. Year-in-Review: 2011 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (April 2012) Year-in-Review: 2011 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (April 2012) The 2011 Year-in-Review (YIR) provides a...

  9. Expansion-loop enclosure resolves subsea line problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, S.K.; Alleyne, A.G.

    1998-08-03

    Recent design and construction of a Gulf of Mexico subsea pipeline illustrate the use of buried, enclosed expansion loops to resolve problems from expansion and upheaval buckling. Buried, subsea pipelines operating at high temperatures and pressures experience extreme compressive loads caused by the axial restraint of the soil. The high axial forces combined with imperfections in the seabed may overstress the pipeline or result in upheaval buckling. Typically, expansion loops, or doglegs, are installed to protect the pipeline risers from expansion and to alleviate axial forces. Buried expansion loops, however, are rendered virtually ineffective by the lateral restraint of the soil. Alternative methods to reduce expansion may increase the potential of upheaval buckling or overstressing the pipeline. Therefore, system design must consider expansion and upheaval buckling together. Discussed here are methods of prevention and control of expansion and upheaval buckling, evaluating the impact on the overall system.

  10. Reforming natural gas markets: the antitrust alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, J.D.; Gilfoyle, N.P.

    1983-05-12

    Key provisions of legislative proposals directed at the natural gas industry and currently being considered in Congress are intended to promote increased competition in the marketing of gas. All are consistent with fundamental tenets of antitrust law. This article review relevant antitrust principles as they relate to the natural-gas industry to place the remedial features of the proposed legislation in a proper context.

  11. Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels Breakout Session IA-Conversion Technologies I: Industrial Perspectives on Pathways to Advanced Biofuels Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels David C. Carroll, President and Chief Executive Officer, Gas Technology Institute PDF icon carroll_biomass_2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Commercialization of IH2® Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology

  12. Reduced Energy Consumption through the Development of Fuel-Flexible Gas Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas turbines—heat engines that use high-temperature and high-pressure gas as the combustible fuel—are used extensively throughout U.S. industry to power industrial processes. The majority of...

  13. Electricity Capacity Expansion Modeling, Analysis, and Visualization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and includes more sectors than ReEDS. For example, it includes modeling of the natural gas and coal supply markets, and a model of electricity load. The ReEDS model...

  14. Carbon Emissions: Food Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct....

  15. Chemicals Industry Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  16. Diamond Shamrock nears completion of major expansions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1993-05-24

    With completion later this year of a second refined products line into Colorado, Diamond Shamrock Inc., San Antonio, will have added more than 600 miles of product and crude-oil pipeline on its system and expanded charge and production capacities at its two state-of-the-art refineries, all within 30 months. The projects aim at improving the company's ability to serve markets in the U.S. Southwest and increasing capacities and flexibility at its two refineries. The paper describes these projects under the following headings: new products service; another new line; and refineries, crude pipelines; Three Rivers expansion and Supplies for McKee.

  17. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2014-10-18

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantialmore » investments.« less

  18. The growing world LP-gas supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoare, M.C.

    1988-11-01

    The possible range of future (LPG) export availabilities is huge, but actual production levels depend on factors, many of which are beyond our direct control - world demand for crude oil and gas, developments in technology, and the price of both energy in general and LPG specifically. Although these factors limit some of the potential developments, a substantial increase in LPG supply is certain, and this is likely to depress its price relative to other products. Over the last few years, a dramatic expansion has taken place in the industry. From 1980 to 1987, non-Communist world production of LPG increased by close to 35%, to a total of 115 million tonnes. If this is set against the general energy scene, LPG represented 3.7% of crude oil production by weight in 1980, rising to 5.4% in 1987. This growth reflects rise in consciousness around the world of the value of the product. LPG is no longer regarded as a byproduct, which is flared or disposed of at low value, but increasingly as a co-product, and much of the growth in production has been due to the installation of tailored recovery systems. LPG markets historically developed around sources of supply, constrained by the costs of transportation. The major exceptions, of course, were the Middle East, the large exporter, and Japan, the large importer.

  19. Lattice-structures and constructs with designed thermal expansion coefficients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spadaccini, Christopher; Hopkins, Jonathan

    2014-10-28

    A thermal expansion-managed lattice structure having a plurality of unit cells each having flexure bearing-mounted tabs supported on a base and actuated by thermal expansion of an actuator having a thermal expansion coefficient greater than the base and arranged so that the tab is inwardly displaced into a base cavity. The flexure bearing-mounted tabs are connected to other flexure-bearing-mounted tabs of adjacent unit cells so that the adjacent unit cells are spaced from each other to accommodate thermal expansion of individual unit cells while maintaining a desired bulk thermal expansion coefficient of the lattice structure as a whole.

  20. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  1. Industrial | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trends Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy consumption increases by only 19 percent from 2009 to 2035 in the AEO2011 Reference case....

  2. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingcovers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  3. Industry Research for Pipeline Systems Panel

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pipeline Research Council International, Inc. DOE Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop -Industry Research for Pipeline Systems Panel Mike Whelan Director, Research Operations November 12, 2014 2 www.prci.org Pipeline Research Council Int'l. Overview  Founded in 1952 - Current Membership  39 Pipelines, over 350,000 miles of transmission pipe * Natural Gas and Hazardous Liquids Pipelines * 27 members are North American based - Remainder: Europe,

  4. LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd formerly LG Industrial Systems ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd formerly LG Industrial Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd (formerly LG Industrial Systems) Place: Anyang,...

  5. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  6. North American Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  7. Natural gas monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured article for this month is on US coalbed methane production.

  8. Career Map: Industrial Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Industrial Engineer positions.

  9. Gas-powered integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawrylyshyn, G.

    1993-05-01

    Popularly known as the Brazil/Bolivia Gas Deal, the project consists of a 20-year agreement to supply Bolivian natural gas to heavily industrialized southern Brazil. This is an inter-regional undertaking comparable in scope and significance to pipeline projects in Europe and the gas networks between the USA and Canada and Mexico. The Brazil/Boliviz agreement call foe a 10-month period to obtain financing and 30 months to build the 1,376 mile main pipeline, a job that will be undertaken individually by each country within its territory. The pipelines will meet at the border in Corumba. Aside from the main gasline, the 20-year agreement will also require the laying of 1,184 kilometers (736 miles) of additional feeder and distribution pipelines in Brazil, raising the total pipe mileage to 3,389 kilometers. Then there is the need to build the whole infrastructure for gas distribution facilities and to switch to gas to power the equipment in thousands of industrial plants, commercial establishments and residences. The total investment in this undertaking is estimated to surpass US$10 billion.

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    hubs have weathered the recent financial turmoil and other changes in the natural gas industry and continue to play a crucial role in industry operations, according to the newly...

  11. Industrial energy-efficiency-improvement program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Progress made by industry toward attaining the voluntary 1980 energy efficiency improvement targets is reported. The mandatory reporting population has been expanded from ten original industries to include ten additional non-targeted industries and all corporations using over one trillion Btu's annually in any manufacturing industry. The ten most energy intensive industries have been involved in the reporting program since the signing of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and as industrial energy efficiency improvement overview, based primarily on information from these industries (chemicals and allied products; primary metal industry; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass products; paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metal products; transportation equipment; machinery, except electrical; and textile mill products), is presented. Reports from industries, now required to report, are included for rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products. Additional data from voluntary submissions are included for American Gas Association; American Hotel and Motel Association; General Telephone and Electronics Corporation; and American Telephone and Telegraph Company. (MCW)

  12. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium Hydroxide to Supply US Battery Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  13. Industrial advanced turbine systems: Development and demonstration. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    The US DOE has initiated a program for advanced turbine systems (ATS) that will serve industrial power generation markets. The ATS will provide ultra-high efficiency, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness. The ATS will foster (1) early market penetration that enhances the global competitiveness of US industry, (2) public health benefits resulting from reduced exhaust gas emissions of target pollutants, (3) reduced cost of power used in the energy-intensive industrial marketplace and (4) the retention and expansion of the skilled US technology base required for the design, development and maintenance of state-of-the-art advanced turbine products. The Industrial ATS Development and Demonstration program is a multi-phased effort. Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar) has participated in Phases 1 and 2 of the program. On September 14, 1995 Solar was awarded a Cooperative Agreement for Phases 3 and 4 of the program. Phase 3 of the work is separated into two subphases: Phase 3A entails Component Design and Development Phase 3B will involve Integrated Subsystem Testing. Phase 4 will cover Host Site Testing. Forecasts call for completion of the program within budget as originally estimated. Scheduled completion is forecasted to be approximately 3 years late to original plan. This delay has been intentionally planned in order to better match program tasks to the anticipated availability of DOE funds. To ensure the timely realization of DOE/Solar program goals, the development schedule for the smaller system (Mercury 50) and enabling technologies has been maintained, and commissioning of the field test unit is scheduled for May of 2000. As of the end of the reporting period work on the program is 22.80% complete based upon milestones completed. This measurement is considered quite conservative as numerous drawings on the Mercury 50 are near release. Variance information is provided in Section 4.0-Program Management.

  14. Thermal barrier characteristics of partially stabilized zirconia coatings on INCOLOY alloy 909; A controlled expansion alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.D. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on INCOLOY{sup 1} alloy 909 which is a low-expansion alloy used in critical seal and shaft applications within the gas turbine engine. However, because of its poor oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures, the maximum service temperature is limited. Since its coefficient of expansion is similar to that of partially stabilized zirconia for temperatures to 1200{degrees}F (649{degrees}C), it has been proposed to use this metal-ceramic combination for dimensionally critical, air-cooled jet engine components. This coating system should extend temperature limitations by reducing metal temperatures and providing oxidation resistance. The performance advantage offered by a thermal barrier coating has been investigated at temperatures up to 2000{degrees}F (1093{degrees}C) and the results are presented in this paper. Metal temperatures and heat flow rates of coated and bare specimens are compared for two air-cooling flow rates.

  15. Prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of gravitational field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2014-06-01

    As a modification of the oblate spheroidal case, a recursive method is developed to compute the point value and a few low-order derivatives of the prolate spheroidal harmonics of the second kind, Q{sub nm} (y), namely the unnormalized associated Legendre function (ALF) of the second kind with its argument in the domain, 1 < y < ∞. They are required in evaluating the prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of the gravitational field in addition to the point value and the low-order derivatives of P-bar {sub nm}(t), the 4π fully normalized ALF of the first kind with its argument in the domain, |t| ≤ 1. The new method will be useful in the gravitational field computation of elongated celestial objects.

  16. Thermal expansion recovery microscopy: Practical design considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mingolo, N. Martnez, O. E.

    2014-01-15

    A detailed study of relevant parameters for the design and operation of a photothermal microscope technique recently introduced is presented. The technique, named thermal expansion recovery microscopy (ThERM) relies in the measurement of the defocusing introduced by a surface that expands and recovers upon the heating from a modulated source. A new two lens design is presented that can be easily adapted to commercial infinite conjugate microscopes and the sensitivity to misalignment is analyzed. The way to determine the beam size by means of a focus scan and the use of that same scan to verify if a thermoreflectance signal is overlapping with the desired ThERM mechanism are discussed. Finally, a method to cancel the thermoreflectance signal by an adequate choice of a nanometric coating is presented.

  17. Users from Industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Users from Industry Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, and/or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial

  18. About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This information product provides the interested reader with a broad and non-technical overview of how the U.S. natural gas pipeline network operates, along with some insights into the many individual pipeline systems that make up the network. While the focus of the presentation is the transportation of natural gas over the interstate and intrastate pipeline systems, information on subjects related to pipeline development, such as system design and pipeline expansion, are also included.

  19. Heavy rains hamper Louisiana gas line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, C.

    1983-06-01

    Despite heavy rains and flooding a 36-mile gas pipeline loop for Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corp. was completed from north of Starks (at the end of Transco's south Louisiana lateral) to the Lake Charles area. Somastic-coated, 42-in. grade X-60 pipe comprises 90% of the route. The contract included multiple 30-42 in. fabrications, installation of six 42-in. gate valves, and expansion of the Gillis compressor station.

  20. Evaluation of gasification and gas cleanup processes for use in molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Final report. [Contains lists and evaluations of coal gasification and fuel gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jablonski, G.; Hamm, J.R.; Alvin, M.A.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Patel, P.

    1982-01-01

    This report satisfies the requirements for DOE Contract AC21-81MC16220 to: List coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants; extensively characterize those coal gas cleanup systems rejected by DOE's MCFC contractors for their power plant systems by virtue of the resources required for those systems to be commercially developed; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC tolerance for particulates on the anode (fuel gas) side of the MCFC; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC anode side tolerance for chemical species, including sulfides, halogens, and trace heavy metals; choose from the candidate gasifier/cleanup systems those most suitable for MCFC-based power plants; choose a reference wet cleanup system; provide parametric analyses of the coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems when integrated into a power plant incorporating MCFC units with suitable gas expansion turbines, steam turbines, heat exchangers, and heat recovery steam generators, using the Westinghouse proprietary AHEAD computer model; provide efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effect rankings of the system; and provide a final report incorporating the results of all of the above tasks. Section 7 of this final report provides general conclusions.

  1. Utility Partnerships Webinar Series: Gas Utility Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emerging gas technologies to enhance industrial energy efficiency, challenges of integrating into the marketplace and an overview of DTE Energy’s energy efficiency programs for natural gas customers.

  2. FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 17, 2015 15th US-China Oil and Gas Industry Forum Opens in Chongqing, China Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Chris Smith opened the 15th US-China Oil and Gas ...

  3. Review of 1989 international mineral industry activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbell, C.L. (US Bureau of Mines, Washington, DC (US))

    1990-07-01

    This article reviews global mineral industry activities for 1989. Production of coal, natural gas, and petroleum, as well as non-fuel minerals, is detailed regionally and for individual countries. The problems of changes in technology, economic and political systems are discussed where they have affected mineral production.

  4. The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Industry, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate...

  5. Improved Technology Transfer Processes for the U.S. Upstream Petroleum Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowell, Deborah; Cole, E. Lance

    2003-01-24

    This report covers PTTC's technical progress during the 1st half of FY99, and illustrates its increasing impact on the independent oil and gas producing industry.

  6. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    monitoring. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring. The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will

  7. What is shale gas and why is it important?

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Shale gas refers to natural gas that is trapped within shale formations. Shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Over the past decade, the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has allowed access to large volumes of shale gas that were previously uneconomical to produce. The production of natural gas from shale formations has rejuvenated the natural gas industry in the United States.

  8. Heat Flow Database Expansion for NGDS Data Development, Collection and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maintenance (SMU) | Department of Energy Heat Flow Database Expansion for NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance (SMU) Heat Flow Database Expansion for NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance (SMU) Heat Flow Database Expansion for NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance (SMU) presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon blackwell_smu_peer2013.pdf More Documents & Publications How to Utilize the National Geothermal

  9. January 16, 2009: Expansion of Spallation Neutron Source | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 16, 2009: Expansion of Spallation Neutron Source January 16, 2009: Expansion of Spallation Neutron Source January 16, 2009: Expansion of Spallation Neutron Source January 16, 2009 The Department gives its initial approval to begin plans for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to build a second target station for the Spallation Neutron Source, expanding what is already the world's most powerful pulsed neutron scattering facility. The new station, which will cost approximately $1

  10. DOE Announces Expansion and Solicitation for Entrepreneur in Residence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program | Department of Energy Expansion and Solicitation for Entrepreneur in Residence Program DOE Announces Expansion and Solicitation for Entrepreneur in Residence Program November 19, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Entrepreneurs Accelerate Deployment of Advanced Clean Energy Technologies from DOE's Labs to the Marketplace WASHINGTON - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced a competitive solicitation for five venture capital firms to participate in the expansion

  11. CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project | Department of Energy CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project Categorical Determination Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 05/06/2014 Location(s): Alcoa, Tennessee Offices(s): Loan Programs Office More Documents & Publications CX-012188: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012189: Categorical Exclusion

  12. EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Washington | Department of Energy 34: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of expansion or continued use of existing sand and gravel pits located on the Hanford Site (Pits F, H, N, 6, 9, 18, 21, 23, 24, 30, and 34) and establishing one new borrow area source in the 100 Area for ongoing construction activities and fill

  13. Natural gas storage - end user interaction. Task 2. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    New opportunities have been created for underground gas storage as a result of recent regulatory developments in the energy industry. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 636 directly changed the economics of gas storage nationwide. This paper discusses the storage of natural gas, storage facilities, and factors affecting the current, and future situation for natural gas storage.

  14. Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This document comprises the Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan, and is a follow-up to the `Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Program Crosscut Plans,` dated July 1995. DOE`s natural gas programs are aimed at simultaneously meeting our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy. The Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan represents a Department-wide effort on expanded development and use of natural gas and defines Federal government and US industry roles in partnering to accomplish defined strategic goals. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Program are to: (1) foster development of advanced natural gas technologies, (2) encourage adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets, (3) support removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets, and (4) foster technologies and policies to maximize environmental benefits of natural gas use.

  15. ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report, August 2007

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Prepared by: David M. Rue James Servaites Dr. Warren Wolf Gas Technology Institute Energy Utilization Center August 2007 Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis FINAL REPORT Prepared by: David M. Rue James Servaites Dr. Warren Wolf (independent consultant) Gas Technology Institute 1700 S. Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, IL 60018 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FC36-03GO13092 August 2007 Table of Contents Table of Figures

  16. Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers July 22, 2015 - 3:01pm Addthis Photo courtesy of San Diego Gas & Electric Photo courtesy of San Diego Gas & Electric Kristen Honey Science and Technology Policy Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy David Wollman Deputy Director of the Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems Program at the National

  17. EIS-0498: Magnolia LNG and Lake Charles Expansion Projects; Calcasieu...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    with the public interest. EIS-0498: Magnolia LNG and Lake Charles Expansion Projects Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time....

  18. Load Expansion with Diesel/Gasoline RCCI for Improved Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with DieselGasoline RCCI for Improved Engine Efficiency and Emissions Load Expansion with DieselGasoline RCCI for Improved Engine Efficiency and Emissions This poster will...

  19. EIS-0498: Magnolia LNG and Lake Charles Expansion Projects; Calcasieu...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    which would reconfigure an existing pipeline system to serve the LNG terminal site. ... EIS-0498: Magnolia LNG and Lake Charles Expansion Projects Public Comment Opportunities No ...

  20. Cluster expansion modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of alnico...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Cluster expansion modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of alnico 5-7 permanent magnets This content will become publicly available on March 5, 2016 Prev Next...