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1

NETL: Methane Hydrates - 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field trial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field trial 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field trial Photo of the Ignik Drilling Pad Download 2011/2012 Field Test Data Ignik Sikumi #1 "Fire in the Ice" Video Project Background Participants Ignik Sikumi Well Review CO2-Ch4 Exchange Overview August 2, 2013 - Project operations are complete. Read the Final Project Technical Report [PDF-44.1MB] February 19, 2013 - Data from the 2011/2012 field test is now available! Click here to access data. Status Report - May 7, 2012 Final abandonment of Ignik Sikumi #1 wellsite has been completed. Tubing, casing-tubing annulus, and flatpack were filled with cement per the abandonment procedure approved by the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. To minimize effects on the landscape and leave as little trace of the operations as possible, a small area around the wellhead was

2

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Barrow Gas Fields - North Slope Borough, Alaska  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase 2- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04/06/2010 Phase 2- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04/06/2010 DE-FC26-06NT42962 Goal The goal of this project is to evaluate, design, drill, log, core and production test methane hydrate resources in the Barrow Gas Fields near Barrow, Alaska to determine its impact on future free gas production and its viability as an energy source. Photo of Barrow welcome sign Performers North Slope Borough, Barrow, Alaska 99723 Petrotechnical Resources Alaska (PRA), Fairbanks, AK 99775 University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 Background Phase 1 of the Barrow Gas Fields Hydrate Study provided very strong evidence for the existence of hydrates updip of the East Barrow and Walakpa Gas Fields. Full-field history matched reservoir modeling supported the

3

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Natural gas from methane hydrate has the potential to play a major role in ensuring adequate future energy supplies in the US. The worldwide volume of gas in the hydrate state has been estimated to be approximately 1.5 x 10^16 m^3 (Makogon 1984). More than...

Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

5

Hydrate risks and prevention solutions for a high pressure gas field offshore in South China Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

YC13-4 gas field is located in the west of the South China Sea, where the seawater depth is around 90 m, and the average surface temperature is 26.2°C, while the minimum temperature at seabed is 18.9°C. Subsea wellheads are designed for gas production. In this paper, the risks of hydrate formation during drilling, well testing and gas production are analysed under different operation conditions. The results show that most hydrate problems will occur during shutdown and restart operations, and the degree of hydrate occurrence is slight to medium, which poses difficult tasks for choosing safe, reliable and economic methods to mitigate the hydrate problems. Various solutions for hydrate control in different processes are considered, including filling the wellbore with drilling/completion fluids or seawater for pressure control during shutdowns, and injection of methanol into wellbore and subsea pipeline during production. A simple and economic method using down-hole chokes to reduce gas pressure before it enters the hydrate stability zone is introduced, and the placement depth of the down-hole choke is determined. [Received: September 5, 2012; Accepted: March 6, 2013

Liang Zhang; Anyuan Huang; Wei Wang; Shaoran Ren; Shukai Jin; Dake Fang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Marine Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In several review articles, e.g., Boswell and Collett (2010), four gas hydrate reservoir types are evaluated in terms of their resource potential: sand-dominated reservoirs, clay-dominated fractured reservoirs, ....

Gerhard Bohrmann; Marta E. Torres

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Natural Gas Hydrate Dissociation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Materials for hydrate synthesis mainly include methane gas of purity 99.9% (produced by Nanjing Special Gases Factory Co., Ltd.), natural sea sand of grain sizes 0.063?0.09,...

Qingguo Meng; Changling Liu; Qiang Chen; Yuguang Ye

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Methane Hydrate Field Program  

SciTech Connect

This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

None

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A& M University; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

Jeffrey Savidge

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Great Gas Hydrate Escape  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Gas Great Gas Hydrate Escape The Great Gas Hydrate Escape Computer simulations revealing how methane and hydrogen pack into gas hydrates could enlighten alternative fuel production and carbon dioxide storage January 25, 2012 | Tags: Carver, Chemistry, Energy Technologies, Hopper, Materials Science PNNL Contact: Mary Beckman , +1 509 375-3688, mary.beckman@pnl.gov NERSC Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov The methane trapped in frozen water burns easily, creating ice on fire. For some time, researchers have explored flammable ice for low-carbon or alternative fuel or as a place to store carbon dioxide. Now, a computer analysis of the ice and gas compound, known as a gas hydrate, reveals key details of its structure. The results show that hydrates can hold hydrogen

16

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska`s North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Methane Hydrate Field Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Studies Field Studies Methane Hydrate Field Studies Arctic/Alaska North Slope Field Studies Since 2001, DOE has conducted field trials of exploration and production technology in the Alaska North Slope. Although Alaska methane hydrate resources are smaller than marine deposits and currently lack outlets to commercial markets, Alaska provides an excellent laboratory to study E&P technology. The research also has implications for various Alaska resources, including potential gas hydrate resources for local communities, conventional "stranded" gas, as well as Alaska's large unconventional oil resources. The hydrate deposits have been delineated in the process of developing underlying oil fields, and drilling costs are much lower than offshore. DOE-BP Project

19

Gas hydrates: past and future geohazard?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...David Pyle, John Smellie and David Tappin Gas hydrates: past and future geohazard? Mark...University of Bristol, , Bristol, UK Gas hydrates are ice-like deposits containing a mixture of water and gas; the most common gas is methane. Gas hydrates...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hydrates represent gas source, drilling hazard  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates look like ordinary ice. However, if a piece of such ice is put into warm water its behavior will be different from the ordinary melting of normal ice. In contrast, gas hydrates cause bubbles in the warm water, which indicates the high content of gas in the hydrate crystals. The presence of four components is required: gas itself, water, high pressure, and low temperature. The paper discusses how hydrates form, hydrates stability, South Caspian hydrates, and hydrates hazards for people, ships, pipelines, and drilling platforms.

Bagirov, E. [Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Lerche, I. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both up-flow and down-flow of fluid at rates that range between 0.5 to 214 cm/yr and 2-162 cm/yr, respectively. The fluid flow system at the mound and background sites are coupled having opposite polarities that oscillate episodically between 14 days to {approx}4 months. Stability calculations suggest that despite bottom water temperature fluctuations, of up to {approx}3 C, the Bush Hill gas hydrate mound is presently stable, as also corroborated by the time-lapse video camera images that did not detect change in the gas hydrate mound. As long as methane (and other hydrocarbon) continues advecting at the observed rates the mound would remain stable. The {_}{sup 13}C-DIC data suggest that crude oil instead of methane serves as the primary electron-donor and metabolic substrate for anaerobic sulfate reduction. The oil-dominated environment at Bush Hill shields some of the methane bubbles from being oxidized both anaerobically in the sediment and aerobically in the water column. Consequently, the methane flux across the seafloor is higher at Bush hill than at non-oil rich seafloor gas hydrate regions, such as at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia. The methane flux across the ocean/atmosphere interface is as well higher. Modeling the methane flux across this interface at three bubble plumes provides values that range from 180-2000 {_}mol/m{sup 2} day; extrapolating it over the Gulf of Mexico basin utilizing satellite data is in progress.

Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

22

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0003060 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a global assessment of methane gas hydrates that will facilitate informed decision-making regarding the potential development of gas hydrate resources between the scientific community and other stakeholders/decision makers. The Assessment will provide science-based information on the role of gas hydrates in natural climate change and the carbon cycle, their sensitivity to climate change, and the potential environmental and socio-economic impacts of hydrate production. Performers Stiftelsen GRID-Arendal, Arendal, Norway Funding Institutions United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Statoil Schlumberger United States Department of Energy (USDOE)

23

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Advanced Gas Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gas Hydrate Production Methods Last Reviewed 09/23/2009 Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gas Hydrate Production Methods Last Reviewed 09/23/2009 DE-FC26-06NT42666 Goal The goal of this project is to compare and contrast, through numerical simulation, conventional and innovative approaches for producing methane from gas hydrate-bearing geologic reservoirs. Numerical simulation is being used to assess the production of natural gas hydrates from geologic deposits using three production technologies: 1) depressurization, 2) direct CO2 exchange, and 3) dissociation-reformation CO2 exchange. Performers Battelle Pacific Northwest Division, Richland, Washington 99352 Background There are relatively few published studies of commercial production methods for gas hydrates, and all of these studies have examined essentially

24

Gas hydrates: past and future geohazard?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...seafloor samples were recovered in the Black Sea...warm to support the solid gas hydrates, so...stored in other fossil fuel reservoirs. However...Kvenvolden (2007). Solid points are locations...hydrates have been recovered. Figure 4. This...trapped below the solid gas hydrate layer...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Project to evaluate natural gas hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

More than 170 scf of natural gas, mostly methane, may be contained in 1 cu ft of hydrate, according to Malcolm A. Goodman, president of Enertech & Research Co., Houston, which is involved in the new hydrate project. ...

1980-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Formation Process Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Non-provisional Patent Application entitled "Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process." Disclosed in this application is a method and device for producing gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas such as methane (CH 4 ) or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone, which may be contained within the body of the spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction vessel, under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for gas hydrate formation. The reaction

27

Gas hydrate formation in fine sand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas hydrate formation from two types of dissolved gas (methane and mixed gas) was studied under varying thermodynamic conditions in ... Sea. The testing media consisted of silica sand particles with diameters of ...

XiaoYa Zang; DeQing Liang; NengYou Wu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Gas hydrate-filled fracture reservoirs on continental margins.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Many scientists predicted that gas hydrate forms in fractures or lenses in fine-grained sediments, but only in the last decade were gas hydrates found… (more)

Cook, Ann Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

SciTech Connect

The current paper complements the Moridis et al. (2009) review of the status of the effort toward commercial gas production from hydrates. We aim to describe the concept of the gas hydrate petroleum system, to discuss advances, requirement and suggested practices in gas hydrate (GH) prospecting and GH deposit characterization, and to review the associated technical, economic and environmental challenges and uncertainties, including: the accurate assessment of producible fractions of the GH resource, the development of methodologies for identifying suitable production targets, the sampling of hydrate-bearing sediments and sample analysis, the analysis and interpretation of geophysical surveys of GH reservoirs, well testing methods and interpretation of the results, geomechanical and reservoir/well stability concerns, well design, operation and installation, field operations and extending production beyond sand-dominated GH reservoirs, monitoring production and geomechanical stability, laboratory investigations, fundamental knowledge of hydrate behavior, the economics of commercial gas production from hydrates, and the associated environmental concerns.

Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Hancock, S.; Santamarina, C.; Boswell, R.; Kneafsey, T.; Rutqvist, J.; Kowalsky, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Sloan, E.D.; Sum, A.K.; Koh, C.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test  

SciTech Connect

Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

Schoderbek, David; Farrell, Helen; Howard, James; Raterman, Kevin; Silpngarmlert, Suntichai; Martin, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Klein, Perry

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Chemically reacting plumes, gas hydrate dissociation and dendrite solidification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the coated bubbles leave the hydrate stability zone thestability zone extends far enough above the sea ?oor, gas hydrates may nucleate on the bubble

Conroy, Devin Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conductivity of gas hydrate-bearing sand. J. Geophys. Res.seal overlying gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs togeologic data on gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in the

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Potential effects of gas hydrate on human welfare  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...distribution of gas hydrate (Fig. 4). According...sediment) of methane hydrate is 10-fold greater...unconventional sources of gas, such as coal beds, tight sands, black shales...conventional natural gas. Given these attractive...that natural gas hydrate could serve as...

Keith A. Kvenvolden

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Natural gas hydrates on the continental slope off Pakistan: constraints from seismic techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2000 research-article Articles Natural gas hydrates on the continental slope...J. Int. (2000) 140, 295310 Natural gas hydrates on the continental slope...adequate gas supplies for hydrate Natural gas hydrates (clathrates) are a crystalline......

Ingo Grevemeyer; Andreas Rosenberger; Heinrich Villinger

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Stable Conditions of Marine Gas Hydrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Figure 9.7 shows the P-T...curve determined by the temperature-pressure method in a sediment-water-methane-hydrate system (natural sand of 20?40, 40?60, and 220?240 mesh). Methane gas is injected into the reactor...

Shicai Sun; Yuguang Ye; Changling Liu; Jian Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The goal of this work is to quantify the Van der Waals interactions in systems involving gas hydrates. Gas hydrates are crystalline com-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas hydrates. Gas hydrates are crystalline com- pounds that are often encountered in oil and gas briefly present the hydrate crystalline structure and the role of hydrates in oil-and gas industry the industrial contexts where they appear, we shall cite : hydrate plugs obstructing oil- or gas

Boyer, Edmond

37

Geologic interrelations relative to gas hydrates within the North Slope of Alaska: Task No. 6, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The five primary objectives of the US Geological Survey North Slope Gas Hydrate Project were to: (1) Determine possible geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate; (2) locate and evaluate possible gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs; (3) estimate the volume of gas within the hydrates; (4) develop a model for gas-hydrate formation; and (5) select a coring site for gas-hydrate sampling and analysis. Our studies of the North Slope of Alaska suggest that the zone in which gas hydrates are stable is controlled primarily by subsurface temperatures and gas chemistry. Other factors, such as pore-pressure variations, pore-fluid salinity, and reservior-rock grain size, appear to have little effect on gas hydrate stability on the North Slope. Data necessary to determine the limits of gas hydrate stability field are difficult to obtain. On the basis of mud-log gas chromatography, core data, and cuttings data, methane is the dominant species of gas in the near-surface (0--1500 m) sediment. Gas hydrates were identified in 34 wells utilizing well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were actually recovered in a core by an oil company. A possible scenario describing the origin of the interred gas hydrates on the North Slope involves the migration of thermogenic solution- and free-gas from deeper reservoirs upward along faults into the overlying sedimentary rocks. We have identified two (dedicated) core-hole sites, the Eileen and the South-End core-holes, at which there is a high probability of recovering a sample of gas hydrate. At the Eileen core-hole site, at least three stratigraphic units may contain gas hydrate. The South-End core-hole site provides an opportunity to study one specific rock unit that appears to contain both gas hydrate and oil. 100 refs., 72 figs., 24 tabs.

Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Magoon, L.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental margins: Impact on gas. Gregory F. Moore, University of Hawaii (USA) http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/moore/ Key Words Gas Hydrates, Faults, Fluid Flow, gas prospectivity Overview Fig. 1. Research on gas hydrates is often undertaken

Henderson, Gideon

39

Gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

filled by one or more gases. In marine sediments gas hydrates are found in regions where high pressure, low temperature and gas in excess of solubility are present. Low molecular weight hydrocarbons (LMWH), I. e. methane through butane, carbon dioxide... loop at a helium carrier flow of 12 ml/min with an elution order of methane, ethane, carbon dioxide and propane. Each fraction was trapped in a U- shaped Porpak-Q filled glass tube immersed in LN2. Butanes and heartier weight gases were trapped...

Cox, Henry Benjamin

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Study on gas hydrates for the solid transportation of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas hydrate typically contains 85 wt.% water and 15 wt.% natural gas, and commonly belongs to cubic structure I...3 solid hydrate contains up to 200 m3 of natural gas depending on pressure and temperature...

Nam-Jin Kim; Chong-Bo Kim

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Natural Gas Hydrates in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program DOE/NETL Methane Hydrate Projects Natural Gas Hydrates in Permafrost and Marine Settings: Resources, Properties, and Environmental Issues Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 DE-FE0002911 Goal The objective of this DOE-USGS Interagency Agreement is to provide world-class expertise and research in support of the goals of the 2005 Energy Act for National Methane Hydrates R&D, the DOE-led U.S. interagency roadmap for gas hydrates research, and elements of the USGS mission related to energy resources, global climate, and geohazards. This project extends USGS support to the DOE Methane Hydrate R&D Program previously conducted under DE-AI26-05NT42496. Performer U.S. Geological Survey at Woods Hole, MA, Denver, CO, and Menlo Park, CA

42

Evidence for natural gas hydrate occurrences in Colombia Basin  

SciTech Connect

Multichannel and selected single-channel seismic lines of the continental margin sediments of the Colombia basin display compelling evidence for large accumulations of natural gas hydrate. Seismic bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs), interpreted to mark the base of the hydrate stability zone, are pronounced and very widespread along the entire Panama-Colombia lower continental slope. BSRs have also been identified at two locations on the abyssal plain. Water depths for these suspected hydrate occurrences range from 900 to 4000 m. Although no gas hydrate samples have been recovered from this area, biogenic methane is abundant in Pliocene turbidites underlying the abyssal plain. More deeply buried rocks beneath the abyssal plain are thermally mature. Thermogenic gas from these rocks may migrate upward along structural pathways into the hydrate stability zone and form hydrate. Impermeable hydrate layers may form caps over large accumulations of free gas, accounting for the very well-defined BSRs in the area. The abyssal plain and the deformed continental margin hold the highest potential for major economic accumulations of gas hydrate in the basin. The extensive continuity of BSRs, relatively shallow water depths, and promixity to onshore production facilities render the marginal deformed belt sediments the most favorable target for future economic development of the gas hydrate resource within the Colombia basin. The widespread evidence of gas hydrates in the Colombia basin suggests a high potential for conventional hydrocarbon deposits offshore of Panama and Colombia.

Finley, P.D.; Krason, J.; Dominic, K.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated with Unconsolidated Marine Sediments Diana associated with unconsolidated marine sediments. The goals are to predict gas-hydrate concentration from intercalated with unconsolidated sediments. We show that the geometrical details of how gas hy- drates

Texas at Austin, University of

44

Natural gas hydrates - issues for gas production and geomechanical stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bearing sediments in offshore environments, I divided these data into different sections. The data included water depths, pore water salinity, gas compositions, geothermal gradients, and sedimentary properties such as sediment type, sediment mineralogy... .................................................................. 9 2.2 Hydrate patterns in sediments .................................................................... 24 3.1 Water depths and penetration for the Blake Ridge..................................... 31 3.2 Geothermal gradients measured...

Grover, Tarun

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

45

Detection of gas hydrates by the measurement of instantaneous temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Changes, either in temperature or pressure, can cause the hydrate to dissociate. In situ gas hydrates were discovered in the permafrost region of the Soviet Union and have been typically The Journal of Geotechnical En ineerin of the American Society... to detect hydrates. Both of these methods, illustrated in Fig. 6, may not detect hydrates in the form of nodules or thin layers. Hence it is necessary to develop a local method to detect Ocean Floor BASE QE GAS HYDRATE PIG. 5. Bottom Simulating...

Dinakaran, Srikanth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

46

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas such as tight gas, shale gas, or coal bed methane gas tolocation. Development of shale oil and gas, tar sands, coalGas hydrates will undoubtedly also be present in shales,

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Documented Example of Gas Hydrate Saturated Sand in the Gulfthat observed for gas hydrate-bearing sand sediments in thethan those for the gas hydrate-bearing sand formations in

Boswell, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Feasibility of monitoring gas hydrate production with time-lapse VSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Documented Example of Gas Hydrate Saturated Sand in the Gulfmoduli for the sand/gas/water/hydrate mixture with theK eff for the sand/gas/aqueous/hydrate mixture is calculated

Kowalsky, M.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Deep-Sea Field Test of the CH4 Hydrate to CO2 Hydrate Spontaneous Conversion Hypothesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have carried out a small-scale deep-sea field test of the hypothesis that CH4 gas can be spontaneously produced from CH4 hydrate by injection of a CO2/N2 gas mixture, thereby inducing release of the encaged molecules with sequestration of the injected ...

Peter G. Brewer; Edward T. Peltzer; Peter M. Walz; Elizabeth K. Coward; Laura A. Stern; Stephen H. Kirby; John Pinkston

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

50

Preliminary Assessment of Hydrocarbon Gas Sources from the Mt. Elbert No. 1 Gas Hydrate Test Well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in two primary horizons; an upper zone, (“D ” Unit) containing 14 meters of gas hydrate-bearing sands

Thomas D. Lorenson; Timothy S. Collett; Robert B. Hunter

51

Experiments on Hydrocarbon Gas Hydrates in Unconsolidated Sand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were carried out to observe the formation and decomposition of hydrocarbon gas hydrates in an unconsolidated sand pack 4.4 cm in diameter and ... 43 bars and 5 to 10°C; gas used was 90% methane and 10...

P. E. Baker

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Natural Gas Hydrates in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Hydrates in Permafrost and Marine Settings: Resources, Properties, and Environmental Issues Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 Natural Gas Hydrates in Permafrost and Marine Settings: Resources, Properties, and Environmental Issues Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 DE-FE0002911 Goal The objective of this DOE-USGS Interagency Agreement is to provide world-class expertise and research in support of the goals of the 2005 Energy Act for National Methane Hydrates R&D, the DOE-led U.S. interagency roadmap for gas hydrates research, and elements of the USGS mission related to energy resources, global climate, and geohazards. This project extends USGS support to the DOE Methane Hydrate R&D Program previously conducted under DE-AI26-05NT42496. Performer U.S. Geological Survey at Woods Hole, MA, Denver, CO, and Menlo Park, CA Background The USGS Interagency Agreement (IA) involves laboratory research and

53

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

54

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

55

Tetrahydrofuran Hydrate Crystal Growth Inhibition by Trialkylamine Oxides and Synergism with the Gas Kinetic Hydrate Inhibitor Poly(N-vinyl caprolactam)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High Pressure Gas Hydrate Rocker Rig Equipment Test Methods ... Solid plugs caused by gas hydrate formation are a menace in various stages of the upstream oil and gas industry such as in production lines, during drilling (especially in deep water), and in work-over operations. ... (1, 4-7) In particular, the design of a new field development with LDHI technology can give large CAPEX savings. ...

Malcolm A. Kelland; Ann Helen Kvćstad; Erik Langeland Astad

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

56

E ects of the Driving Force on the Composition of Natural Gas Hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E ects of the Driving Force on the Composition of Natural Gas Hydrates Odd I. Levik(1) , Jean for storage and transport of natural gas. Storage of natural gas in the form of hydrate at elevated pressure concept) (Gud- mundsson et al. 1998). Natural gas hydrate contains up to 182 Sm3 gas per m3 hydrate

Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

57

Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence  

SciTech Connect

This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

CONTENTS BOEM Releases Assessment of In-Place Gas Hydrate Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BOEM Releases Assessment of BOEM Releases Assessment of In-Place Gas Hydrate Resources of the Lower 48 United States Outer Continental Shelf ..............1 Re-examination of Seep Activity at the Blake Ridge Diapir ............6 Field Data from 2011/2012 ConocoPhillips-JOGMEC-DOE Iġnik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial Now Available .......................9 Announcements .......................11 * Norwegian Center of Excellence to Receive Ten Years of Arctic Research Funding * Release of Mallik 2007-2008 Results * Goldschmidt Conference * 2012 Methane Hydrate Research Fellowship Awarded to Jeffrey James Marlow Spotlight on Research........... 16 Bjørn Kvamme CONTACT Ray Boswell Technology Manager-Methane Hydrates, Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil 304-285-4541 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov

59

The growth rate of gas hydrate from refrigerant R12  

SciTech Connect

Experimental and theoretical investigations were presented dealing with three phase direct-contact heat transfer by evaporation of refrigerant drops in an immiscible liquid. Refrigerant R12 was used as the dispersed phase, while water and brine were the immiscible continuous phase. A numerical solution is presented to predict the formation rate of gas hydrates in test column. The solution provided an acceptable agreement when compared with experimental results. The gas hydrate growth rate increased with time. It increased with increasing dispersed phase flow rate. The presence of surface-active sodium chloride in water had a strong inhibiting effect on the gas hydrate formation rate. (author)

Kendoush, Abdullah Abbas; Jassim, Najim Abid [Centre of Engineering Physics, Ministry of Sciences and Technology, P.O. Box 765, Baghdad (Iraq); Joudi, Khalid A. [Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad (Iraq)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Estimate Gas-Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Last Reviewed 6/14/2013 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Last Reviewed 6/14/2013 DE-FC26-06NT42959 Goal The goal of this project is to evaluate the direct-current electrical resistivity (DCR) method for remotely detecting and characterizing the concentration of gas hydrates in the deep marine environment. This will be accomplished by adapting existing DCR instrumentation for use on the sea floor in the deep marine environment and testing the new instrumentation at Mississippi Canyon Block 118. Performer Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 Collaborators Advanced Geosciences Inc., Austin, TX 78726 Specialty Devices Inc., Wylie, TX 75098 Background Marine occurrences of methane hydrates are known to form in two distinct

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Drilling through gas hydrates formations: possible problems and suggested solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate research in the last two decades has taken various directions ranging from ways to understand the safe and economical production of this enormous resource to drilling problems. as more rigs and production platforms move into deeper...

Amodu, Afolabi Ayoola

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Gas hydrate detection and mapping on the US east coast  

SciTech Connect

Project objectives are to identify and map gas hydrate accumulations on the US eastern continental margin using remote sensing (seismic profiling) techniques and to relate these concentrations to the geological factors that-control them. In order to test the remote sensing methods, gas hydrate-cemented sediments will be tested in the laboratory and an effort will be made to perform similar physical tests on natural hydrate-cemented sediments from the study area. Gas hydrate potentially may represent a future major resource of energy. Furthermore, it may influence climate change because it forms a large reservoir for methane, which is a very effective greenhouse gas; its breakdown probably is a controlling factor for sea-floor landslides; and its presence has significant effect on the acoustic velocity of sea-floor sediments.

Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Dillon, W.P.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

approach for exploration of gas hydrate reservoirs in marine areas. Authors C. Y. Sun, B. H. Niu, P. F. Wen, Y. Y. Huang, H. Y. Wang, X. W. Huang and J. Li Published Journal...

64

Natural Gas Hydrate Dissociation by Presence of Ethylene Glycol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrate Dissociation by Presence of Ethylene Glycol ... solids that form from mixts. of water and light natural gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, ethane, propane and butane. ... Pulse Combustion Characteristics of Various Gaseous Fuels ...

Shuanshi Fan; Yuzhen Zhang; Genlin Tian; Deqing Liang; Dongliang Li

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ultrasonic velocity measurements for synthetic gas?hydrate samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory ultrasonic methods offer a way of studying acoustic velocity of a gas?hydrate bearing formation. By measuringultrasonic velocities of the gas?hydrate samples in various temperature and pressure conditions more effective inversion techniques can be developed to quantitatively evaluate gas?hydrate concentration and distributions. Low?temperature laboratory measurements of compressional velocities in compacted samples are conducted. These gas?hydrate samples are synthesized by using various densities at various pressures and temperatures. At ?10°C the compressional velocities of the compacted gas?hydrate samples are from 2440 to 3570 m/s with the density range from 475 to 898 kg/m3. Compressional velocity measurements are made where the temperature and pressure can be controlled. When the pore pressure increases from 10 to 40 MPa the compressional velocities of the sample increases from 2340 to 2600 m/s at 1.5°C. When the temperature decreases from 10° to ?13°C the compressional velocity will increase from 3600 to 3800 m/s at a pore pressure of 6 MPa. Our experimental results are qualitatively in agreement with those of weighted average model and the Biot?Gassmanns model when the gas?hydrate concentration in a sediment bearing sand is about 20%. [Work supported by National Natural Science Fundation of China No. 10534040.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Gas Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - Chatham Rise, New Zealand Task Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - Chatham Rise, New Zealand Task Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 DE-AI26-06NT42878 Goal The goal of the Interagency Agreement between the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Naval Research Laboratory is to conduct research to enhance understanding of the extent and dynamics of gas hydrate deposits and their relation to areas of focused fluid flux at and beneath the seafloor. Performer Marine Biogeochemistry Section, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 Background Methane is a potent greenhouse gas necessitating a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling its contribution to the atmospheric carbon cycle. Active methane fluxes (from deep sediment hydrates and seeps) contribute to shallow sediment biogeochemical carbon cycles, which in turn

67

Basin scale assessment of gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change  

SciTech Connect

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating climate. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. Field investigations have discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor along the Arctic Ocean margin, and the plumes appear at depths corresponding to the upper limit of a receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the first visible signs of the dissociation of shallow hydrate deposits due to ongoing climate change in the arctic. We simulate the release of methane from oceanic deposits, including the effects of fully-coupled heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate dissociation, and other thermodynamic processes, for systems representative of segments of the Arctic Ocean margins. The modeling encompasses a range of shallow hydrate deposits from the landward limit of the hydrate stability zone down to water depths beyond the expected range of century-scale temperature changes. We impose temperature changes corresponding to predicted rates of climate change-related ocean warming and examine the possibility of hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. The assessment is performed at local-, regional-, and basin-scales. The simulation results are consistent with the hypothesis that dissociating shallow hydrates alone can result in significant methane fluxes at the seafloor. However, the methane release is likely to be confined to a narrow region of high dissociation susceptibility, defined by depth and temperature, and that any release will be continuous and controlled, rather than explosive. This modeling also establishes the first realistic bounds for methane release along the arctic continental shelf for potential hydrate dissociation scenarios, and ongoing work may help confirm whether climate change is already impacting the stability of the vast oceanic hydrate reservoir.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Cameron-Smith, P.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The sensitivity of seismic responses to gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

The sensitivity of seismic reflection coefficients and amplitudes, and their variations with changing incidence angles and offsets, was determined with respect to changes in the parameters which characterize marine sediments containing gas hydrates. Using the results of studies of ice saturation effects in permafrost soils, we have introduced rheological effects of hydrate saturation. The replacement of pore fluids in highly porous and unconsolidated marine sediments with crystalline gas hydrates, increases the rigidity of the sediments, and alters the ratio of compressional/shear strength ratio. This causes Vp/Vs ratio variations which have an effect on the amplitudes of P-wave and S-wave reflections. Analysis of reflection coefficient functions has revealed that amplitudes are very sensitive to porosity estimates, and errors in the assumed model porosity can effect the estimates of hydrate saturation. Additionally, we see that the level of free gas saturation is difficult to determine. A review of the effects of free gas and hydrate saturation on shear wave arrivals indicates that far-offset P to S wave converted arrivals may provide a means of characterizing hydrate saturations. Complications in reflection coefficient and amplitude modelling can arise from gradients in hydrate saturation levels and from rough sea floor topography. An increase in hydrate saturation with depth in marine sediments causes rays to bend towards horizontal and increases the reflection incidence angles and subsequent amplitudes. This effect is strongly accentuated when the vertical separation between the source and the hydrate reflection horizon is reduced. The effect on amplitude variations with offset due to a rough sea floor was determined through finite difference wavefield modelling. Strong diffractions in the waveforms add noise to the amplitude versus offset functions.

Foley, J.E.; Burns, D.R.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The sensitivity of seismic responses to gas hydrates. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The sensitivity of seismic reflection coefficients and amplitudes, and their variations with changing incidence angles and offsets, was determined with respect to changes in the parameters which characterize marine sediments containing gas hydrates. Using the results of studies of ice saturation effects in permafrost soils, we have introduced rheological effects of hydrate saturation. The replacement of pore fluids in highly porous and unconsolidated marine sediments with crystalline gas hydrates, increases the rigidity of the sediments, and alters the ratio of compressional/shear strength ratio. This causes Vp/Vs ratio variations which have an effect on the amplitudes of P-wave and S-wave reflections. Analysis of reflection coefficient functions has revealed that amplitudes are very sensitive to porosity estimates, and errors in the assumed model porosity can effect the estimates of hydrate saturation. Additionally, we see that the level of free gas saturation is difficult to determine. A review of the effects of free gas and hydrate saturation on shear wave arrivals indicates that far-offset P to S wave converted arrivals may provide a means of characterizing hydrate saturations. Complications in reflection coefficient and amplitude modelling can arise from gradients in hydrate saturation levels and from rough sea floor topography. An increase in hydrate saturation with depth in marine sediments causes rays to bend towards horizontal and increases the reflection incidence angles and subsequent amplitudes. This effect is strongly accentuated when the vertical separation between the source and the hydrate reflection horizon is reduced. The effect on amplitude variations with offset due to a rough sea floor was determined through finite difference wavefield modelling. Strong diffractions in the waveforms add noise to the amplitude versus offset functions.

Foley, J.E.; Burns, D.R.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate formation in a variable volume bed of silica sandamount of sand, gas, and water. Although methane hydrate has

Kneafsey, T.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on gas production from hydrate accumulations in the permafrost  

SciTech Connect

The quantity of hydrocarbon gases trapped in natural hydrate accumulations is enormous, leading to significant interest in the evaluation of their potential as an energy source. Large volumes of gas can be readily produced at high rates for long times from methane hydrate accumulations in the permafrost by means of depressurization-induced dissociation combined with conventional technologies and horizontal or vertical well configurations. Initial studies on the possibility of natural gas production from permafrost hydrates assumed homogeneity in intrinsic reservoir properties and in the initial condition of the hydrate-bearing layers (either due to the coarseness of the model or due to simplifications in the definition of the system). These results showed great promise for gas recovery from Class 1, 2, and 3 systems in the permafrost. This work examines the consequences of inevitable heterogeneity in intrinsic properties, such as in the porosity of the hydrate-bearing formation, or heterogeneity in the initial state of hydrate saturation. Heterogeneous configurations are generated through multiple methods: (1) through defining heterogeneous layers via existing well-log data, (2) through randomized initialization of reservoir properties and initial conditions, and (3) through the use of geostatistical methods to create heterogeneous fields that extrapolate from the limited data available from cores and well-log data. These extrapolations use available information and established geophysical methods to capture a range of deposit properties and hydrate configurations. The results show that some forms of heterogeneity, such as horizontal stratification, can assist in production of hydrate-derived gas. However, more heterogeneous structures can lead to complex physical behavior within the deposit and near the wellbore that may obstruct the flow of fluids to the well, necessitating revised production strategies. The need for fine discretization is crucial in all cases to capture dynamic behavior during production.

Reagan, M. T.; Kowalsky, M B.; Moridis, G. J.; Silpngarmlert, S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Marine electromagnetic methods for gas hydrate characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 m 3 ) Conventional gas reserves Year of estimate Figureworld conventional gas reserves (from Milkov and Sassen (

Weitemeyer, Karen Andrea

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Marine Electromagnetic Methods for Gas Hydrate Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 m 3 ) Conventional gas reserves Year of estimate Figureworld conventional gas reserves (from Milkov and Sassen (

Weitemeyer, Karen A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Documented Example of Gas Hydrate Saturated Sand in the Gulfthe behavior of gas hydrate bearing sand reservoirs can beof highly-saturated gas-hydrate bearing sand in the Gulf of

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Final Technical Report on: Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Technical Report on: Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation, Final Technical Report on: Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation, Gulf of Mexico: In Situ Field Study with Laboratory Characterizations of Exposed and Buried Gas Hydrates DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-02NT41328 Dates: 3/4/02 - 3/3/06 Prepared by: Miriam Kastner, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California 92093 Ian MacDonald, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 Prepared for US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2006 2 Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

76

Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in the Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Submitted by: Baylor University One Bear Place, Box 97354 Waco, TX 76798 Principal Author: John A. Dunbar Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 15, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Pr oject Quar ter 17 Repor t Report Type: Quarterly Starting October 1, 2010 Ending December 31, 2010 Author: John A. Dunbar Baylor University Department of Geology January 15, 2011 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-06NT142959

77

Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: define a rational approach for inhibitor design, using the most probable molecular mechanism; improve the performance of inhibitors; test inhibitors on Colorado School of Mines apparatuses and the Exxon flow loop; and promote sharing field and flow loop results. This report presents the results of the progress on these four goals.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Studies of geologic and geophysical data from the offshore of India have revealed two geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences: the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 was designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. NGHP Expedition 01 established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna- Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. The expedition discovered one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented (Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin), documented the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known (Site 17 in Andaman Sea), and established the existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin (Site 19).

Collett, T.S. (USGS); Riedel, M. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec, Canada); Cochran, J.R. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY); Boswell, R.M.; Kumar, Pushpendra (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Navi Mumbai, India); Sathe, A.V. (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Uttaranchal, INDIA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Chitosan as green kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetic inhibiting effect of a number of chitosans on hydrate formation was investigated using methane and methane/ethane gas mixtures. The results indicated that chitosan was a good kinetic inhibitor. The induction time of gas hydrate formation evidently increased with the degree of deacetylation (DD), however, when DD was higher than 80%, the effect of DD on the induction time was negligible. Moreover, it was found that the molecular weight (MW) of chitosan and the addition of polyethylene oxide (PEO) had little effect on the induction time. The optimal concentration of chitosan was found to be 0.6 wt%. Finally, the mechanisms of the kinetic inhibitor on the hydrate formation were discussed.

Yongjun Xu; Minlin Yang; Xiaoxi Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies May 2, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the completion of a successful, unprecedented test of technology in the North Slope of Alaska that was able to safely extract a steady flow of natural gas from methane hydrates - a vast, entirely untapped resource that holds enormous potential for U.S. economic and energy security. Building upon this initial, small-scale test, the Department is launching a new research effort to conduct a long-term production test in the Arctic as well as research to test additional technologies that could be used to locate,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Recovery of gas from hydrate deposits using conventional production technology. [Salt-frac technique  

SciTech Connect

Methane hydrate gas could be a sizeable energy resource if methods can be devised to produce this gas economically. This paper examines two methods of producing gas from hydrate deposits by the injection of hot water or steam, and also examines the feasibility of hydraulic fracturing and pressure reduction as a hydrate gas production technique. A hydraulic fracturing technique suitable for hydrate reservoirs is also described.

McGuire, P.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

International Conference on Gas Hydrates May 19-23, 2002, Yokohama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrates for transport and storage of natural gas and in cold flow technology. In a continuous stirred tank. The same conditions are relevant in cold flow technology where oil, gas and water are passed through4th International Conference on Gas Hydrates May 19-23, 2002, Yokohama Hydrate Formation Rate

Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

83

ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Canyon-infilling and gas hydrate occurrences in the frontal fold  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Canyon-infilling and gas hydrate occurrences in the frontal fold to infer the canyon-infilling, fold uplift, and gas hydrate occurrences beneath the frontal fold at the toe simu- lating reflector (BSR) on seismic sections indicates the base of gas hydrate stability zone

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

84

Acoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas Hydrates Formation and Silica Diagenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas Hydrates Formation and Silica Rights Reserved #12;ABSTRACT Acoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas Hydrates-A to Opal-CT, the formation of gas hydrates, fluid substitution in hydrocarbon reservoirs, and fluid

Guerin, Gilles

85

Massive dissociation of gas hydrate during a Jurassic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

release of methane from gas hydrate contained in marine continental-margin sediments. The better-known positive carbon-isotope excursion of the Early Toarcian is well illustrated by European organic-poor marine-resolution ammonite biostratigraphy is simply determined. Fossil wood is also present, preserved as coal (some

Hesselbo, Stephen P.

86

Marine gas hydrates in thin sand layers that soak up microbial methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At Site U1325 (IODP Exp. 311, Cascadia margin), gas hydrates occupy 20–60% of pore space in thin sand layers (hydrate. This is a common occurrence in gas hydrate-bearing marine sequences, and it has been related to the inhibition of hydrate formation in the small pores of fine-grained sediments. This paper applies a mass balance model to gas hydrate formation in a stack of alternating fine- and coarse-grained sediment layers. The only source of methane considered is in situ microbial conversion of a small amount of organic carbon (gas hydrates in the fine-grained layers. Methane generated in these layers is transported by diffusion into the coarse-grained layers where it forms concentrated gas hydrate deposits. The vertical distribution and amount of gas hydrate observed at Site U1325 can be explained by in situ microbial methane generation, and a deep methane source is not necessary.

Alberto Malinverno

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Gas Production from Hydrate-Bearing Sediments - Emergent Phenomena -  

SciTech Connect

Even a small fraction of fine particles can have a significant effect on gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments and sediment stability. Experiments were conducted to investigate the role of fine particles on gas production using a soil chamber that allows for the application of an effective stress to the sediment. This chamber was instrumented to monitor shear-wave velocity, temperature, pressure, and volume change during CO{sub 2} hydrate formation and gas production. The instrumented chamber was placed inside the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS), which was used to control the fluid pressure and temperature. Experiments were conducted with different sediment types and pressure-temperature histories. Fines migrated within the sediment in the direction of fluid flow. A vuggy structure formed in the sand; these small cavities or vuggs were precursors to the development of gas-driven fractures during depressurization under a constant effective stress boundary condition. We define the critical fines fraction as the clay-to-sand mass ratio when clays fill the pore space in the sand. Fines migration, clogging, vugs, and gas-driven fracture formation developed even when the fines content was significantly lower than the critical fines fraction. These results show the importance of fines in gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments, even when the fines content is relatively low.

Jung, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jang, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Santamarina, Carlos [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Sedimentological control on saturation distribution in Arctic gas-hydrate-bearing sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mechanistic model is proposed to predict/explain hydrate saturation distribution in “converted free gashydrate reservoirs in sub-permafrost formations in the Arctic. This 1-D model assumes that a gas column accumulates and subsequently is converted to hydrate. The processes considered are the volume change during hydrate formation and consequent fluid phase transport within the column, the descent of the base of gas hydrate stability zone through the column, and sedimentological variations with depth. Crucially, the latter enable disconnection of the gas column during hydrate formation, which leads to substantial variation in hydrate saturation distribution. One form of variation observed in Arctic hydrate reservoirs is that zones of very low hydrate saturations are interspersed abruptly between zones of large hydrate saturations. The model was applied to data from Mount Elbert well, a gas hydrate stratigraphic test well drilled in the Milne Point area of the Alaska North Slope. The model is consistent with observations from the well log and interpretations of seismic anomalies in the area. The model also predicts that a considerable amount of fluid (of order one pore volume of gaseous and/or aqueous phases) must migrate within or into the gas column during hydrate formation. This paper offers the first explanatory model of its kind that addresses “converted free gas reservoirs” from a new angle: the effect of volume change during hydrate formation combined with capillary entry pressure variation versus depth.

Javad Behseresht; Steven L. Bryant

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

I/I ratios and halogen concentrations in pore waters of the Hydrate Ridge: Relevance for the origin of gas hydrates in ODP Leg 204  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in fluids associated with hydrocarbons, such as oil field brines (Moran et al., 1995) or coal-bed methane association of iodine with methane allows the identification of the organic source material responsible for iodine and methane in gas hydrates. In all cores, iodine concentrations were found to increase strongly

Fehn, Udo

90

Processes for Methane Production from Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main cost here is only that of the pipeline used to transport the gas to the production platform. For subsea systems that do not ... group of wells. Transporting methane from the production site to the shore ...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Gas hydrate occurrences and their relation to host sediment properties: Results from Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition, East Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) recovered various forms of gas-hydrate bearing sediments from 10 drill sites in the lower slope and basin floor of the Ulleung Basin. To characterize the gas-hydrate occurrences and the properties of the host sediments, whole-round core samples were taken from portions of recovered cores determined to be hydrate-bearing based on infrared (IR) scanning. These samples were further characterized by a variety of shipboard experiments such as imaging of the sediments with hand-held IR and visual cameras, measurements of pore water chlorinity within and around IR inferred cold regions in the core and grain-size analysis of pore-water squeeze cakes. Sediment compositions of selected samples were further characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopes during post-cruise analysis. The shipboard and post-cruise analysis results collectively indicate that the recovered gas hydrates mainly occur as 1) “pore-filling” type bounded by discrete silty sand to sandy silt layers, 2) “fracture-filling” veins and nodules, or 3) “disseminated” type in silt. In addition, minor but significant variation in gas hydrate concentrations were observed in diatomaceous silt where gas hydrates occur as “pore-filling” material in layers dominated by intact diatom frustules. Gas hydrate accumulations of “fracture-filling” type occur predominantly in regions where acoustic blanking features in the seismic record suggest gas migration from below the gas hydrate stability zone. Results from the UBGH2 core studies along with the analysis of similar samples from other expeditions, including those executed by the Ocean Drilling Program, the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and the First Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition, greatly improved our understanding of lithologic controls on marine gas hydrate occurrences.

J.-J. Bahk; D.-H. Kim; J.-H. Chun; B.-K. Son; J.-H. Kim; B.-J. Ryu; M.E. Torres; M. Riedel; P. Schultheiss

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with a study directed towards a modeling effort on production related ground movements and subsidence resulting from hydrate dissociation. The goal of this research study was to evaluate whether there could be subsidence related problems that could be an impediment to hydrate production. During the production of gas from a hydrate reservoir, it is expected that porous reservoir matrix becomes more compressible which may cause reservoir compression (compaction) under the influence of overburden weight. The overburden deformations can propagate its influence upwards causing subsidence near the surface where production equipment will be located. In the present study, the reservoir compaction is modeled by using the conventional ``stress equilibrium`` approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ``cavity`` generated by reservoir depletion. The present study is expected to provide a ``lower bound`` solution to the subsidence caused by hydrate reservoir depletion. The reservoir compaction anticipated during hydrate production was modeled by using the finite element method, which is a powerful computer modeling technique. The ground movements at the reservoir roof (i.e. reservoir compression) cause additional stresses and disturbance in the overburden strata. In this study, the reservoir compaction was modeled by using the conventional ``stress equilibrium`` approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ``cavity`` generated by reservoir depletion. The resulting stresses and ground movements were computed by using the finite element method. Based on the parameters used in this investigation, the maximum ground subsidence could vary anywhere from 0.50 to 6.50 inches depending on the overburden depth and the size of the depleted hydrate reservoir.

Siriwardane, H.J.; Kutuk, B.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION CHEVRON GULF OF MEXICO GAS HYDRATES JIP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION CHEVRON GULF OF MEXICO GAS HYDRATES JIP BLOCKS 13 AND 14, ATWATER VALLEY AREA BLOCK 151, KEATHLEY CANYON AREA GULF OF MEXICO RESULTS OF CORE SAMPLE ANALYSIS, STANDARD AND ADVANCED LABORATORY TESTING Report No. 0201-5081 CHEVRON TEXACO ENERGY TECHNOLOGY COMPANY Houston, Texas FUGRO-McCLELLAND MARINE GEOSCIENCES, INC. P. O. Box 740010, Houston, Texas 77274, Phone: 713-369-5600, Fax: 713-369-5570 GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION CHEVRON GULF OF MEXICO GAS HYDRATES JIP BLOCKS 13 AND 14, ATWATER VALLEY AREA BLOCK 151, KEATHLEY CANYON AREA GULF OF MEXICO RESULTS OF CORE SAMPLE ANALYSIS, STANDARD AND ADVANCED LABORATORY TESTING REPORT NO. 0201-5081 Client: ChevronTexaco Energy Technology Company 1500 Louisiana St. Houston, Tx 77002

94

Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 1 - September 30, 2011 July 1 - September 30, 2011 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in the Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Submitted by: Baylor University One Bear Place, Box 97354 Waco, TX 76798 Principal Author: John A. Dunbar Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 14, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Pr oject Quar ter 20 Repor t Report Type: Quarterly Starting July 1, 2011 Ending September 30, 2011 Author: John A. Dunbar Baylor University Department of Geology October 14, 2011 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-06NT142959

95

Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 1 - March 31, 2012 January 1 - March 31, 2012 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in the Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Submitted by: Baylor University One Bear Place, Box 97354 Waco, TX 76798 Principal Author: John A. Dunbar Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 18, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Pr oject Quar ter 22 Repor t Report Type: Quarterly Starting January 1, 2012 Ending March 31, 2012 Author: John A. Dunbar Baylor University Department of Geology April 18, 2012 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-06NT142959

96

Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: continue both screening and high pressure experiments to determine optimum inhibitors; investigate molecular mechanisms of hydrate formation/inhibition, through microscopic and macroscopic experiments; begin controlled tests on the Exxon pilot plant loop at their Houston facility; and continue to act as a forum for the sharing of field test results. Progress on these objectives are described in this report.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Geochemical and geologic factors effecting the formulation of gas hydrate: Task No. 5, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of our work has been to determine the primary geochemical and geological factors controlling gas hydrate information and occurrence and particularly in the factors responsible for the generation and accumulation of methane in oceanic gas hydrates. In order to understand the interrelation of geochemical/geological factors controlling gas hydrate occurrence, we have undertaken a multicomponent program which has included (1) comparison of available information at sites where gas hydrates have been observed through drilling by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) on the Blake Outer Ridge and Middle America Trench; (2) regional synthesis of information related to gas hydrate occurrences of the Middle America Trench; (3) development of a model for the occurrence of a massive gas hydrate as DSDP Site 570; (4) a global synthesis of gas hydrate occurrences; and (5) development of a predictive model for gas hydrate occurrence in oceanic sediment. The first three components of this program were treated as part of a 1985 Department of Energy Peer Review. The present report considers the last two components and presents information on the worldwide occurrence of gas hydrates with particular emphasis on the Circum-Pacific and Arctic basins. A model is developed to account for the occurrence of oceanic gas hydrates in which the source of the methane is from microbial processes. 101 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

Kvenvolden, K.A.; Claypool, G.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Integrated Geologic and Geophysical Assessment of the Eileen Gas Hydrate Accumulation, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Using detailed analysis and interpretation of 2-D and 3-D seismic data, along with modeling and correlation of specially processed log data, a viable methodology has been developed for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone (HSZ) and associated ''sub-hydrate'' free gas prospects in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska (Figure 1). The seismic data, in conjunction with modeling results from a related study, was used to characterize the conditions under which gas hydrate prospects can be delineated using conventional seismic data, and to analyze reservoir fluid properties. Monte Carlo style gas hydrate volumetric estimates using Crystal Ball{trademark} software to estimate expected in-place reserves shows that the identified prospects have considerable potential as gas resources. Future exploratory drilling in the Milne Point area should provide answers about the producibility of these shallow gas hydrates.

Timothy S. Collett; David J. Taylor; Warren F. Agena; Myung W. Lee; John J. Miller; Margarita Zyrianova

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

Clathrate hydrate equilibrium data for the gas mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Clathrate hydrate equilibrium data for the gas mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen the mole fraction of CO2 in the carbon dioxide + nitrogen + cyclopentane mixed hydrate phase, both defined;2 {water +carbon dioxide + nitrogen}, the equilibrium pressure of the mixed hydrate is reduced by 0.95 up

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Resource Characterization and Quantification of Natural Gas-Hydrate and Associated Free-Gas Accumulations in the Prudhoe Bay - Kuparuk River Area on the North Slope of Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates have long been considered a nuisance by the petroleum industry. Hydrates have been hazards to drilling crews, with blowouts a common occurrence if not properly accounted for in drilling plans. In gas pipelines, hydrates have formed plugs if gas was not properly dehydrated. Removing these plugs has been an expensive and time-consuming process. Recently, however, due to the geologic evidence indicating that in situ hydrates could potentially be a vast energy resource of the future, research efforts have been undertaken to explore how natural gas from hydrates might be produced. This study investigates the relative permeability of methane and brine in hydrate-bearing Alaska North Slope core samples. In February 2007, core samples were taken from the Mt. Elbert site situated between the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk oil fields on the Alaska North Slope. Core plugs from those core samples have been used as a platform to form hydrates and perform unsteady-steady-state displacement relative permeability experiments. The absolute permeability of Mt. Elbert core samples determined by Omni Labs was also validated as part of this study. Data taken with experimental apparatuses at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, ConocoPhillips laboratories at the Bartlesville Technology Center, and at the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation's facilities in Anchorage, Alaska, provided the basis for this study. This study finds that many difficulties inhibit the ability to obtain relative permeability data in porous media-containing hydrates. Difficulties include handling unconsolidated cores during initial core preparation work, forming hydrates in the core in such a way that promotes flow of both brine and methane, and obtaining simultaneous two-phase flow of brine and methane necessary to quantify relative permeability using unsteady-steady-state displacement methods.

Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?  

SciTech Connect

Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Mechanisms Leading to Co-existence of Gas and Hydrate in Ocean Sediments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leading to Co-existence of Gas Leading to Co-existence of Gas and Hydrate in Ocean Sediments Steven Bryant Dept. of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering The University of Texas at Austin and Ruben Juanes Dept. of Civil Engineering MIT Observations and Ruminations * Some proposed explanations for co-existence - kinetics of hydrate formation; - regional geotherms; - hypersaline brines as a result of hydrate formation;

104

Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate simulating reflectors (BSRs) imply the potential existence of gas hydrates offshore southwestern Taiwan that the fluxes are very high in offshore southwestern Taiwan. The depths of the SMI are different at sites GH6

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

105

Controlled-source electromagnetic modeling of the masking effect of marine gas hydrate on a deeper hydrocarbon reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that electric field data were reliable to roughly 5000 m of TX-RX offset for the 1 Hz and 3 Hz cases, and to 6500 m offset for 10 Hz. The gas hydrate/hydrocarbon model was then run with zero-value boundary conditions. The goal was to determine what effect...

Dickins, David

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

106

DOE Gas Hydrate R&D: Shale Gas Déjŕ Vu?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

More than 30 years ago, DOE looked into the future and saw the potentially large benefit of developing promising but difficult-to-extract unconventional natural gas resources, particularly those from shale formations. As a result, it began sponsoring research and development (R&D), partnering with industry and academia, and, among other things, invested about $137 million in the Eastern Gas Shale Program between 1978 and 1992.

107

Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

In the late spring of 2008, the Chevron-led Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) expects to conduct an exploratory drilling and logging campaign to better understand gas hydrate-bearing sands in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. The JIP Site Selection team selected three areas to test alternative geological models and geophysical interpretations supporting the existence of potential high gas hydrate saturations in reservoir-quality sands. The three sites are near existing drill holes which provide geological and geophysical constraints in Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system in an area characterized by seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and abundant seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets ponded sheet sands and associated channel/levee deposits within a minibasin, making this a non-structural play. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. Drilling locations have been selected at each site to 1) test geological methods and models used to infer the occurrence of gas hydrate in sand reservoirs in different settings in the northern Gulf of Mexico; 2) calibrate geophysical models used to detect gas hydrate sands, map reservoir thicknesses, and estimate the degree of gas hydrate saturation; and 3) delineate potential locations for subsequent JIP drilling and coring operations that will collect samples for comprehensive physical property, geochemical and other analyses.

Hutchinson, D.R. (USGS); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger, Houston, TX); Dai, J. (Schlumberger, Hoston, TX); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics, Inc., Houston, TX); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Boswell, R.; Jones, E. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX); Collett, T.S. (USGS); Rose, K.; Dugan, B. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX); Wood, W. (U.S. Naval Research Laboratory); Latham, T. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Experimental studies on the P-T stability conditions and influencing factors of gas hydrate in different systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The P-T stability conditions of gas hydrate in different systems (i.e., solution, silica sand, and marine sediment) were studied using...P-T stability conditions of gas hydrate were investigated. The results show...

ChangLing Liu; YuGuang Ye; ShiCai Sun; Qiang Chen…

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Simulation of gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is proposed, which can overcome ... gas production by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurizati...

YuHu Bai; QingPing Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We propose an integrated study method for exploration of gas hydrate reservoirs in marine areas. This method combines analyses of geology, seismology, and geochemistry. First, geological analysis is made using data of material sources, structures, sediments, and geothermal regimes to determine the hydrocarbon-formation conditions of gas hydrate in marine areas. Then analyses of seismic attributes,such as BSR, AVO, and BZ as well as forward modeling are conducted to predict the potential

112

DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates July 30, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. Read Dr. Boswell's testimony Dr. Ray Boswell, Senior Management and Technology Advisor at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, testified before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources that the R&D program in gas hydrates is working to integrate and leverage

113

Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico May 14, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis USGS technicians Eric Moore and Jenny White deploy instruments at the start of a seismic survey to explore gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico from April to May 2013 | Photo courtesy of USGS USGS technicians Eric Moore and Jenny White deploy instruments at the start of a seismic survey to explore gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico from April to May 2013 | Photo courtesy of USGS Washington, DC - A joint-federal-agency 15-day research expedition in the northern Gulf of Mexico yielded innovative high-resolution seismic data and imagery that will help refine characterizations of large methane

114

Status of DOE Research Efforts in Gas Hydrates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status of DOE Research Efforts in Gas Hydrates Status of DOE Research Efforts in Gas Hydrates Status of DOE Research Efforts in Gas Hydrates July 30, 2009 - 1:38pm Addthis Statement of Dr. Ray Boswell, National Energy Technology Laboratory before the Committee on Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources, U.S. House of Representatives. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the status of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) research efforts in naturally-occurring gas hydrates. INTRODUCTION Since 2000, DOE, through the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has led the national research program in gas hydrates. The program is conducted through partnerships with private

115

Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing operations. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds which form when molecules smaller than n-butane contact molecules of water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures, both above and below the ice point. Because these crystalline compounds plug flow channels, they are undesirable. In this project the authors proposed an alternate approach of controlling hydrate formation by preventing hydrate growth into a sizeable mass which could block a flow channel. The authors call this new technique kinetic inhibition, because while it allows the system to exist in the hydrate domain, it prevents the kinetic agglomeration of small hydrate crystals to the point of pluggage of a flow channel. In order to investigate the kinetic means of inhibiting hydrate formation, they held two consortium meetings, on June 1, 1990 and on August 31, 1990. At subsequent meetings, the authors determined the following four stages of the project, necessary to reach the goal of determining a new hydrate field inhibitor: (1) a rapid screening method was to be determined for testing the hydrate kinetic formation period of many surfactants and polymer candidates (both individually and combined), the present report presents the success of two screening apparatuses: a multi-reactor apparatus which is capable of rapid, high volume screening, and the backup screening method--a viscometer for testing with gas at high pressure; (2) the construction of two high, constant pressure cells were to experimentally confirm the success of the chemicals in the rapid screening apparatus; (3) in the third phase of the work, Exxon volunteered to evaluate the performance of the best chemicals from the previous two stages in their 4 inch I.D. Multiphase flow loop in Houston; (4) in the final phase of the work, the intention was to take the successful kinetic inhibition chemicals from the previous three stages and then test them in the field in gathering lines and wells from member companies.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine Hydrate Deposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sands interlayered with silts and clays, a regime that is not conducive to significant free gas and/or hydrate

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol, Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

AN INTERNATIONAL EFFORT TO COMPARE GAS HYDRATE RESERVOIR SIMULATORS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AN INTERNATIONAL EFFORT TO COMPARE GAS HYDRATE RESERVOIR SIMULATORS Joseph W. Wilder 1 , George J. Moridis 2 , Scott J. Wilson 3 , Masanori Kurihara 4 , Mark D. White 5 , Yoshihiro Masuda 6 , Brian J. Anderson 7, 8 *, Timothy S. Collett 9 , Robert B. Hunter 10 , Hideo Narita 11 , Mehran Pooladi-Darvish 12 , Kelly Rose 7 , Ray Boswell 7 1 Department of Theoretical & Applied Math University of Akron 302 Buchtel Common Akron, OH 44325-4002 USA 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California Earth Sciences Division, 1 Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 USA 3 Ryder Scott Company, Petroleum Consultants 621 17th Street, Suite 1550 Denver, Colorado 80293 USA 4 Japan Oil Engineering Company, Ltd. Kachidoki Sun-Square 1-7-3, Kachidoki, Chuo-ku,

118

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Methane Hydrate Research - Geoscience Evaluations and Field Studies Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 - Methane Hydrate Research - Geoscience Evaluations and Field Studies Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 Project Goals The primary goals of the DOE/NETL Natural Gas Hydrate Field Studies (NGHFS) project are: Conduct field-based studies that advance the ability to predict, detect, characterize, and understand distribution of and controls on natural gas hydrate occurrences. Analyze geologic, geochemical, and microbiologic data for indications of past and current changes to the stability of natural gas hydrate in marine settings. Develop links between the U.S. Gas Hydrate Program and international R&D efforts through direct participation in international field programs and workshops. Evaluate the potential role natural gas hydrates may play in the global carbon cycle through analysis of modern and paleo-natural gas

119

Scientific Objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Leg II Drilling  

SciTech Connect

The Gulf of Mexico Methane Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) has been performing research on marine gas hydrates since 2001 and is sponsored by both the JIP members and the U.S. Department of Energy. In 2005, the JIP drilled the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon exploration blocks in the Gulf of Mexico to acquire downhole logs and recover cores in silt- and clay-dominated sediments interpreted to contain gas hydrate based on analysis of existing 3-D seismic data prior to drilling. The new 2007-2009 phase of logging and coring, which is described in this paper, will concentrate on gas hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaminos Canyon, Green Canyon, and Walker Ridge protraction areas. Locations were selected to target higher permeability, coarser-grained lithologies (e.g., sands) that have the potential for hosting high saturations of gas hydrate and to assist the U.S. Minerals Management Service with its assessment of gas hydrate resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper discusses the scientific objectives for drilling during the upcoming campaign and presents the results from analyzing existing seismic and well log data as part of the site selection process. Alaminos Canyon 818 has the most complete data set of the selected blocks, with both seismic data and comprehensive downhole log data consistent with the occurrence of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Preliminary analyses suggest that the Frio sandstone just above the base of the gas hydrate stability zone may have up to 80% of the available sediment pore space occupied by gas hydrate. The proposed sites in the Green Canyon and Walker Ridge areas are also interpreted to have gas hydrate-bearing sands near the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, but the choice of specific drill sites is not yet complete. The Green Canyon site coincides with a 4-way closure within a Pleistocene sand unit in an area of strong gas flux just south of the Sigsbee Escarpment. The Walker Ridge site is characterized by a sand-prone sedimentary section that rises stratigraphically across the base of the gas hydrate stability zone and that has seismic indicators of gas hydrate. Copyright 2008, Offshore Technology Conference

Jones, E. (Chevron); Latham, T. (Chevron); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Hunt, J. (Minerals Management Service); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger); Boswell, R.M. (NETL); Rose, K.K. (NETL); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Hutchinson, D. (USGS); Collett, T. (USGS); Dugan, B. (Rice University); Wood, W. (Naval Research Laboratory)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Methane Hydrates May Exceed the Energy Content of All Other Fossil Fuels Combined; Could Ensure Decades of Affordable Natural Gas and Cut America’s Foreign Oil Dependence

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability  

SciTech Connect

The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

Krason, J.; Finley, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Coupled flow and geomechanical analysis for gas production in the Prudhoe Bay Unit L-106 well Unit C gas hydrate deposit in Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrate deposits that are desirable gas production targets almost invari- ably involve coarse, unlithified, unconsolidated media (such as sands

Kim, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Experimental determination of permeability of porous media in the presence of gas hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Permeability variation, particularly in the presence of gas hydrates, greatly influences production of natural gas from hydrate reservoirs. A series of experiments were performed to investigate the variation of permeability in gas hydrates-bearing sediments. Carbon dioxide hydrate was formed in Ottawa 20/30 sand samples contained within a rigid cell using a partial water saturation formation methodology. Different initial water saturations were used to achieve hydrate saturations up to 45% and the corresponding water permeability was measured during steady-state flow. The experimental permeability results were compared with several theoretical models using both the quantitative and graphical analyses. A hybrid modeling approach based on the weighted combination of grain coating and the pore filling models was used to fit the measured experimental data. The experimental results were also compared to relevant experimental studies that used similar methods to form hydrates. Our analysis indicates a gradual reduction in permeability with increasing hydrate saturation, which is consistent with earlier studies. Further analysis using hybrid modeling suggests a progressive change in the hydrate formation morphology from cementing to that of the pore filling with increasing hydrate saturation.

Mohana L. Delli; Jocelyn L.H. Grozic

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Purification of Natural Gases with High CO2 Content Using Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purification of Natural Gases with High CO2 Content Using Gas Hydrates ... The feed was separated using a cascade of continuously stirred tank crystallizer vessels, which can also be regarded as an ideal crystallizer column resembling a gas-hydrate-based scrubbing process. ... Pressurized gas scrubbing, pressure swing adsorption, chemical absorption, and membrane and cryogenic processes are some examples of well-established technologies for the removal of CO2 from gaseous products. ...

Nena Dabrowski; Christoph Windmeier; Lothar R. Oellrich

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

125

Carbon Dioxide Hydrate Process for Gas Separation from a Shifted Synthesis Gas Stream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration and Sequestration and Gasification Technologies Carbon DioxiDe HyDrate ProCess for Gas seParation from a sHifteD syntHesis Gas stream Background One approach to de-carbonizing coal is to gasify it to form fuel gas consisting predominately of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. This fuel gas is sent to a shift conversion reactor where carbon monoxide reacts with steam to produce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and hydrogen. After scrubbing the CO 2 from the fuel, a stream of almost pure hydrogen stream remains, which can be burned in a gas turbine or used to power a fuel cell with essentially zero emissions. However, for this approach to be practical, it will require an economical means of separating CO 2 from mixed gas streams. Since viable options for sequestration or reuse of CO

126

Invasion of drilling mud into gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. Part II: Effects of geophysical properties of sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......sediments with hydrate veins or lenses...fracturing and the phase equilibrium pressure...with fractures, hydrate veins and lenses...2003). In the sand-silt mixture...gas production behavior in porous media...of Mexico Gas Hydrates joint Industry...estimating three-phase relative permeability......

Fulong Ning; Nengyou Wu; Yibing Yu; Keni Zhang; Guosheng Jiang; Ling Zhang; Jiaxin Sun; Mingming Zheng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Detection and evaluation methods for in-situ gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

With the increased interest in naturally occuring hydrates, the need for improved detection and evaluation methods has also increased. In this paper, logging of hydrates is discussed and selected logs from four arctic wells are examined. A new procedure based on temperature log analysis is described. The concept of a downhole heater for use with drill stem testing is also described for testing and evaluation of hydrate intervals. 12 refs.

Goodman, M.A.; Guissani, A.P.; Alger, R.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Chapter 8 - Methane Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be produced through exploratory drilling programs; (2) the tools for gas hydrate detection and characterisation from remote sensing data; (3) the details of gas hydrate reservoir production behaviour through additional, well-monitored and longer duration field tests and (4) the understanding of the potential environmental impacts of gas hydrate resource development. The results of future production tests, in the context of varying market and energy supply conditions around the globe, will be the key to determine the ultimate timing and scale of the commercial production of natural gas from gas hydrates.

Ray Boswell; Koji Yamamoto; Sung-Rock Lee; Timothy Collett; Pushpendra Kumar; Scott Dallimore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico,” Fire In The Ice: NETL Methane Hydrates R&D Programand Kelly Boswell of DOE-NETL for making the Tigershark data

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Development of an electrical resistivity cone for the detection of gas hydrates in marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

onshore and offshore environments, as well as in permafrost and tropical regions. The presence of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments are of concern to geotechnical engineers for several reasons, including: (1) their effect on the load bearing...

McClelland, Martha Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

132

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bound gas in marine sediments: how much is really out there?methane hydrate in ocean sediment. Energy & Fuels 2005: 19:Accumulations in Oceanic Sediments George J. Moridis 1 and

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Sulfur geochemistry of thermogenic gas hydrate and associated sediment from the Texas-Louisiana continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total reduced sulfide (TRS), acid volatile sulfide, and citrate-dithionate and HCl extractable iron. Pore-fluid measurements included []H?S, chloride, sulfate, ammonia and total dissolved inorganic carbon. Gas hydrate hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide...

Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Detection of Gas Hydrates in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon from Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, where the sub-seafloor is a complex structure of shallow salt diapirs and sheets underlying heavily deformed shallow sediments and surrounding diverse minibasins. Here, we consider the effect these structural factors have on gas hydrate occurrence...

Murad, Idris

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

135

Electrical anisotropy of gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present new results and interpretations of the electrical anisotropy and reservoir architecture in gas hydrate-bearing sands using logging data collected during the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II. We focus specifically on sand reservoirs in Hole Alaminos Canyon 21 A (AC21-A), Hole Green Canyon 955 H (GC955-H) and Hole Walker Ridge 313 H (WR313-H). Using a new logging-while-drilling directional resistivity tool and a one-dimensional inversion developed by Schlumberger, we resolve the resistivity of the current flowing parallel to the bedding, R? and the resistivity of the current flowing perpendicular to the bedding, R?. We find the sand reservoir in Hole AC21-A to be relatively isotropic, with R? and R? values close to 2 ? m. In contrast, the gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic. In these reservoirs, R? is between 2 and 30 ? m, and R? is generally an order of magnitude higher. Using Schlumberger’s WebMI models, we were able to replicate multiple resistivity measurements and determine the formation resistivity the gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoir in Hole WR313-H. The results showed that gas hydrate saturations within a single reservoir unit are highly variable. For example, the sand units in Hole WR313-H contain thin layers (on the order of 10–100 cm) with varying gas hydrate saturations between 15 and 95%. Our combined modeling results clearly indicate that the gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic due to varying saturations of gas hydrate forming in thin layers within larger sand units.

Ann E. Cook; Barbara I. Anderson; John Rasmus; Keli Sun; Qiming Li; Timothy S. Collett; David S. Goldberg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Sensitivity Analysis of Gas Production from Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds in which gas molecules are lodged within the lattices of an ice-like crystalline solid. The vast quantities of hydrocarbon gases trapped in hydrate formations in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments may constitute a new and promising energy source. Class 2 hydrate deposits are characterized by a Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is underlain by a saturated zone of mobile water. Class 3 hydrate deposits are characterized by an isolated Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is not in contact with any hydrate-free zone of mobile fluids. Both classes of deposits have been shown to be good candidates for exploitation in earlier studies of gas production via vertical well designs - in this study we extend the analysis to include systems with varying porosity, anisotropy, well spacing, and the presence of permeable boundaries. For Class 2 deposits, the results show that production rate and efficiency depend strongly on formation porosity, have a mild dependence on formation anisotropy, and that tighter well spacing produces gas at higher rates over shorter time periods. For Class 3 deposits, production rates and efficiency also depend significantly on formation porosity, are impacted negatively by anisotropy, and production rates may be larger, over longer times, for well configurations that use a greater well spacing. Finally, we performed preliminary calculations to assess a worst-case scenario for permeable system boundaries, and found that the efficiency of depressurization-based production strategies are compromised by migration of fluids from outside the system.

Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George; Zhang, Keni

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 6, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates in the Panama Basin  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a geological description of the Panama Basin, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, distribution of hydrates within the sediments, and the relation of hydrate distribution to other features such as salt diapirism are also included. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for both biogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 63 refs., 38 figs., 7 tabs.

Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

X-ray Scanner for ODP Leg 204: Drilling Gas Hydrates on Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin  

SciTech Connect

An x-ray scanner was designed and fabricated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to provide high speed acquisition of x-ray images of sediment cores collected on the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204: Drilling Gas Hydrates On Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin. This report discusses the design and fabrication of the instrument, detailing novel features that help reduce the weight and increase the portability of the instrument. Sample x-ray images are included. The x-ray scanner was transferred to scientific drilling vessel, the JOIDES Resolution, by the resupply ship Mauna Loa, out of Coos Bay, Oregon on July 25. ODP technicians were trained in the instruments operation. The availability of the x-ray scanner at the drilling site allows real-time imaging of cores containing methane hydrate immediately after retrieval. Thus, imaging experiments on cores can yield information on the distribution and quantity of methane hydrates. Performing these measurements at the location of core collection eliminates the need for high pressures or low temperature core handling while the cores are stored and transported to a remote imaging laboratory.

Freifeld, Barry; Kneafsey, Tim; Pruess, Jacob; Reiter, Paul; Tomutsa, Liviu

2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

139

New Project To Improve Characterization of U.S. Gas Hydrate Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the selection of a multi-year, field-based research project designed to gain further insight into the nature, formation, occurrence and physical properties of methane hydrate?bearing sediments for the purpose of methane hydrate resource appraisal.

140

Measurement of Gas Hydrate by Laser Raman Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four types of natural sand (respectively 250–350, 180–250, 125 ... ) are used as media to synthesize methane hydrate that is measured by laser Raman spectrometry. ... show that sediment grain sizes do not influen...

Changling Liu; Qingguo Meng; Yuguang Ye

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An effective medium inversion algorithm for gas hydrate quantification and its application to laboratory and borehole measurements of gas hydrate-bearing sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......reconstituted natural samples showed a large increase in velocities for...in Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results...R.J., Suess E., Ocean Drilling Program, College Station...application to laboratory and borehole measurements of gas hydrate-bearing......

Shyam Chand; Tim A. Minshull; Jeff A. Priest; Angus I. Best; Christopher R. I. Clayton; William F. Waite

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

GAS METHANE HYDRATES-RESEARCH STATUS, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, AND ENERGY IMPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this task as originally conceived was to compile an assessment of methane hydrate deposits in Alaska from available sources and to make a very preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of producing methane from these deposits for remote power generation. Gas hydrates have recently become a target of increased scientific investigation both from the standpoint of their resource potential to the natural gas and oil industries and of their positive and negative implications for the global environment After we performed an extensive literature review and consulted with representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Canadian Geological Survey, and several oil companies, it became evident that, at the current stage of gas hydrate research, the available information on methane hydrates in Alaska does not provide sufficient grounds for reaching conclusions concerning their use for energy production. Hence, the original goals of this task could not be met, and the focus was changed to the compilation and review of published documents to serve as a baseline for possible future research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). An extensive annotated bibliography of gas hydrate publications has been completed. The EERC will reassess its future research opportunities on methane hydrates to determine where significant initial contributions could be made within the scope of limited available resources.

James Sorensen; Jaroslav Solc; Bethany Bolles

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the conventional gas reserve of 1.5x10 14 m 3 ofconventional oil and gas reserves, the assessment of theconventional fossil fuel reserves, gas hydrates are emerging

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

As part of an effort to identify suitable targets for a planned long-term field test, we investigate by means of numerical simulation the gas production potential from unit D, a stratigraphically bounded (Class 3) permafrost-associated hydrate occurrence penetrated in the ount Elbert well on North Slope, Alaska. This shallow, low-pressure deposit has high porosities, high intrinsic permeabilities and high hydrate saturations. It has a low temperature because of its proximity to the overlying permafrost. The simulation results indicate that vertical ells operating at a constant bottomhole pressure would produce at very low rates for a very long period. Horizontal wells increase gas production by almost two orders of magnitude, but production remains low. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the initial deposit temperature is y the far the most important factor determining production performance (and the most effective criterion for target selection) because it controls the sensible heat available to fuel dissociation.

Moridis, G.J.; Silpngarmlert, S.; Reagan, M. T.; Collett, T.S.; Zhang, K.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Scientific results of the Second Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition in the Ulleung Basin (UBGH2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As a part of Korean National Gas Hydrate Program, the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) was conducted from 9 July to 30 September, 2010 in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea, offshore Korea using the D/V Fugro Synergy. The UBGH2 was performed to understand the distribution of gas hydrates as required for a resource assessment and to find potential candidate sites suitable for a future offshore production test, especially targeting gas hydrate-bearing sand bodies in the basin. The UBGH2 sites were distributed across most of the basin and were selected to target mainly sand-rich turbidite deposits. The 84-day long expedition consisted of two phases. The first phase included logging-while-drilling/measurements-while-drilling (LWD/MWD) operations at 13 sites. During the second phase, sediment cores were collected from 18 holes at 10 of the 13 LWD/MWD sites. Wireline logging (WL) and vertical seismic profile (VSP) data were also acquired after coring operations at two of these 10 sites. In addition, seafloor visual observation, methane sensing, as well as push-coring and sampling using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) were conducted during both phases of the expedition. Recovered gas hydrates occurred either as pore-filling medium associated with discrete turbidite sand layers, or as fracture-filling veins and nodules in muddy sediments. Gas analyses indicated that the methane within the sampled gas hydrates is primarily of biogenic origin. This paper provides a summary of the operational and scientific results of the UBGH2 expedition as described in 24 papers that make up this special issue of the Journal of Marine and Petroleum Geology.

Byong-Jae Ryu; Timothy S. Collett; Michael Riedel; Gil Young Kim; Jong-Hwa Chun; Jang-Jun Bahk; Joo Yong Lee; Ji-Hoon Kim; Dong-Geun Yoo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Predicted geoacoustic properties of gas hydrate saturated marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for various temperatures and pressures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ? 53 3 Physical properties of grain material, pore fluid, variables affecting global fluid motion, and skeletal frame... of quartz and glass as a function of pressure 79 27 Skeletal frame elastic moduli as a function of varying hydrate concen- tration. . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ?. 81 28...

Curtis, William Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

GAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL OF DISPERSE LOW-SATURATION HYDRATE ACCUMULATIONS IN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

61446 61446 GAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL OF DISPERSE LOW-SATURATION HYDRATE ACCUMULATIONS IN OCEANIC SEDIMENTS George J. Moridis Earth Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 E. Dendy Sloan Center for Hydrate Research and Chemical Engineering Department Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 August 2006 This work was partly supported by the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory, under the U.S. Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Gas Production Potential of Disperse Low-Saturation Hydrate Accumulations in Oceanic Sediments George J. Moridis 1 and E. Dendy Sloan 2 1 Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1166

148

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Mapping Permafrost and Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping Permafrost and Gas Hydrate using Marine Controlled Source Electromagnetic Methods (CSEM) Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Mapping Permafrost and Gas Hydrate using Marine Controlled Source Electromagnetic Methods (CSEM) Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0010144 Goal The objective of this project is to develop and test a towed electromagnetic source and receiver system suitable for deployment from small coastal vessels to map near-surface electrical structure in shallow water. The system will be used to collect permafrost data in the shallow water of the U.S. Beaufort Inner Shelf at locations coincident with seismic lines collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The electromagnetic data will be used to identify the geometry, extent, and physical properties of permafrost and any associated gas hydrate in order to provide a baseline for future studies of the effects of any climate-driven dissociation of

149

Derivation of a Langmuir type of model to describe the intrinsic growth rate of gas hydrates during crystallization from gas mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derivation of a Langmuir type of model to describe the intrinsic growth rate of gas hydrates during crystallization from gas mixtures Jean-Michel Herri* and Matthias Kwaterski Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint- Etienne, France Abstract Gas Hydrates

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

150

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 9, Formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Middle America Trench  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a geological description of the Pacific margin of Mexico and Central America, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, and distribution of hydrates within the sediments are also included in this report. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for both biogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 150 refs., 84 figs., 17 tabs.

Finley, P.; Krason, J.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost-effective) techniques to remotely detect hydrate deposits, and to monitor their changes in the course of gas production.production of gas from hydrates occurring in the Gulf of Mexico because, despite of the substantially increased complexity and cost

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Gas Hydrate Equilibrium Measurements for Multi-Component Gas Mixtures and Effect of Ionic Liquid Inhibitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrate inhibition data from a newly commissioned micro bench top reactor, a high-pressure autoclave and a rocking cell. The conditions for hydrate formation for pure methane and carbon dioxide were also measured, for validation purposes. The measured data...

Othman, Enas Azhar

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fundamentals of Natural Gas and Species Flows from Hydrate Dissociation-Applications to Safety and Sea Floor Instability  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas production from the dissociation of methane hydrate in a confined reservoir by a depressurizing down-hole well was studied. The case that the well pressure was kept constant was treated and two different linearization schemes in an axisymmetric configuration were used in the analysis. For different fixed well pressures and reservoir temperatures, approximate self-similar solutions were obtained. Distributions of temperature, pressure and gas velocity field across the reservoir were evaluated. The distance of the decomposition front from the well and the natural gas production rate as functions of time were also computed. Time evolutions of the resulting profiles were presented in graphical forms and their differences with the constant well output results were studied. It was shown that the gas production rate was a sensitive function of well pressure and reservoir temperature. The sensitivity of the results to the linearization scheme used was also studied.

Goodarz Ahmadi

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Hydrate Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate R&D Program Newsletter Methane Hydrate R&D Program Newsletter An image of a hydrate burning overlayed with the Newsletter Title: Fire in the Ice The methane hydrate newsletter, Fire in the Ice, is a bi-annual publication highlighting the latest developments in international gas hydrates R&D. Fire in the Ice promotes the exchange of information amoung those involved in gas hydrates research and development, and also recognizes the efforts of a hydrate researcher in each issue. The newsletter now reaches nearly 1300 scientists and other interested individuals in sixteen countries. To subscribe electronically to Fire in the Ice please send an email to karl.lang@contr.netl.doe.gov Please click on the links below to access issues of "Fire in the Ice". More on Methane Hydrates

156

Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

future gas hydrate core handling and preservation in sand-gas-hydrate-bearing zones, in which the sediments (particularly the sands)sand deposits are primarily being investigated in the Mount Elbert well, much of the world’s natural gas hydrate

Collett, T.J. Kneafsey, T.J., H. Liu, W. Winters, R. Boswell, R. Hunter, and T.S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

future gas hydrate core handling and preservation in sand-gas-hydrate-bearing zones, in which the sediments (particularly the sands)sand deposits are primarily being investigated in the Mount Elbert well, much of the world’s natural gas hydrate

Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Feasibility of monitoring gas hydrate production with time-lapse VSP  

SciTech Connect

In this work we begin to examine the feasibility of using time-lapse seismic methods-specifically the vertical seismic profiling (VSP) method-for monitoring changes in hydrate accumulations that are predicted to occur during production of natural gas.

Kowalsky, M.B.; Nakagawa, S.; Moridis, G.J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

On the compliance method and the assessment of three-dimensional seafloor gas hydrate deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......approximation is not unlike the response of a country roadbed to an automobile moving over it. The car has motion but the response of the...of marine gas hydrate deposits using a seafloor transient electric dipole-dipole method62 6374. 10 Fink C.R. , Spence G......

K. Latychev; R. N. Edwards

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 °C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20°C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned for stranded gas reserves. The recent experiments and their results from the testing within NETL's 15-Liter Hydrate Cell Facility exhibit promising results. Introduction of water at the desired temperature and pressure through an NETL designed nozzle into a temperature controlled methane environment within the 15-Liter Hydrate Cell allowed for instantaneous formation of methane hydrates. The instantaneous and continuous hydrate formation process was repeated over several days while varying the flow rate of water, its' temperature, and the overall temperature of the methane environment. These results clearly indicated that hydrates formed immediately after the methane and water left the nozzle at temperatures above the freezing point of water throughout the range of operating conditions. [1] Oil and Gas Journal Vol. 160.48, Dec 22, 2008. [2] http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/chapter3.html and http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/pdf/tbl7.pdf [3] U.S. Geological Survey, “Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal: Estimates of Undiscovered Oil and Gas North of the Arctic Circle,” May 2008.

Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fundamentals of Natural Gas and Species Flows from Hydrate Dissociation - Applications to Safety and Sea Floor Instability  

SciTech Connect

Semi-analytical computational models for natural gas flow in hydrate reservoirs were developed and the effects of variations in porosity and permeability on pressure and temperature profiles and the movement of a dissociation front were studied. Experimental data for variations of gas pressure and temperature during propane hydrate formation and dissociation for crushed ice and mixture of crushed ice and glass beads under laboratory environment were obtained. A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase liquid-gas flows trough porous media was developed. Numerical models for hydrate dissociation process in one dimensional and axisymmetric reservoir were performed. The computational model solved the general governing equations without the need for linearization. A detail module for multidimensional analysis of hydrate dissociation which make use of the FLUENT code was developed. The new model accounts for gas and liquid water flow and uses the Kim-Boshnoi model for hydrate dissociation.

Goodarz Ahmadi

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

The simulation of gas production from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by the combination of ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new method is proposed to produce gas from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by combining the ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization which can efficiently utilize the synthetic effects of therma...

Hao Yang; Yu-Hu Bai; Qing-Ping Li

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fiber Optic Sensing Technology for Detecting Gas Hydrate Formation and Decomposition  

SciTech Connect

A fiber optic-based distributed sensing system (DSS) has been integrated with a large volume (72 L) pressure vessel providing high spatial resolution, time resolved, 3-D measurement of hybrid temperature-strain (TS) values within experimental sediment gas hydrate systems. Areas of gas hydrate formation (exothermic) and decomposition (endothermic) can be characterized through this proxy by time series analysis of discrete data points collected along the length of optical fibers placed within a sediment system. Data is visualized as a 'movie' of TS values along the length of each fiber over time. Experiments conducted in the Seafloor Processing Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory show clear indications of hydrate formation and dissociation events at expected P-T conditions given the thermodynamics of the CH4-H2O system. The high spatial resolution achieved with fiber optic technology makes the DSS a useful tool for visualizing time resolved formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in large-scale sediment experiments.

Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Leeman, John R [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Ulrich, Shannon M [ORNL; Alford, Jonathan E [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Madden, Megan Elwood [University of Oklahoma, Norman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Acoustic properties of natural gas hydrates and the geophysical assessment of the subsurface distribution of hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas hydrates are a solid form of natural gas found in the deep water marine margins of continents and under permafrost in Arctic regions worldwide. They have been recognized as a very significant potential energy source in the future. They form under high pressure and low temperature. Hydrate saturated sediments are acoustically faster and slightly less dense than water saturated sediments but much faster and denser than gas saturated sediments. These properties allow for the identification of marine hydrate saturated sediments that are underlain by gas saturated sediments. The resulting geophysical reflector referred to as a bottom simulating reflector or BSR often mimics the seafloor in areas where geothermal gradient is laterally consistent. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Regulation and Enforcement has used three?dimensional seismic data in the Gulf of Mexico and two?dimensional seismic data in the Atlantic to (1) map the distribution of BSRs (2) drill six wells in the GOM with moderate to high hydrate saturations in sand reservoirs and (3) assess the resource potential of hydrates.

William Shedd; Matt Frye; Paul Godfriaux; Kody Kramer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Numerical Modeling of Hydrate Formation in Sand Sediment Simulating Sub-Seabed CO2 Storage in the form of Gas Hydrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Among several methods for CO2 capture and storage, we focus on CO2 sequestration in the form of gas hydrate under the seafloor, mainly for many sequestration sites offshore Japan and for little risk of CO2 leakage from the sediment. However, it is difficult to evaluate the precise storage potential and cost of this method due to the lack of the relevant information. Here, in order to do feasibility studies of this technique so as to make an effective storage method, we made a 3-dimentional gas water flow simulator with kinetic hydrate formation. The new design of CO2 hydrate formation in porous media under two-phase flow condition was implemented in this simulator, and unknown parameters in necessary mathematical models for gas-water flow in sand sediments were verified from the comparison between the results of the numerical simulations and the experimental measurements from the previous study.

Takuya Nakashima; Toru Sato; Masayuki Inui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Analysing sand-dominated channel systems for potential gas-hydrate-reservoirs using an AVO seismic inversion technique on the Southern Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas hydrates have recently been recognised as a class of unconventional petroleum resource and the economic viability of gas production from hydrates is now being viewed as a realistic possibility within the next decade. Therefore, potential offshore hydrate accumulations in the world-class endowed gas hydrate province, the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand, represent a significant medium- to long-term opportunity to meet the country's future energy requirements. In this paper we delineate a potential gas hydrate reservoir in the East Coast Basin, New Zealand and quantitatively estimate its gas hydrate concentrations from 2D seismic data with no well information available. The target is interesting for exploration since it shows evidence for gas-hydrate bearing sands, in particular, buried channel systems. We use a combined analysis of high-resolution velocity analysis, amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) attribute and AVO inversion to investigate whether we can identify regions that are likely to contain highly concentrated gas hydrates and whether they are likely to be sand-dominated. To estimate hydrate concentrations we apply a rock physics model. Our results indicate the presence of several – up to 200 m thick – zones that are likely to host gas hydrates, with one location predicted to consist of high-permeable channel sands and an inferred gas hydrate saturation of ?25%. These findings suggest significant amounts of gas hydrates may be present in high-quality reservoirs on this part of the margin.

M. Fohrmann; I.A. Pecher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Progress report, June 16--September 30, 1988  

SciTech Connect

The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

Krason, J.; Finley, P.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Potential gradients produced by pore-space heterogeneities: Application to isothermal frost damage and submarine hydrate anomalies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from simple laboratory experiments. Field observations of hydrate anomalies in a submarine sand layer, gas hydrates are com- monly concentrated within the most coarse-grained material. Natural gas hydrates and submarine hydrate anomalies Alan W. Rempel1 and Laura J. Van Alst2 1 Department of Geological Sciences

Rempel, Alan W.

169

CO{sub 2} HYDRATE PROCESS FOR GAS SEPARATION  

SciTech Connect

Modifications were implemented to the hydrogen flow test rig per safety review comments, and the apparatus was tested for leaks. Tests were then done using Helium/CO{sub 2} mixtures to re-verify performance prior to hydrogen testing. It was discovered that hydrate formation was more difficult to initiate, and new initiation methods were developed to improve the tests. Delivery of ETM hardware continued and buildup of the ETM system continued, the ETM is now mechanically complete. The STU (pilot plant) site selection process was resumed because Tennessee Eastman declined to participate in the program. Two potential sites were visited: The Global Energy/Conoco-Phillips Wabash River Plant, and the Tampa Electric Polk Power Plant.

G. Deppe; R. Currier; D. Spencer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities  

SciTech Connect

In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

Bent, Jimmy

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Design and Experimental Study of the Steam Mining System for Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Figure 3. Schematic diagram of the SMSGH: (1) water tank, (2) water pump, (3) water treatment system, (4) soft water tank, (5) small pump, (6) electricity steam generator, (7) steam control valve, (8) orifice device, (9) dual-wall drill pipe, (10) non-productive layer bushing, (11) floral tube in the mined bed, (12) submersible pump, (13) air pump, (14) water tank, (15) gas–liquid separator, (16) cartridge gas filter, (17) gas flow meter, (18) gas storage tank, and (19) ignition device. ... The working principle of the gas collection system is as follows: The obtained natural gas spills from the layer of earth through the floral tube in the mined bed (11) and will generate a high flow rate with the vapor and water mixture using the pump function of the air pump (13). ... Hydrates continuously generated natural gas. ...

You-hong Sun; Rui Jia; Wei Guo; Yong-qin Zhang; You-hai Zhu; Bing Li; Kuan Li

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

172

X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stability zone, hydrate will first form at the methane-water interface, either as a film on a methane gas bubble

Kneafsey, T.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Production Trial Using CO2 / CH4 Exchange Completed Gas Hydrate Production Trial Using CO2 / CH4 Exchange Completed DE-NT0006553 Goal The goal of this project is to define, plan, conduct and evaluate the results of a field trial of a methane hydrate production methodology whereby carbon dioxide (CO2) molecules are exchanged in situ for methane (CH4) molecules within a hydrate structure, releasing the methane for production. The objective is to evaluate the viability of this hydrate production technique and to understand the implications of the process at a field scale. image showing Conceptual rendering of proposed CO2 - CH4 exchange methodology for the production of natural gas from hydrates Conceptual rendering of proposed CO2 - CH4 exchange methodology for the

174

Geomechanical response of permafrost-associated hydrate deposits to depressurization-induced gas production  

SciTech Connect

In this simulation study, we analyzed the geomechanical response during depressurization production from two known hydrate-bearing permafrost deposits: the Mallik (Northwest Territories, Canada) deposit and Mount Elbert (Alaska, USA) deposit. Gas was produced from these deposits at constant pressure using horizontal wells placed at the top of a hydrate layer (HL), located at a depth of about 900 m at the Mallik and 600 m at the Mount Elbert. The simulation results show that general thermodynamic and geomechanical responses are similar for the two sites, but with substantially higher production and more intensive geomechanical responses at the deeper Mallik deposit. The depressurization-induced dissociation begins at the well bore and then spreads laterally, mainly along the top of the HL. The depressurization results in an increased shear stress within the body of the receding hydrate and causes a vertical compaction of the reservoir. However, its effects are partially mitigated by the relatively stiff permafrost overburden, and compaction of the HL is limited to less than 0.4%. The increased shear stress may lead to shear failure in the hydrate-free zone bounded by the HL overburden and the downward-receding upper dissociation interface. This zone undergoes complete hydrate dissociation, and the cohesive strength of the sediment is low. We determined that the likelihood of shear failure depends on the initial stress state as well as on the geomechanical properties of the reservoir. The Poisson's ratio of the hydrate-bearing formation is a particularly important parameter that determines whether the evolution of the reservoir stresses will increase or decrease the likelihood of shear failure.

Rutqvist, J.; Moridis, G.J.; Grover, T.; Collett, T.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Enhanced rate of gas hydrate formation in a fixed bed column filled with sand compared to a stirred vessel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of two gas/liquid contact modes was evaluated in relation to the rate of gas hydrate formation. Hydrate formation experiments were conducted for several gas mixtures relevant to natural gas hydrate formation in the earth (CH4, CH4/C3H8, CH4/C2H6 and CH4/C2H6/C3H8) and two CO2 capture and storage (CO2, CO2/H2/C3H8). One set of experiments was conducted in a bed of silica sand, saturated with water (fixed fed column) while the other experiment was conducted in a stirred vessel for each gas/gas mixture. Both sets of experiments were conducted at a constant temperature. The rate of hydrate formation is customarily correlated with the rate of gas consumption. The results show that the rate of hydrate formation in the fixed bed column is significantly greater and thereby resulted in a higher percent of water conversion to hydrate in lesser reaction time for all the systems studied.

Praveen Linga; Nagu Daraboina; John A. Ripmeester; Peter Englezos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Modelling of Gas Clathrate Hydrate Equilibria using the Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (eNRTL) Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g. pipeline blockages by hydrates in drilling applications or gas pipelines) [6]. Species being capable of forming hydrogen bonds with the water molecules like methanol or ethylene glycol as well as water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Gas Hydrate Production and Hazard Avoidance in the Gulf of Mexico Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Gas Hydrate Production and Hazard Avoidance in the Gulf of Mexico DE-FC26-02NT41327 Goal The project goal was to develop new methodologies to characterize the physical properties of methane hydrate and hydrate sediment systems. Performers Westport Technology Center International - Houston, TX University of Houston - Houston, TX Results Project researchers created a pressure cell for measuring acoustic velocity and resistivity on hydrate-sediment cores. They utilized the measurements for input to an existing reservoir model for evaluating possible offshore hydrate accumulations. The organization of an industry-led Advisory Board and the development of a Research Management Plan have been completed. The development of a handbook for transporting, preserving, and storing hydrate core samples brought from the field to the laboratory was completed and distributed for review by industry and researchers.

178

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization and Decomposition Kinetic Studies of Methane Hydrate in Host Sediments under Subsurface Mimic Conditions Last Reviewed 02/17/2010 Characterization and Decomposition Kinetic Studies of Methane Hydrate in Host Sediments under Subsurface Mimic Conditions Last Reviewed 02/17/2010 EST-380-NEDA Goal The purpose of this study is to establish sediment lithology and quantification of methane in hydrates hosted in fine-grained sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), a marine site of methane hydrate occurrence. The results will help establish a correlation between laboratory data and hydrate accumulation field data on dispersed hydrates in the natural environment. Performer Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, New York 11973 Background Gas hydrates are located in permafrost and marine environments and show potential as a vast methane source worldwide. However, methane is about 17 times more potent a greenhouse gas than CO2 and the inherent instability of

179

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Hydrate Modeling - TOUGH-Fx/HYDRATE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrate Modeling - TOUGH+/HYDRATE & HydrateResSim Hydrate Modeling - TOUGH+/HYDRATE & HydrateResSim TOUGH+/HYDRATE v1.0 LBNL's new hydrate reservoir simulator (TOUGH+/HYDRATE v1.0) is now publicly available for licensing. TOUGH+/HYDRATE models non-isothermal gas release, phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat in complex geologic media. The code can simulate production from natural CH4-hydrate deposits in the subsurface (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments), as well as laboratory experiments of hydrate dissociation/formation in porous/fractured media. TOUGH+/HYDRATE v1.0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate formation and dissociation. More information on TOUGH+/Hydrate Also available is HydrateResSim. HydrateResSim (HRS) is a freeware, open-source reservoir simulator code available for use “as-is” from the NETL. HRS’ code was derived from an earlier version of the TOUGH+/Hydrate code.

180

Characterization of gas hydrate reservoirs by integration of core and log data in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Examinations of core and well-log data from the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) drill sites suggest that Sites UBGH2-2_2 and UBGH2-6 have relatively good gas hydrate reservoir quality in terms of individual and total cumulative thicknesses of gas-hydrate-bearing sand (HYBS) beds. In both of the sites, core sediments are generally dominated by hemipelagic muds which are intercalated with turbidite sands. The turbidite sands are usually thin-to-medium bedded and mainly consist of well sorted coarse silt to fine sand. Anomalies in infrared core temperatures and porewater chlorinity data and pressure core measurements indicate that “gas hydrate occurrence zones” (GHOZ) are present about 68–155 mbsf at Site UBGH2-2_2 and 110–155 mbsf at Site UBGH2-6. In both the GHOZ, gas hydrates are preferentially associated with many of the turbidite sands as “pore-filling” type hydrates. The HYBS identified in the cores from Site UBGH2-6 are medium-to-thick bedded particularly in the lower part of the GHOZ and well coincident with significant high excursions in all of the resistivity, density, and velocity logs. Gas-hydrate saturations in the HYBS range from 12% to 79% with an average of 52% based on pore-water chlorinity. In contrast, the HYBS from Site UBGH2-2_2 are usually thin-bedded and show poor correlations with both of the resistivity and velocity logs owing to volume averaging effects of the logging tools on the thin HYBS beds. Gas-hydrate saturations in the HYBS range from 15% to 65% with an average of 37% based on pore-water chlorinity. In both of the sites, large fluctuations in biogenic opal contents have significant effects on the sediment physical properties, resulting in limited usage of gamma ray and density logs in discriminating sand reservoirs.

J.-J. Bahk; G.-Y. Kim; J.-H. Chun; J.-H. Kim; J.Y. Lee; B.-J. Ryu; J.-H. Lee; B.-K. Son; T.S. Collett

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well  

SciTech Connect

When maintained under hydrate-stable conditions, methane hydrate in laboratory samples is often considered a stable and immobile solid material. Currently, there do not appear to be any studies in which the long-term redistribution of hydrates in sediments has been investigated in the laboratory. These observations are important because if the location of hydrate in a sample were to change over time (e.g. by dissociating at one location and reforming at another), the properties of the sample that depend on hydrate saturation and pore space occupancy would also change. Observations of hydrate redistribution under stable conditions are also important in understanding natural hydrate deposits, as these may also change over time. The processes by which solid hydrate can move include dissociation, hydrate-former and water migration in the gas and liquid phases, and hydrate formation. Chemical potential gradients induced by temperature, pressure, and pore water or host sediment chemistry can drive these processes. A series of tests were performed on a formerly natural methane-hydrate-bearing core sample from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, in order to observe hydrate formation and morphology within this natural sediment, and changes over time using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Long-term observations (over several weeks) of methane hydrate in natural sediments were made to investigate spatial changes in hydrate saturation in the core. During the test sequence, mild buffered thermal and pressure oscillations occurred within the sample in response to laboratory temperature changes. These oscillations were small in magnitude, and conditions were maintained well within the hydrate stability zone.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Drilling Through Gas Hydrates Formations: Managing Wellbore Stability Risks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this workflow were based on a real field case. The results provide an understanding of the effects of drilling through hydratebearing sediments and of the impact of drilling fluid temperature and BHP on changes in temperature and pore pressure within...

Khabibullin, Tagir R.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

183

Geological controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate from core, downhole log, and seismic data in the Shenhu area, South China Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Multi-channel seismic reflection data, well logs, and recovered sediment cores have been used in this study to characterize the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in the Shenhu area of the South China Sea. The concept of the “gas hydrate petroleum system” has allowed for the systematic analysis of the impact of gas source, geologic controls on gas migration, and the role of the host sediment in the formation and stability of gas hydrates as encountered during the 2007 Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey Gas Hydrate Expedition (GMGS-1) in the Shenhu area. Analysis of seismic and bathymetric data identified seventeen sub-linear, near-parallel submarine canyons in this area. These canyons, formed in the Miocene, migrated in a northeasterly direction, and resulted in the burial and abandonment of canyons partially filled by coarse-grained sediments. Downhole wireline log (DWL) data were acquired from eight drill sites and sediment coring was conducted at five of these sites, which revealed the presence of suitable reservoirs for the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate accumulations. Gas hydrate-bearing sediment layers were identified from well log and core data at three sites mainly within silt and silt clay sediments. Gas hydrate was also discovered in a sand reservoir at one site as inferred from the analysis of the DWL data. Seismic anomalies attributed to the presence of gas below the base of gas hydrate stability zone, provided direct evidence for the migration of gas into the overlying gas hydrate-bearing sedimentary sections. Geochemical analyses of gas samples collected from cores confirmed that the occurrence of gas hydrate in the Shenhu area is controlled by the presence thermogenic methane gas that has migrated into the gas hydrate stability zone from a more deeply buried source.

Xiujuan Wang; Timothy S. Collett; Myung W. Lee; Shengxiong Yang; Yiqun Guo; Shiguo Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Hydration of gas-phase gramicidin S (M + 2H)2+ ions formed by electrospray: The transition from solution to gas-phase structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydration of doubly protonated gas-phase ions of gramicidin S formed by electrospray ionization was investigated. Under “gentle” electrospray conditions, a near Gaussian distribution of (M + 2H + nH2O)2+ ions...

Sandra E. Rodriguez-Cruz; John S. Klassen…

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During April-September 2002, the JIP concentrated on: Reviewing the tasks and subtasks on the basis of the information generated during the three workshops held in March and May 2002; Writing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and Cost, Time and Resource (CTRs) estimates to accomplish the tasks and subtasks; Reviewing proposals sent in by prospective contractors; Selecting four contractors; Selecting six sites for detailed review; and Talking to drill ship owners and operators about potential work with the JIP.

Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During the first six months of operation, the primary activities of the JIP were to conduct and plan Workshops, which were as follows: (1) Data Collection Workshop--March 2002 (2) Drilling, Coring and Core Analyses Workshop--May 2002 (3) Modeling, Measurement and Sensors Workshop--May 2002.

Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Scale-dependent gas hydrate saturation estimates in sand reservoirs in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Through the use of 2-D and 3-D seismic data, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea and thirteen drill sites were established and logging-while-drilling (LWD) data were acquired from each site in 2010. Sites UBGH2–6 and UBGH2–10 were selected to test a series of high amplitude seismic reflections, possibly from sand reservoirs. LWD logs from the UBGH2–6 well indicate that there are three significant sand reservoirs with varying thickness. Two upper sand reservoirs are water saturated and the lower thinly bedded sand reservoir contains gas hydrate with an average saturation of 13%, as estimated from the P-wave velocity. The well logs at the UBGH2–6 well clearly demonstrated the effect of scale-dependency on gas hydrate saturation estimates. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the high resolution LWD acquired ring resistivity (vertical resolution of about 5–8 cm) reaches about 90% with an average saturation of 28%, whereas gas hydrate saturations estimated from the low resolution A40L resistivity (vertical resolution of about 120 cm) reaches about 25% with an average saturation of 11%. However, in the UBGH2–10 well, gas hydrate occupies a 5-m thick sand reservoir near 135 mbsf with a maximum saturation of about 60%. In the UBGH2–10 well, the average and a maximum saturation estimated from various well logging tools are comparable, because the bed thickness is larger than the vertical resolution of the various logging tools. High resolution wireline log data further document the role of scale-dependency on gas hydrate calculations.

M.W. Lee; T.S. Collett

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Phase equilibrium conditions for simulated landfill gas hydrate formation in aqueous solutions of tetrabutylammonium nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrate phase equilibrium conditions for the simulated landfill gas (LFG) of methane and carbon dioxide (50 mol% methane, 50 mol% carbon dioxide) were investigated with the pressure range of (1.90 to 13.83) MPa and temperature range of (280.0 to 288.3) K at (0.050, 0.170, 0.340, and 0.394) mass fraction (w) of tetrabutylammonium nitrate (TBANO3). The phase boundary between liquid–vapor–hydrate (L–V–H) phases and liquid–vapor (L–V) phases was determined by employing an isochoric pressure-search method. The phase equilibrium data measured showed that TBANO3 appeared a remarkable promotion effect at w TBANO 3  = 0.394, corresponding to TBANO3 · 26H2O, but inhibition effect at w TBANO 3  = (0.050, or 0.170) on the semiclathrate hydrate formation. In addition, the application of TBANO3 at 0.340 mass fraction, corresponding to TBANO3 · 32H2O, displayed promotion effect at lower pressures (below 6.38 MPa) and inhibition effect at higher pressures (above 6.38 MPa).

Ling-Li Shi; De-Qing Liang; Dong-Liang Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Last Reviewed 8/21/2013 Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Last Reviewed 8/21/2013 Field Work Proposals: ESD07-014 (LBNL) and 08FE-003 (LANL) Project Goal The primary objectives of this project are to: 1) investigate the effect of rising water temperatures on the stability of oceanic hydrate accumulations, 2) estimate the global quantity of hydrate-originating carbon that could reach the upper atmosphere as CH4 or CO2 thus affecting global climate, 3) quantify the interrelationship between global climate and the amount of hydrate-derived carbon reaching the upper atmosphere focusing on the potential link between hydrate dissociation and cascading global warming and 4) test the discharge phase of the Clathrate Gun Hypothesis which stipulates large-scale hydrate dissociation and gas

190

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Natural Hydrate Bearing Sediments and Hydrate Dissociation Kinetics Last Reviewed 12/6/2013 Characterization of Natural Hydrate Bearing Sediments and Hydrate Dissociation Kinetics Last Reviewed 12/6/2013 FWP-45133 Work conducted under this field work proposal (FWP) includes two distinct phases. Ongoing Phase 2 work is discussed directly below. Click here to review the completed, Phase 1 work, associated with this FWP. Phase 2 Project Information Characterization of Natural Hydrate Bearing Core Samples Goal The overarching goal of this project is to gain an improved understanding of the dynamic processes of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media by combining laboratory studies, numerical simulation, and analysis of shipboard infrared imaging of hydrate core samples. This project comprises four principal components: (1) fundamental laboratory investigations, (2)

191

Methane Hydrate Production Feasibility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Feasibility Production Feasibility Methane Hydrate Production Feasibility The red curves are temperature profiles for various water depths; the blue line shows methane hydrate stability relative to temperature and pressure. The area enclosed by the two curves represents the area of methane hydrate stability. The red curves are temperature profiles for various water depths; the blue line shows methane hydrate stability relative to temperature and pressure. The area enclosed by the two curves represents the area of methane hydrate stability. Methane, the predominant component of natural gas, forms hydrate in the presence of water, low temperatures and high pressures. Alternatively, when the temperature is increased or the pressure decreased so that hydrates are outside their stability field, they dissociate into methane and water.

192

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of Sea Floor Monitoring Station Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of Sea Floor Monitoring Station DE-FC26-02NT41328 Goal Determine the potential impacts of gas hydrate instability in terms of the release of methane into seafloor sediments, the ocean and the atmosphere. Performers University of California, San Diego (Scripps Institution of Oceanography) - manage geochemical, hydrological and sedimentological investigations Texas A&M University - manage field monitoring program Location La Jolla, California 92093 Background This project will monitor, characterize, and quantify the rates of formation and dissociation of methane gas hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, and determine linkages between formation/dissociation and physical/chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of a year. The stability and response of shallow gas hydrates to temperature and chemical perturbations will be monitored in situ, and localized seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation characterized. The following will be determined: 1) The equilibrium/steady state conditions for structure II methane gas hydrates at the field site,2) whether the system is in dynamic equilibrium and the local hydrology is characterized by steady state episodic fluid flow, and 3) how fluid fluxes and fluid composition work together to dynamically influence gas hydrate stability.

193

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Mexico, http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/of Mexico, http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil- gas/

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

History of the Development of Low Dosage Hydrate Inhibitors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low dosage hydrate inhibitors (LDHIs) are a recent and alternative technology to thermodynamic inhibitors for preventing gas hydrates from plugging oil and gas production wells and pipelines. ... A wide range of OPEX savings, possible extended field lifetime and multi-million dollar CAPEX savings, are economic drivers for choosing LDHIs instead of other hydrate prevention methods.2 ... A second apparatus is the ball-stop rig or rocker rig. ...

Malcolm A. Kelland

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gathering, Processing and Evaluating Seismic and Physical Data on Gas Hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 Gathering, Processing and Evaluating Seismic and Physical Data on Gas Hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 DE-AT26-97FT34343 photo of piston core apparatus prior to being dropped Piston core apparatus with 6-ton weight prior to being dropped Photo courtesy USGS Goal The goal of the project is to characterize hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and further develop field techniques for characterizing hydrates. Performer US Geological Survey, Woods Hole Field Center Location Woods Hole Massachusetts Background Oceanic methane hydrates are a major emerging research topic spanning energy resource issues, global climate change, seafloor stability, ocean acoustics, impact on deep marine biota, and a number of special topics. Recent developments in the last five years have both broadened and deepened

196

Hydrate-phobic surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for ultra deep-sea production. Current methods for hydrate mitigation focus on injecting thermodynamic ...

Smith, Jonathan David, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Anisotropic models to account for large borehole washouts to estimate gas hydrate saturations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II Alaminos Canyon 21 B well  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Through the use of 3-D seismic amplitude mapping, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Alaminos Canyon (AC) area of the Gulf of Mexico. Two locations were drilled as part of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (JIP Leg II) in May of 2009 and a comprehensive set of logging-while-drilling (LWD) logs were acquired at each well site. LWD logs indicated that resistivity in the range of ?2 ohm-m and P-wave velocity in the range of ?1.9 km/s were measured in the target sand interval between 515 and 645 feet below sea floor. These values were slightly elevated relative to those measured in the sediment above and below the target sand. However, the initial well log analysis was inconclusive regarding the presence of gas hydrate in the logged sand interval, mainly because large washouts caused by drilling in the target interval degraded confidence in the well log measurements. To assess gas hydrate saturations in the sedimentary section drilled in the Alaminos Canyon 21 B (AC21-B) well, a method of compensating for the effect of washouts on the resistivity and acoustic velocities was developed. The proposed method models the washed-out portion of the borehole as a vertical layer filled with sea water (drilling fluid) and the apparent anisotropic resistivity and velocities caused by a vertical layer are used to correct the measured log values. By incorporating the conventional marine seismic data into the well log analysis, the average gas hydrate saturation in the target sand section in the AC21-B well can be constrained to the range of 8–28%, with 20% being our best estimate.

M.W. Lee; T.S. Collett; K.A. Lewis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Journal of Crystal Growth 250 (2003) 499515 Induction time in crystallization of gas hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for revealing how additives in the solution that act as kinetic inhibitors of hydrate crystallization can affect to prevent hydrate crystallization. These options include heating, insulation, water removal, and the use

Firoozabadi, Abbas

199

Optimization of offshore natural gas field development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis the target is to find the optimal development solution of an offshore natural gas field. Natural gas is increasing in importance… (more)

Johansen, Gaute Rannem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates  

SciTech Connect

As part of the effort to investigate the technical feasibility of gas production from hydrate deposits, a long-term field test (lasting 18-24 months) is under consideration in a project led by the U.S. Department of Energy. We evaluate a candidate deposit involving the C-Unit in the vicinity of the PBU-L106 site in North Slope, Alaska. This deposit is stratigraphically bounded by impermeable shale top and bottom boundaries (Class 3), and is characterized by high intrinsic permeabilities, high porosity, high hydrate saturation, and a hydrostatic pressure distribution. The C-unit deposit is composed of two hydrate-bearing strata separated by a 30-ft-thick shale interlayer, and its temperatrure across its boundaries ranges between 5 and 6.5 C. We investigate by means of numerical simulation involving very fine grids the production potential of these two deposits using both vertical and horizontal wells. We also explore the sensitivity of production to key parameters such as the hydrate saturation, the formation permeability, and the permeability of the bounding shale layers. Finally, we compare the production performance of the C-Unit at the PBU-L106 site to that of the D-Unit accumulation at the Mount Elbert site, a thinner, single-layer Class 3 deposit on the North Slope of Alaska that is shallower, less-pressurized and colder (2.3-2.6 C). The results indicate that production from horizontal wells may be orders of magnitude larger than that from vertical ones. Additionally, production increases with the formation permeability, and with a decreasing permeability of the boundaries. The effect of the hydrate saturation on production is complex and depends on the time frame of production. Because of higher production, the PBU-L106 deposit appears to have an advantage as a candidate for the long-term test.

Moridis, G.J.; Reagan, M.T.; Boyle, K.L.; Zhang, K.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Methane Hydrate and Free Gas on the Blake Ridge from Vertical Seismic Profiling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...expression: The phase boundary between methane hydrate and methane plus...and methane hydrate, CH4-5.75H20...a structure I hydrate construct-ed...documented anomalous behavior in the formation...325 Fig. 1. Phase diagram for the...

W. Steven Holbrook; Hartley Hoskins; Warren T. Wood; Ralph A. Stephen; Daniel Lizarralde

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

202

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the project reports.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase 1 - Characterization and Qualification of the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Phase 1 - Characterization and Qualification of the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields DE-FC26-06NT42962 Goal The goal of this project is to characterize and quantify the postulated gas hydrate resource associated with the Barrow Gas Fields – three producing fields located in a permafrost region near Barrow, the North Slope's biggest population center and economic hub. Map of the North Slope Borough showing the location of its eight major communities, including Barrow, the site of this research project. Map of the North Slope Borough showing the location of its eight major communities, including Barrow, the site of this research project. Performers North Slope Borough, Barrow, Alaska (North Slope Borough) 99723

204

Methane Hydrate | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Methane Hydrate Methane Hydrate Types of Methane Hydrate Deposits Types of Methane Hydrate Deposits Methane hydrate is a cage-like lattice of ice inside of which are trapped molecules of methane, the chief constituent of natural gas. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will revert back to water and natural gas. When brought to the earth's surface, one cubic meter of gas hydrate releases 164 cubic meters of natural gas. Hydrate deposits may be several hundred meters thick and generally occur in two types of settings: under Arctic permafrost, and beneath the ocean floor. Methane that forms hydrate can be both biogenic, created by biological activity in sediments, and thermogenic, created by geological processes deeper within the earth.

205

Petrographic, Mineralogic, and Geochemical Studies of Hydrocarbon-derived Authigenic Carbonate Rock from Gas Venting, Seepage, Free Gas, and Gas Hydrate Sites in the Gulf of Mexico and offshore India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ACR collected from the seafloor in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and ACR recovered from drilled cores in the Krishna-Godawari (KG) basin offshore India were used. All study sites are associated with hydrocarbon gas venting, seepage, free gas, or gas hydrate...

Jung, Woodong

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

Gas hydrate identified in sand-rich inferred sedimentary section using downhole logging and seismic data in Shenhu area, South China Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Downhole wireline log (DWL) data was acquired from eight drill sites during China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition (GMGS-1) in 2007. Initial analyses of the acquired well log data suggested that there were no significant gas hydrate occurrences at Site SH4. However, the re-examination of the DWL data from Site SH4 indicated that there are two intervals of high resistivity, which could be indicative of gas hydrate. One interval of high resistivity at depth of 171–175 m below seafloor (mbsf) is associated with a high compressional- wave (P-wave) velocities and low gamma ray log values, which suggests the presence of gas hydrate in a potentially sand-rich (low clay content) sedimentary section. The second high resistivity interval at depth of 175–180 mbsf is associated with low P-wave velocities and low gamma values, which suggests the presence of free gas in a potentially sand-rich (low clay content) sedimentary section. Because the occurrence of free gas is much shallower than the expected from the regional depth of the bottom simulating reflector (BSR), the free gas could be from the dissociation of gas hydrate during drilling or there may be a local anomaly in the depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. In order to determine whether the low P-wave velocity with high resistivity is caused by in-situ free gas or dissociated free gas from the gas hydrate, the surface seismic data were also used in this analysis. The log analysis incorporating the surface seismic data through the construction of synthetic seismograms using various models indicated the presence of free gas directly in contact with an overlying gas hydrate-bearing section. The occurrence of the anomalous base of gas hydrate stability at Site SH4 could be caused by a local heat flow conditions. This paper documents the first observation of gas hydrate in what is believed to be a sand-rich sediment in Shenhu area of the South China Sea.

Xiujuan Wang; Myung Lee; Timthy Collett; Shengxiong Yang; Yiqun Guo; Shiguo Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production. Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The grantee will evaluate the influence of hydrate production on ground subsidence near the wellbore and the surface. The objective of this research will be achieved by using computer simulations of what is expected in a hydrate reservoir during the production stage as reported by hydrate production models and available data. The model will be based on theories of continuum mechanics, thermomechanics of hydrate production, principles of rock mechanics and geomechanics, and special features of geomaterials under cold temperatures such as those found in permafrost regions. The research work involved in the proposed investigation will be divided into three major tasks; mechanics of subsidence in permafrost regions, modeling of subsidence, and parametric studies.

Siriwardane, H.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sensitivity Analysis of Gas Production from Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico,” Fire In The Ice, NETL Methane Hydrates R&D ProgramBoswell and Kelly Rose of DOE-NETL for making the Tigershark

Reagan, Matthew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrates, Fire In The Ice, NETL Methane Hydrates R&D ProgramCanada, Fire In The Ice, NETL Methane Hydrates R&D Programat MMS, Fire In The Ice, NETL Methane Hydrates R&D Program

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Experimental and Numerical Observations of Hydrate Reformation during Depressurization in a Core-Scale Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrate has been predicted to reform around a wellbore during depressurization-based gas production from gas hydrate-bearing reservoirs. This process has an adverse effect on gas production rates and it requires time and sometimes special measures to resume gas flow to producing wells. Due to lack of applicable field data, laboratory scale experiments remain a valuable source of information to study hydrate reformation. In this work, we report laboratory experiments and complementary numerical simulations executed to investigate the hydrate reformation phenomenon. Gas production from a pressure vessel filled with hydrate-bearing sand was induced by depressurization with and without heat flux through the boundaries. Hydrate decomposition was monitored with a medical X-ray CT scanner and pressure and temperature measurements. CT images of the hydrate-bearing sample were processed to provide 3-dimensional data of heterogeneous porosity and phase saturations suitable for numerical simulations. In the experiments, gas hydrate reformation was observed only in the case of no-heat supply from surroundings, a finding consistent with numerical simulation. By allowing gas production on either side of the core, numerical simulations showed that initial hydrate distribution patterns affect gas distribution and flow inside the sample. This is a direct consequence of the heterogeneous pore network resulting in varying hydraulic properties of the hydrate-bearing sediment.

Seol, Yongkoo; Myshakin, Evgeniy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Salt Tectonics and Its Effect on Sediment Structure and Gas Hydrate Occurrence in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico from 2-D Multichannel Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to investigate mobile salt and its effect on fault structures and gas hydrate occurrence in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Industry 2-D multichannel seismic data were used to investigate the effects of the salt within...

Lewis, Dan'L 1986-

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methane hydrate-bearing sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sand, the gas permeability of the sand with hydrate, and thefor gas and water through methane hydrate-bearing sand. X-hydrate dissociation and making a single-phase (gas or water) permeability measurement of the sand

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas hydrate morphology on the seismic velocities of sands,sand does not distribute water and gas evenly. Resultant hydrateHydrate Using Excess Gas Method Followed by Water Saturation Description In this method, moist sand

Kneafsey, T.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS  

SciTech Connect

The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large-grain sand in ice. Results with this core showed that the viscosity of the drilling fluid must also be carefully controlled. When coarse sand was being cored, the core barrel became stuck because the drilling fluid was not viscous enough to completely remove the large grains of sand. These tests were very valuable to the project by showing the difficulties in coring permafrost or hydrates in a laboratory environment (as opposed to a field environment where drilling costs are much higher and the potential loss of equipment greater). Among the conclusions reached from these simulated hydrate coring tests are the following: Frozen hydrate core samples can be recovered successfully; A spring-finger core catcher works best for catching hydrate cores; Drilling fluid can erode the core and reduces its diameter, making it more difficult to capture the core; Mud must be designed with proper viscosity to lift larger cuttings; and The bottom 6 inches of core may need to be drilled dry to capture the core successfully.

John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production. Progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The grantee will evaluate the influence of hydrate production on ground subsidence near the wellbore and the surface. The objective of this research will be achieved by using computer simulations of what is expected in a hydrate reservoir during the production stage as reported by hydrate production models and available data. The model will be based on theories of continuum mechanics, thermomechanics of hydrate production, principles of rock mechanics and geomechanics, and special features of geomaterials under cold temperatures such as those found in permafrost regions. The research work involved in the proposed investigation will be divided into three major tasks: (1) Mechanics of subsidence in permafrost regions; (2) modeling of subsidence; and (3) parametric studies. Progress reports are presented for tasks 1 and 2.

Siriwardane, H.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Methane Hydrates R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrates R&D Program Methane Hydrates R&D Program Gas hydrates are a naturally-occurring combination of methane gas and water that form under specific conditions of low temperature and high pressure. Once thought to be rare in nature, gas hydrates are now known to occur in great abundance in association with arctic permafrost and in the shallow sediments of the deep-water continental shelves. The most recent estimates of gas hydrate abundance suggest that they contain

217

Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine HydrateDeposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea  

SciTech Connect

Although significant hydrate deposits are known to exist in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea, their survey and evaluation as a possible energy resource has not yet been completed. However, it is possible to develop preliminary estimates of their production potential based on the limited data that are currently available. These include the elevation and thickness of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL), the water depth, and the water temperature at the sea floor. Based on this information, we developed estimates of the local geothermal gradient that bracket its true value. Reasonable estimates of the initial pressure distribution in the HBL can be obtained because it follows closely the hydrostatic. Other critical information needs include the hydrate saturation, and the intrinsic permeabilities of the system formations. These are treated as variables, and sensitivity analysis provides an estimate of their effect on production. Based on the geology of similar deposits, it is unlikely that Ulleung Basin accumulations belong to Class 1 (involving a HBL underlain by a mobile gas zone). If Class 4 (disperse, low saturation accumulations) deposits are involved, they are not likely to have production potential. The most likely scenarios include Class 2 (HBL underlain by a zone of mobile water) or Class 3 (involving only an HBL) accumulations. Assuming nearly impermeable confining boundaries, this numerical study indicates that large production rates (several MMSCFD) are attainable from both Class 2 and Class 3 deposits using conventional technology. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the dependence of production on the well design, the production rate, the intrinsic permeability of the HBL, the initial pressure, temperature and hydrate saturation, as well as on the thickness of the water zone (Class 2). The study also demonstrates that the presence of confining boundaries is indispensable for the commercially viable production of gas from these deposits.

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol,Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

Seawater desalination by gas hydrate process and removal characteristics of dissolved ions (Na+, K+, Mg2 +, Ca2 +, B3 +, Cl?, SO42 ?)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to evaluate hydrate-based desalination (HBD), experiments with seawater samples were carried out at various conditions (i.e. hydraulic pressure, washing step, and hydrate-forming gas). Before and after the hydrate process, cations (Na+, K+, Mg2 +, Ca2 +, and B3 +) and anions (Cl? and SO42 ?) were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and ion chromatography (IC). In a single stage of CO2 hydrate process without any pretreatment, 71%–94% of each cation was removed in the following order: K+ > Na+ ? Mg2 + ? Ca2 + > B3 + and 73%–83% of each anion was removed. When the brines on the surface of hydrate pellets were removed, the ion removal efficiency increased above 4%. It was also found that the desalting efficiency depended on the hydrate-forming gas (CO2 > CH4) and the hydraulic pressure (6–10 MPa) to produce hydrate pellets. In this study, the removal efficiency of cations and anions in a real seawater sample using HBD processes were reported for the first time.

Kyung Chan Kang; Praveen Linga; Kyeong-nam Park; Sang-June Choi; Ju Dong Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Numerical Simulation Last Reviewed 3/8/2013 Numerical Simulation Last Reviewed 3/8/2013 Project Goal The goal of NETL's gas hydrate numerical simulation studies is to obtain pertinent, high-quality information on the behavior of gas hydrates in their natural environment under either production (methane gas extraction) or climate change scenarios. This research is closely linked with NETL's experimental and field studies programs to ensure the validity of input datasets and scenarios. Project Performers Brian Anderson, NETL/RUA Fellow (West Virginia University) Hema Siriwardane, NETL/RUA Fellow (West Virginia University) Eugene Myshakin, NETL/URS Project Locations National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA, and Morgantown WV West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Background Field-scale hydrate production tests rely heavily on reservoir-scale

220

Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Now  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Now Available on NETL Website Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Now Available on NETL Website March 11, 2013 - 10:07am Addthis DOE participated in gas hydrate field production trials in early 2012 in partnership with ConocoPhillips and the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp at the IÄ¡nik Sikumi (Inupiat for “Fire in the Ice”) test well, shown here, on the north slope of Alaska. Datasets from that field trial are now available to the public. DOE participated in gas hydrate field production trials in early 2012 in partnership with ConocoPhillips and the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp at the Iġnik Sikumi (Inupiat for "Fire in the Ice") test well,

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II: Walker Ridge 313 LWD Operations and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cook Cook 1 , Gilles Guerin 1 , Stefan Mrozewski 1 , Timothy Collett 2 , & Ray Boswell 3 Walker Ridge 313 LWD Operations and Results Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II: 1 Borehole Research Group Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University Palisades, NY 10964 E-mail: Cook: acook@ldeo.columbia.edu Guerin: guerin@ldeo.columbia.edu Mrozewski: stefan@ldeo.columbia.edu 3 National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 E-mail: ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov 2 US Geological Survey Denver Federal Center, MS-939 Box 25046 Denver, CO 80225 E-mail:

222

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

SciTech Connect

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation  

SciTech Connect

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The U.S. DOE Methane Hydrate R&D Program DOE Sponsored Student Researchers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. DOE Methane Hydrate R&D Program U.S. DOE Methane Hydrate R&D Program DOE Sponsored Student Researchers Publications and Presentations of DOE Supported Methane Hydrate R&D 1999-2013 December 2013 Table of Contents Section I: Documentation of Support for Education .................................................................................... 5 Additional Post-Degree Assignments at National Labs and USGS .......................................................... 14 Papers Authored and Presentations Given by NETL Methane Hydrate Fellows .................................... 15 Section II: Publications Related to the Program's Major Field Projects .................................................... 21 Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Reservoir Characterization (DE-FC26-01NT41332) ............................ 21

225

Measurement of in situ hydrate thermodynamic properties  

SciTech Connect

Heat capacities and heats of fusion measured in simulated in situ natural gas hydrates using tetrahydrofuran hydrates in clean sand indicated that sediments significantly affect hydrate formation conditions. These data are required to devise and evaluate methods for producing natural gas from hydrates, a potentially significant energy resource.

Sloan, E.D.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to economically Page viable gas production. The overallare not promising targets for gas production. AcknowledgmentEnergy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology,

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Methane Hydrate and Free Gas on the Blake Ridge from Vertical Seismic Profiling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subtle differences in permeability between lithologically...hydrate filling 2% of porosity at Site 994 and...estimate of 1% of porosity, on average, occupied...estimate of 5 to 7% of porosity (33, 34...UNCONSOLIDATED POROUS SAND RESERVOIRS, GEOPHYSICS 42...SEISMIC-WAVES IN POROUS ROCKS, GEOPHYSICS...

W. Steven Holbrook; Hartley Hoskins; Warren T. Wood; Ralph A. Stephen; Daniel Lizarralde

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

Sequestering carbon dioxide into complex structures of naturally occurring gas hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...deposited worldwide as a new energy source. For recovering...found that CO 2 hydrates reform at both the surface and...sites such as the Gulf of Mexico outside the Caspian Sea (17, 18...Ratcliffe C. I. ( 1988 ) Energy Fuels 12 : 197 – 200 . 15 Seo Y...Commerce, Industry, and Energy of Korea, also partially...

Youngjune Park; Do-Youn Kim; Jong-Won Lee; Dae-Gee Huh; Keun-Pil Park; Jaehyoung Lee; Huen Lee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Application of Crunch-Flow Routines to Constrain Present and Past Carbon Fluxes at Gas-Hydrate Bearing Sites  

SciTech Connect

In November 2012, Oregon State University initiated the project entitled: Application of Crunch-Flow routines to constrain present and past carbon fluxes at gas-hydrate bearing sites. Within this project we developed Crunch-Flow based modeling modules that include important biogeochemical processes that need to be considered in gas hydrate environments. Our modules were applied to quantify carbon cycling in present and past systems, using data collected during several DOE-supported drilling expeditions, which include the Cascadia margin in US, Ulleung Basin in South Korea, and several sites drilled offshore India on the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea. Specifically, we completed modeling efforts that: 1) Reproduce the compositional and isotopic profiles observed at the eight drilled sites in the Ulleung Basin that constrain and contrast the carbon cycling pathways at chimney (high methane flux) and non-chimney sites (low methane, advective systems); 2) Simulate the Ba record in the sediments to quantify the past dynamics of methane flux in the southern Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia margin; and 3) Provide quantitative estimates of the thickness of individual mass transport deposits (MTDs), time elapsed after the MTD event, rate of sulfate reduction in the MTD, and time required to reach a new steady state at several sites drilled in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) Basin off India. In addition we developed a hybrid model scheme by coupling a home-made MATLAB code with CrunchFlow to address the methane transport and chloride enrichment at the Ulleung Basins chimney sites, and contributed the modeling component to a study focusing on pore-scale controls on gas hydrate distribution in sediments from the Andaman Sea. These efforts resulted in two manuscripts currently under review, and contributed the modeling component of another pare, also under review. Lessons learned from these efforts are the basis of a mini-workshop to be held at Oregon State University (Feb 2014) to instruct graduate students (OSU and UW) as well as DOE staff from the NETL lab in Albany on the use of Crunch Flow for geochemical applications.

Torres, Marta

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a suspected hazard to oil and gas drilling operations, andregional oil and gas reservoir) and the BGHS. Drilling

Boswell, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Presentations from the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations from the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory Committee Meeting International Gas Hydrate...

232

Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2014 Next Release Date: 12312015 Referring Pages: New Field Discoveries of Dry Natural Gas Reserves Florida Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves New...

233

Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in a Partially Saturated Core-Scale Sand Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas system and the sand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as wellproperties of the sand/water/gas system, hydrate formation,saturated sand/water/gas (s/w/g) system, hydrate formation,

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissocation in a Partially Saturated Sand--Measurements and Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas system and the sand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as wellproperties of the sand/water/gas system, hydrate formation,saturated sand/water/gas (s/w/g) system, hydrate formation,

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Core and sediment physical property correlation of the second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) results in the East Sea (Japan Sea)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We analyzed the data consist of core digital images and X-rays, core-logs, LWD (logging-while-drilling), and sediment grain-size from the second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Expedition (UBGH2) in the East Sea. Core digital images and X-rays were spliced as a complete composite core in meters below seafloor (mbsf) for five sites; UBGH2-1_1 (Hole D), 2_1 (B), 2_2 (B), 2-6 (B) and 2-10 (C–D), and were correlated with the core-log and LWD measurements showing that possible gas hydrate bearing layers are between the depths of about 60–180 mbsf at these sites. Bulk densities generally increase with depth from 1.3 to 2.0 g/cm3 in LWD data, and from 1.1 to 1.8 g/cm3 onboard which measured lower than in-situ. Gas hydrate bearing sediments respond with an increase of LWD densities (1.4–1.6 g/cm3) and a decrease in core-logs (1.1–1.4 g/cm3). P-wave velocity values of LWD increase (1400 to 1700 m/s) with depth for non-reservoirs, and are high (1500 and 2000 m/s) within the gas hydrate bearing intervals depending on the hydrate saturations.Resistivity values logged onboard range from less than 1.0 to over 10.0 ?-m, while LWD records are around 1.0 ?-m and between 5.0 and 30.0 ?-m in background sediments and possible gas hydrate reservoirs, respectively. High resistivity values were observed (5.0–30.0 ?-m) within coarse-grained turbidites (mean grain-size between 2.9 and 5.1 ?; laminated sandy mud or muddy sands). Medium resistivities were observed (5.0 ?-m) within the silt-dominant hemi-pelagic and turbiditic sediments (5.1–7.4 ?; crudely laminated, bioturbated, homogeneous sand, and disintegrated sand and sandy mud facies) bearing pore-filling gas hydrates, or disseminated gas hydrates either formed in pores or small fractures of fine-grained sediments. Core-log measurements are highly fluctuating and sensitive but mostly lower (e.g., density and resistivity) than LWD records.

Senay Horozal; Gil Young Kim; Jang Jun Bahk; Roy H. Wilkens; Dong Geun Yoo; Byong Jae Ryu; Seong Pil Kim

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. World crude and natural gas reserves rebound in 2000. Oilto the conventional gas reserve of 0.15x10 15 m 3 methane (

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments with CO2. Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments...

238

SUBSURFACE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HYDRATE BEARING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fps). The underlying wet sand at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) has low resistivity

Sediments Near; Alaminos Canyon; Thomas Latham; Dianna Shelander; Ray Boswell; Timothy Collett; Myung Lee

239

Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 829-843, December 2006 Gas Hydrate Stability Zone in Offshore Southern Taiwan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Offshore Southern Taiwan Wu-Cheng Chi 1, *, Donald L. Reed 2 , and Chih-Chin Tsai 3 (Manuscript received 17 in meeting natural gas demand in the future. To study the feasibility of recovering methane from the offshore hydrates in the sediments offshore of southern Taiwan. We used a dense grid of 6-channel and 120-channel

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

240

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2003.04.02 - 2003.09.02 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon, water, and energy varies with climate, soil, and land management, in ways 1) that influence the CO2 flux and planetary boundary layer CO2 concentration in ARM CART and 2) that we can model and predict. This activity repeated portable flux system measurements that we performed in spring 2002, by continuing measurements of the spatial heterogeneity of carbon, water, and energy fluxes in fields surrounding the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Study on small-strain behaviours of methane hydrate sandy sediments using discrete element method  

SciTech Connect

Methane hydrate bearing soil has attracted increasing interest as a potential energy resource where methane gas can be extracted from dissociating hydrate-bearing sediments. Seismic testing techniques have been applied extensively and in various ways, to detect the presence of hydrates, due to the fact that hydrates increase the stiffness of hydrate-bearing sediments. With the recognition of the limitations of laboratory and field tests, wave propagation modelling using Discrete Element Method (DEM) was conducted in this study in order to provide some particle-scale insights on the hydrate-bearing sandy sediment models with pore-filling and cementation hydrate distributions. The relationship between shear wave velocity and hydrate saturation was established by both DEM simulations and analytical solutions. Obvious differences were observed in the dependence of wave velocity on hydrate saturation for these two cases. From the shear wave velocity measurement and particle-scale analysis, it was found that the small-strain mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sandy sediments are governed by both the hydrate distribution patterns and hydrate saturation.

Yu Yanxin; Cheng Yipik [Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London (UCL), Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Xu Xiaomin; Soga, Kenichi [Geotechnical and Environmental Research Group, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

242

Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate Production Technologies Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate Production Technologies May 17, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A fully instrumented well that will test innovative technologies for producing methane gas from hydrate deposits has been safely installed on the North Slope of Alaska. As a result, the "Iġnik Sikumi" (Iñupiaq for "fire in the ice") gas hydrate field trial well will be available for field experiments as early as winter 2011-12. The well, the result of a partnership between ConocoPhillips and the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory, will test a technology that involves injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into sandstone

243

Compressional and shear-wave velocities from gas hydrate bearing sediments: Examples from the India and Cascadia margins as well as Arctic permafrost regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shear wave velocity data have been acquired at several marine gas hydrate drilling expeditions, including the India National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 1 (NGHP-01), the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 (X311). In this study we use data from these marine drilling expeditions to develop an understanding of general grain-size control on the P- and S-wave properties of sediments. A clear difference in the downhole trends of P-wave (Vp) and S-wave (Vs) velocity and the Vp/Vs ratio from all three marine regions was observed: the northern Cascadia margin (IODP X311) shows the highest P-wave and S-wave velocity values overall and those from the India margin (Expedition NGHP-01) are the lowest. The southern Cascadia margin (ODP Leg 204) appears to have similar low P-wave and S-wave velocity values as seen off India. S-wave velocity values increase relative to the sites off India, but they are not as high as those seen on the northern Cascadia margin. Such regional differences can be explained by the amount of silt/sand (or lack thereof) occurring at these sites, with northern Cascadia being the region of the highest silt/sand occurrences. This grain-size control on P-wave and S-wave velocity and associated mineral composition differences is amplified when compared to the Arctic permafrost environments, where gas hydrate predominantly occurs in sand- and silt-dominated formations. Using a cross-plot of gamma ray values versus the Vp/Vs ratio, we compare the marine gas hydrate occurrences in these regions: offshore eastern India margin, offshore Cascadia margin, the Ignik-Sikumi site in Alaska, and the Mallik 5L-38 site in the Mackenzie Delta. The log-data from the Arctic permafrost regions show a strongly linear Vp–Vs relationship, similar to the previously defined empirical relationships by Greenberg and Castagna (1992). P- and S-wave velocity data from the India margin and ODP Leg 204 deviate strongly from these linear trends, whereas data from IODP X311 plot closer to the trend of the Arctic data sets and previously published relationships. Three new linear relationships for different grain size marine sediment hosts are suggested:a) mud-dominated (Mahanadi Basin, ODP Leg 204 & NGHP-01-17): Vs = 1.5854 × Vp ? 2.1649 b) silty-mud (KG Basin): Vs = 0.8105 × Vp ? 1.0223 c) silty-sand (IODP X311): Vs = 0.5316 × Vp ? 0.4916 We investigate the relationship of gas hydrate saturation determined from electrical resistivity on the Vp/Vs ratio and found that the sand-dominated Arctic hosts show a clearly decreasing trend of Vp/Vs ratio with gas hydrate saturation. Though limited due to lower overall GH saturations, a similar trend is seen for sites from IODP X311 and at the ash-dominated NGHP-01-17 sediment in the Andaman Sea. Gas hydrate that occurs predominantly in fractured clay hosts show a different trend where the Vp/Vs ratio is much higher than at sand-dominated sites and remains constant or increases slightly with increasing gas hydrate saturation. This trend may be the result of anisotropy in fracture-dominated systems, where P- and S-wave velocities appear higher and Archie-based saturations of gas hydrate are overestimated. Gas hydrate concentrations were also estimated in these three marine settings and at Arctic sites using an effective medium model, combining P- and S-wave velocities as equally weighted constraints on the calculation. The effective medium approach generally overestimates S-wave velocity in high-porosity, clay-dominated sediments, but can be accurately used in sand-rich formations.

M. Riedel; D. Goldberg; G. Guerin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressurized Coring Equipment Pressurized Coring Equipment Pressure Core Equipment used by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program Pressure Core Equipment - Photo Gallery One of the key objectives of the ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico hydrates Joint Industry Project is the collection and analyses of deepwater sediment samples. Because these samples may contain hydrate which is only stable at specific temperature and pressure conditions it is necessary to use specialized sampling equipment. Otherwise, the combination of reduced pressure and increased temperatures as the sample is retrieved through 4,000 feet of gulf seawater will fully dissociate the hydrate, leaving only gas and water. Although techniques exist to infer hydrates presence from distinctive geochemical markers, we have lost the ability to image the nature of hydrate distribution, or to conduct measurements of the various physical and chemical properties of hydrates in the host sediments.

245

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2006.01.01 - 2006.12.31 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. In an extension of our earlier work on crop systems, we investigated the effects of burning on the cycles of carbon, water, and energy in an example of grazed land of the Southern Great Plains. In collaboration with Dr. Herman Mayeux, of the USDA Grazing

246

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2004.04.15 - 2004.12.15 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. Models predicting fluxes for un-irrigated agriculture were posed with the challenge of characterizing the onset and severity of plant water stress. We conducted a study that quantified the spatial heterogeneity and temporal variations in land

247

Hydrate-phobic surfaces: fundamental studies in clathrate hydrate adhesion reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for deep-sea oil and gas operations. Current methods for hydrate mitigation are expensive and energy ...

Smith, J. David

248

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - NT42496  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Scientific Studies of Natural Gas Hydrates to Support the DOE Efforts to Evaluate and Understand Methane Hydrates Last Reviewed 05/16/2011 Conducting Scientific Studies of Natural Gas Hydrates to Support the DOE Efforts to Evaluate and Understand Methane Hydrates Last Reviewed 05/16/2011 DE-AI26-05NT42496 Goal The United States Geological Survey (USGS) conducts scientific studies of natural gas hydrates in support of DOE efforts to evaluate and understand methane hydrates, their potential as an energy resource, and the hazard they may pose to ongoing drilling efforts. This project extends USGS support to the DOE Methane Hydrate Research Program previously supported under DE-AT26-97FT34342 and DE-AT26-97FT34343. Performer U.S. Geological Survey at Denver, CO, Woods Hole, MA, and Menlo Park, CA. Background The USGS Interagency Agreement (IA) involves laboratory research and international field studies in which DOE/NETL has a significant interest.

249

Laboratory measurements on core-scale sediment/hydrate samples to predice reservoir behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

top) and for the sand/hydrate/water/gas system (bottom),3.145 W / m K for the sand/hydrate/water/gas system (watertop-left) and the sand-hydrate-water-gas system (bottom-

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Moridis, George J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Freifeld, Barry M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Physical property changes in hydrate-bearing sediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

documented example of gas hydrate saturated sand in the Gulfa volume of water to gas hydrate in sands at these pressureseffects of hydrate redistribution in cemented, gas-rich sand

Waite, W.F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Natural Gas Pools Characteristics in Sulige Gas Field, Ordos Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are abundant natural gas resources in Sulige gas field, Ordos Basin. The ascertained resources ... setting and reservoir heterogeneity. The characteristics of natural gas pools were analyzed from gas compos...

Lin Xiaoying; Zeng Jianhui; Zhang Shuichang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Bacteria and ArchaeaPhysically Associated with Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of oil, gas, and coal combined (). There...feedback mechanism for global warming, and as an agent...all oil, gas, and coal reserves combined...significant role in global methane and carbon...chronology of climate warming during the Palaeocene...

Brian D. Lanoil; Roger Sassen; Myron T. La Duc; Stephen T. Sweet; Kenneth H. Nealson

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Hollow fiber membrane process for the pretreatment of methane hydrate from landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Landfill gas is major source of green house effect because it is mainly composed of CH4 and CO2. Especially, the separation of CH4 from landfill gas was studied actively due to its high heating value which can be used for energy resource. In this study, polymeric hollow fiber membrane was produced by dry–wet phase inversion method to separate CH4 from the landfill gas. The morphology of the membranes was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand and correlate the morphology with the performance of the membrane. Firstly, single gas permeation and mixed gas separation were performed in lab-scale. After then, a pilot scale membrane process was designed using a simulation program. The manufactured process settled in Gyeong-ju landfill site and operated at various conditions. As a result, CH4 was concentrated to 88 vol.% and also CO2 removal efficiency increases up to 86.7%.

KeeHong Kim; WonKil Choi; HangDae Jo; JongHak Kim; Hyung Keun Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NSTX High Field Side Gas Fueling System  

SciTech Connect

Fueling National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas with gas injected from the high field side (HFS) has produced earlier, more reliable transitions to the H-mode, longer H-mode durations, higher toroidal rotation, and higher edge electron temperature compared with similar discharges using the low field side (LFS) gas fueling injectors. The HFS gas fueling system consists of a Center Stack midplane injector, and an injector at the inner, upper corner of the Center Stack. The challenging design and installation constraints for the HFS gas system involved placing the control components as close as possible to the machine-vacuum interface, devising a special feed-through flange, traversing through vessel regions whose temperatures during bake-out range from 150 to 350 degrees Centigrade, adapting the gas transport tubing size and route to the small instrumentation wire channels behind the existing graphite plasma facing component tiles on the Center Stack, and providing output orifices shielded from excessive plasma power depositions while concentrating the output flow to facilitate fast camera viewing and analysis. Design, recent performance, and future upgrades will be presented.

H.W. Kugel; M. Anderson; G. Barnes; M. Bell; W. Blanchard; L. Dudek; D. Gates; R. Gernhardt; R. Maingi; D. Mueller; T. Provost; R. Raman; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Winston

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

Efficient storage of hydrogen fuel into leaky cages of clathrate hydrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate an alternative principle to efficiently store molecular hydrogen fuel into clathrate hydrate medium. Hydrogen-free hydrate powders quickly absorb the hydrogen gas at moderate pressure appropriate for industrial applications. The absorption kinetics was observed in situ by nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR)spectroscopy in a pressurized tube. The diffusion of hydrogen through the solid hydrate medium was directly measured by pulsed field gradient NMR. At temperatures down to 250 K the stored hydrogen is still mobile so that the hydrate storage should work well even in cold environments.

Takuo Okuchi; Igor L. Moudrakovski; John. A. Ripmeester

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

GAS HYDRATE EQUILIBRIA FOR CO2-N2 AND CO2-CH4 GAS MIXTURES, EXPERIMENTS AND MODELLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to remove those industrial gases that have an impact on the global warming before being emitted CO2 capture in industry is regarded as a possible tool that is suitable for reducing the global steelmaking plants, gas or coal power plants, chemical plants or natural gas production plants. Facing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

257

Hydrates as an Energy Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As an energy resource, gas hydrates are considered together with other unconventional hydrocarbon ... of these unconventional resources. Besides the tar sands and extra heavy oils, other examples are shale gas an...

Carlo Giavarini; Keith Hester

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Greenhouse Gases (GHG) Emissions from Gas Field Water in Southern Gas Field, Sichuan Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to assess correctly the gases emissions from oil/gas field water and its contributions to the source of greenhouse gases (GHG) at the atmospheric temperature and pressure, ... first developed to study th...

Guojun Chen; Wei Yang; Xuan Fang; Jiaai Zhong…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NETL: Methane Hydrates - ANS Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Well - Location Maps Well - Location Maps Maps of Prospect The Mt. Elbert prospect is located within the Milne Point Unit on Alaska’s North Slope. The Milne Point field, one of a number of distinct oil fields on the North Slope, extends offshore into the Beaufort Sea and is situated north of the large Kuparuk Field and northwest of the well known Prudhoe Bay Field. Map showing project location Map showing Milne Point Unit on Alaska’s North Slope The work done under the “Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Reservoir Characterization” project has resulted in a characterization of two large prospective methane hydrate accumulations (or trends); the Eileen Trend, which underlies but extends well beyond the Milne Point field, and the Tarn Trend to the west of the Kuparuk Field.

260

Prediction of gas-hydrate formation conditions in production and surface facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as methane, ethane, propane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to binary, ternary, and natural gas mixtures. I used the Statistical Analysis Software (SAS) to find the best correlations among variables such as specific gravity and pseudoreduced pressure...

Ameripour, Sharareh

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Quantum Chemistry Study of Natural Gas Hydrates Mert Atilhan,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aparicio3 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Qatar University, PO Box 2713, Doha, Qatar 2 Department to flow obstruction problems and flow assurance issues in oil and gas transmission pipe networks, which

Pala, Nezih

262

Studies of Reaction Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Dissocation in Porous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sand cores partially satu- rated with water, hydrate and CH 4 gas,the formation of hydrates. For the sand/water/gas/CH 4 -

Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Antisymmetric field in string gas cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how the introduction of a 2-form field flux modify the dynamics of a T-duality invariant string gas cosmology model of Greene, Kabat and Marnerides. It induces a repulsive potential term in the effective action for the scale factor of the spacial dimensions. Without the 2-form field flux, the universe fails to expand when the pressure due to string modes vanishes. With the presence of a homogeneous 2-form field flux, it propels 3 spacial dimensions to grow into a macroscopic 4 dimensional space-time. We find that it triggers an expansion of a universe away from the oscillating phase around the self-dual radius. We also investigate the effects of a constant 2-form field. We can obtain an expanding 4 dimensional space-time by tuning it at the critical value.

Igmar C. Rosas-López; Yoshihisa Kitazawa

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future August 31, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas. Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas. Jenny Hakun What Are Methane Hydrates? Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. The substance looks remarkably like white ice, but it does not behave like ice. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas.

265

Laboratory measurements on core-scale sediment/hydrate samples topredice reservoir behavior  

SciTech Connect

Measurements on hydrate-bearing laboratory and field samplesare necessary in order to provide realistic bounds on parameters used innumerically modeling the production of natural gas from hydrate-bearingreservoirs. The needed parameters include thermal conductivity,permeability, relative permeability-saturation(s) relationships, andcapillary pressure-saturation(s) relationships. We have developed atechnique to make hydrate-bearing samples ranging in scale from coreplug-size to core-size in the laboratory to facilitate making thesemeasurements. In addition to pressure and temperature measurements, weuse x-ray computed tomography scanning to provide high-resolution dataproviding insights on processes occurring in our samples. Several methodsare available to make gas hydrates in the laboratory, and we expect thatthe method used to make the hydrate will impact the behavior of thehydrate sample, and the parameters measured.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Moridis, George J.; Tomutsa,Liviu; Freifeld, Barry M.

2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

voxel contained sand, gas, hydrate (under proper conditions)of Gas Hydrate Formation in a Bed of Silica Sand Particles.Gas Hydrate Formation in a Variable Volume Bed of Silica Sand

Rees, E.V.L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

X-ray computed-tomography observations of water flow through anisotropic methane hydrate-bearing sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conductivity of gas hydrate-bearing sand. J. Geophys. Res.the water and gas flow through hydrate-bearing sands.The gas from hydrate dissociation in the fine sand appears

Seol, Yongkoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Physical property changes in hydrate-bearingsediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization  

SciTech Connect

Physical property measurements of sediment cores containing natural gas hydrate are typically performed on material exposed at least briefly to non-in situ conditions during recovery. To examine effects of a brief excursion from the gas-hydrate stability field, as can occur when pressure cores are transferred to pressurized storage vessels, we measured physical properties on laboratory-formed sand packs containing methane hydrate and methane pore gas. After depressurizing samples to atmospheric pressure, we repressurized them into the methane-hydrate stability field and remeasured their physical properties. Thermal conductivity, shear strength, acoustic compressional and shear wave amplitudes and speeds are compared between the original and depressurized/repressurized samples. X-ray computed tomography (CT) images track how the gas-hydrate distribution changes in the hydrate-cemented sands due to the depressurization/repressurization process. Because depressurization-induced property changes can be substantial and are not easily predicted, particularly in water-saturated, hydrate-bearing sediment, maintaining pressure and temperature conditions throughout the core recovery and measurement process is critical for using laboratory measurements to estimate in situ properties.

Kneafsey, Timothy; Waite, W.F.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gases are stored, separated, and/or concentrated. An electric field is applied across a porous dielectric adsorbent material. A gas component from a gas mixture may be selectively separated inside the energized dielectric. Gas is stored in the energized dielectric for as long as the dielectric is energized. The energized dielectric selectively separates, or concentrates, a gas component of the gas mixture. When the potential is removed, gas from inside the dielectric is released.

Currier, Robert P; Obrey, Stephen J; Devlin, David J; Sansinena, Jose Maria

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

OPTIMAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPTIMAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD INFRASTRUCTURE UNDER COMPLEX FISCAL Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract The optimal development planning of offshore oil and gas fields has received development planning. Keywords Multiperiod Optimization, Planning, Offshore Oil and Gas, MINLP, MILP, FPSO

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

271

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Hydrate-Bearing Clayey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and Engineering/Geological Implications Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and Engineering/Geological Implications Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 DE-FE0009897 Goal The primary goal of this research effort is to contribute to an in-depth understanding of hydrate bearing, fine-grained sediments with a focus on investigation of their potential for hydrate-based gas production. Performer Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta GA Background Fine-grained sediments host more than 90 percent of global gas hydrate accumulation. Yet hydrate formation in clay-dominated sediments is less understood and characterized than other types of hydrate occurrence. There is an inadequate understanding of hydrate formation mechanisms, segregation structures, hydrate-lense topology, system connectivity, and physical

272

Methane Hydrate Research and Modeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Research is focused on understanding the physical and chemical nature of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. These studies advance the understanding of the in situ nature of GHBS and their potential...

273

Architecture of gas-hydrate-bearing sands from Walker Ridge 313, Green Canyon 955, and Alaminos Canyon 21: Northern deepwater Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Logging-while-drilling data acquired during the 2009 Gulf of Mexico (GoM) Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II program combined with features observed in seismic data allow assessment of the depositional environment, geometry, and internal architecture of gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs from three sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM): Walker Ridge 313, Alaminos Canyon 21, and Green Canyon 955. The site descriptions assist in the understanding of the geological development of gas-hydrate-bearing sands and in the assessment of their energy production potential. Three sand-rich units are described from the Walker Ridge site, including multiple ponded sand-bodies representing turbidite channel and associated levee and terminal lobe environments within the Terrebonne basin on the lower slope of the GoM. Older units display fewer but greater-reservoir-quality channel and proximal levee facies as compared to thinner, more continuous, and unconfined sheet-like sands that characterize the younger units, suggesting a decrease in depositional gradient with time in the basin. The three wells in the Green Canyon 955 site penetrated proximal levee sands within a previously recognized Late Pleistocene basin floor turbidite-channel-levee complex. Reservoirs encountered in GC955 exhibit thin-bedded internal structure and complex fault compartmentalization. Two wells drilled in the Alaminos Canyon 21 site tested a large, shallow, sand unit within the Diana mini-basin that exhibits steep lateral margins, non-sinuous elongate form, and flat base with hummocky upper surface. These features suggest deposition as a mass-transport deposit consisting of remobilized sand-rich turbidites or as a large basin-floor fan that was potentially eroded and buried by later-stage, mud-prone, mass-transport deposits.

Ray Boswell; Matthew Frye; Dianna Shelander; William Shedd; Daniel R. McConnell; Ann Cook

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - Storage Fields Other than...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - Storage Fields Other than Salt Caverns",8,"Monthly","102014","115...

275

,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012...

276

Geochemical characteristics and formation process of natural gas in Kela 2 gas field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of a large amount of natural gas components and the carbon isotope as well ... as some other analysis data in Kela 2 gas field, the geochemical characteristics, source, origin, and formation process ...

Mengjun Zhao; Shuangfang Lu; Tingdong Wang; Jian Li

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 DE-FC26-06NT42960 Goal The goal of this project is to improve the understanding of regional and local differences in gas hydrate systems from three perspectives: as an energy resource, as a geohazard, and as a long-term influence on global climate. Performers Rice University, Houston, TX University of Texas, Austin, TX Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK Background Heterogeneity in the distribution of gas hydrate accumulations impacts all aspects of research into gas hydrate natural systems. The challenge is to delineate, understand, and appreciate these differences at the regional and local scales, where differences in in situ concentrations are relevant to the importance of gas hydrate as a resource, a geohazard, and a factor in

278

Hydrate Test Well, Milne Pt. Alaska Thomas D. Lorenson* U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS/ 999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Hydrocarbon Gas Sources from the Mt. Elbert No. 1 Gas Assessment of Hydrocarbon Gas Sources from the Mt. Elbert No. 1 Gas Hydrate Test Well, Milne Pt. Alaska Thomas D. Lorenson* U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS/ 999 Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA tlorenson@usgs.gov Timothy S. Collett U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center Box 25046, MS-939 Denver CO, 80225, USA Robert B. Hunter ASRC Energy Services, 3900 C St., Suite 702 Anchorage, Alaska, 99503 USA ABSTRACT Hydrocarbon gases were collected from well cuttings and core at the MtElbert-01 gas hydrate stratigraphic test well, drilled within the Milne Point field on the Alaska North Slope. Regionally, the Eileen gas hydrate deposits overlie the more deeply buried Prudhoe Bay, Milne Point, and Kuparuk River oil fields and are

279

Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

280

Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

282

Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

283

Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

284

California Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) California Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

285

Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

286

Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

287

Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

288

Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

289

Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

290

Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

291

Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

292

Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

293

Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

294

Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

295

Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

296

Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

297

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

298

2.0 Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate) Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate) 2.1 Problem Description One half of a 20-m, one-dimensional horizontal domain, discretized using uniformly spaced 1-m grid cells (optionally 0.1-m grid cells) is initialized with aqueous-hydrate conditions; whereas, the other half of the domain is initialized with gas-aqueous conditions. As with the Base Case problem, a closed horizontal domain is used to eliminate gravitational body forces and boundary condition effects. The initial conditions are specified to yield complete dissociation of the hydrate, via the thermal capacitance of the domain-half initialized with gas-aqueous conditions. To initialize the aqueous-hydrate half of the domain, temperature, pressure, and hydrate saturation are

299

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List Oil and Gas Field Code Master List With Data for 2012 | Release Date: May 8, 2013 | Next Release Date: April 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Comprehensive listing of U.S. oil and gas field names. Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2012 Definition of a Field Afield is defined as "an area consisting of a single reservoir ormultiple reservoirs all grouped on, or related to, the same individual geological structural feature and/or stratigraphic condition. There may be two or more reservoirs in a field which are separated vertically by intervening impervious strata, or laterally by local geologic barriers, or by both." More › About the Field Code Master List Related Links

300

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Field Work Proposal.: ESD12-011 2012 Annual Research Progress Report (April - December 2012) Numerical Studies for the Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits Project Period (April 2012 - March 2013) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory George Moridis (Principal Investigator) GJMoridis@lbl.gov Tel: (510) 486-4746 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Submission date: 2/4/2013 Office of Fossil Energy ii 2012Annual Progress Report Numerical Studies for the Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits WORK PERFORMED UNDER ESD12-010 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory George Moridis (Principal Investigator)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the revolutionary and new Arctic Drilling Platform in search of gas hydrate and free gas accumulations at depths of approximately 1200 to 2500 ft MD. A secondary objective was the gas-charged sands of the uppermost Campanian interval at approximately 3000 ft. Summary results of geophysical analysis of the well are presented in this report.

Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cruise Cruise Special Report - Bottom-Simulating Reflections(BSR). Seismic lines from deep continental shelves all around the world contain anomalous reflections known as bottom-simulating reflections(BSR). The reflections mimic the sea-floor topography at a near constant depth below the surface, and commonly cut across geological layers. The nature of the reflection indicates a horizon across which seismic velocity dramatically decreases. At one time, scientists thought the reflection must be due to some mineralogical alteration in the sediment due to heat and pressure. Once the existence of natural methane hydrate was established, BSRs were thought to record the decrease in velocity when passing from hydrate-bearing sediments to those containing only water. Therefore, BSRs were thought to be a direct indicator of hydrate: no BSR meant no hydrate. However, the velocity contrast between hydrate and no-hydrate was determined to be insufficient to cause BSRs. Today, scientists have established that BSRs are an indication of concentrations of free methane gas that is blocked from further upward migration by the presence of methane hydrate in the overlying layers. Consequently, the distribution of BSRs may mark only a subset of the areas containing hydrate.

303

Gas plants, new fields spark production rise  

SciTech Connect

Gas plant construction is welcomed by operators in the Williston Basin, North Dakota. Petroleum and gas production has increased. The Montana portion of the Williston Basin shows new discoveries. Some secondary recovery efforts are in operation. Industrial officials share the same enthusiasm and optimism for rising production as they do for exploration potential in the basin. 5 tables.

Lenzini, D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods  

SciTech Connect

Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanical Testing of Gas Hydrate/Sediment Samples Mechanical Testing of Gas Hydrate/Sediment Samples DE-AT26-99FT40267 Goal Develop understanding of the mechanical characteristics of hydrate-containing sediments. Background The ACE CRREL has a unique group of experienced personnel that have studied the mechanical characteristics of ice and permafrost that can be applied to the study and characterization of the mechanical properties of gas hydrates. The effort aims to quantify the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and hydrate cemented sediments for use in models of the dynamic behavior of sediments related to drilling and seafloor installations in the Gulf of Mexico. Performers US Army Corp of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) - project management and research products

306

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat flow and gas hydrates on the continental margin of India Last Reviewed 12/15/2011 Heat flow and gas hydrates on the continental margin of India Last Reviewed 12/15/2011 DE-NT0005669 Goal The goals of this project are to construct maps of apparent and residual heat flow through the western continental margin of India and to investigate the relationship of residual heat flow anomalies to fluid flow and gas hydrate distribution in the subsurface. Performer Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Science, Corvallis, OR 97331 Map of the four regions sampled during NGHP Expedition 01 Map of the four regions sampled during NGHP Expedition 01 Background Gas hydrate distribution in sediments depends on methane supply, which in turn depends on fluid flow. When drilling data are available to calibrate seismic observations of the base of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ),

307

,"Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

308

METHANE HYDRATE STUDIES: DELINEATING PROPERTIES OF HOST SEDIMENTS TO ESTABLISH REPRODUCIBLE DECOMPOSITION KINETICS.  

SciTech Connect

The use of methane hydrate as an energy source requires development of a reliable method for its extraction from its highly dispersed locations in oceanic margin sediments and permafrost. The high pressure (up to 70 MPa) and low temperature (272 K to 278 K) conditions under which hydrates are stable in the marine environment can be mimicked in a laboratory setting and several kinetic studies of pure methane hydrate decomposition have been reported. However, the effect of host sediments on methane hydrate occurrence and decomposition are required to develop reliable hydrate models. In this paper, we describe methods to measure sediment properties as they relate to pore-space methane gas hydrate. Traditional geotechnical techniques are compared to the micrometer level by use of the synchrotron Computed Microtomography (CMT) technique. CMT was used to measure the porosity at the micrometer level and to show pore-space pathways through field samples. Porosities for three sediment samples: one from a site on Georges Bank and two from the known Blake Ridge methane hydrate site, from different depths below the mud line were measured by traditional drying and by the new CMT techniques and found to be in good agreement. The integration of the two analytical approaches is necessary to enable better understanding of methane hydrate interactions with the surrounding sediment particles.

MAHAJAN,D.SERVIO,P.JONES,K.W.FENG,H.WINTERS,W.J.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Authors: Robert Hunter (ASRC Energy), Scott Digert (BPXA), Tim Collett (USGS), Ray Boswell (USDOE) Venue: AAPG National Meeting Gas Hydrate session, Oral Presentation, San Antonio, TX, April 22, 2008 (http://www.AAPG.org [external site]) Abstract: This BP-DOE collaborative research project is helping determine whether or not gas hydrate can become a technically and economically recoverable gas resource. Reservoir characterization, development modeling, and associated studies indicate that 0-0.34 trillion cubic meters (TCM) gas may be technically recoverable from the estimated 0.92 TCM gas-in-place within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). Reservoir modeling indicates sufficient potential for technical recovery to justify proceeding into field operations to acquire basic reservoir and fluid data from the Mount Elbert gas hydrate prospect in the Milne Point Unit (MPU). Successful drilling and data acquisition in the Mount Elbert-01 stratigraphic test well was completed during February 3-19, 2007. Data was acquired from 131 meters of core (30.5 meters gas hydrate-bearing), extensive wireline logging, and wireline production testing operations using Modular Dynamics Testing (MDT). The stratigraphic test validated the 3D seismic interpretation of the MPU gas hydrate-bearing Mount Elbert prospect. Onsite core sub- sampling preserved samples for later analyses of interstitial water geochemistry, physical properties, thermal properties, organic geochemistry, petrophysics, and mechanical properties. MDT testing was accomplished within two gas hydrate-bearing intervals, and acquired during four long shut-in period tests. Four gas samples and one pre-gas hydrate dissociation formation water sample were collected. MDT analyses are helping to improve understanding of gas hydrate dissociation, gas production, formation cooling, and long-term production potential as well as help calibrate reservoir simulation models.

310

DPF -"Hydrated EGR" Fuel Saver System | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Saver System DPF -"Hydrated EGR" Fuel Saver System GreenPower muffler uses hydrated exhaust gas recirculation to reduce NOx and improve fuel efficiency deer08rim.pdf More...

311

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July-September 2007 July-September 2007 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Submitted by: Rice University University of Houston George J. Hirasaki Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory December, 2007 Office of Fossil Energy Table of Contents DOE Methane Hydrate Program Peer Review.................................................. 3 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ........................... 3 Task 6: Numerical Models for Quantification of Hydrate and Free Gas Accumulations....................................................................................................

312

Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 74,056 76,732 74,938 79,040 82,376 81,196 1981-2013 PADD 1 1,525 1,439 2,394 2,918 2,821 2,687 1981-2013 East Coast 1993-2008 Appalachian No. 1 1,525 1,439 2,394 2,918 2,821 2,687 1993-2013 PADD 2 12,892 13,208 13,331 13,524 15,204 15,230 1981-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 1,975 1,690 2,171 1,877 2,630 2,746 1993-2013

313

Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

– Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Last Reviewed 07/7/2011 – Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Last Reviewed 07/7/2011 Project Objective Observe hydrate formation and dissociation phenomena in various porous media and characterize hydrate-bearing sediments by estimating physical properties (kinetic parameters for hydrate formation and dissociation, thermal conductivity, permeability, relative permeability, and mechanical strength) to enhance fundamental understanding on hydrate formation and accumulation and to support numerical simulations and potential gas hydrate production Project Performers Yongkoo Seol – NETL Office of Research & Development Jeong Choi – Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Jongho Cha-Virginia Polytech Institute Project Location National Energy Technology Laboratory - Morgantown, West Virginia

315

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Advanced Hydrate Reservoir  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics Techniques Last Reviewed 11/29/2013 Advanced Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics Techniques Last Reviewed 11/29/2013 DE-FE0010160 Goal The primary goal of this research is to develop analytical techniques capable of quantitatively evaluating the nature of methane hydrate reservoir systems through modeling of their acoustic response using techniques that integrate rock physics theory, amplitude analysis, and spectral decomposition. Performers Fugro GeoConsulting, Inc., Houston TX Background Past efforts under the DOE-supported Gulf of Mexico Joint Industry project included the selection of well locations utilizing prospectivity analysis based primarily on a petroleum systems approach for gas hydrate using 3-D exploration seismic data and derivative analyses that produced predicted

316

Identification and selection of a stable gel polymer to control or reduce water production in gas condensate fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The existence of water in hydrocarbon reservoirs damages the wells. In many cases, it leads to shut off the wells and decreases the gas production efficiency. For example, one of the problems of fractured gas wells is unwanted water invasion to gas production areas through the existing fracture in the reservoirs. This would increase the water production and decrease the gas production efficiency. As well, increasing of water/gas production ratio will increase the total operational costs due to water separation from the gas flow, corrosion of inside and outside well facilities and hydrate formation. Hence, prevention of water production in gas wells can boost the gas production economy. Generally, some mechanical and chemical methods exist to control unwanted water. One of the most effective methods to control and prevent of water production in hydrocarbon reservoirs is gel polymer method. The gel polymer is a chemical method with high efficiency and low cost. This work is concerned with producing a stable and suitable gel polymer (HPAM–Cr (III) gel system) to control and remove water in the gas condensate fields. The important parameters in the gel construction such as the polymer and cross-linker concentrations, pH of solution and also the effect of different additives have been examined and optimized at four temperatures of 30, 60, 80 and 100 °C. The effect of gel polymer on the absolute and relative permeabilities of two different cores for water and gas condensate fluids has been investigated. The results show that prepared gel polymer results in decreasing the water relative permeability, while increases the gas condensate relative permeability.

Shahram Karimi; Feridun Esmaeilzadeh; Dariush Mowla

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

HydrateNewsIssue2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 T H E N A T I O N A L E N E R G Y T E C H N O L O G Y L A B O R A T O R Y M E T H A N E H Y D R A T E N E W S L E T T E R Announcements ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project Naturally Occurring Gas Hydrate Data Collection Workshop March 14-15, 2002, Adam's Mark Hotel, Houston, Texas The ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project (JIP), in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), will be holding a workshop to collect data on naturally occurring hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). All key contributors to the understanding of naturally occurring hydrates are invited to apply to participate in the first of three workshops sponsored by the JIP. The purpose of the workshop is to develop a clear understanding of what

320

Geology of new Springdale gas field in northeastern Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The Springdale gas field in Leavenworth County, Kansas, is east of the old McLouth and north of the old Ackerland/Jarbolo fields, both now used for gas storage. Gas production from McLouth sand bodies and the Burgess sand in the Cherokee Group (Pennsylvanian) ranges from 1350 to 1400 ft and extends to the nearby Great Kansas City area. Gas pressures range from 350 to 500 psi and open-flow tests produced up to 675 MCFGD. Structurally, the better wells are high on the flanks of a paleovalley opening toward the north. This structure is reflected on the erosional surface of the Mississippian rocks below and is preserved in the now-deformed base of the Kansas City Group of rocks. The Springdale field is only one of several new Pennsylvanian gas fields in Leavenworth, Wyandotte, and Johnson Counties, Kansas, that are currently commercial. These fields serve as a good example of opening a new frontier in an old area.

Goebel, E.D.; Dow, V.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Accounting for Polarization Cost When Using Fixed Charge Force Fields. II. Method and Application for Computing Effect of Polarization Cost on Free Energy of Hydration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The final result that will be demonstrated is that under appropriate circumstances ?GsolvQM ? ?GsolvCM + Wpol, and so the polarization cost of a single molecular conformation may be added as an adjustment to the free energy computed using a fixed charge force field to produce values that may be compared directly with experimental solvation free energies. ... This approximation allowed the use of polarization costs (actually, energies) to correct hydration free energy results. ... The quality of the vapor pressure results highlights the success of TIP4P-Ew in describing the energetic and entropic aspects of intermol. ...

William C. Swope; Hans W. Horn; Julia E. Rice

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

322

Lithium bromide absorption chiller passes gas conditioning field test  

SciTech Connect

A lithium bromide absorption chiller has been successfully used to provide refrigeration for field conditioning of natural gas. The intent of the study was to identify a process that could provide a moderate level of refrigeration necessary to meet the quality restrictions required by natural-gas transmission companies, minimize the initial investment risk, and reduce operating expenses. The technology in the test proved comparatively less expensive to operate than a propane refrigeration plant. Volatile product prices and changes in natural-gas transmission requirements have created the need for an alternative to conventional methods of natural-gas processing. The paper describes the problems with the accumulation of condensed liquids in pipelines, gas conditioning, the lithium bromide absorption cycle, economics, performance, and operating and maintenance costs.

Lane, M.J.; Huey, M.A. [Nicol and Associates, Richardson, TX (United States)

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Observed oil and gas field size distributions: A consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained ... should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence ... the observable size distributions change w...

Lawrence J. Drew; Emil D. Attanasi; John H. Schuenemeyer

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

International Cooperation in Methane Hydrates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil & Gas » Methane Hydrate » Oil & Gas » Methane Hydrate » International Cooperation in Methane Hydrates International Cooperation in Methane Hydrates In 1982 the multi-national Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) recovered the first subsea substantial methane hydrate deposits, which spurred methane hydrate research in the US and other countries. The successor programs, the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) sampled hydrate deposits off Oregon (ODP 204, 2002) and in the Cascadia Margin off Vancouver Island, Canada (ODP 146, 1992 and IODP 311, 2005). In the Atlantic Ocean off the US, ODP Leg 146 sampled hydrate deposits on the Blake Ridge and Carolina Rise in 1995. International cooperation helps scientists in the US and other countries

325

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project (JIP) Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico - Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project (JIP) Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico - Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FC26-01NT41330 Goal: The goal of this project is to develop technology and collect data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The intent of the project is to better understand the impact of hydrates on safety and seafloor stability as well as provide data for use by scientists in their study of climate change and assessment of the feasibility of marine hydrate as a potential future energy resource. Photo of the Helix Q4000 The Semi-Submersible Helix Q4000 used on the 21 day JIP Leg II Drilling and Logging Expedition

326

Development of a reservoir simulator for thermal recovery of heavy oils/tar sands in the presence of gas hydrates: Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the summary of work performed under the US Department of Energy, Grant numberDE-FG21-86LC11075, during the past year. The report contains detailed equations, numerical solution approach for the three models, namely: fundamental hydrate dissociation model, model for layered hydrate-oil configuration, and model for distributed hydrate-oil configuration. The results of the fundamental hydrate dissociation model are provided and discussed. The other two models have been formulated and computer coded. The results of these two models will be provided in the final report.

Kamath, V.A.; Godbole, S.P.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Numerical studies on two-way coupled fluid flow and geomechanics in hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrate deposits that are desirable gas production targets almost invariably involve coarse, unlithified, unconsolidated media (such as sands

Kim, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Experimentally observed field–gas interaction in intense optical lattices  

SciTech Connect

When a gas perturbed by a laser interference pattern, an optical lattice, exhibits a periodic modulation of its refractive index, strong Bragg diffraction of the perturbing light can occur. This scattering reduces the field's ability to further manipulate the gas. Experimental observations of Bragg scattering, evidence of a two-way coupling, are compared to the evolution of the light fields calculated by solutions to the wave equation. Comparison indicates momentum deposition as a prime contributor to the shape of the scattering function vs. lattice velocity, a rationale further supported through additional direct simulation Monte Carlo simulation.

Graul, Jacob S.; Cornella, Barry M.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Lilly, Taylor C. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States); Shneider, Mikhail N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

If you need help finding information on a particular project, please contact the content manager. If you need help finding information on a particular project, please contact the content manager. Search Hydrates Projects Active Projects | Completed Projects Click on project number for a more detailed description of the project. Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-FC26-01NT41332 Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Reservoir Characterization BP Exploration Alaska, Inc. DE-FC26-01NT41330 Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration Chevron Energy Technology Company DE-FE0009897 Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and Engineering/Geological Implications Georgia Tech Research Corporation DE-FE0009904 Structural and Stratigraphic Controls on Methane Hydrate Occurrence and Distribution: Gulf of Mexico, Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 Oklahoma State University

330

Methane Hydrates R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

abundance suggest that they contain perhaps more organic carbon that all the world's oil, gas, and coal combined. The primary mission of the Methane Hydrates R&D Program is to...

331

SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version (from ArcGIS 9.0 to ArcGIS 9.2) of the polygon smoothing algorithm described below. A bug that occurred when multiple wells had the same location was also fixed. SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINE POLYGONS MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS Why smooth buffered field outlines? See the issues in the figure below: [pic] The smoothing application provided as VBA code below does the following: Adds area to the concave portions; doesn't add area to convex portions to maintain buffer spacing Fills in non-field "islands" smaller than buffer size Joins separate polygon rings with a "bridge" if sufficiently close Minimizes increase in total field area Methodology: creates trapezoids between neighboring wells within an oil/gas

332

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

NETL: Methane Hydrates - ANS Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo Gallery Photo Gallery Photo of hydrate saturated, fine grained sand core from the Mt. Elbert #1 well Hydrate saturated, fine grained sand core from the Mt. Elbert #1 well .- click on image to enlarge Photo of close up of fine grained sand core sample. This sample was taken for porewater geochemical analyses and was hydrate saturated at the time of recovery. Close up of fine grained sand core sample. This sample was taken for porewater geochemical analyses and was hydrate saturated at the time of recovery.- click on image to enlarge Photo of close up of fine grained sand core sample being placed in water. Links to video of hydrate dissociating One visual test used to confirm that a core contains hydrate is to place a small sample from the core in a canister of water. The gas dissociated from the hydrate-bearing sediment is released into the water and bubbles to the surface. In the video sequence shown here, dissociated hydrate gas from a sample of Mt. Elbert #1 core can be seen and heard as it is released into the water. - click on image to view video [MPEG]

334

Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

Haszeldine, Stuart

335

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection and Microbiological Analysis of Gas Hydrate Cores Collection and Microbiological Analysis of Gas Hydrate Cores FWP-4340-60 and FWP-42C1-01 Goal Determine the presence and activity of methanogens in methane hydrate-bearing sediments. Background The project was set up to determine a fundamental modeling parameter - the amount of methane generated in deep sediments by methanogenic microorganisms. This would allow methane distribution models of gas hydrate reservoirs to accurately reflect an unknown volume and the distribution of biogenic methane within in a reservoir. The personnel at INEL have experience in similar biologic research and are considered to be experts by their global peers. Performer Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) - sample collection and analysis Location

336

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing Arctic Hydrates (Canadian Test Well and Alaskan "Wells of Opportunity") Characterizing Arctic Hydrates (Canadian Test Well and Alaskan "Wells of Opportunity") photo of drilling rig at Mallik 2L-38 location Rig at Mallik 2L-38 location courtesy Geological Survey of Canada DE-AT26-97FT34342 Goal The purpose of this project is to assess the recoverability and potential production characteristics of the onshore natural gas hydrate and associated free-gas accumulations in the Arctic of North America Performer United States Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 80225 - partner in GSC-managed consortium and provide expertise in data gathering and analysis Background The U.S. Geological Survey has been participating in natural gas hydrate reservoir research with DOE NETL through an interagency agreement which began in the early 1980Â’s. The work has been an ongoing effort as part of

337

3 , LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) -165oC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, , . . . , . , LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) -165oC , . (Piped Natural Gas, PNG) , , . PNG, LNG ( 2-3 ), . (Natural Gas Hydrate, NGH) / . -20oC / . Natural Gas Hydrate (NGH) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Modes of Transport and Storage

Hong, Deog Ki

338

Methane Hydrates and Climate Change | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrates and Climate Change Hydrates and Climate Change Methane Hydrates and Climate Change Methane hydrates store huge volumes of methane formed by the bacterial decay of organic matter or leaked from underlying oil and natural gas deposits. The active formation of methane hydrates in the shallow crust prevents methane, a greenhouse gas, from entering the atmosphere. On the other hand, warming of arctic sediments or ocean waters has the potential to cause methane hydrate to dissociate, releasing methane into the deepwater sediments, the ocean or atmosphere. DOE is conducting research to understand the mechanisms and volumes involved in these little-studied processes. DOE environmental and climate change research projects related to Arctic methane hydrate deposits include: Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading

339

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Studies in Support of Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits Last Reviewed 5/10/2012 Laboratory Studies in Support of Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits Last Reviewed 5/10/2012 ESD05-048 Goal The project is bringing new laboratory measurements and evaluation techniques to bear on the difficult problems of characterization and gas recovery from methane hydrate deposits. Performer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Background LBNL is performing laboratory tests to provide data to support the characterization and development of methane hydrate deposits. Major areas of research underway include hydrologic measurements, combined geomechanical/geophysical measurements, and synthetic hydrate formation studies. Hydrologic Measurements Relatively little research has been done to experimentally determine

340

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Properties of Hydrate – Tool Development Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 Thermal Properties of Hydrate – Tool Development Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 Project Goal The goal of this project is increased understanding of gas hydrate thermal properties through measurements on natural hydrate-bearing sediment cores and hydrate-bearing cores formed within laboratory pressure vessels. Project Performers Eilis Rosenbaum, NETL, Office of Research and Development Ronald Lynn, NETL, RDS/Parsons Dr. David Shaw, Geneva College Project Location National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA Background NETL utilizes a modified transient plane source (TPS) shown in Figure 1 using a technique originally developed by Gustafsson [1, 2] in a single-sided configuration (Figure 2). The TPS technique is capable of simultaneously determining both thermal conductivity and thermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate DE-FC26-05NT42663 Goal The goal of this project was to establish rock physics models for use in generating synthetic seismic signatures of methane hydrate reservoirs. Ultimately, the intent was to improve seismic detection and quantification of offshore and onshore methane hydrate accumulations. Performer Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Background Gas hydrate reservoir characterization is, in principle, no different from traditional hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. The seismic response of the subsurface is determined by the spatial distribution of the elastic properties (properties of the subsurface that deform as seismic waves pass through it) and attenuation. By mapping changes in the elastic properties, scientists can identify geologic features, including hydrocarbon reservoirs.

342

Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Upper Wilcox sandstones, Katy gas field, Waller County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" Wilcox oil and gas fields Page Structure map on the top of the Wilcox Group, Katy gas field, Wailer County, Texas. Contour interval is 100 feet. Nap shows location of wells in the field which penetrate the'IJpper Wilcox" section. Cores are from... Sedimentary structures of the Upper Wilcox sandstones in Humble W-35, Katy gas field, Mailer County, Texas 18 Shale character, deformational features, and sedimentary structures of the Upper Wilcox sand- stones in Humble W-35, Katy gas field, Mailer...

DePaul, Gilbert John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

343

Geology of Bravo Dome carbon dioxide gas field, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Bravo Dome carbon dioxide gas field is located in Union and Harding Counties of northeast New Mexico. The Bravo Dome field covers approximately 800,000 acres, but areal boundaries of the field have not been fully defined. Production in 1989 was 113 bcf of gas from 272 wells. Cumulative production at the end of 1989 was 626 bcf. Estimated recoverable reserves are more than 10 tcf. The gas is 98-99% CO{sub 2}. Most CO{sub 2} produced from Bravo Dome is used for enhanced oil recovery in the Permian basin. The Bravo Dome is a faulted, southeast-plunging, basement-cored anticlinal nose. It is bordered on the east and south by large high-angle faults of Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian (Early Permian) age. The principal reservoir in the Bravo Dome field is the Tubb sandstone (Leonardian-Permian) at depths of 1,900 to 2,950 ft. The Tubb consists of 0-400 ft of fine- to medium-grained, well-sorted, orange feldspathic sandstone. It rests unconformably on Precambrian basement on the highest parts of the Bravo Dome and is not offset by late Paleozoic faults that form the dome. The Cimmaron Anhydrite (Leonardian-Permian) conformably overlies the Tubb and is a vertical seal. The trap at Bravo Dome has structural and stratigraphic aspects. Drape of Tubb sandstone over the dome created structural closure on the northeast, southeast, and southwest flanks of the field. Trapping on the northwest flank of the field is associated with regional northwest thinning of the Tubb.

Broadhead, R.F. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Gas insulated transmission line with insulators having field controlling recesses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line having a novel insulator for supporting an inner conductor concentrically within an outer sheath. The insulator has a recess contiguous with the periphery of one of the outer and inner conductors. The recess is disposed to a depth equal to an optimum gap for the dielectric insulating fluid used for the high voltage insulation or alternately disposed to a large depth so as to reduce the field at the critical conductor/insulator interface.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Pederson, Bjorn O. (Chelmsford, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

MethaneHydrateRD_FC.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

gas is an important energy gas is an important energy resource for the United States, providing nearly one-quarter of total energy use. The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has played a major role in developing technologies to help tap new, unconventional sources of natural gas. FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH BENEFITS Methane Hydrate R&D "The (DOE) Program has supported and managed a high-quality research portf olio that has enabled signifi cant progress toward the (DOE) Program's long-term goals." The Nati onal Academies 2010 One of these is methane hydrate - molecules of natural gas trapped in ice crystals. Containing vast amounts of natural gas, methane hydrate occurs in a variety of forms in sediments within and below thick permafrost in Arctic regions, and in the

346

Thermodynamics of Modified Chaplygin Gas and Tachyonic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we generalize the results of the work of ref. [10] in modified Chaplygin gas model and tachyonic field model. Here we have studied the thermodynamical behaviour and the equation of state in terms of volume and temperature for both models. We have used the solution and the corresponding equation of state of our previous work [12] for tachyonic field model. We have also studied the thermodynamical stability using thermal equation of state for the tachyonic field model and have shown that there is no critical points during thermodynamical expansion. The determination of $T_{*}$ due to expansion for the tachyonic field have been discussed by assuming some initial conditions. Here, the thermal quantities have been investigated using some reduced parameters.

Samarpita Bhattacharya; Ujjal Debnath

2010-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effects of Antiagglomerants on the Interactions between Hydrate Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production Introduction The undesirable formation of gas hydrates in natural gas pipelines, and their prevention is a problem that has received considerable interest. In subsea pipelines, the presence of water of hydrates. These crystalline compounds can agglomerate and form plugs in the pipelines. The costs associated

Firoozabadi, Abbas

348

nat_gas_current_proj | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Enhanced Oil Recovery Deepwater Tech Methane Hydrate Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas | Environmental | Other Natural Gas Related...

349

Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's North  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's North Slope Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's North Slope October 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy, the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation, and ConocoPhillips will work together to test innovative technologies for producing methane gas from hydrate deposits on the Alaska North Slope. The collaborative testing will take place under the auspices of a Statement of Intent for Cooperation in Methane Hydrates signed in 2008 and extended in 2011 by DOE and Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry. The production tests are the next step in both U.S. and Japanese national efforts to evaluate the response of gas hydrate reservoirs to alternative

350

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Natural Gas July 30, 2009 DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. May 18, 2009 DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and nearby states, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, can now provide petroleum companies and related service providers with the geologic, geographic, and engineering data needed to tap into these resources.

351

Opacity reduction using hydrated lime injection  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this investigation is to study the effects of injecting dry hydrated lime into flue gas to reduce sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) concentrations and consequently stack opacity at the University of Missouri, Columbia power plant. Burning of high sulfur coal (approx. 4% by weight) at the power plant resulted in opacity violations. The opacity problem was due to sulfuric acid mist (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) forming at the stack from high SO{sub 3} concentrations. As a result of light scattering by the mist, a visible plume leaves the stack. Therefore, reducing high concentrations of SO{sub 3} reduces the sulfuric acid mist and consequently the opacity problem. The current hydrated lime injection system has reduced the opacity to acceptable limits. To reduce SO{sub 3} concentrations, dry hydrated lime is injected into the flue gas upstream of a particulate collection device (baghouse) and downstream of the induced draft fan. The lime is periodically injected into the flue via a pneumatic piping system. The hydrated lime is transported down the flue and deposited on the filter bags in the baghouse. As the hydrated lime is deposited on the bags a filter cake is established. The reaction between the SO{sub 3} and the hydrated lime takes place on the filter bags. The hydrated lime injection system has resulted in at least 95% reduction in the SO{sub 3} concentration. Low capital equipment requirements and operating cost coupled with easy installation and maintenance makes the system very attractive to industries with similar problems. This paper documents the hydrated lime injection system and tests the effectiveness of the system on SO{sub 3} removal and subsequent opacity reduction. Measurements Of SO{sub 3} concentrations, flue gas velocities, and temperatures have been performed at the duct work and baghouse. A complete analysis of the hydrated lime injection system is provided.

Wolf, D.E.; Seaba, J.P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Effect of Brine on Hydrate Antiagglomeration J. Dalton York and Abbas Firoozabadi*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production lines often favor formation of crystalline inclusion compounds known as gas hydrates. Water, 2008. ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed March 19, 2009 Natural gas production poses a risk of flow-line hydrate blockage from coproduced water and hydrate- forming species. Our previous studies have focused

Firoozabadi, Abbas

353

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists planning hydrate exploration and development projects. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this and other project reports. This Topical Report contains details describing logging operations.

Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the project reports. Documenting the results of this effort are key to extracting lessons learned and maximizing the industry's benefits for future hydrate exploitation. In addition to the Final Report, several companion Topical Reports are being published.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireline Logging Wireline Logging From: Timothy Collett, USGS Conventional Wireline Logging Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program Conventional wireline (CWL) logging operations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program (GOM-JIP) was scheduled to include the deployment of a signal logging string (Figure 1) and a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) tool (Figure 2) in several of the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon drill sites. The only wireline logging tool scheduled to be deployed was the FMS-sonic tool string, which consisted of the Formation MicroScanner (FMS), a general purpose inclinometer tool (GPIT), and scintillation gamma ray tool (SGT), and the dipole shear sonic imager tool (DSI). The vertical seismic imager tool (VSI) will also be deployed during the GOM-JIP drilling program. The wireline logging tools were provided by Schlumberger wireline services.

356

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Speaker(s): Matthew T. Reagan Date: March 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane may have had a significant role in regulating past climate. However, the behavior of contemporary permafrost deposits and oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. A recent expedition to the west coast of Spitsbergen discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor at depths that correspond to the upper limit of the receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the

357

Measurement and modeling of hydrate dissociation: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas could be recovered from hydrate deposits by either of two basic methods (1) thermal stimulation in which an external source of energy is provided and (2) lowering of the equilibrium pressure (depressurization) in which the energy of the hydrate-containing and the surrounding media is utilized. In this work, we have measured and modeled mathematically the dissociation of hydrates in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media. Hydrates were formed in laboratory samples of Ottawa sand and Berea sandstone using miscible and non-miscible hydrate formers. A state-of-the-art, computer-controlled transient hot wire needle probe apparatus was developed for the measurements of thermal conductivity of pure hydrates and hydrate-containing porous media. We have measured the thermal conductivity of hydrate-containing Ottawa sand and Berea sandstone samples in order to determine the physical properties necessary for the mathematical models. We have also measured the electric resistivity of methane hydrate-containing Berea sandstone in order to verify the formation of the hydrate and to track the dissociation front during hydrate depressurization. Two mathematical models were developed for the process of hydrate dissociation in porous media using the two recovery schemes thermal stimulation and depressurization. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Sloan, E.D.; Selim, M.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Sea-floor Observatory Project Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Sea-floor Observatory Project Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE26-06NT42877, DE-FC26-02NT41628, and DE-FC26-00NT40920 Goal The goal of this project is to conduct activities leading to the development, implementation, and operation of a remote, multi-sensor seafloor observatory focused on behavior of the marine hydrocarbon system within the gas hydrate stability zone of the deepwater Gulf of Mexico and analysis of data resultant from that observatory over time. Attaining this goal will lead to an enhanced understanding of the role the hydrocarbon system plays in the environment surrounding the site. Investigations include physical, chemical, and microbiological studies. Models developed from these studies are designed to provide a better understanding of gas

359

Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member and/or six member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone.

Sloan, Jr., Earle D. (Golden, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Soil gases have been used as an exploration tool for minerals, oil and gas, and geothermal energy, through the detection of anomalous gas levels. This paper describes a soil gas survey conducted over a large part of the Rotorua geothermal field to supplement the sparse gas data from drillhole samples and to determine gas distribution patterns over the field. Data collected from a reference hole were used to observe the effect changing meteorological conditions had on soil gas levels. The results were

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Reference Shelf The Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf was created to provide a repository for information collected from projects funded as part of the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program. As output from the projects is received, it will be reviewed and then placed onto the reference shelf to be available to other methane hydrate researchers. Projects: DOE/NETL Projects : These pages contain detailed information on methane hydrate projects funded through the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Publications: Newsletter | Bibliography | Software | Reports | Program Publications | Photo Gallery Newsletter: Fire in the Ice: A publication highlighting the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program Bibliography: "Project Reports Bibliography"[PDF]: The bibliography lists publications resulting from DOE/NETL-sponsored

362

Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissocation in a Partially Saturated Sand--Measurements and Observations  

SciTech Connect

We performed a sequence of tests on a partially water-saturated sand sample contained in an x-ray transparent aluminum pressure vessel that is conducive to x-ray computed tomography (CT) observation. These tests were performed to gather data for estimation of thermal properties of the sand/water/gas system and the sand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as well as data to evaluate the kinetic nature of hydrate dissociation. The tests included mild thermal perturbations for the estimation of the thermal properties of the sand/water/gas system, hydrate formation, thermal perturbations with hydrate in the stability zone, hydrate dissociation through thermal stimulation, additional hydrate formation, and hydrate dissociation through depressurization with thermal stimulation. Density changes throughout the sample were observed as a result of hydrate formation and dissociation, and these processes induced capillary pressure changes that altered local water saturation.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Freifeld, Barry; Taylor, Charles E.; Gupta, Arvind

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Method for production of hydrocarbons from hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering natural gas entrapped in frozen subsurface gas hydrate formations in arctic regions. A hot supersaturated solution of CaCl.sub.2 or CaBr.sub.2, or a mixture thereof, is pumped under pressure down a wellbore and into a subsurface hydrate formation so as to hydrostatically fracture the formation. The CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 solution dissolves the solid hydrates and thereby releases the gas entrapped therein. Additionally, the solution contains a polymeric viscosifier, which operates to maintain in suspension finely divided crystalline CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 that precipitates from the supersaturated solution as it is cooled during injection into the formation.

McGuire, Patrick L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotropic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments Last Reviewed 1/8/2013 Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotropic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments Last Reviewed 1/8/2013 DE-NT0005667 Goal The goal of this project is to assess the efficacy of aerobic methanotrophy in preventing the escape of methane from marine, hydrate-bearing reservoirs to the atmosphere and ultimately to better define the role of aerobic methanotrophy in the global carbon cycle. Graph overlayed on photo - Methane seeps with the resulting methane plume Methane seeps with the resulting methane plume, Geophysical Research Letters, November 2007 Performers University of California – Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara (UCSB), CA 93106 Background The global methane reservoir in the form of gas hydrate is estimated at 500–10,000 Gt (KVENVOLDEN, 1995; MILKOV, 2004). This pool of carbon

365

A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field, Houston, TX 77098 Abstract The planning of offshore oil or gas field infrastructure under uncertainty is addressed in this paper. The main uncertainties considered are in the initial maximum oil or gas flowrate

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

366

Understanding Sectoral Labor Market Dynamics: An Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding Sectoral Labor Market Dynamics: An Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field examines the response of employment and wages in the US oil and gas ...eld services industry to changes the dynamic response of wages and employment in the U.S. Oil and Gas Field Services (OGFS) industry to changes

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

367

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Properties of Hydrate-Bearing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Properties of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Subjected to Changing Gas Compositions Last Reviewed 12/11/2013 Properties of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Subjected to Changing Gas Compositions Last Reviewed 12/11/2013 ESD12-011 Goal The objective of this research is to measure physical, chemical, mechanical, and hydrologic property changes in methane hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to injection of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. Performer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA 94720 Background A number of studies have investigated the impact of injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) and CO2-nitrogen (N2) mixtures into methane hydrate for the purpose of sequestering CO2 and releasing methane (CH4), and review articles have been published summarizing the literature. Most of these studies have investigated the fundamental physical/chemical nature of the exchange of CO2 and/or N2 with CH4 in the clathrate. These studies have

368

Huntsman and West Engelland Fields a Case History of Gas Migration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the years 1982–85, a lengthy litigation took place between KN Energy and Marathon Oil Corp. The case involved performance of two ... gas into the gas cap of a producing oil field. After some 3 years of ext...

M. R. Tek

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Verification Of Capillary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verification Of Capillary Pressure Functions And Relative Permeability Equations For Modeling Gas Production From Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/12/2013 Verification Of Capillary Pressure Functions And Relative Permeability Equations For Modeling Gas Production From Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/12/2013 DE-FE0009927 Goal The goal of this project is to verify and validate the capillary pressure functions and relative permeability equations that are frequently used in hydrate numerical simulators. In order to achieve this goal, numerical simulation using a network model will be used to suggest fitting parameters, modify existing equations or, if necessary, develop new equations for better simulation results. Performers Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202-3622 Background Numerical simulation is used to estimate and predict long-term behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments during gas production [Kurihara et al., 2008;

370

Methane hydrate formation in turbidite sediments of northern Cascadia IODP Expedition 311  

SciTech Connect

Expedition 311 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) to northern Cascadia recovered gas-hydrate bearing sediments along a SW–NE transect from the first ridge of the accretionary margin to the eastward limit of gas-hydrate stability. In this study we contrast the gas gas-hydrate distribution from two sites drilled ~8 km apart in different tectonic settings. At Site U1325, drilled on a depositional basin with nearly horizontal sedimentary sequences, the gas-hydrate distribution shows a trend of increasing saturation toward the base of gas-hydrate stability, consistent with several model simulations in the literature. Site U1326 was drilled on an uplifted ridge characterized by faulting, which has likely experienced some mass wasting events. Here the gas hydrate does not show a clear depth-distribution trend, the highest gas-hydrate saturation occurs well within the gas-hydrate stability zone at the shallow depth of ~49 mbsf. Sediments at both sites are characterized by abundant coarse-grained (sand) layers up to 23 cm in thickness, and are interspaced within fine-grained (clay and silty clay) detrital sediments. The gas-hydrate distribution is punctuated by localized depth intervals of high gas-hydrate saturation, which preferentially occur in the coarse-grained horizons and occupy up to 60% of the pore space at Site U1325 and N80% at Site U1326. Detailed analyses of contiguous samples of different lithologies show that when enough methane is present, about 90% of the variance in gas-hydrate saturation can be explained by the sand (N63 ?m) content of the sediments. The variability in gas-hydrate occupancy of sandy horizons at Site U1326 reflects an insufficient methane supply to the sediment section between 190 and 245 mbsf.

Torres, M. E.; Trehu, Ann M.; cespedes, N.; Kastner, Miriam; Wortmann, Ulrich; Kim, J.; Long, Philip E.; Malinverno, Alberto; Pohlman, J. W.; Collett, T. S.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - A New Approach to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Approach to Understanding the Occurrence and Volume of Natural Gas Hydrate in the Northern Gulf of Mexico Using Petroleum Industry Well Logs Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 A New Approach to Understanding the Occurrence and Volume of Natural Gas Hydrate in the Northern Gulf of Mexico Using Petroleum Industry Well Logs Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0009949 Goal The overarching objective of the project is to significantly increase our understanding of the occurrence, volume, and fine scale distribution of natural gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico using petroleum industry and Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) well logs. Performer The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 Background A large quantity of natural gas hydrate certainly occurs within the sediments of the northern Gulf of Mexico; however, the total amount and distribution of gas hydrate across the basin is relatively unconstrained

372

Micromechanics of Hydrate Dissociation in Marine Sediments by Grain-Scale Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE 114223 Micromechanics of Hydrate Dissociation in Marine Sediments by Grain-Scale Simulations dissociation on the strength of hydrate-bearing sediments. Dissociation of gas-hydrates in marine sediments pressure increase, this process reduces the stiffness of the sediments, which may fracture or be flu

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

373

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The geomechanical response of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments (HBS) is a serious concern that needs to be addressed before the installation of facilities for hydrate deposits can proceed, and if gas production from hydrate deposits is to become reality. HBS are often unconsolidated, and are characterized by low shear strength. Heat from external sources, that cross the formation or depressurization-based production, can induce dissociation of hydrates (a strong cementing agent), and degradation of the structural stability of the HBS. Changes in pressure and temperature, phase changes, and the evolution of an expanding (and structurally weak) gas zone can significantly alter the distribution of loads in the sediments. The corresponding changes in the local stress and strain fields can result in substantial changes in the hydrologic, thermal and geomechanical properties of the system, displacement, and potentially failure.

374

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Measurement and Interpretation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Interpretation of Seismic Velocities and Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Measurement and Interpretation of Seismic Velocities and Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0009963 Goal The primary project objectives are to relate seismic and acoustic velocities and attenuations to hydrate saturation and texture. The information collected will be a unique dataset in that seismic attenuation will be acquired within the seismic frequency band. The raw data, when combined with other measurements (e.g., complex resistivity, micro-focus x-ray computed tomography, etc.), will enable researchers to understand not only the interaction between mineral surfaces and gas hydrates, but also how the hydrate formation method affects the hydrate-sediment system in terms of elastic properties. An over-arching goal of this research is to calibrate geophysical

375

An Efficient Multiperiod MINLP Model for Optimal Planning of Offshore Oil and Gas Field Infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An Efficient Multiperiod MINLP Model for Optimal Planning of Offshore Oil and Gas Field Infrastructure ... Offshore oil and gas field development represents a very complex problem and involves multibillion dollar investments and profits (Babusiaux et al.(1)). ... This paper focuses on a nonconvex MINLP model for the strategic/tactical planning of the offshore oil and gas fields, which includes sufficient details to make it useful for realistic oilfield development projects, as well as for extensions to include fiscal and uncertainty considerations. ...

Vijay Gupta; Ignacio E. Grossmann

2012-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

,"New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

377

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 DE-FC26-01NT41331 photo of new Anadarko drilling rig in place at Hot Ice No.1 on Alaska's North Slope Hot Ice No. 1 Drilling Platform courtesy Anadarko Petroleum Corp. Goal The goal of the project was to develop technologies for drilling and recovering hydrates in arctic areas. The specific objectives were to drill, core, and test a well through the hydrate stability zone in northern Alaska Performers Maurer Technology, Inc.* - Project coordination with DOE Anadarko Petroleum Corporation - Overall project management for the design, construction, and operation of the Arctic Drilling Platform and mobile core lab, and field coring operations Noble Engineering and Development* - Real time data collection and

378

DOE Announces $2 Million Funding for Methane Hydrates Projects | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces $2 Million Funding for Methane Hydrates Projects DOE Announces $2 Million Funding for Methane Hydrates Projects DOE Announces $2 Million Funding for Methane Hydrates Projects November 7, 2005 - 12:43pm Addthis Seeks to Unlock World's Biggest Potential Source of "Ice That Burns" WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced a total of $2 million in funding to five research projects that will assess the energy potential, safety, and environmental aspects of methane hydrate exploration and development. Termed the "ice that burns," methane hydrates are crystalline solids that release a flammable gas when melted. They are considered the Earth's biggest potential source of hydrocarbon energy and could be a key element in meeting natural gas demand in the United States,

379

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation of the system behavior of hydrate-bearing geologic media involves solving fully coupled mass and heat balance equations. The models need to simulate equilibrium or kinetic processes of hydrate formation and dissociation. TOUGH+HYDRATE is a widely used code for gas hydrate simulations. The code can model non-isothermal gas release, phase changes and flow of fluids and heat. It accounts for up to four mass components and four possible phases. Because hydrate simulations require intensive computational effort, many studies that involve serial processors are limited by problems of complexity and scale. With the growing availability of multi-core CPUs, Linux clusters, and super-computers, the use of parallel processing methods is a distinct advantage. This study develops a domain decomposition approach for large-scale gas hydrate simulations using parallel computation. The approach partitions the simulation domain into small sub-domains. The full simulation domain is simulated integrally by using multiple processes. Each process will be in charge of one portion of the simulation domain for updating thermophysical properties, assembling mass and energy balance equations, solving linear equation systems, and performing other local computations. The linear equation systems are solved in parallel by multiple processes with a parallel linear solver. The multiple processes are run in parallel on shared- or distributed memory multiple-CPU computers. A hybrid approach, running multiple processes in each CPU and using multiple CPUs, may achieve additional speedup. During calculations, communication between processes is needed to update sub-domain boundary parameters. An efficient inter-process communication scheme has been developed. The new approach was implemented into the TOUGH+HYDRATE code and demonstrates excellent speedup and very good scalability. For many large-scale problems, this method can obtain linear or super-linear speedup. This paper will show applications of the new approach to simulate three dimensional field-scale models for gas production from gas-hydrate

380

Strength behavior of methane hydrate bearing sand in undrained triaxial testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas hydrates represent a potential future energy source as well as a considerable geohazard. In order to assess both the benefits and risks that gas hydrate bearing sediments pose, fundamental information about their physical properties is required. In this study, the undrained shear strength of methane hydrate bearing sand was investigated. The experimental program required modifications to an existing triaxial apparatus and accurate determination of the hydrate saturation lead to the use of two methods for comparison of the saturation calculations. Strength results indicated that the presence of gas hydrate will increase the sediment's undrained shear strength and corresponding stiffness. The relative contribution of cohesion and friction angle was observed to be a function of the hydrate saturation, for this particular hydrate formation methodology.

Hossein Ghiassian; Jocelyn L.H. Grozic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in a PartiallySaturated Core-Scale Sand Sample  

SciTech Connect

We performed a sequence of tests on a partiallywater-saturated sand sample contained in an x-ray transparent aluminumpressure vessel that is conducive to x-ray computed tomography (CT)observation. These tests were performed to gather data for estimation ofthermal properties of the sand/water/gas system and thesand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as well as data to evaluate the kineticnature of hydrate dissociation. The tests included mild thermalperturbations for the estimation of the thermal properties of thesand/water/gas system, hydrate formation, thermal perturbations withhydrate in the stability zone, hydrate dissociation through thermalstimulation, additional hydrate formation, and hydrate dissociationthrough depressurization with thermal stimulation. Density changesthroughout the sample were observed as a result of hydrate formation anddissociation, and these processes induced capillary pressure changes thataltered local water saturation.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.; Seol,Yongkoo; Freifeld, Barry M.; Taylor, Charles E.; Gupta, Arvind

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

382

Obsidian Hydration Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OBSIDIAN HYDRATION RATE FOR KLAMATH BASIN OF CALIFORNIA AND OREGON...as the material is excreted, falls through the air, and dries...Friedman. Table 1 presents two new groups of hydra-tion readings for...the true age is believed to fall (3). The Snaketown age is...

Clement W. Meighan

1970-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

383

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

384

Integrated Reservoir Characterization and Simulation Studies in Stripper Oil and Gas Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for oil and gas is increasing yearly, whereas proven oil and gas reserves are being depleted. The potential of stripper oil and gas fields to supplement the national energy supply is large. In 2006, stripper wells accounted for 15% and 8...

Wang, Jianwei

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Storage Fields" Salt Cavern Storage Fields" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields",8,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm10vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/data_publications/natural_gas_monthly/ngm.html" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

386

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

SciTech Connect

To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Domain Decomposition Approach for Large-Scale Simulations of Flow Processes in Hydrate-Bearing Geologic Media  

SciTech Connect

Simulation of the system behavior of hydrate-bearing geologic media involves solving fully coupled mass- and heat-balance equations. In this study, we develop a domain decomposition approach for large-scale gas hydrate simulations with coarse-granularity parallel computation. This approach partitions a simulation domain into small subdomains. The full model domain, consisting of discrete subdomains, is still simulated simultaneously by using multiple processes/processors. Each processor is dedicated to following tasks of the partitioned subdomain: updating thermophysical properties, assembling mass- and energy-balance equations, solving linear equation systems, and performing various other local computations. The linearized equation systems are solved in parallel with a parallel linear solver, using an efficient interprocess communication scheme. This new domain decomposition approach has been implemented into the TOUGH+HYDRATE code and has demonstrated excellent speedup and good scalability. In this paper, we will demonstrate applications for the new approach in simulating field-scale models for gas production from gas-hydrate deposits.

Zhang, Keni; Moridis, G.J.; Wu, Y.-S.; Pruess, K.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Effect of under-inhibition with methanol and ethylene glycol on the hydrate control process  

SciTech Connect

Hydrate control can be achieved by chemical injection. Currently, methanol and ethylene glycol are the most widely used inhibitors in offshore hydrate control operations. To achieve effective hydrate inhibition, a sufficient amount of inhibitor must be injected to shift the thermodynamic equilibrium condition for hydrate formation outside the pipeline operating pressure and temperature. Recently published field experiments showed that hydrate blockages form more readily in under-inhibited systems than in systems completely without inhibitor. A laboratory study is conducted to determine the effect of low concentration (1--5wt%) methanol and ethylene glycol on the hydrate formation process. The results show that, although these chemicals are effective hydrate inhibitors when added in sufficient quantities, they actually enhance the rate of hydrate formation when added at low concentrations to the water. Furthermore, the presence of these chemicals seems to affect the size of the forming hydrate particles.

Yousif, M.H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Supply and Emerging Resources Future Supply and Emerging Resources The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program - Graduate Fellowship Program Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship Program Jeffrey James Marlow, a graduate student in Geobiology at the California Institute of Technology, was recently selected as the 2012 recipient of the NETL-National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Methane Hydrate Research Fellowship. Please see page 15 of the March 2013 issue (Vol. 13, Issue 1) of Fire in the Ice for more information on the recipient. The Department of Energy has a long history of building synergistic relationships with research universities. Funding academic research is a "win-win-win" situation. The U.S. government is able to tap into some of the best minds available for solving national energy problems, the universities get the support they need to maintain cutting edge faculty and laboratories, and the students involved are provided with opportunities that help them along their chosen path of study, strengthening the national pool of scientists and engineers. According to Samuel Bodman, speaking about graduate research in methane hydrates, "Students are the foundation of our energy future, bringing new ideas and fresh perspectives to the energy industry. What better way to assure technology innovation than to encourage students working on the development of a resource that has the potential to tip our energy balance toward clean-burning, domestic fuels."

390

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - New Zealand Task Gas Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - New Zealand Task DE-AI26-06NT42878 Goal The objective of this research is to determine the extent and dynamics of gas hydrate deposits and their relation to areas of focused fluid flux at and beneath the seafloor. Specific objectives include: a). Refine geophysical, geochemical and microbiological technologies for prospecting hydrate distribution and content; b). Contribute to establishing high-priority geographical regions of prospective interest, in terms of methane volume estimates; c). Prediction of environmental effects and geologic risks at the continental margin associated to the natural resource occurrence and resource exploitation; and d). Expand understanding of the biogeochemical parameters and associated microbial community diversity in shallow sediments that influence the porewater sulfate gradient observed through anaerobic oxidation of methane. To accomplish these objectives, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) collaborated with New ZealandÂ’s Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences (GNS) in a research cruise off the coast of New Zealand. NRL has conducted similar research cruises off the west coast and east coast of the United States, in the Gulf of Mexico and off the coast of Chile.

391

Prediction and inhibition of hydrate and wax formation. Annual report, January-December 1991  

SciTech Connect

The first objective of the research project is to quantify and explain kinetics of co-precipitation of natural gas hydrates and wax. The second objective is to find means for inhibiting the rate of formation of natural gas hydrates, and the rate of natural gas/wax co-precipitation. During the first contract year, a method for measuring the rate of formation of natural gas hydrates was developed. This method has five advantages over other possible methods. First, it provides a defined surface area on which the hydrate nucleation and growth can proceed. Second, it minimizes the initial resistance to mass and heat transfer, thus maximizing sensitivity to kinetics. Third, it provides a way to test the effect of a variety of solid surfaces on hydrate formation. Fourth, it requires a low-cost apparatus with low operational cost. Fifth, it can be applied with little modification to the scheduled studies of kinetic inhibition and hydrate/wax-co-precipitation.

Sloan, E.D.; Christiansen, R.L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples  

SciTech Connect

Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Design Options for Avoiding Hydrates in Deep Offshore Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrate blockage in subsea systems is responsible for a portion of lost profits in several deepwater oil fields. ... Additionally, in this scenario, the logistic for hydrate remediation, if a rig is required, is even more complex due to the greater distance from shore. ...

Carlos A. B. R. Cardoso; Marcelo A. L. Gonçalves; Ricardo M. T. Camargo

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Methane Hydrate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2011 FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress July 2012 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | July 2012 FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress | Page ii Message from the Secretary Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of methane hydrate research. I am pleased to submit the enclosed report entitled U.S. Department of Energy FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress. The report was prepared by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy and summarizes the progress being made in this important area of research. Pursuant to statutory requirements, this report is being provided to the following

395

Methane Hydrate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fiscal Year 2012 Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress August 2013 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | August 2013 Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress | Page ii Message from the Secretary Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the actions taken to carry out methane hydrate research. I am pleased to submit the enclosed report, entitled U.S. Department of Energy Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress. The report was prepared by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy and summarizes the progress being made in this important area

396

Energy Department Advances Research on Methane Hydrates - the World's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research on Methane Hydrates - the Research on Methane Hydrates - the World's Largest Untapped Fossil Energy Resource Energy Department Advances Research on Methane Hydrates - the World's Largest Untapped Fossil Energy Resource August 31, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Energy Department today announced the selection of 14 new research projects across 11 states that will be a part of an expanding portfolio of projects designed to increase our understanding of methane hydrates' potential as a future energy supply. Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside, and are found both onshore and offshore - including under the Arctic permafrost and in ocean sediments along nearly every continental shelf in the world. Today's projects build on the completion of a successful, unprecedented test

397

Energy Department Advances Research on Methane Hydrates - the World's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Advances Research on Methane Hydrates - the Energy Department Advances Research on Methane Hydrates - the World's Largest Untapped Fossil Energy Resource Energy Department Advances Research on Methane Hydrates - the World's Largest Untapped Fossil Energy Resource August 31, 2012 - 1:20pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Energy Department today announced the selection of 14 new research projects across 11 states that will be a part of an expanding portfolio of projects designed to increase our understanding of methane hydrates' potential as a future energy supply. Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside, and are found both onshore and offshore - including under the Arctic permafrost and in ocean sediments along nearly every continental shelf in the world.

398

Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 96 108 95 1980's 99 77 208 329 327 163 398 242 163 146 1990's 437 259 110 108 79 53 66 84 42 37 2000's 42 52 18 13 9 48 12 56 85 178 2010's 1 18 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

399

Experimental study on the formation and dissociation conditions of methane hydrates in porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrates formed by methane gas and pure water in porous media. Methane gas hydrates were formed in a cell packed with 0.177-mm (0.007 in) diameter single sand (U.S. Sieve Series Designation Mesh No. 80) and 0.420-mm (0.017 in) diameter single sand (U...

Jung, Woodong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

400

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate  

SciTech Connect

We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

Amos Nur

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Characterization of Field-Exposed Iron Aluminide Hot Gas Filters  

SciTech Connect

The use of a power turbine fired with coal-derived synthesis gas will require some form of gas cleaning in order to protect turbine and downstream components from degradation by erosion, corrosion, or deposition. Hot-gas filtration is one form of cleaning that offers the ability to remove particles from the gases produced by gasification processes without having to substantially cool and, possibly, reheat them before their introduction into the turbine. This technology depends critically on materials durability and reliability, which have been the subject of study for a number of years (see, for example, Alvin 1997, Nieminen et al. 1996, Oakey et al. 1997, Quick and Weber 1995, Tortorelli, et al. 1999).

McKamey, C.G.; McCleary, D.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Sawyer, J.; Lara-Curzio, E.; Judkins, R.R.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

402

Estimated gas reserves and availability of the Viking-Kinsella Field, Alberta, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-KINSELVL FEEI' . ~. . . . . . . . . . ~ ~ ~ - ~ 3 '3 CIASSIF ICATION of RESERVES Proved Reserves Probable Reserves Possible Reserves 5 6 6 6 FUTURE AVAIIJBXLITY of PIPELINE GAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Estimation of' Projected Peri...'ormance of Free Gas . . . . . . . 7 Estimated Projected Performance of' the Viking-Kinaella Field . 9 CONCWS ION ACKNOWLZDGEbEN1'S REFERENCES 13 TABUIAT I 0 NS I - Estimated Natnral Gas Reserves--viking sand IX - Projected Perf'ormance--Viking Sand 15...

Meyer, Lawrence Joffre

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field Infrastructure under Decision-Dependent Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field Infrastructure under Decision-Dependent Uncertainty ... The planning of offshore oil or gas field infrastructure under uncertainty is addressed in this article. ... An Efficient Multiperiod MINLP Model for Optimal Planning of Offshore Oil and Gas Field Infrastructure ...

Bora Tarhan; Ignacio E. Grossmann; Vikas Goel

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

Electromagnetic fields and transport coefficients in a hot pion gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present recent results on finite temperature electromagnetic form factors and the electrical conductivity in a pion gas. The standard Chiral Perturbation Theory power counting needs to be modified for transport coefficients. We pay special attention to unitarity and to possible applications for dilepton and photon production.

A. Gomez Nicola; D. Fernandez-Fraile

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

405

Secondary natural gas recovery in mature fluvial sandstone reservoirs, Frio Formation, Agua Dulce Field, South Texas  

SciTech Connect

An approach that integrates detailed geologic, engineering, and petrophysical analyses combined with improved well-log analytical techniques can be used by independent oil and gas companies of successful infield exploration in mature Gulf Coast fields that larger companies may consider uneconomic. In a secondary gas recovery project conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and funded by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, a potential incremental natural gas resource of 7.7 bcf, of which 4.0 bcf may be technically recoverable, was identified in a 490-ac lease in Agua Dulce field. Five wells in this lease had previously produced 13.7 bcf from Frio reservoirs at depths of 4600-6200 ft. The pay zones occur in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones offset by faults associated with the Vicksburg fault zone. The compartments may each contain up to 1.0 bcf of gas resources with estimates based on previous completions and the recent infield drilling experience of Pintas Creek Oil Company. Uncontacted gas resources occur in thin (typically less than 10 ft) bypassed zones that can be identified through a computed log evaluation that integrates open-hole logs, wireline pressure tests, fluid samples, and cores. At Agua Dulce field, such analysis identified at 4-ft bypassed zone uphole from previously produced reservoirs. This reservoir contained original reservoir pressure and flowed at rates exceeding 1 mmcf/d. The expected ultimate recovery is 0.4 bcf. Methodologies developed in the evaluation of Agua Dulce field can be successfully applied to other mature gas fields in the south Texas Gulf Coast. For example, Stratton and McFaddin are two fields in which the secondary gas recovery project has demonstrated the existence of thin, potentially bypassed zones that can yield significant incremental gas resources, extending the economic life of these fields.

Ambrose, W.A.; Levey, R.A. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Vidal, J.M. (ResTech, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Sippel, M.A. (Research and Engineering Consultants, Inc., Englewood, CA (United States)); Ballard, J.R. (Envirocorp Services and Technology, Houston, TX (United States)); Coover, D.M. Jr. (Pintas Creek Oil Company, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)); Bloxsom, W.E. (Coastal Texas Oil and Gas, Houston, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A new generation of multilateral well enhances small gas field economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the economic benefits of the new technology in the domain of offshore and small gas fields. This work also shows that this new generation of multilaterals brings new option values to the domain of multilateral technology....

Atse, Jean-Philippe

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Water Intensity Assessment of Shale Gas Resources in the Wattenberg Field in Northeastern Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water Intensity Assessment of Shale Gas Resources in the Wattenberg Field in Northeastern Colorado ... Efficient use of water, particularly in the western U.S., is an increasingly important aspect of many activities including agriculture, urban, and industry. ...

Stephen Goodwin; Ken Carlson; Ken Knox; Caleb Douglas; Luke Rein

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

408

Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S. Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S. November 20, 2013 - 12:08pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Today, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced nearly $5 million in funding across seven research projects nationwide designed to increase our understanding of methane hydrates - a large, completely untapped natural gas resource-and what it could mean for the environment, as well as American economic competiveness and energy security. "The recent boom in natural gas production - in part due to long-term Energy Department investments beginning in the 70's and 80's - has had

409

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Dollars awarded will go to research the advance understanding of the nature and occurrence of Deepwater and Arctic gas hydrates, and their implications for future resources, geohazards, and the environment Characterizing the Affect of Environmental Change on Gas-Hydrate-Bearing Deposits The University of California at San Diego (San Diego, Calif.) - Researchers at the University of California at San Diego will design, build, and test an electromagnetic (EM) system designed for very shallow water use and will apply the system to determine the extent of offshore permafrost on the U.S. Beaufort inner shelf. Energy Department Investment: $507,000 Duration: 36 months The University of Mississippi (Oxford, Miss.) - Using electronic measurements, the researchers will

410

Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone. Additives can also contain multiple cyclic chemical groupings having different size rings. One such additive is sold under the name Gaffix VC-713.

Sloan, E.D. Jr.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

411

Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone. Additives can also contain multiple cyclic chemical groupings having different size rings. One such additive is sold under the name Gaffix VC-713.

Sloan, Jr., Earle D. (Golden, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Optimization of offshore oil and gas field development using mathematical programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPTIMIZATION OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD DEVELOPMENT USING MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING A Thesis by TODD THATCHER GRIMMETT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering OPTIMIZATION OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD DEVELOPMENT VSING MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING A Thesis by TODD THATCHER GRIMMETT Approved as to style and content by: R. A. Startzma...

Grimmett, Todd Thatcher

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

Estimation of Landfill Gas Generation Rate and Gas Permeability Field of Refuse Using Inverse Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill methane must be captured to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases; moreover it can be used as an alternative energy source. However, despite the widespread use of landfill gas (LFG) collection systems for...

Yoojin Jung; Paul Imhoff; Stefan Finsterle

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Methane hydrate formation and dissociation in a partially saturated core-scale sand sample  

SciTech Connect

We performed a series of experiments to provide data for validating numerical models of gas hydrate behavior in porous media. Methane hydrate was formed and dissociated under various conditions in a large X-ray transparent pressure vessel, while pressure and temperature were monitored. In addition, X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to determine local density changes during the experiment. The goals of the experiments were to observe changes occurring due to hydrate formation and dissociation, and to collect data to evaluate the importance of hydrate dissociation kinetics in porous media. In the series of experiments, we performed thermal perturbations on the sand/water/gas system, formed methane hydrate, performed thermal perturbations on the sand/hydrate/water/gas system resulting in hydrate formation and dissociation, formed hydrate in the resulting partially dissociated system, and dissociated the hydrate by depressurization coupled with thermal stimulation. Our CT work shows significant water migration in addition to possible shifting of mineral grains in response to hydrate formation and dissociation. The extensive data including pressure, temperatures at multiple locations, and density from CT data is described.

Kneafsey, T.J. (LBNL); Tomutsa, L. (LBNL); Moridis, G.J. (LBNL); Seol, Y. (LBNL); Freifeld, B.M. (LBNL); Taylor, C.E.; Gupta, A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core Handling Core Handling From: Cruise Prospectus [PDF-827KB] Visit the Photo Gallery for more pictures showing core handling Non-pressurized and Pressure Core Handling Non-pressurized Core Handling (Fugro Hydraulic Piston Corer and Fugro Corer) Photo of Core packed in ice bath Core packed in ice bath Cores that might contain gas hydrates should be recovered as quickly as possible. An ice bath may be used in some cases to slow the dissociation process. A core reception/preparation van will be on the deck of the Uncle John where individual cores (perhaps up to 9 m long) can be laid on ‘core hooks' and quickly drilled, labeled and sectioned. Infrared (IR) camera imaging will be done as soon as practical after core recovery. Both track-mounted and hand held IR cameras will be used to identify the

416

Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2013 0, 2013 Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S. WASHINGTON - Today, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced nearly $5 million in funding across seven research projects nationwide designed to increase our understanding of methane hydrates - a large, completely untapped natural gas resource-and what it could mean for the environment, as well as American economic competiveness and energy security. "The recent boom in natural gas production - in part due to long-term Energy Department investments beginning in the 70's and 80's - has had a transformative impact on our energy landscape, helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and support thousands of American jobs," said Secretary Moniz. "While our research into methane hydrates is still in its early stages, these investments will increase our understanding of this domestic resource and the potential to safely and sustainably unlock the natural gas held within."

417

NETL: Methane Hydrates - ANS Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Alaska North Slope Stratigraphic Test Well The Alaska North Slope Stratigraphic Test Well image showing Donyon Rig Photo courtesy Doyon Drilling Inc Project Background Participants Status Report Maps of Research Area Science Plan Photo Gallery Well log Data From BP-DOE-US "Mount Elbert" Test Is Now Available. Digital well log data acquired at the February 2007 gas hydrates test well at Milne Point, Alaska are now available. Data include Gamma ray, neutron porosity, density porosity, three-dimensional high resolution resistivity, acoustics including compressional- and shear-wave data and nuclear magnetic resonance. A listing of the available data, as well as instructions on obtaining the data, can be found on the NETL Gas Hydrates Website . The drilling of the “Mt. Elbert prospect” within the Milne Point Unit

418

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Quarterly Progress Report Reporting Period: April-June 2007 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Submitted by: Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August, 2007 Office of Fossil Energy Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Quarterly Progress Report Reporting Period: April-June 2007 Prepared by: George Hirasaki Rice University August 2007 CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-06NT42960 Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; Fax: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu

419

Use of computed X-ray tomographic data for analyzing the thermodynamics of a dissociating porous sand/hydrate mixture  

SciTech Connect

X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a method that has been used extensively in laboratory experiments for measuring rock properties and fluid transport behavior. More recently, CT scanning has been applied successfully to detect the presence and study the behavior of naturally occurring hydrates. In this study, we used a modified medical CT scanner to image and analyze the progression of a dissociation front in a synthetic methane hydrate/sand mixture. The sample was initially scanned under conditions at which the hydrate is stable (atmospheric pressure and liquid nitrogen temperature, 77 K). The end of the sample holder was then exposed to the ambient air, and the core was continuously scanned as dissociation occurred in response to the rising temperature. CT imaging captured the advancing dissociation front clearly and accurately. The evolved gas volume was monitored as a function of time. Measured by CT, the advancing hydrate dissociation front was modeled as a thermal conduction problem explicitly incorporating the enthalpy of dissociation, using the Stefan moving-boundary-value approach. The assumptions needed to perform the analysis consisted of temperatures at the model boundaries. The estimated value for thermal conductivity of 2.6 W/m K for the remaining water ice/sand mixture is higher than expected based on conduction alone; this high value may represent a lumped parameter that incorporates the processes of heat conduction, methane gas convection, and any kinetic effects that occur during dissociation. The technique presented here has broad implications for future laboratory and field testing that incorporates geophysical techniques to monitor gas hydrate dissociation.

Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Stern, Laura A.; Kirby, Stephen H.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

420

Use of Computed X-ray Tomographic Data for Analyzing the Thermodynamics of a Dissociating Porous Sand/Hydrate Mixture  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a method that has been used extensively in laboratory experiments for measuring rock properties and fluid transport behavior. More recently, CT scanning has been applied successfully to detect the presence and study the behavior of naturally occurring hydrates. In this study, we used a modified medical CT scanner to image and analyze the progression of a dissociation front in a synthetic methane hydrate/sand mixture. The sample was initially scanned under conditions at which the hydrate is stable (atmospheric pressure and liquid nitrogen temperature, 77 K). The end of the sample holder was then exposed to the ambient air, and the core was continuously scanned as dissociation occurred in response to the rising temperature. CT imaging captured the advancing dissociation front clearly and accurately. The evolved gas volume was monitored as a function of time. Measured by CT, the advancing hydrate dissociation front was modeled as a thermal conduction problem explicitly incorporating the enthalpy of dissociation, using the Stefan moving-boundary-value approach. The assumptions needed to perform the analysis consisted of temperatures at the model boundaries. The estimated value for thermal conductivity of 2.6 W/m K for the remaining water ice/sand mixture is higher than expected based on conduction alone; this high value may represent a lumped parameter that incorporates the processes of heat conduction, methane gas convection, and any kinetic effects that occur during dissociation. The technique presented here has broad implications for future laboratory and field testing that incorporates geophysical techniques to monitor gas hydrate dissociation.

Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Stern, Laura A.; Kirby, Stephen H.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Magnetism of a relativistic degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The magnetization and magnetic susceptibility of a degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field in which electrons are located on the ground Landau level and the electron gas has the properties of a nonlinear paramagnet have been calculated. The paradoxical properties of the electron gas under these conditions-a decrease in the magnetization with the field and an increase in the magnetization with the temperature-have been revealed. It has been shown that matter under the corresponding conditions of neutron stars is a paramagnet with a magnetic susceptibility of {chi} {approx} 0.001.

Skobelev, V. V., E-mail: v.skobelev@inbox.ru [Moscow State Industrial University (Russian Federation)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

NETL: News Release - Field Testing Underway of Remote Sensor Gas Leak  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 16, 2004 September 16, 2004 Field Testing Underway of Remote Sensor Gas Leak Detection Systems CASPER, WY-An extensive field test that will document and demonstrate how effective technologies are in remotely detecting natural gas leaks is being held September 13-17, as the Department of Energy simulates natural gas leaks along a predetermined course at DOE's Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). Low-flying aircraft, satellites and special ground vehicles carrying advanced leak detection sensors will participate as representatives of the gas industry and potential technology manufacturers observe the technologies in a real-world environment and evaluate their readiness for commercialization. The test plan was devised with strong input from an industry advisory board and test participants to compare the effectiveness of several gas-leak detection devices from ground, air and satellite based platforms.

423

Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: Results of Australian field trial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A field scale trial was undertaken at a landfill site in Sydney, Australia (2004–2008), to investigate passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas as a means of managing landfill gas emissions from low to moderate gas generation landfill sites. The objective of the trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a passive landfill gas drainage and biofiltration system at treating landfill gas under field conditions, and to identify and evaluate the factors that affect the behaviour and performance of the system. The trial results showed that passively aerated biofilters operating in a temperate climate can effectively oxidise methane in landfill gas, and demonstrated that maximum methane oxidation efficiencies greater than 90% and average oxidation efficiencies greater than 50% were achieved over the 4 years of operation. The trial results also showed that landfill gas loading was the primary factor that determined the behaviour and performance of the passively aerated biofilters. The landfill gas loading rate was found to control the diffusion of atmospheric oxygen into the biofilter media, limiting the microbial methane oxidation process. The temperature and moisture conditions within the biofilter were found to be affected by local climatic conditions and were also found to affect the behaviour and performance of the biofilter, but to a lesser degree than the landfill gas loading.

Stuart A. Dever; Gareth E. Swarbrick; Richard M. Stuetz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Temporal Characterization of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0010141 Goal The overall objective of the project is to investigate hydrate system dynamics beneath seafloor mounds—a structurally focused example of hydrate occurrence at the landward extreme of their stability field—in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Researchers will conduct observatory-based in situ measurements at Woolsey Mound, MC118 to: Characterize (geophysically) the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability and, Contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents, and seafloor

425

Evidence for large methane releases to the atmosphere from deep-sea gas-hydrate dissociation during the last glacial episode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inductively coupled plasma optical emission...waters induced by the thermal dissociation of gas...large increases in atmospheric concentration...episode. | Past atmospheric methane-concentration...Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't...2006036403 Past atmospheric methane-concentration...

Thibault de Garidel-Thoron; Luc Beaufort; Franck Bassinot; Pierre Henry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 933-950, December 2006 Methane Venting in Gas Hydrate Potential Area Offshore of SW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Area Offshore of SW Taiwan: Evidence of Gas Analysis of Water Column Samples Tsanyao Frank Yang 1 areas offshore of SW Taiwan for analysis of dissolved gases. Some these samples show unusually high-shore and offshore of southwestern Taiwan (e.g., Chow et al. 2000; Yang et al. 2004; Chiu et al. 2006). The gases

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

427

Studies of Reaction Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Dissocation in Porous Media  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is the description of the kinetic dissociation of CH4-hydrates in porous media, and the determination of the corresponding kinetic parameters. Knowledge of the kinetic dissociation behavior of hydrates can play a critical role in the evaluation of gas production potential of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media. We analyzed data from a sequence of tests of CH4-hydrate dissociation by means of thermal stimulation. These tests had been conducted on sand cores partially saturated with water, hydrate and CH4 gas, and contained in an x-ray-transparent aluminum pressure vessel. The pressure, volume of released gas, and temperature (at several locations within the cores) were measured. To avoid misinterpreting local changes as global processes, x-ray computed tomography scans provided accurate images of the location and movement of the reaction interface during the course of the experiments. Analysis of the data by means of inverse modeling (history matching ) provided estimates of the thermal properties and of the kinetic parameters of the hydration reaction in porous media. Comparison of the results from the hydrate-bearing porous media cores to those from pure CH4-hydrate samples provided a measure of the effect of the porous medium on the kinetic reaction. A tentative model of composite thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing media was also developed.

Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Application of Crunch-Flow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of CrunchFlow Routines to Constrain Present and Past Carbon Fluxes at Gas-Hydrate Bearing Sites Last Reviewed 12/11/2013 Application of CrunchFlow Routines to Constrain Present and Past Carbon Fluxes at Gas-Hydrate Bearing Sites Last Reviewed 12/11/2013 DE-FE0010496 Goal The goal of this project is to apply a multi-component, multi-dimensional reactive transport simulation code to constrain modern day methane fluxes and to reconstruct past episodes of methane flux that can be correlated with environmental changes. Performers Oregon State University – Corvallis, OR Background The importance of understanding the role that gas hydrates play in the global carbon cycle and in understanding their potential as a future energy resource have long been recognized and are key components of the Methane Hydrate R&D Program. Fundamental questions remain, however, as to the residence time of gas hydrates near the seafloor and deeper within the

429

Field-dependent collision frequency of the two-dimensional driven random Lorentz gas Christoph Dellago*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Utrecht, Postbus 80006, Utrecht 3508 TA, The Netherlands-driven, thermostated Lorentz gas the collision frequency increases with the magnitude of the applied field due to long exponents on the applied field strength. These nonanalytic terms can be traced back to logarithmic terms

Dellago, Christoph

430

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 30, 2009 July 30, 2009 DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. July 30, 2009 DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Two U.S. Department of Energy projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. May 18, 2009 DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and

431

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Environmental assessment of deep-water sponge fields in relation to oil and gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Environmental assessment of deep-water sponge fields in relation to oil and gas activity: a west of Shetland case study industry and government identified sponge grounds in areas of interest to the oil and gas sector

Henderson, Gideon

432

Bonding Strength by Methane Hydrate Formed among Sand Particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanical properties of methane hydrate?bearing sand were investigated by low temperature and high confining pressure triaxial testing apparatus in the present study. The specimens were prepared by infiltrating the methane gas into partially saturated sand specimen under the given temperature and stress condition which is compatible with the phase equilibrium condition for the stability of methane hydrate. The tests were firstly performed to investigate the effect of temperature on the shear behaviour of the specimen. Then the effect of backpressure was investigated. The strength of methane hydrate bearing sand increased as the temperature decreased and the back pressure increased. The bonding strength due to methane hydrate was dependent on methane hydrate saturation temperature and back pressure but independent of effective stress. Dissociation tests of methane hydrate were also performed by applying the temperature to the specimen at the various initial stress conditions. The marked development of shear and volumetric strains were observed due to dissociation of the methane hydrate in the specimen corresponding to the initial stress conditions.

M. Hyodo; Y. Nakata; N. Yoshimoto; R. Orense; J. Yoneda

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Isolation and Characterization of Methanothermobacter crinale sp. nov., a Novel Hydrogenotrophic Methanogen from the Shengli Oil Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...17393T) was isolated from oil sands in the Haoxian central facility...sediments that contain methane hydrates, and description of Methanoculleus...in a high temperature natural gas field in Japan. Extremophiles...G. E . 1983. Interpreting gas kinetics of batch cultures...

Lei Cheng; Lirong Dai; Xia Li; Hui Zhang; Yahai Lu

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

434

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Controls On Methane Expulsion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controls On Methane Expulsion During Melting Of Natural Gas Hydrate Systems Last Reviewed 12/24/2013 Controls On Methane Expulsion During Melting Of Natural Gas Hydrate Systems Last Reviewed 12/24/2013 DE-FE0010406 Goal The project goal is to predict, given characteristic climate-induced temperature change, the conditions under which gas will be expelled from existing accumulations of gas hydrate into the shallow ocean or directly to the atmosphere. When those conditions are met, the fraction of the gas accumulation that escapes and the rate of escape shall be quantified. The predictions shall be applicable in Arctic regions and in gas hydrate systems at the updip limit of the stability zone on continental margins. The behavior shall be explored in response to both longer term changes in sea level (e.g., twenty-thousand years) and shorter term due to atmospheric

435

Flexible gas insulated transmission line having regions of reduced electric field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line having radially flexible field control means for reducing the electric field along the periphery of the inner conductor at predetermined locations wherein the support insulators are located. The radially flexible field control means of the invention includes several structural variations of the inner conductor, wherein careful controlling of the length to depth of surface depressions produces regions of reduced electric field. Several embodiments of the invention dispose a flexible connector at the predetermined location along the inner conductor where the surface depressions that control the reduced electric field are located.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fischer, William H. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Meyer, Jeffry R. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Turtle Bayou - 1936 to 1983: case history of a major gas field in south Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

Turtle Bayou field, located in the middle Miocene trend in S. Louisiana, is nearing the end of a productive life which spans over 30 yr. Discovered by Shell Oil Co. in 1949 after unsuccessful attempts by 2 other majors, the field is a typical, low relief, moderately faulted Gulf Coast structure, probably associated with deep salt movement. The productive interval includes 22 separate gas-bearing sands in a regressive sequence of sands and shales from approx. 6500 to 12,000 ft. Now estimated to have contained ca 1.2 trillion scf of gas in place, cumulative production through 1982 was 702 billion scf. Cumulative condensate-gas ratio has been 20 bbl/million. Recovery mechanisms in individual reservoirs include strong bottom water drive, partial edgewater drive, and pressure depletion. Recovery efficiencies in major reservoirs range from 40 to 75% of original gas in place.

Cronquist, C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas Liquids 74,056 76,732 74,938 79,040 82,376 81,196 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 9,772 10,464 10,689 11,270 11,542 11,167 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 64,284 66,268 64,249 67,770 70,834 70,029 1981-2013 Ethane 27,647 28,274 26,311 27,829 30,063 30,015 1981-2013 Propane 23,332 24,191 24,157 25,425 25,974 25,545 1981-2013 Normal Butane 5,876 6,383 6,543 6,399 6,508 6,893 1981-2013 Isobutane 7,429 7,420 7,238 8,117 8,289 7,576 1981-2013 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

438

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Natural Gas Liquids 650,794 652,822 697,124 757,019 808,865 881,306 1981-2012 Pentanes Plus 95,899 96,530 98,904 101,155 106,284 116,002 1981-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 554,895 556,292 598,220 655,864 702,581 765,304 1981-2012 Ethane 258,682 256,713 280,590 317,180 337,972 356,592 1981-2012 Propane 185,099 187,340 199,398 213,782 230,227 260,704 1981-2012 Normal Butane 46,833 48,976 49,528 56,655 57,399 65,555 1981-2012 Isobutane 64,281 63,263 68,704 68,247 76,983 82,453 1981-2012 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

439

A field example of a gas orifice meter with debris-ridden liquid in mist flow  

SciTech Connect

A field example of debris-ridden liquids in an orifice meter is presented in this paper. Flow conditions in gas pipelines containing hydrocarbon liquids and particulate matter are discussed. Known effects on measurement of the presence of these materials in orifice meters is presented. By definition, gas measurement is accurate if performed on a clean and dry flow stream. This paper demonstrates the importance of removing as much liquid and debris as possible prior to measurement.

Chisholm, J.L.; Mooney, C.V. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States); Datta-Barua, L.; Feldmann, R.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Replacement of methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposed as a strategy for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and/or production of methane (CH{sub 4}) from natural hydrate deposits. This replacement strategy requires a better understanding of the thermodynamic characteristics of binary mixtures of CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} hydrate (CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates), as well as thermophysical property changes during gas exchange. This study explores the thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates. We prepared CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate samples from two different, well-defined gas mixtures. During thermal dissociation of a CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate sample, gas samples from the head space were periodically collected and analyzed using gas chromatography. The changes in CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} compositions in both the vapor phase and hydrate phase during dissociation were estimated based on the gas chromatography measurements. It was found that the CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase became richer during dissociation because the initial hydrate composition contained relatively more CO{sub 2} than the vapor phase. The composition change in the vapor phase during hydrate dissociation affected the dissociation pressure and temperature; the richer CO{sub 2} in the vapor phase led to a lower dissociation pressure. Furthermore, the increase in CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase enriched the hydrate in CO{sub 2}. The dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate was computed by fitting the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the pressure-temperature (PT) trace of a dissociation test. It was observed that the dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate lays between the limiting values of pure CH{sub 4} hydrate and CO{sub 2} hydrate, increasing with the CO{sub 2} fraction in the hydrate phase.

Kwon, T.H.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas hydrate field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fire in the Ice, August 2010 Methane Hydrate Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1: Simulation results of coupled thermo-dynamic and geomechanical changes around a hot Figure 1: Simulation results of coupled thermo-dynamic and geomechanical changes around a hot production well intersecting an HBS near a sloping seafloor after 30 years of production and heating (Rutqvist and Moridis, 2010). CONTENTS Geohazards of In Situ Gas Hydrates ...........................................1 Behavior of Methane Released in the Deep Ocean.....5 Core-Scale Heterogeneity ............6 Gas Volume Ratios ........................9 The Role of Methane Hydrates in the Earth System ....................12 Announcements .......................15 * Inter-Laboratory Comparison Project * Mississippi Canyon 118 * Research Fellowship * Call for Papers * Call for Abstracts * Upcoming Meetings Spotlight on Research .......... 20 Graham Westbrook CONTACT

442

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluid Flow through Heterogeneous Methane-Hydrate Bearing Sand Fluid Flow through Heterogeneous Methane-Hydrate Bearing Sand Fluid Flow through Heterogeneous Methane-Hydrate Bearing Sand: Observations Using X-Ray CT Scanning Authors: Yongkoo Seol and Timothy J. Kneafsey Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2008), Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA, July 6-10, 2008. http://www.icgh.org/ [external site] Abstract: The effects of porous medium heterogeneity on methane hydrate formation, water flow through the heterogeneous hydrate-bearing sand, and hydrate dissociation were observed in an experiment using a heterogeneous sand column with prescribed heterogeneities. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to monitor saturation changes in water, gas, and hydrate during hydrate formation, water flow, and hydrate dissociation. The sand column was packed in several segments having vertical and horizontal layers with two distinct grain-size sands. The CT images showed that as hydrate formed, the water and hydrate saturations were dynamically redistributed by variations in capillary strength of the medium (the tendency for a material to imbibe water), which changed with the presence and saturation of hydrate. Water preferentially flowed through fine sand near higher hydrate-saturation regions where the capillary strength was elevated relative to the lower hydrate saturation regions. Hydrate dissociation initiated by depressurization varied with different grain sizes and hydrate saturations.

443

U.S. Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,173 3,860 3,188 1980's 2,539 3,731 2,687 1,574 2,536 999 1,099 1,089 1,638 1,450 1990's 2,004 848 649 899 1,894 1,666 1,451 2,681 1,074 1,568 2000's 1,983 3,578 1,332 1,222 759 942 409 796 1,170 1,372 2010's 850 947 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: New Field Discoveries of Dry Natural Gas Reserves U.S. Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries

444

Thermodynamic functions of a nonrelativistic degenerate neutron gas in a magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi energy, partial concentrations of polarized neutrons, pressure, and volume energy density of a degenerate nonrelativistic neutron gas in a magnetic field are calculated using numerical methods taking into account the anomalous magnetic moment of a neutron. The results of calculations are a generalization of relations underlying the Oppenheimer-Volkov model of a neutron star to the case of an applied magnetic field. An ultrastrong (up to 10{sup 17} G) magnetic field changes the pressure and internal energy of the star and affects it static configuration and evolution. It is shown that a degenerate neutron gas in ultrastrong and weak magnetic fields is paramagnetic; the corresponding values of magnetic susceptibility differ by a factor on the order of unity. The possibility of experimentally verifying the results from analysis of pulsar-emitted radiation is discussed.

Skobelev, V. V., E-mail: v.skobelev@inbox.ru [Moscow State Industrial University (Russian Federation)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Practical scheme for a light-induced gauge field in an atomic Bose gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a scheme to generate an Abelian gauge field in an atomic gas using two crossed laser beams. If the internal atomic state follows adiabatically the eigenstates of the atom-laser interaction, Berry’s phase gives rise to a vector potential that can nucleate vortices in a Bose gas. The present scheme operates even for a large detuning with respect to the atomic resonance, making it applicable to alkali-metal atoms without significant heating due to spontaneous emission. We test the validity of the adiabatic approximation by integrating the set of coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations associated with the various internal atomic states, and we show that the steady state of the interacting gas indeed exhibits a vortex lattice, as expected from the adiabatic gauge field.

Kenneth J. Günter, Marc Cheneau, Tarik Yefsah, Steffen P. Rath, and Jean Dalibard

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

Play analysis and stratigraphic position of Uinta Basin tertiary - age oil and gas fields  

SciTech Connect

Tertiary-age sediments in the Uinta basin produce hydrocarbons from five types of plays. These play types were determined by hydrocarbon type, formation, depositional environment, rock type, porosity, permeability, source, and per-well recovery. Each well was reviewed to determine the stratigraphic position and producing characteristics of each producing interval. The five types of plays are as follows: (1) naturally fractured oil reservoirs, (2) low-permeability oil reservoirs, (3) high-permeability of oil reservoirs, (4) low-permeability gas reservoirs, and (5) tight gas sands. Several fields produce from multiple plays, which made it necessary to segregate the hydrocarbon production into several plays. The stratigraphic position of the main producing intervals is shown on a basin-wide cross section, which is color-coded by play type. This 61-well cross section has several wells from each significant Tertiary oil and gas field in the Uinta basin.

Williams, R.A. (Pennzoil Exploration and Production Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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