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1

Global Wind Power Ltd GWP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GWP Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Wind Power Ltd. (GWP) Place Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Zip 400 059 Sector Wind energy Product Mumbai-based firm involved in...

2

Global Wind Power AS GWP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Global Wind Power AS GWP Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Wind Power AS (GWP) Place...

3

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - High-GWP gases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. High-GWP gases 5. High-GWP gases 5.1. Total emissions Greenhouse gases with high global warming potential (high-GWP gases) are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which together represented 3 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. Emissions estimates for the high-GWP gases are provided to EIA by the EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. The estimates for emissions of HFCs not related to industrial processes or electric transmission are derived from the EPA Vintaging Model. Emissions from manufacturing and utilities are derived by the EPA from a mix of public and proprietary data, including from the EPA's voluntary emission reduction partnership programs. For this year's EIA inventory, 2008 values for HFC-23 from HCFC-22

4

"GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP)" Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP)" "(From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605)" "GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP" ,,,"TAR1","AR42" "(1) Carbon Dioxide","CO2","CO2",1,1 "(2) Methane","CH4","CH4",23,25 "(3) Nitrous Oxide","N2O","N2O",296,298 "(4) Hydroflourocarbons" "HFC-23 (trifluoromethane)",15,"CHF3",12000,14800 "HFC-32 (difluoromethane)",16,"CH2F2",550,675 "HFC-41 (monofluoromethane)",43,"CH3F",97,92 "HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane)",17,"CHF2CF3",3400,3500

5

Low-GWP Refrigerants Research Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Low-GWP Refrigerants Research Project Emerging Technologies » Low-GWP Refrigerants Research Project Low-GWP Refrigerants Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into low global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants. As concerns about climate change intensify, it is becoming increasingly clear that suitable low-GWP refrigerants will be needed for both new and existing residential and commercial heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) equipment. Project Description This project seeks to develop alternative refrigerants for HVAC&R equipment. The overall environmental impacts of alternative refrigerants will be assessed using a life cycle climate performance model that accounts for direct emissions associated with refrigerant leaks and indirect

6

Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Greg Smith Brandon Trelstad OSU Facilities Services June greenhouse gas multiplied by a Global Warming Potential (GWP) factor. (3) "Global Warming Potential factor" (GWP) means the radiative forcing impact of one mass-based unit of a given greenhouse gas relative

Escher, Christine

7

Addendum to Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Effect of 1992 revision of global warming potential (GWP) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).  

SciTech Connect

This addendum contains 2 important messages. (1) This document supersedes all previous versions of this work. Please do not use any older versions any more. (2) The atmospheric-science community now believes that it cannot estimate confidently the ''Global Warming Potentials'' (GWPs) of the indirect effects of greenhouse gases. A GWP is a number that converts a mass-unit emission of a greenhouse gas other than CO{sub 2} into the mass amount of CO{sub 2} that has an equivalent warming effect over a given period of time. This report refers to GWPs as ''CO{sub 2}-equivalency factors.'' For example, a forthcoming report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change disavows many of the GWPs estimated in an earlier IPCC report, and states that GWPs for the indirect effects of the non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases cannot be estimated accurately yet. However, this does not mean that in principle there are no GWPs for the non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases; rather, it means that some of the GWPs are uncertain, and that the earlier IPCC estimates of the GWPs may or may not turn out to be right (albeit, in at lease one case, discussed in this paper, the earlier estimates almost certainly will be wrong). In this report the author used the IPCC's 1990 estimates of the GWPs for 20-, 100-, and 500-year time horizons, and expressed the bottom-line results for each of these three time horizons. However, the recent uncertainty about the GWPs affects how you should interpret the results. Because the IPCC has disclaimed some of its GWPs, the GWPs as a group no longer are the best estimates of the warming effects over 20, 100, and 500 years. Instead, they are just a collection of possible values for the GWPs--in short, scenarios. Therefore, you should interpret the ''20-, 100-, and 500-year time horizons'' as three general GWP scenarios--say, scenarios, A, B, and C.--and not as time-period scenarios. For example, you should not think that the results shown here under the ''100-year time horizon'' actually embody the scientific community's best estimates of the relative warming potentials of the various greenhouse gases over a 100-year period. Instead, you should understand the results to be the outcome of making a particular set of assumptions about what the GWPs might be. The ''time horizons'' no longer necessarily represent time horizons, but rather general scenarios for, or assumptions about, the GWPs.

DeLuchi, M. A.

1992-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

8

Global Natural Gas Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the characteristics of global gas markets. These markets have entered a period of supplier strength and high prices as global demand growth has outpaced supply growth. The report systematically evaluates developments in global liquefaction andfor the principal consuming nationsin domestic production, market growth, pipelines, and regasification. While containing a great deal of detail, the report probes myriad announcements of commercial activities to help interpret the evolving comp...

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

9

Global Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

World natural gas consumption and production are expected to increase by more than 50 percent from 2005 through 2030. Asia is expected to become the world's number one gas consumer, taking over that spot from North America, as China's economy grows 6.4 percent annually. Non-OECD countries are expected to account for more than 70 percent of the world's total growth in consumption and production of natural gas over the forecast period. A significant portion of the non-OECD production growth is expected to be in the form of export projects, particularly LNG projects. World LNG trade is projected to more than double by 2030, with the center of the trade moving away from northeast Asia toward an even Atlantic/Pacific basin split.

Information Center

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

10

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Global Natural Gas Market Trends, 2. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides an overview of major trends occurring in the natural gas industry and includes a concise look at the drivers behind recent rapid growth in gas usage and the challenges faced in meeting that growth. Topics covered include: an overview of Natural Gas including its history, the current market environment, and its future market potential; an analysis of the overarching trends that are driving a need for change in the Natural Gas industry; a description of new technologies being developed to increase production of Natural Gas; an evaluation of the potential of unconventional Natural Gas sources to supply the market; a review of new transportation methods to get Natural Gas from producing to consuming countries; a description of new storage technologies to support the increasing demand for peak gas; an analysis of the coming changes in global Natural Gas flows; an evaluation of new applications for Natural Gas and their impact on market sectors; and, an overview of Natural Gas trading concepts and recent changes in financial markets.

NONE

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

GTI online - matching gas technologies with global gas markets  

SciTech Connect

The International Centre for Gas Technology Information (ICGTI) is a technology information centre of the International Energy Agency (IEA). Its members account for more than half the world`s natural gas production and consumption. ICGTI has established a web site, GTI Online (http://www.icgti.org). GTI Online is designed to cover all aspects of the gas industry from production to end-use as well as supporting technologies, including market assessment, national energy policies, environmental information and computing and modeling techniques. It si designed to use existing information sources whenever possible, so as not to duplicate public and/or commercial efforts. It is intended to fill the gap in providing useful international information to both the US and global market.

Lang, M., Manor, D.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Vertical Structures in the Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the last decade, the global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market altered substantially. Significant investments have been realized, traded volumes increased and contracting structures gained (more)

Rster, Sophia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Swapping Global Warming Gases for Methane in Gas Hydrate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swapping Global Warming Gases for Methane in Gas Hydrate Layer ... would serve as energy sources as well as carbon dioxide storage sites in the ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 6142013 DE-FE0003060 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a global assessment of methane gas hydrates that will facilitate...

16

A New Global Unconventional Natural Gas Resource Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1997, Rogner published a paper containing an estimate of the natural gas in place in unconventional reservoirs for 11 world regions. Rogner's work was assessing the unconventional gas resource base, and is now considered to be very conservative. Very little is known publicly about technically recoverable unconventional gas resource potential on a global scale. Driven by a new understanding of the size of gas shale resources in the United States, we estimated original gas in place (OGIP) and technically recoverable resource (TRR) in highly uncertain unconventional gas reservoirs, worldwide. We evaluated global unconventional OGIP by (1) developing theoretical statistic relationships between conventional hydrocarbon and unconventional gas; (2) fitting these relationships to North America publically available data; and (3) applying North American theoretical statistical relationships to evaluate the volume of unconventional gas resource of the world. Estimated global unconventional OGIP ranges from 83,300 (P10) to 184,200 (P90) Tcf. To assess global TRR from unconventional gas reservoirs, we developed a computer program that we call Unconventional Gas Resource Assessment System (UGRAS). In the program, we integrated a Monte Carlo technique with an analytical reservoir simulator to estimate the original volume of gas in place and to predict production performance. We used UGRAS to evaluate the probabilistic distribution of OGIP, TRR and recovery factor (RF) for the most productive unconventional gas formations in the North America. The P50 of recovery factor for shale gas, tight sands gas and coalbed methane is 25%, 79% and 41%, respectively. Finally, we applied our global OGIP assessment and these distributions of recovery factor gained from our analyses of plays/formations in the United States to estimate global technically recoverable unconventional gas resource. Global technically recoverable unconventional gas resource is estimated from 43,000 (P10) to 112,000 (P90) Tcf.

Dong, Zhenzhen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Global Gas Markets - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

BSA 28 years of gas and energy advisory services. Economics, pipeline tariffs, contracting, price risks. Research & training Negotiation of gas contracts

18

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Director of the Office for Oil and Gas Global...

19

Global natural gas production doubled between 1980 and 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global dry natural gas production increased 110% between 1980 and 2010, from 53 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 1980 to 112 Tcf in 2010. The combined share of North ...

20

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0003060 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a global assessment of methane gas hydrates that will facilitate informed decision-making regarding the potential development of gas hydrate resources between the scientific community and other stakeholders/decision makers. The Assessment will provide science-based information on the role of gas hydrates in natural climate change and the carbon cycle, their sensitivity to climate change, and the potential environmental and socio-economic impacts of hydrate production. Performers Stiftelsen GRID-Arendal, Arendal, Norway Funding Institutions United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Statoil Schlumberger United States Department of Energy (USDOE)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Liquefied Natural Gas: Global Challenges (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

U.S. imports of LNG in 2007 were more than triple the 2000 total, and they are expected to grow in the long term as North Americas conventional natural gas production declines. With U.S. dependence on LNG imports increasing, competitive forces in the international markets for natural gas in general and LNG in particular will play a larger role in shaping the U.S. market for LNG. Key factors currently shaping the future of the global LNG market include the evolution of project economics, worldwide demand for natural gas, government policies that affect the development and use of natural resources in countries with LNG facilities, and changes in seasonal patterns of LNG trade.

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

22

Greenhouse Gas Management: Local Efforts to Curb a Global Phenomenon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SB 375 seeks to lower greenhouse gas emissions by changing2020 and 2035 greenhouse gas targets. The regional targetsburden to accomplish its greenhouse gas target. But setting

Matute, Juan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Natural gas and efficient technologies: A response to global warming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has become recognized by the international scientific community that global warming due to fossil fuel energy buildup of greenhouse CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is a real environmental problem. Worldwide agreement has also been reached to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. A leading approach to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions is to utilize hydrogen-rich fuels and improve the efficiency of conversion in the power generation, transportation and heating sectors of the economy. In this report, natural gas, having the highest hydrogen content of all the fossil fuels, can have an important impact in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. This paper explores natural gas and improved conversion systems for supplying energy to all three sectors of the economy. The improved technologies include combined cycle for power generation, the Carnol system for methanol production for the transportation sector and fuel cells for both power generation and transportation use. The reduction in CO{sub 2} from current emissions range from 13% when natural gas is substituted for gasoline in the transportation sector to 45% when substituting methanol produced by the Carnol systems (hydrogen from thermal decomposition of methane reacting with CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants) used in the transportation sector. CO{sub 2} reductions exceeding 60% can be achieved by using natural gas in combined cycle for power generation and Carnol methanol in the transportation sector and would, thus, stabilize CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere predicted to avoid undue climate change effects. It is estimated that the total fossil fuel energy bill in the US can be reduced by over 40% from the current fuel bill. This also allows a doubling in the unit cost for natural gas if the current energy bill is maintained. Estimates of the total net incremental replacement capital cost for completing the new improved equipment is not more than that which will have to be spent to replace the existing equipment conducting business as usual.

Steinberg, M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all fuels including electricity and syngas will be used forGas Electricity Biomass Syngas Space Heating Coal Oil Gas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors for production of coal products -- patent fuel, cokeoven coke,coke oven gas, blast furnace gas and briquettes (BKB) --

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-56144 Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use andAC02-05CH11231. ii Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use andConsumption iii iv Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use and

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greater than a current combined-cycle natural gas plant. Inemissions level based on a Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT)profiles worse than the combined cycle gas plants upon which

Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Comparing the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policies dealing with global warming require a measure of the effects of the emissions of greenhouse gases that create different magnitudes of instantaneous radiative forcing and have different lifetimes. The Global Warming ...

Eckaus, Richard S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Shale oil and shale gas resources are globally abundant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

30

Gas Shale Plays… The Global Transition  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

XX. China EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment XX. China EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May 17, 2013 XX-1 XX. CHINA SUMMARY China has abundant shale gas and shale oil potential in seven prospective basins: Sichuan, Tarim, Junggar, Songliao, the Yangtze Platform, Jianghan and Subei, Figure XX-1. Figure XX-1. China's Seven Most Prospective Shale Gas and Shale Oil Basins are the Jianghan, Junggar, Sichuan, Songliao, Subei, Tarim, and Yangtze Platform. Source: ARI, 2013. XX. China EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment

31

Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Industry, Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity Resource Type: Publications Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/i1580e/i1580e00.pdf Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Screenshot References: Forestry Industry Impacts[1] "This book examines the influence of the forest products (roundwood, processed wood products and pulp and paper) value chain on atmospheric greenhouse gases. Forests managed for natural conservation, for protection

32

Gas Shale Plays… The Global Transition  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Canada EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment Canada EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May 17, 2013 I-1 I. CANADA SUMMARY Canada has a series of large hydrocarbon basins with thick, organic-rich shales that are assessed by this resource study. Figure I-1 illustrates certain of the major shale gas and shale oil basins in Western Canada. Figure I-1. Selected Shale Gas and Oil Basins of Western Canada Source: ARI, 2012. I. Canada EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May 17, 2013 I-2 The full set of Canadian shale gas and shale oil basins assessed in this study include:

33

Global natural gas consumption doubled from 1980 to 2010 - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Although consumption in North America saw the slowest regional ... trends in regional natural gas consumption and production are more similar because of the limited ...

34

Global natural gas prices vary considerably - Today in Energy - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Japanese natural gas prices had been rising over the past year, even before the earthquake. ... Russia, United Kingdom . Email; Share; Print; Email Updates. RSS ...

35

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Staff Listing - Office for Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Director of the Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (Vacant) Natural Gas Regulatory Activities Division John A. Anderson, Director Room 3E-042 Lisa Craig Room 3E-042 Telephone (202)586-9484 FAX (202) 586-6050 Case Management Beverly Howard Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-9387 FAX (202) 586-6050 Lisa Tracy Room 3E-052 Telephone (202) 586-4523 FAX (202) 586-6050 Marc Talbert Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-7991 FAX (202) 586-6050 Office of Natural Gas Docket Room Larine Moore Docket Room Manager Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-9478 FAX (202) 586-6050 International Activities Division Sally Kornfeld, Director Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-3814

36

THE OUTLOOK FOR GLOBAL TRADE IN LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LNG Terminal proposed for offshore California is based on this design. For nearly thirty years, world gas, LNG, liquefaction, LNG tankers, regasification, LNG receipt terminals, natural gas geopolitics liquid LNG and to regasify it for pipeline delivery onshore. The proposed Cabrillo Port and Crystal

37

The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy supplies from known resources are declining, the development of new energy sources is mandatory. One reasonable source is natural gas from unconventional resources. This study focus on three types of unconventional gas resources: coalbeds, tight sands, and shales. Whereas these resources are abundant, they have largely been overlooked and understudied, especially outside of North America. New technologies, including those needed to unlock unconventional gas (UCG) resources, have been acknowledged to be the most significant factor in increasing natural gas supply in the United States. This study evaluates advances in critical technology that will most likely increase supply the most. Advanced technology is one of the main drivers in increasing unconventional natural gas production, as observed in the United States, Canada, and Australia. 3D seismic, horizontal drilling, multilateral completion, water and gel based fracturing, coiled tubing rig, enhanced recovery, and produced water treatments are current important technologies critical in developing unconventional gas resources. More advanced technologies with significant impacts are expected to be available in the next decades. Fit-to-purpose technology reduces the cost to recover gas from unconventional resources. The better the unconventional gas resources are characterized, the better we can tailor specific technology to recover the gas, and less cost are needed. Analogy assumption is a good start in deciding which critical technology to be transferred to undeveloped unconventional reservoirs. If the key properties of two unconventional gas basins or formations are more or less similar, it is expected that the impact of certain technology applied in one basin or formation will resemble the impact to the other basin or formation.

Yanty, Evi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

physical limits on how much hydro power flows south from thethe Kyoto protocol, the hydro power in British Columbia andHydro Total WECC SB1368 Compliant Supply in WECC Gas Coal CA baseload demand Figure 2 Importing Clean Power

Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Global Gas Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

World natural gas consumption and production are expected to increase by more than 50 percent from 2005 through 2030. Asia is expected to become the worlds number ...

40

Gas Shale Plays… The Global Transition  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

VIII. Poland EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment VIII. Poland EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May 17, 2013 VIII-1 VIII. POLAND (INCLUDING LITHUANIA AND KALININGRAD) SUMMARY Poland has some of Europe's most favorable infrastructure and public support for shale development. The Baltic Basin in northern Poland remains the most prospective region with a relatively simple structural setting. The Podlasie and Lublin basins also have potential but are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative [91]. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

[Outlook for 1997 in the global oil and gas industries  

SciTech Connect

This section contains 4 small articles which deal with the global outlook on the following: worldwide drilling (Middle East leads the charge); offshore drilling (US Gulf remains hot); worldwide oil production (Producers meet the challenge); and the Canadian outlook (Canada prepares for another brisk year by Hans Maciej). Tables are provided for the 1997 forecast of drilling outside the US, the 1997 forecast of offshore drilling worldwide, world crude oil/condensate production by country in 1995 and 1996, and Canadian drilling forecasts.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

U.S. Natural Gas Storage and The Global LNG Market  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

U.S. natural gas storage operators are in a good position to take advantage of growing liquefied natural gas (LNG) trade. With the largest storage capacity in the world, the United States has the capability to import LNG in the summer for winter peak use. The normal falloff in global natural gas demand during the summer frees up some LNG supplies, but storage operators in many countries compete for this gas. The ability of U.S. operators to attract LNG supplies depends on the relative prices in the United States and other countries. At the same time, LNG imports compete with domestic supplies.

Information Center

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

44

Indirect global warming effects of ozone and stratospheric water vapor induced by surface methane emission  

SciTech Connect

Methane has indirect effects on climate due to chemical interactions as well as direct radiative forcing effects as a greenhouse gas. We have calculated the indirect, time-varying tropospheric radiative forcing and GWP of O{sub 3} and stratospheric H{sub 2}O due to an impulse of CH{sub 4}. This impulse, applied to the lowest layer of the atmosphere, is the increase of the atmospheric mass of CH{sub 4} resulting from a 25 percent steady state increase in the current emissions as a function of latitude. The direct CH{sub 4} radiative forcing and GWP are also calculated. The LLNL 2-D radiative-chemistry-transport model is used to evaluate the resulting changes in the O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} atmospheric profiles as a function of time. A correlated k-distribution radiative transfer model is used to calculate the radiative forcing at the tropopause of the globally-averaged atmosphere profiles. The O{sub 3} indirect GWPs vary from {approximately}27 after a 20 yr integration to {approximately}4 after 500 years, agreeing with the previous estimates to within about 10 percent. The H{sub 2}O indirect GWPs vary from {approximately}2 after a 20 yr integration to {approximately}0.3 after 500 years, and are in close agreement with other estimates. The CH{sub 4} GWPs vary from {approximately}53 at 20 yrs to {approximately}7 at 500 yrs. The 20 year CH{sub 4} GWP is {approximately}20% larger than previous estimates of the direct CH{sub 4} GWP due to a CH{sub 4} response time ({approximately}17 yrs) that is much longer than the overall lifetime (10 yrs). The increased CH{sub 4} response time results from changes in the OH abundances caused by the CH{sub 4} impulse. The CH{sub 4} radiative forcing results are consistent with IPCC values. Estimates are made of latitude effects in the radiative forcing calculations, and UV effects on the O{sub 3} radiative forcing calculations (10%).

Wuebbles, D.J.; Grossman, A.S.; Tamaresis, J.S.; Patten, K.O. Jr.; Jain, A.; Grant, K.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effects of Globally Waste Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

Stewart, Charles W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

46

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 12.7 - Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (100-year time horizon) Gas GWP SAR 900 Carbon dioxide (CO2) 1 Methane (CH 4 ) 1 21 Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) 310 HFC-23 11,700 HFC-32 650...

47

Global gas processing will strengthen to meet expanding markets  

SciTech Connect

The worldwide LPG industry continues to expand faster than the petroleum industry -- 4%/year for LPG vs. 2%/year for petroleum in 1995 and less than 1%/year in the early 1990s. This rapid expansion of LPG markets is occurring in virtually every region of the world, including such developing countries as China. The Far East is the focus of much of the LPG industry`s attention, but many opportunities exist in other regions such as the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. The investment climate is improving in all phases of downstream LPG marketing, including terminaling, storage, and wholesale and retail distribution. The world LPG supply/demand balance has been relatively tight since the Gulf War and should remain so. Base demand (the portion of demand that is not highly price-sensitive) is expanding more rapidly than supplies. As a result, the proportion of total LPG supplies available for price-sensitive petrochemical feedstock markets is declining, at least in the short term. The paper discusses importers, price patterns, world LPG demand, world LPG supply, US NGL supply, US gas processing, ethane and propane supply, butane, isobutane, and natural gasoline supply, and US NGL demand.

Haun, R.R. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C.; Gist, R.L. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

49

Int. J. Global Energy Issues, Vol. 23, No. 4, 2005 307 Canada's efforts towards greenhouse gas emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Int. J. Global Energy Issues, Vol. 23, No. 4, 2005 307 Canada's efforts towards greenhouse gas greenhouse gas emissions reductions. Without a major change in direction towards more compulsory policies, it seems unlikely that Canada will achieve significant domestic greenhouse gas reductions over and beyond

50

2 Global Gas Turbine News August 2008 There is an old saying that the only constant in life is change. Our  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Global Gas Turbine News August 2008 There is an old saying that the only constant in life to improve gas turbines over the last 50 years, it has also played an active role in fostering a global our community. One area of discussion has been the role of turbomachinery outside of the gas turbine

Daraio, Chiara

51

Life Cycle Assessment of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Ethanol - Global Warming Potential and Environmental Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to use life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the global warming potential (GWP), water use, and net energy value (NEV) associated with the EISA-mandated 16 bgy cellulosic biofuels target, which is assumed in this study to be met by cellulosic-based ethanol, and the EISA-mandated 15 bgy conventional corn ethanol target. Specifically, this study compares, on a per-kilometer-driven basis, the GWP, water use, and NEV for the year 2022 for several biomass feedstocks.

Heath, G. A.; Hsu, D. D.; Inman, D.; Aden, A.; Mann, M. K.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Alternative Approaches to Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Global Climate Change in CEQA Documents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global climate change (GCC) is a change in the average weather of the earth that can be measured by wind patterns, storms, precipitation, and temperature. This paper is not a scientific analysis of the existence or potential causes of GCC. Further, this paper does not address National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements. Instead, the intent of this paper is to provide practical, interim information to California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) practitioners to help Lead Agencies determine how to address GCC in CEQA documents prior to the development and adoption of guidance by appropriate government agencies. A typical individual project does not generate enough greenhouse gas emissions to influence GCC significantly on its own; the issue of GCC is by definition a cumulative environmental impact. Therefore, if the Lead Agency chooses to address GCC effects in a CEQA document, it should be discussed in the context of a cumulative impact. A complicating factor, however, is that there are currently no published CEQA thresholds or approved methods for determining whether a projects potential contribution to a cumulative GCC impact is considerable. This paper provides a summary of background information on GCC, the current regulatory environment surrounding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and the various approaches that a Lead

Tony Held, Ph.D.; Terry Rivasplata; Tim Rimpo; Kenneth M. Bogdan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Global warming potentials; Part 7 of 7 supporting documents. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the general guidelines for voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Public review draft  

SciTech Connect

This document provides methods to account for the different effects of different gases on the atmosphere. It discusses the rationale and uses for simplified measures to represent human-related effects on climate and provides a brief introduction to a major index, the global warming potential (GWP) index. Appendix 7.A analyzes the science underlying the development of indices for concerns about climate, which is still evolving, evaluates the usefulness of currently available indices, and presents the state of the art for numerical indices and their uncertainties. For concerns about climate, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been instrumental in examining relative indices for comparing the radiative influences of greenhouse gases. The IPCC developed the concept of GWPs to provide a simple representation of the relative effects on climate resulting from a unit mass emission of a greenhouse gas. Alternative measures and variations on the definition of GWPs have also been considered and reported.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Prime Movers of Globalization: The History and Impact of Diesel Engines and Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Diesel Engines and Gas Turbines By Vaclav Smil Reviewedof Diesel Engines and Gas Turbines. Cambridge, MA: The MITin the 1890s and the gas turbine invented by Frank Whittle

Anderson, Byron P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Worldwide Natural Gas Supply and Demand and the Outlook for Global ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is a proven commercial technology for transporting natural gas across oceans. The international trade in LNG is more than 30 years old.

56

Shale gas is a global phenomenon - Today in Energy - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technically recoverable natural gas resources in the assessed basins totaled 5,760 Tcf. ... natural gas, offshore, Russia, shale. Email; Share; Print;

57

Helium-Based Soundwave Chiller: Trillium: A Helium-Based Sonic Chiller- Tons of Freezing with 0 GWP Refrigerants  

SciTech Connect

BEETIT Project: Penn State is designing a freezer that substitutes the use of sound waves and environmentally benign refrigerant for synthetic refrigerants found in conventional freezers. Called a thermoacoustic chiller, the technology is based on the fact that the pressure oscillations in a sound wave result in temperature changes. Areas of higher pressure raise temperatures and areas of low pressure decrease temperatures. By carefully arranging a series of heat exchangers in a sound field, the chiller is able to isolate the hot and cold regions of the sound waves. Penn States chiller uses helium gas to replace synthetic refrigerants. Because helium does not burn, explode or combine with other chemicals, it is an environmentally-friendly alternative to other polluting refrigerants. Penn State is working to apply this technology on a large scale.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Decomposition algorithms for global solution of deterministic and stochastic pooling problems in natural gas value chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a Benders decomposition algorithm is designed and implemented to solve both deterministic and stochastic pooling problems to global optimality. Convergence of the algorithm to a global optimum is proved and ...

Armagan, Emre

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

U.S. Natural Gas Storage and The Global LNG Market  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. natural gas storage operators are in a good position to take advantage of growing liquefied natural gas (LNG) trade. With the largest storage capacity in the ...

60

Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Global Gas and Dust budge of the Large Magellanic Cloud --- Importance of Asymptotic Giant Branch stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is still an unresolved problem how much AGB stars can contribute to the overall gas and dust enrichment processes in the interstellar medium within galaxies. We start tackling this problem, by using our test case observational data from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), from which we obtain the global gas and dust budget. The photometric data from the LMC is obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We established an infrared colour classification scheme to select AGB stars, which are based on spectroscopically identified AGB stars. We further confirm a correlation between the Spitzer colour and mass-loss rate, which leads to a measurement of the total mass-loss rate from the entire AGB population in the LMC. Indeed, AGB stars are an important gas and dust source.

Matsuura, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Sensitivity of Multi-gas Climate Policy to Emission Metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-gas greenhouse emission targets require that different emissions be combined into an aggregate total. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) index is currently used for this purpose, despite various criticisms of the underlying concept. It is not possible to uniquely define a single metric that perfectly captures the different impacts of emissions of substances with widely disparate atmospheric lifetimes, which leads to a wide range of possible index values. We examine the sensitivity of emissions and climate outcomes to the value of the index used to aggregate methane emissions using a technologically detailed integrated assessment model. We find that the sensitivity to index value is of order 4-14% in terms of methane emissions and 2% in terms of total radiative forcing, using index values between 4 and 70 for methane, with larger regional differences in some cases. The sensitivity to index value is much higher in economic terms, with total 2-gas mitigation cost decreasing 4-5% for a lower index and increasing 10-13% for a larger index, with even larger changes if the emissions reduction targets are small. The sensitivity to index value also depends on the assumed maximum amount of mitigation available in each sector. Evaluation of the maximum mitigation potential for major sources of non-CO2 greenhouse gases would greatly aid analysis

Smith, Steven J.; Karas, Joseph F.; Edmonds, James A.; Eom, Jiyong; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hard truths: facing the hard truths about energy. A comprehensive view to 2030 of global oil and natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the questions posed by the US Secretary of Energy in October 2005, the National Petroleum Council conducted a comprehensive study considering the future of oil and natural gas to 2030 in the context of the global energy system. The Council proposed five core strategies to assist markets in meeting the energy challenges to 2030 and beyond. All five strategies are essential; there is no single, easy solution to the multiple challenges we face. However, we are confident that the prompt adoption of these strategies, along with a sustained commitment to implementation, will promote U.S. competitiveness by balancing economic, security, and environmental goals. The United States must: Moderate the growing demand for energy by increasing efficiency of transportation, residential, commercial, and industrial uses; Expand and diversify production from clean coal, nuclear, biomass, other renewables, and unconventional oil and gas; moderate the decline of conventional domestic oil and gas production; and increase access for development of new resources; Integrate energy policy into trade, economic, environmental, security, and foreign policies; strengthen global energy trade and investment; and broaden dialogue with both producing and consuming nations to improve global energy security; Enhance science and engineering capabilities and create long-term opportunities for research and development in all phases of the energy supply and demand system; and Develop the legal and regulatory framework to enable carbon capture and sequestration. In addition, as policymakers consider options to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, provide an effective global framework for carbon management, including establishment of a transparent, predictable, economy-wide cost for carbon dioxide emissions. The report, details findings and recommendations based on comprehensive analyses developed by the study teams. 5 apps.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Worldwide Natural Gas Supply and Demand and the Outlook for Global LNG Trade  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article is adapted from testimony by Jay Hakes, Administrator of the Energy Information Administration, before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on July 23, 1997. The hearing focused on the examination of certain aspects of natural gas into the next century with special emphasis on world natural gas supply and demand to 2015.

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Fluids Low GWP Working Fluids Low GWP Refrigerants - CRADA Ed Vineyard Oak Ridge National Laboratory vineyardea@ornl.gov (865) 574-0576 3 April 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: - High GWP refrigerants increase CO 2 equivalent emissions for HVAC&R equipment - Low GWP alternatives may increase energy consumption, introduce safety risks, require significant modifications to equipment, and have higher costs

66

Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working Fluids Low GWP Working Fluids Low GWP Refrigerants - CRADA Ed Vineyard Oak Ridge National Laboratory vineyardea@ornl.gov (865) 574-0576 3 April 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: - High GWP refrigerants increase CO 2 equivalent emissions for HVAC&R equipment - Low GWP alternatives may increase energy consumption, introduce safety risks, require significant modifications to equipment, and have higher costs

67

A Strategy for a Global Observing System for Verification of National Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the risks of climate change becoming increasingly evident, there is growing discussion regarding international treaties and national regulations to lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Enforcement of such agreements ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

68

U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative [80]. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. GHG intensitydefined as the ratio of total U.S. GHG emissions to economic outputby 18 percent over the 2002 to 2012 time frame.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Development of Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerant Solutions for Commercial Refrigeration Systems using a Life Cycle Climate Performance Design Tool  

SciTech Connect

Commercial refrigeration systems are known to be prone to high leak rates and to consume large amounts of electricity. As such, direct emissions related to refrigerant leakage and indirect emissions resulting from primary energy consumption contribute greatly to their Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP). In this paper, an LCCP design tool is used to evaluate the performance of a typical commercial refrigeration system with alternative refrigerants and minor system modifications to provide lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerant solutions with improved LCCP compared to baseline systems. The LCCP design tool accounts for system performance, ambient temperature, and system load; system performance is evaluated using a validated vapor compression system simulation tool while ambient temperature and system load are devised from a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). The LCCP design tool also accounts for the change in hourly electricity emission rate to yield an accurate prediction of indirect emissions. The analysis shows that conventional commercial refrigeration system life cycle emissions are largely due to direct emissions associated with refrigerant leaks and that system efficiency plays a smaller role in the LCCP. However, as a transition occurs to low GWP refrigerants, the indirect emissions become more relevant. Low GWP refrigerants may not be suitable for drop-in replacements in conventional commercial refrigeration systems; however some mixtures may be introduced as transitional drop-in replacements. These transitional refrigerants have a significantly lower GWP than baseline refrigerants and as such, improved LCCP. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the tradeoffs between refrigerant GWP, efficiency and capacity.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Government/industry partnership: A revolutionary approach in global leadership of advanced gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established a government/industry partnership program to greatly improve the capabilities of U.S. gas turbine technology. A new and challenging program named the Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) has been initiated by DOE. The technical and business objectives of this initiative are to challenge the bounds of high performance capabilities of gas turbines, meet stringent environmental requirements, and produce lower cost electric power and cogeneration steam. This program will also yield greater societal benefits through continued expansion of high skilled U.S. jobs and export of U.S. products world wide. A progress report on the ATS program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. A preliminary design of an industrial advanced turbine system configuration will also be outlined in the paper. The technical challenges; advanced critical technologies incorporation, analytical and experimental solutions, and test results of an advanced gas turbine meeting the DOE goals will be described and discussed.

Ali, S.A. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zeh, C.M. [Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

72

Californias Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California is in the process of implementing a broad portfolio of policies and regulations aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This paper summarizes the initiatives likely to impact the electricity generating sector. We present calculations showing that there is a substantial risk that two of the most prominent policies could simply result in a reshuffling, on paper, of the electricity generating resources within the West that are dedicated to serving California. This reshuffling is different from the conventional leakage problem as it involves no physical changes to the way electricity is generated across regulated and unregulated regions, but is instead driven by a contractual reshuffling of who buys power from whom. The problem is similar to an ineffective consumer boycott. The problem is still present but less severe if more Western states adopt carbon limitations. We also show that some of the least market-based initiatives, the renewable portfolio standards (RPS), are likely to have the biggest near-term impact on the carbon-intensity of electricity generation in the West. Thus the scale of RPS programs may be limiting the potential role of non-renewable options in reducing carbon emissions from the electricity sector.

James Bushnell; Carla Peterman; Catherine Wolfram

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

www.ucei.org Californias Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California is in the process of implementing a broad portfolio of policies and regulations aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This paper summarizes the initiatives likely to impact the electricity generating sector. We present calculations showing that there is a substantial risk that two of the most prominent policies could simply result in a reshuffling, on paper, of the electricity generating resources within the West that are dedicated to serving California. This reshuffling is different from the conventional leakage problem as it involves no physical changes to the way electricity is generated across regulated and unregulated regions, but is instead driven by a contractual reshuffling of who buys power from whom. The problem is similar to an ineffective consumer boycott. The problem is still present but less severe if more Western states adopt carbon limitations. We also show that some of the least market-based initiatives, the renewable portfolio standards (RPS), are likely to have the biggest near-term impact on the carbon-intensity of electricity generation in the West. Thus the scale of RPS programs may be limiting the potential role of non-renewable options in reducing carbon emissions from the electricity sector.

James Bushnell; Carla Peterman; Catherine Wolfram; James Bushnell; Carla Peterman; Catherine Wolfram; Grateful To Max Auffhammer; Dallas Burtraw; Alex Farrell; Larry Goulder

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We estimated the effects on per-vehicle-mile fuel-cycle petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and energy use of using ethanol blended with gasoline in a mid-size passenger car, compared with the effects of using gasoline in the same car. Our analysis includes petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with chemicals manufacturing, farming of corn and biomass, ethanol production, and ethanol combustion for ethanol; and petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with petroleum recovery, petroleum refining, and gasoline combustion for gasoline. For corn-based ethanol, the key factors in determining energy and emissions impacts include energy and chemical usage intensity of corn farming, energy intensity of the ethanol plant, and the method used to estimate energy and emissions credits for co-products of corn ethanol. The key factors in determining the impacts of cellulosic ethanol are energy and chemical usage intensity of biomass farming, ethanol yield per dry ton of biomass, and electricity credits in cellulosic ethanol plants. The results of our fuel-cycle analysis for fuel ethanol are listed below. Note that, in the first half of this summary, the reductions cited are per-vehicle-mile traveled using the specified ethanol/gasoline blend instead of conventional (not reformulated) gasoline. The second half of the summary presents estimated changes per gallon of ethanol used in ethanol blends. GHG emissions are global warming potential (GWP)-weighted, carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O).

C. Saricks; D. Santini; M. Wang

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

75

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong production and trade model with a greenhouse gas model to assess leakage associated with modified beef

Zhou, Yaoqi

76

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

77

Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.

Boden, T.A.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Andres, R.J. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When President Bush announced his Global Climate Change Initiative in February 2002, he committed the United States to a new strategy to cut greenhouse gas emissions over the next...

79

Shale Gas and the Outlook for U.S. Natural Gas Markets and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Shale Gas and the Outlook for U.S. Natural Gas Markets and Global Gas Resources ... Associated with oil Coalbed methane Net imports Non-associated ...

80

Greenhouse-gas emissions from biofuel use in Asia.  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is a primary fuel for much of the world's population. In some developing countries it can contribute 80-90% of total primary energy consumption. In Asia as a whole we estimate that biomass contributes about 22 EJ, almost 24% of total energy use. Much of this biomass is combusted in inefficient domestic stoves and cookers, enhancing the formation of products of incomplete combustion (PIC), many of which are greenhouse gases. An inventory of the combustion of biofuels (fuelwood, crop residues, and dried animal waste) in Asia is used to develop estimates of the emissions of carbon-containing greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2},CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHC) in Asian countries. The data are examined from two perspectives: total carbon released and total global warming potential (GWP) of the gases. We estimate that blofuels contributed 573 Tg-C in 1990, about 28% of the total carbon emissions from energy use in Asia. China (259 Tg-C) and India (187 Tg-C) were the largest emitting countries by far. The majority of the emissions, 504 Tg-C, are in the form of CO{sub 2}; however, emissions of non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases are significant: 57 Tg-C as CO, 6.4 Tg-C as CH{sub 4}, and 5.9 Tg-C as NMHC. Because of the high rate of incomplete combustion in typical biofuel stoves and the high GWP coefficients of the products of incomplete combustion, biofuels comprise an even larger share of energy-related emissions when measured in terms of global warming potential (in CO{sub 2} equivalents): 38% over a 20-year time frame and 31% over 100 years. Even when the biofuel is assumed to be harvested on a completely sustainable basis (all CO{sub 2} emissions are reabsorbed in the following growing season), PIC emissions from biofuel combustion account for almost 5% of total carbon emissions and nearly 25% of CO{sub 2} equivalents in terms of short-term (20-year) GWP.

Streets, D. G.; Waldhoff, S. T.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Greenhouse-gas emissions from biofuel use in Asia.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a primary fuel for much of the world's population. In some developing countries it can contribute 80-90% of total primary energy consumption. In Asia as a whole we estimate that biomass contributes about 22 EJ, almost 24% of total energy use. Much of this biomass is combusted in inefficient domestic stoves and cookers, enhancing the formation of products of incomplete combustion (PIC), many of which are greenhouse gases. An inventory of the combustion of biofuels (fuelwood, crop residues, and dried animal waste) in Asia is used to develop estimates of the emissions of carbon-containing greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2},CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHC) in Asian countries. The data are examined from two perspectives: total carbon released and total global warming potential (GWP) of the gases. We estimate that blofuels contributed 573 Tg-C in 1990, about 28% of the total carbon emissions from energy use in Asia. China (259 Tg-C) and India (187 Tg-C) were the largest emitting countries by far. The majority of the emissions, 504 Tg-C, are in the form of CO{sub 2}; however, emissions of non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases are significant: 57 Tg-C as CO, 6.4 Tg-C as CH{sub 4}, and 5.9 Tg-C as NMHC. Because of the high rate of incomplete combustion in typical biofuel stoves and the high GWP coefficients of the products of incomplete combustion, biofuels comprise an even larger share of energy-related emissions when measured in terms of global warming potential (in CO{sub 2} equivalents): 38% over a 20-year time frame and 31% over 100 years. Even when the biofuel is assumed to be harvested on a completely sustainable basis (all CO{sub 2} emissions are reabsorbed in the following growing season), PIC emissions from biofuel combustion account for almost 5% of total carbon emissions and nearly 25% of CO{sub 2} equivalents in terms of short-term (20-year) GWP.

Streets, D. G.; Waldhoff, S. T.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hello. I'm a bright guy in Canada. As a Global Warming ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... brainstorming applications for barrels of oil and bucket fulls of tar (and maybe NG depending on GWP); this qualifier preserves refinery jobs making ...

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Security Global Security LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent;...

84

The Psychology of Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evidence in support of global warming and the lack of significant published evidence to the contrary provides an extraordinarily strong foundation for the scientific community's call for action on greenhouse gas emissions. However, public ...

Ben R. Newell; Andrew J. Pitman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II CD-ROM Atlas of Global Monthly Aerosols, Ozone, NO2, Water, Vapor, and Relative Humitidy (19851993)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual profile measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite have been used to create latitude-longitude maps of monthly mean aerosols, ozone, water vapor, ...

D. Rind; X. Liao

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Global warming and end-use efficiency implications of replacing CFCs  

SciTech Connect

The direct contribution of CFCs to calculated global warming has been recognized for some time. As a result of the international agreement to phase out CFCs due to stratospheric ozone and the ensuing search for suitable alternatives, there has recently been increased attention on the DIRECT global warming potential (GWP) of the fluorocarbon alternatives as greenhouse gases. However, to date there has been little focus on the INDIRECT global warming effect arising from end-use efficiency changes and associated CO{sub 2} emissions. A study being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) addresses this combined or total global warming impact of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related applications. This paper reviews selected results for air-conditioning, refrigeration, and heat pump applications. The analysis indicates that the CFC user industries have made substantial progress in approaching near-equal energy efficiency with the HCFC/HFC alternative refrigerants. The findings also bring into question the relative importance of the DIRECT (chemical-related) effect in many applications. Replacing CFCs is an important step in reducing the total global warming impact, and at present the HCFC and HFCS appear to offer the best efficiency and lowest total impact of options available in the relatively short time period required for the transition away from CFCs.

Fairchild, P.D.; Fischer, S.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Global Insight Energy Group  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Outlook Outlook Mary Novak Managing Director IHS Global Insight Copyright © 2010 IHS Global Insight, Inc. Overview: Energy Sector Transformation Underway * The recession has hit energy demand hard, and aggregate energy demand is not expected to return to 2007 levels until 2018. * Oil and natural gas prices will both rise over the long-term, but the price trends will diverge with natural gas prices rising slowly due to the development of shale gas. * This forecast does not include a GHG cap-and-trade program. However, it is assumed that there will be continued improvement in equipment, appliance and building efficiencies that will reduce carbon emissions relative to past projections. * The forecast also includes the more than 30 state- level programs to increase efficiency and reduce

88

The Shale Gas Matt Ridley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Shale Gas Shock Matt Ridley Foreword by Freeman Dyson The Global Warming Policy Foundation GWPF Professor Richard Tol Professor Deepak Lal Dr David Whitehouse Professor Harold Lewis #12;The Shale Gas ....................................................................14 Coal-bed methane and tight gas in sandstone................................15 Shale gas

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

89

NEXT-GENERATION FIRE SUPPRESSION TECHNOLOGY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... reignition quenching; - ODP; - global warming potential (GWP ... by the Program Support Office, which provides ... program and management support to ...

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

Metadata compiled and distributed by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center for global climate change and greenhouse gas-related data bases  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) compiles and provides information to help international researchers, policymakers, and educators evaluate complex environmental issues associated with elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other trace gases, including potential climate change. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and is line funded by the U. S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Global Change Research Program (GCRP). CDIAC is an information analysis center (IAC). In operation since 1982, CDIAC identifies sources of primary data at national and international levels; obtains, archives, evaluates and distributes data and computer models; fully documents select data sets and computer models and offers them as numeric data packages (NDPs) and computer model packages (CMPs); distributes data and computer models on a variety of magnetic and electronic medias including 9-track magnetic tapes; IBM-formatted floppy diskettes; CD-ROM; and over Internet, Omnet, and Bitnet electronic networks; develops derived, often multidisciplinary data products useful for carbon cycle and climate-change research; distributes reports pertinent to greenhouse effect and climate change issues; produces the newsletter, CDIAC Communications; and in general acts as the information focus for the GCRPs research projects. Since its inception, CDIAC has responded to thousands of requests for information, and since 1985 has distributed more than 70,000 reports, NDPs and CMPs to 97 countries worldwide.

Boden, T.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Flashback and blowoff characteristics of gas turbine swirl combustor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas turbines are extensively used in combined cycle power systems. These form about 20% of global power generating capacity, normally being fired on natural gas, (more)

Abdulsada, Mohammed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Monetizing stranded gas : economic valuation of GTL and LNG projects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Globally, there are significant quantities of natural gas reserves that lie economically or physically stranded from markets. Options to monetize such reserves include Gas to (more)

Black, Brodie Gene, 1986-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Energy Crossroads: Global Climate Change | Environmental Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Global Climate Change Suggest a Listing Best Global Warming Articles Global Warming Articles provides facts about the causes, effects and answers to global warming; the environment; energy conservation, climate change and more. Ecolytics As emissions requirements, climate change, financial markets, and risk management become increasingly interconnected, organizations are left with critical choices regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions management. Ecolytics(tm), a comprehensive web-based software tool, can help organizations in the navigation of this complex area by providing an effective cataloging, strategic planning, economic analysis, and risk management solution. Enviro$en$e Funded by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Strategic

94

MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy supply technologies. In comparison to many previous studies of natural gas markets, a global to the addition of unconventional gas supplies. In 2008, the EU imported about 8.5 Tcf of natural gas: 4.5 TcfMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Russia's Natural Gas Export Potential

95

Global production through 2005  

SciTech Connect

Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

Foreman, N.E. [Petroconsultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Greenhouse Gases and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605) GREENHOUSE GAS NAME GREENHOUSE GAS CODE FORMULA GWP TAR1 AR42 (1) Carbon Dioxide CO2 CO2 1 1 (2) Methane CH4 CH4 23 25 (3) Nitrous Oxide N2O N2O 296 298 (4) Hydroflourocarbons HFC-23 (trifluoromethane) 15 CHF3 12000 14800 HFC-32 (difluoromethane) 16 CH2F2 550 675 HFC-41 (monofluoromethane) 43 CH3F 97 -3 HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane) 17 CHF2CF3 3400 3500 HFC-134 (1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane) 44 CHF2CHF2 1100 -3 HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) 18 CH2FCF3 1300 1430 HFC-143 (1,1,2-trifluorethane) 45 CHF2CH2F 330 -3 HFC-143a (1,1,1-trifluoroethane) 46 CF3CH3 4300 4470 HFC-152 (1,2-difluorethane) 47 CH2FCH2F

97

Energy and global warming impacts of HFC refrigerants and emerging technologies: TEWI-III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of hydrofluorocarbons (BFCs) which were developed as alternative refrigerants and insulating foam blowing agents to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) is now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants and blowing agents on global warming. A Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) assessment analyzes the environmental affects of these halogenated working fluids in energy consuming applications by combining a direct effect resulting from the inadvertent release of HFCs to the atmosphere with an indirect effect resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels needed to provide the energy to operate equipment using these compounds as working fluids. TEWI is a more balanced measure of environmental impact because it is not based solely on the global warming potential (GWP) of the working fluid. It also shows the environmental benefit of efficient technologies that result in less CO{sub 2} generation and eventual emission to the earth`s atmosphere. The goal of TEWI is to assess total global warming impact of all the gases released to the atmosphere, including CO{sub 2} emissions from energy conversion. Alternative chemicals and technologies have been proposed as substitutes for HFCs in the vapor-compression cycle for refrigeration and air conditioning and for polymer foams in appliance and building insulations which claim substantial environmental benefits. Among these alternatives are: (1) Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants and blowing agents which have zero ozone depleting potential and a negligible global warming potential, (2) CO{sub 2} as a refrigerant and blowing agent, (3) Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor compression systems, (4) Absorption chiller and heat pumping cycles using ammonia/water or lithium bromide/water, and (5) Evacuated panel insulations. This paper summarizes major results and conclusions of the detailed final report on the TEWI-111 study.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The 7. global warming international conference and expo: Abstracts  

SciTech Connect

This conference was held April 1--3, 1996 in Vienna, Austria. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on global warming. Topics of interest include the following: global and regional natural resource management; energy, transportation, minerals and natural resource management; industrial technology and greenhouse gas emission; strategies for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emission; greenhouse gas production/utilization and carbon budgets; strategies for promoting the understanding of global change; international policy strategy and economics; and global warming and public health. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

The two prime movers of globalization: history and impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and natural gas), have rela- tively great longevity. When assessed on the global scale, coal was the world pressures lowered it to less than 200 g/W. In contrast, the first non-compressing coal gas-fuelled internal Augustus Otto (1832­91) in 1877. Otto's innovative four-stroke design, also fuelled by coal gas, had a mass

Smil, Vaclav

100

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The Joint Global Change  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Northwest Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The Joint Global Change The Joint Global Change Research Institute Research Institute Nuclear Power and Stabilizing CO 2 Concentrations Jae Edmonds and Sonny Kim Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting April 15 and 16, 2002 Alexandria, VA Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 The Joint Global Change The Joint Global Change Research Institute Research Institute CLIMATE CHANGE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 The Joint Global Change The Joint Global Change Research Institute Research Institute CLIMATE CHANGE Multiple gases * CO 2 (fossil fuel, land-use) * CH 4 (rice paddies, ruminant livestock, landfills, coal mining, oil and gas production, incomplete combustion) * N 2 O (nitrogen fertilizers, industrial processes, other??)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Global Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited) Trends Since 1751 approximately 337 billion metric tonnes of carbon have been released to the atmosphere from the consumption of fossil fuels and cement production. Half of these emissions have occurred since the mid 1970s. The 2007 global fossil-fuel carbon emission estimate, 8365 million metric tons of carbon, represents an all-time high and a 1.7% increase from 2006. Globally, liquid and solid fuels accounted for 76.3% of the emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement production in 2007. Combustion of gas fuels (e.g., natural gas) accounted for 18.5% (1551 million metric tons of carbon) of the total emissions from fossil fuels in 2007 and reflects a gradually increasing global utilization of natural gas. Emissions from

102

Powering the World: Offshore Oil & Gas Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate of production of oil is peaking now, coal will peak in 2-5 years, and natural gas in 20-30 yearsPowering the World: Offshore Oil & Gas Production Macondo post-blowout operations Tad Patzek Gulf of Mexico's oil and gas production Conclusions ­ p.5/59 #12;Summary of Conclusions. . . The global

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

103

CSEM WP 166 California's Greenhouse Gas Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CSEM WP 166 California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem? James. 2547 Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;California's Greenhouse Gas Policies a broad portfolio of policies and regulations aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This paper

Kammen, Daniel M.

104

MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the approach for this study for natural gas supply by creating a two-stage production process. In stage 1 global supplies of natural gas by EPPA region and uncertainty range. The mean global estimate of 16) is from 12,400 to 20,800 Tcf. The set of natural gas supply functions are based on estimates

105

Caspian countries are developing new oil and natural gas export ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Caspian Sea region has the potential to export oil and natural gas to European, South Asian, and East Asian markets. With rising energy prices and growing global ...

106

Spheroid-Encapsulated Ionic Liquids for Gas Separation  

Combustion of fossil fuels produces carbon dioxide (CO 2), a greenhouse gas contributing to global climate change. As the demand for energy continues

107

NETL: News Release - Storing Liquefied Natural Gas in Underground...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 22, 2003 Storing Liquefied Natural Gas in Underground Salt Caverns Could Boost Global LNG Trade Novel Process May be Half the Cost of Conventional Liquid Tank Terminals...

108

Production decline analysis of horizontal well in gas shale reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The major factor influencing the increase of natural gas use is the rise in its global demand. Due to the relentlessly increasing demand, there have (more)

Adekoya, Folarin.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to (more)

Elkjr, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Simulating the daily gasoline price-setting behaviour of gas stations in Cincinnati by agent-based modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the retail gasoline market, gas stations as independent entities set gas prices according to a number of factors related to global and local economic (more)

Zhou, Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Unconventional gas: truly a game changer?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If prices of natural gas justify and/or if concerns about climate change push conventional coal off the table, vast quantities of unconventional gas can be brought to market at reasonable prices. According to a report issued by PFC Energy, global unconventional natural gas resources that may be ultimately exploited with new technologies could be as much as 3,250,000 billion cubic feet. Current conventional natural gas resources are estimated around 620,000 billion cubic feet.

NONE

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Cosmic global strings  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following topics: Global Strings; The Gravitational field of a straight global string; How do global strings behave The axion cosmological energy density; Computer simulations of the motion and decay of global strings; and Electromagnetic radiation from the conversion of Nambu-Goldstone bosons in astrophysical magnetic fields.

Sikivie, P. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Risk analysis in oil and gas projects : a case study in the Middle East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global demand for energy is rising around the world. Middle East is a major supplier of oil and gas and remains an important region for any future oil and gas developments. Meanwhile, managing oil and gas projects are ...

Zand, Emad Dolatshahi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Carbon Dioxide Emissions on GNP Growth: Interpretation ofMcNeil et al Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (Keywords Greenhouse gas emissions, emissions scenarios,

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Interpretation of Simulated Global Warming Using a Simple Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple energy balance model with two parameters, an effective heat capacity and an effective climate sensitivity, is used to interpret six GCM simulations of greenhouse gasinduced global warming. By allowing the parameters to vary in time, the ...

I. G. Watterson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

WATCH: Current Knowledge of the Terrestrial Global Water Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water-related impacts are among the most important consequences of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Changes in the global water cycle will also impact the carbon and nutrient cycles and vegetation patterns. There is already some evidence ...

Richard Harding; Martin Best; Eleanor Blyth; Stefan Hagemann; Pavel Kabat; Lena M. Tallaksen; Tanya Warnaars; David Wiberg; Graham P. Weedon; Henny van Lanen; Fulco Ludwig; Ingjerd Haddeland

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Chapters 1 and 3 Notion of greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Chapters 1 and 3 Notion of greenhouse gas · A gas, natural or anthropogenic, that absorbs the paradox of the faint young Sun. Near-infrared greenhouse gas absorption bands (Fig. 3.13) near infrared trace gas concentrations to radiative forcing: the effects of anthropogenic greenhouse gases on global

Wolfe, Alexander P.

118

The Global Energy Challenge George Crabtree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an Energy Carrier coal gas heat mechanical motion electricity hydro wind fuel cells solar communication://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/abstracts.html#SC pre 1986 post 1986 # Tc 24 Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier solar wind hydro fossil fuel reformingThe Global Energy Challenge George Crabtree Argonne National Laboratory Kansas Energy Symposium

Peterson, Blake R.

119

Natural Gas Regulation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation The Natural Gas Act of 1938, as amended, requires anyone who wants to import or export natural gas, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) from or to a foreign country must first obtain an authorization from the Department of Energy. The Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply, Division of Natural Gas Regulatory Activities is the one-stop-shopping place to obtain these authorizations in the Department. The import/export authorizations are necessary for anyone who wants to import or export natural gas, including LNG. There are basically two types of authorizations, blanket and long-term authorizations. The blanket authorization enables you to import or export on a short-term or spot market basis for a period of up to two years. The

120

Tensions in Global Power and Fuel Sector Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world has been through its steepest ever commodity cycle in the past year. The current study attempts to make sense of the dramatic swings in the energy markets by closely examining market fundamentals and identifying the critical considerations and constraints that explain their progression. The study builds on a foundation of EPRI studies conducted in 2007-2008 on global generation decisions and global natural gas and coal markets. It offers timely reassessments of natural gas and coal, adds a disc...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

122

A global warming forum: Scientific, economic, and legal overview  

SciTech Connect

A Global Warming Forum covers in detail five general subject areas aimed at providing first, the scientific background and technical information available on global warming and second, a study and evaluation of the role of economic, legal, and political considerations in global warming. The five general topic areas discussed are the following: (1) The role of geophysical and geoengineering methods to solve problems related to global climatic change; (2) the role of oceanographic and geochemical methods to provide evidence for global climatic change; (3) the global assessment of greenhouse gas production including the need for additional information; (4) natural resource management needed to provide long-term global energy and agricultural uses; (5) legal, policy, and educational considerations required to properly evaluate global warming proposals.

Geyer, R.A. (ed.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ECO-BAT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thickness. Output Detailed numerical results are given for four impacts indicators: NRE (non renewable energy), GWP (global warming), AP (acidification potential) and POCP...

124

Mapping environments at risk under different global climate change scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON Significant disruptions to natural ecosystems are widely expected as a result of global climate change. There is uncertainty about the pace of this change because that depends on future greenhouse gas emissions and complex no readily predictable community structure or composition. We introduce a novel approach to mapping global

Hoffman, Forrest M.

125

Platts top 250 global energy company rankings  

SciTech Connect

Revenues and profits for many firms surged last year over previous years. The turnaround from last year's global survey is dramatic. Asset- and revenue-rich integrated oil and gas companies dominate the top rungs of the 2005 Platts Top 250 Global Energy Company Rankings. The following industry segments were analyzed: diversified utilities; exploration and production; electric utilities; gas utilities; integrated oil and gas companies; refining and marketing; independent power producers; coal and consumable fuel companies and storage and transfer companies; The total combined revenue for the coal and consumable fuels sector was $74.7 billion. Leaders in this sector were: Yanzhou Coal Mining Co., CONSOl Energy Inc., Peabody Energy Corp., PT Bumi Resources Tbk, Cameco Corp., and Arch Coal. 14 tabs.

Mullen, T.; Leonard, M.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Global Fuel Economy Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Fuel Economy Initiative Global Fuel Economy Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Fuel Economy Initiative Agency/Company /Organization: FIA Foundation, International Energy Agency, International Transport Forum, United Nations Environment Programme Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.globalfueleconomy.org/ The Global Fuel Economy Initiative has launched the 50by50 challenge to facilitate large reductions of greenhouse gas emissions and oil use through improvements in automotive fuel economy. The website provides access to working papers, a map showing countries with fuel economy standards, and other related information. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Avoid - Cut the need for travel

127

Review: Globalization of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the PlanetsAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planets140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

Tennant, Matthew Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Global Security 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security *Intelligence *Hyper Innovation Global Security Weapons & Complex Integration NIF Office of Strategic Outcomes Operations & Business Lawrence Livermore National...

129

Global Energy Perspectives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global Energy Perspectives: Supply Security, Economic Development and Sustainability The Annual Energy Policy Conference of the National Capital Area ...

130

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

132

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-GWP Refrigerants Mark O. McLinden National Institute of Standards and Technology markm@boulder.nist.gov; 303-497-3580 April 3, 2013 Optimization Fluid Modeling Cycle Modeling Final Candidates Optimum Thermo Parameters 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: HFC refrigerants face restrictions: U.S./Canada/Mexico proposal to Montreal Protocol (85 % cut) EU regulations likely on all application areas (79 % cut)

133

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-GWP Refrigerants Mark O. McLinden National Institute of Standards and Technology markm@boulder.nist.gov; 303-497-3580 April 3, 2013 Optimization Fluid Modeling Cycle Modeling Final Candidates Optimum Thermo Parameters 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: HFC refrigerants face restrictions: U.S./Canada/Mexico proposal to Montreal Protocol (85 % cut) EU regulations likely on all application areas (79 % cut)

134

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

Use of CO 2 -Snow for Protecting Molten Magnesium from ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2005 ... The protective gas SF6, which is widely used nowadays, increases the greenhouse effect due to it's GWP of approximately 23900 relative to...

136

Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Links Global Climate Change Links This page provides links to web pages that we at CDIAC feel do a responsible job of presenting information and discussion pertinent to the science behind the global climate change ("global warming") debate. These sites include those on both sides of the debate; some asserting that global warming is a clear and present danger, and others that might be labeled global warming "skeptics." Some of these sites don't take a position per se; they exist to offer the public objective scientific information and results on our present understanding of the climate system. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, by any means. We hope it will be especially helpful for those who may be just beginning their research into global

137

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

138

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

139

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

140

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

142

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

143

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

144

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

145

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

146

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

147

Technological Options to Address Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2K-2854 RAB 4/01 2K-2854 RAB 4/01 Hydro 8% Coal 22% Coal 22% Other 1% Gas 23% Gas 23% Coal 19% Coal 19% Gas 28% Gas 28% Fossil Fuels Will Continue as Key to World Economy 1999 data from International Energy Annual 1999 (February 2001) 2020 data from International Energy Outlook 2001 (March 2001) + 6 0 % Oil 40% Hydro 7% Other 0.7% Nuclear 7% 1999 85% Fossil Energy 382 Qbtu / yr 2020 85% Fossil Energy 607 Qbtu / yr Oil 40% Nuclear 4% 2K-2854 RAB 4/01 World Energy Demand Growing Dramatically 0 2 4 6 8 12 2000 2050 2100 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Population (Billions) Energy Consumption (Qbtu / yr) Population Projections: United Nations "Long-Range World Population Projections: Based on the 1998 Revision" Energy Projections: "Global Energy Perspectives" ITASA / WEC World Population Population of

148

Platts top 250 global energy company rankings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The third annual survey of global energy companies measures companies' financial performance using four metrics: asset worth, revenues, profits and return on invested capital. The following industry segments were analysed: coal and consumable fuel companies; diversified utilities; exploration and production; electric utilities; gas utilities; integrated oil and gas companies; refining and marketing; independent power producers and storage and transfer companies. Integrated oil and gas companies (IOGs) captured nine out of the top ten spots while IPPS struggled in 2005 as the sector on a whole lost money. The exploration and production segment showed financial stability while gas utilities saw their financials climb. The Exxon Mobile Corp. continued its reign of the number one spot.

NONE

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement Final, climate policy, global Abstract. We give empirical welfare results for global greenhouse gas emission recycling together. #12;1. Introduction Designing policy mechanisms for abating greenhouse gas emissions

Pezzey, Jack

151

Global energy for the next millennium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Public demand for cleaner air; an ever-growing need for electricity; rising standards of living; convenience of use and reliability of supply--these are the global forces that are accelerating the demand for natural gas today, from Thailand to Brazil, and the gas industry worldwide is moving fast to meet this growing need. Changes--in the regulatory environment, physical infrastructure, and technology--are coming at an unprecedented rate. These changes in turn are exerting a strong influence on the structuring of new gas industries, and the restructuring of existing ones, around the world. The most dramatic increase in gas use, in recent years, was in the Asia-Pacific region and South America, but the expansion is virtually universal. The widespread availability of more efficient gas-fired, combined-cycle power plants are playing a major role in this expansion, but changing trends in demand, regulatory policy, infrastructure development, and technology all contribute to structural change in the industry. In the broadest sense, these are all global issues, transcending national and even regional boundaries. When one looks more closely at exactly how demand growth or regulatory change, for example, is acting as a catalyst for industry restructuring, one can still see significant regional and national differences. A brief overview of these trends is presented.

Jacobs, R.H. [Purvin and Gertz, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

2013 Global Carbon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Global Carbon Project 2013 Global Carbon Project DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2013_V1.1 image 2013 Budget v1.1 (November 2013) image 2013 Budget v1.3 (December 2013, contains typographical corrections to 2011 Australia emissions from v1.1 and corrections to the 2011 Australia transfer and consumption emissions from v1.2) image image image image Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Reach 36 Billion Tonnes in 2013 Global emissions of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels will reach 36 billion tonnes for the year 2013. "This is a level unprecedented in human history," says CSIRO's Dr Pep Canadell, Executive-Director of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and co-author of a new report. Global emissions due to fossil fuel alone are set to grow this year at a slightly lower pace of 2.1% than the average 3.1% since 2000, reaching 36

153

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

Global Oil Geopolitics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Iran-Iraq War . Iranian revolution . Arab Oil Embargo . Asian financial crisis . capacity exhausted . Global financial collapse . 9-11 attacks . OPEC cuts targets 1.7 ...

155

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Speaker(s): Matthew T. Reagan Date: March 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane may have had a significant role in regulating past climate. However, the behavior of contemporary permafrost deposits and oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. A recent expedition to the west coast of Spitsbergen discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor at depths that correspond to the upper limit of the receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the

156

Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Jump to: navigation, search Name Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC4M 9DN Product Cleantech Professional Resource is a resource management consultancy focusing on the cleantech sector in the UK and Europe. References Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cleantech_Professional_Resource_Global_Limited_CPR_Global&oldid=343687

157

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

158

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

159

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

160

NPP and the Global Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Global Carbon Cycle the Global Carbon Cycle Introduction Photosynthetic carbon fixation comprises a major component of the global carbon cycle. Data on net primary productivity (NPP) may be sparse, but a consistent NPP data set may be used to calibrate, parameterize and evaluate models of terrestrial carbon cycling, as well as for validation of remote sensing data and other applications (identifying trends, investigating biogeochemical processes, etc.). It is also useful to place such data within the context of carbon cycling and carbon storage worldwide. For example: How much carbon exists in the biosphere, and where exactly is it stored? How much is in fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas), and how large are current fossil-fuel emissions? How much is in living biomass (plants/ animals/ humans)?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Investing in Oil and Natural Gas A Few Key Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Investing in Oil and Natural Gas: A Few Key Issues Prepared for EIA Conference Susan Farrell, Senior Director PFC Energy April 8, 2009 Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 2 The Top 20 IOCs and Top 20 NOCs Account for Over Half of E&P Spend Source: PFC Energy, Global E&P Surveys Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 3 Oil Prices Rose, But So Did Costs + 52% $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 WTI $/barrel Annual averages Large Gulf of Mexico Facility Costs by Segment Avg $28.31 Avg $59.13 Source: PFC Energy Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 4 Near term Spending Cuts will be Significant

162

Solar and Greenhouse Gas Forcing and Climate Response in the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble experiments with a global coupled climate model are performed for the twentieth century with time-evolving solar, greenhouse gas, sulfate aerosol (direct effect), and ozone (tropospheric and stratospheric) forcing. Observed global ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Warren M. Washington; T. M. L. Wigley; Julie M. Arblaster; Aiguo Dai

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

164

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

165

ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sequestration as natural gas prices rise. INTRODUCTION Heightened concerns about global climate change have were added to EPPA for 1) coal power generation with CCS (coal capture), 2) natural gas combined cycle pulverized coal technology and the 3 #12;advanced natural gas technology. Compared with the pulverized coal

166

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Policy options for stabilizing global climate  

SciTech Connect

The structure of this paper is designed to answer the following questions in turn: What is the greenhouse effect What evidence i there that the greenhouse effect is increasing How will the Earth's climate respond to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations What activities are responsible for the greenhouse gas emissions How might emissions and climate change in the future What technologies are available for limiting greenhouse gas emissions And what domestic and international policy options, if implemented, would help to stabilize global climate This chapter provides a general introduction to the climate change issue and reviews selected previous studies. Chapter II discusses the greenhouse gases, their sources and sinks, chemical properties, current atmospheric concentrations and distributions, and related uncertainties. Chapter III relates the greenhouse gases to the process of climatic change. Once this link is made, Chapter IV examines those human activities that affect trace-gas emissions and ultimately influence climate change. Chapter V discusses the scenarios developed for this report to assist us in thinking about possible future emissions and climate change. Chapter VI then presents sensitivity analyses of the modeling results. Chapter VII gives a detailed description of existing and emerging technologies that should be considered in the formation of a comprehensive strategy for mitigating global warming. Chapter VIII outlines domestic policy options, and the concluding chapter (Chapter IX) discusses international mechanisms for responding to climate change.

Lashof, D.A.; Tirpak, D.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and

169

Winners and losers in a world with global warming: Noncooperation, altruism, and social welfare  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, global warming is an asymmetric transboundary externality which benefits some countries or regions and harms others. Few environmental problems have captured the public`s imagination as much and attracted as much scrutiny as global warming. The general perception is that global warming is a net social bad, and that across-the-board abatement of greenhouse gas emissions is therefore desirable. Despite many interesting academic contributions, not all of the basic economics of this phenomenon have been fully worked out. The authors use a simple two-country model to analyze the effects of global warming on resource allocations, the global-warming stock, and national and global welfare.

Caplan, A.J. [Weber State Univ., Ogden, UT (United States). Dept. of Economics; Ellis, C.J.; Silva, E.C.D. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Economics

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Reduction of natural gas engine emissions using a novel aftertreatment system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The global objective of this study was to develop an exhaust aftertreatment system to reduce gaseous and particulate matter emissions from natural gas fueled vehicles. (more)

Burlingame, Timothy S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Global Internet Summit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... from laboring as a roughneck on drilling rigs to working as an engineer and manager, and running a multi-billion dollar oil and gas company at 33 ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

172

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

173

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

174

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

175

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

176

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

177

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

178

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

179

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

180

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

182

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

183

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

184

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

185

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

186

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

187

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

189

Global Renewable Power International Global RPI | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RPI) Place Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spain-based developer of wind projects in Poland, Croatia and Chile. References Global Renewable Power International (Global RPI)1...

190

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

191

Pax Global, Inc.,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pax Global, Inc., Pax Global, Inc., (freezers) Issued: April 2, 2013 BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, D.C. 20585 ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-L413 NOTICE OF NONCOMPLIANCE DETERMINATION Manufacturers and private labelers are prohibited from distributing covered products in the United States that do not comply with applicable federal energy conservation standards. 10 C.F.R. § 429.102; 42 U.S.C. § 6302. Pax Global, Inc. ("Pax Global") is a private labeler and uses the "Crosley" and "Daewoo" brands to distribute freezers in the United States. TESTING l. The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") tested four privately labeled units o basic model numbe , manufactured , 1 that had been distributed in the United States by a third-pa1iy private labeler.

193

KRFTWRK Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Global Warming, Soot, Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming, Soot, Ice Speaker(s): James Hansen Date: November 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Irreversible "dangerous anthropogenic interference" with the climate system...

195

The Global Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Gran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Estimated Global Hydrographic Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An estimate is made of the three-dimensional global oceanic temperature and salinity variability, omitting the seasonal cycle, both as a major descriptive element of the ocean circulation and for use in the error estimates of state estimation. ...

Gal Forget; Carl Wunsch

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. China, Venezuela firms to co-developoilfields. China Daily (27 August 2005) http://David and Bi Jianhai. Chinas Global Hunt for Energy.

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Earth's Global Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An update is provided on the Earth's global annual mean energy budget in the light of new observations and analyses. In 1997, Kiehl and Trenberth provided a review of past estimates and performed a number of radiative computations to better ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo; Jeffrey Kiehl

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Global Ocean Meridional Overturning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decade-mean global ocean circulation is estimated using inverse techniques, incorporating airsea fluxes of heat and freshwater, recent hydrographic sections, and direct current measurements. This information is used to determine mass, heat, ...

Rick Lumpkin; Kevin Speer

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Producing Natural Gas from Shale Opportunities and Challenges of a Major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continuing annual support to STRONGER (the State Review of Oil and Natural Gas Environmental Regulation1 Producing Natural Gas from Shale ­ Opportunities and Challenges of a Major New Energy Source ~2300 TCF (85% Shale Gas) "100 years of Natural Gas" U.S. Consumption 23 TCF/y #12;5 Opportunity: Global

Nur, Amos

202

Global climate change: Implications, challenges and mitigation measures  

SciTech Connect

The present volume discusses topics in the fields of natural climatic fluctuations, the greenhouse effect, climate modeling, the biophysical and socioeconomic impacts of climate change, climate-change effect mitigation and adaptation strategies, and domestic (US) and international perspectives on regulation of climate-affecting activities. Attention is given to past climates as a guide to the future, the certainty of contemporary global warming, the physics of the greenhouse effect, the global carbon cycle, general circulation model studies of global warming, the implications of sea-level rise, forests' role in global climate change, the ecological effects of rapid climate change, predicted effects of climate change on agriculture, the impact of global warming on human health, energy supply technologies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the U.N.'s 1992 Earth Summit Conference.

Majumdar, S.K.; Kalkstein, L.S.; Yarnal, B.M.; Miller, E.W.; Rosenfeld, L.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Rethinking the economics of global warming  

SciTech Connect

Most of the debates over the impact of the greenhouse effect have centered around the reliability of computer models and have neglected considerations of the economic effects of attempts to reduce global warming. Economic models have certain limitations but the input of cost benefit analysis is needed for arriving at suitable policies for lowering anthropogenic input into warming of the earth. Care must be used in extrapolating from data of time periods which are inappropriate. Estimates of costs of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions also must include possible benefits; at present this is not being done. Economic models must address differences in the distribution of global warming's consequences over time and geographical space. The costs of delaying or accelerating reduction in greenhouse-gas emissions need to be included in policy considerations. A global agreement must not adversely affect developing countries. Faulty assumptions of the effect of market forces on costs impair economic models. We have to recognize that economic and environmental goals need not be incompatible. If economic models are viewed as possible scenarios and not as predictions, then these scenarios can be useful in determining policies for reducing the greenhouse effect without harming populations and their economies.

Miller, A.; Mintzer, I.; Brown, P.G. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Privatization and the globalization of energy markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews recent global efforts to privatize energy resources and outlines the opportunities and challenges privatization has presented to U.S. and foreign multinational energy companies. The group of energy companies studied in this report includes the major U.S. petroleum companies and many foreign companies. The foreign companies reviewed include state-run energy enterprises, recently privatized energy enterprises, and foreign multinationals that have been privately held. The privatization of non-petroleum energy industries, such as electricity generation and transmission, natural gas transmission, and coal mining, are also discussed. Overseas investments made by electric companies, natural gas companies, and coal companies are included. The report is organized into six chapters: (1) economics of privatization; (2) petroleum privatization efforts among non-U.S. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development nations; (3) petroleum privatization efforts in Latin America; (4) privatization in socialist and former socialist regimes; (5) privatization efforts in global electric power generation, transmission, and distribution industries; and (6) privatization and globalization of world coal.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

206

Impacts of greenhouse gas mitigation policies on agricultural land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are widely acknowledged to be responsible for much of the global warming in the past century. A number of approaches have been proposed to mitigate GHG emissions. Since the burning of ...

Wang, Xiaodong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Oil & Gas Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Research Oil & Gas Research Section 999 Report to Congress DOE issues the 2013 annual plan for the ultra-deepwater and unconventional fuels program. Read more DOE Signs MOU with Alaska New accord to help develop Alaska's potentially vast and important unconventional energy resources. Read more Methane Hydrate R&D DOE is conducting groundbreaking research to unlock the energy potential of gas hydrates. Read more LNG Safety Research Report This Report to Congress summarizes the progress of DOE's LNG safety research Read more FE's Office of Oil & Natural Gas supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas. Resource/Safety R&D Hydraulic Fracturing & Shale Gas Research. Natural gas from shales has the

209

NETL: Global Environmental Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gasification Systems Global Environmental Benefits Environmental performance for future energy production systems is a much greater factor as emission standards tighten in the United States and worldwide. The outstanding environmental performance of gasification systems makes it an excellent technology for the clean production of electricity and other products. In addition, the reduction of CO2 emissions is one of the major challenges facing industry in response to global climate change. Other countries with coal reserves might potentially import technologies developed in the United States to enable low-cost gasification with carbon capture and EOR or sequestration. Not only will this benefit the U.S. gasification technology industry, but it will also result in a global environmental benefit through more affordable control of greenhouse gases (GHGs). See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) link below for a summary of the impact of fossil fuels without carbon capture on CO2 emissions, on the GHG contributions of different countries, and of the projected impact of developing countries to 2030:

210

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

211

global | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

global global Dataset Summary Description GIS data for offshore wind speed (meters/second). Specified to Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ).Wind resource based on NOAA blended sea winds and monthly wind speed at 30km resolution, using a 0.11 wind sheer to extrapolate 10m - 90m. Annual average >= 10 months of data, no nulls. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords GIS global NOAA NREL offshore wind wind speed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 18.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Please cite NREL and NOAA Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

212

Global ice sheet modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

214

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

215

Principal Associate Director - Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Associate Director - Global Security Principal Associate Director - Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with special focus on developing and applying the scientific and engineering capabilities to address complex national and global security threats. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505 667-5061 Wallace's expertise is forensic seismology, a highly specialized discipline focusing on detection and quantification of nuclear tests. Terry C. Wallace, Jr. Principal Associate Director for Global Security Terry C. Wallace, Jr., Principal Associate Director for Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with a focus on applying scientific and engineering capabilities

216

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

217

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

218

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

219

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

220

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

222

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

223

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

224

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

225

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

226

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

227

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

228

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

229

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

230

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

231

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

232

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

233

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

234

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

235

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

236

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

237

Putting LNG into Perspective on a Global Basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global liquefied natural gas (LNG) business is undergoing rapid expansion that will reshape gas supplies, risks, and price expectations. The period 2005-2010 will likely see a tripling of LNG trade. Growth is occurring across all three major market centers: Asia, Europe, and the United States. Historically the marked has been dominated by gas requirements in Asia; but by the end of the decade U.S. imports are poised to exceed those in Asia; and the U.S. and Europe will compete strongly within the Atl...

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

238

Emission Scenario Dependency of Precipitation on Global Warming in the MIROC3.2 Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The precipitation sensitivity per 1 K of global warming in twenty-first-century climate projections is smaller in an emission scenario with larger greenhouse gas concentrations and aerosol emissions, according to the Model for Interdisciplinary ...

Hideo Shiogama; Seita Emori; Kiyoshi Takahashi; Tatsuya Nagashima; Tomoo Ogura; Toru Nozawa; Toshihiko Takemura

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Global climate change and international security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

Rice, M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

8th Global warming international conference and exposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from The 8th Annual Global Warming international conference and expo. Topics centered around greenhouse gas emission and disposal methods, policy and economics, carbon budget, and resource management. Individual reports have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina,Slovenia. Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Shale oil and shale gas resources are globally abundant ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... solar, wind , geothermal ... Quarterly Coal Report Monthly Energy Review Residential Energy ... to evaluate and test the production potential ...

243

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity by State by Sector by Provider) and assumes an average 1.98% growth rate for each of the states

Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applied to China Projections 2030 projections A1 B2 GDP/ca0237762 b2 | .9999351 6.64e-06 2030 projections A1 B2 GDP/caof end use efficiency to 2030. This report focuses on the

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production from non- fossil-fuel energy such as renewableenergy of the non- fossil-fuel energy at the level ofenergy of the non fossil fuel energy is accounted for at the

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intensity of the energy use compared to the evolution of GDP. Historically, this indicatorenergy intensity to continue to decrease in a similar manner over the next 30 years (36%) while the B2 scenario forecasts this indicator

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia,Europe Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agency (IEA), 2004c. CO2 emissions from fuel combustion,of Carbon Dioxide Emissions on GNP Growth: Interpretation ofD. , 2000. Special Report on Emissions Scenarios: Report of

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Consumption 11and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand theData Historical energy consumption and energy-related CO 2

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions Trading, Electricity Industry Restructuring, andshow that in the electricity industry, California companiesto migrate. The electricity industry, however, represents

Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such a standard for baseload power plants. The regulationapplies to plants meeting baseload power needs, we limitedwould cover Californias baseload electricity demand. Figure

Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We produced a two-dimensional geological time- and basin-scale model of the sedimentary margin in passive and active settings, for the simulation of the deep sedimentary methane cycle including hydrate formation. Simulation of geochemical data required development of parameterizations for bubble transport in the sediment column, and for the impact of the heterogeneity in the sediment pore fluid flow field, which represent new directions in modeling methane hydrates. The model is somewhat less sensitive to changes in ocean temperature than our previous 1-D model, due to the different methane transport mechanisms in the two codes (pore fluid flow vs. bubble migration). The model is very sensitive to reasonable changes in organic carbon deposition through geologic time, and to details of how the bubbles migrate, in particular how efficiently they are trapped as they rise through undersaturated or oxidizing chemical conditions and the hydrate stability zone. The active margin configuration reproduces the elevated hydrate saturations observed in accretionary wedges such as the Cascadia Margin, but predicts a decrease in the methane inventory per meter of coastline relative to a comparable passive margin case, and a decrease in the hydrate inventory with an increase in the plate subduction rate.

David Archer; Bruce Buffett

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Global natural gas prices vary considerably - Today in Energy - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... even before the earthquake. The relationship between North American and northwest European spot prices appears to have changed in the last 18 months.

254

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

year into the worldwide solar PV market, estimated at over $costs, current generation Solar PV represents a curiousestimates indicate that solar PV installations cost about 25

Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

words, all historic electricity trades are considered to beof western electricity firms to trade their electricity. Itif the electricity sector is allowed to trade with other

Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility of oil reserve depletion raises questionscoefficient as these reserves of oil require more energy tooil use with other forms of energy. The potential exploitation of the large and inexpensive coal reserves

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of roughly 70 TWh of hydro energy in neighboring regions ofall of this additional hydro energy would be available forcarbon nuclear, hydro, and renewable energy sources. If we

Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Global Hunger Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of halving the proportion of hungry people between 1990 and 2015, we are nowhere near meeting that target. The percentage of undernourished people fell from 20 percent in 199092 to 16 percent in 200406. In recent years, however, the number of hungry people has actually been increasing. In 2009, on the heels of a global food price

Heidi Fritschel; Yisehac Yohannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

260

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

262

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

263

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

264

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

265

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

266

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Printer-Friendly Version Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and maintenance costs, deliverability rates, and cycling capability), which govern its suitability to particular applications. Two of the most important characteristics of an underground storage reservoir are its capacity to hold natural gas for future use and the rate at which gas inventory can be withdrawn-its deliverability rate (see Storage Measures, below, for key definitions).

267

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

268

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

270

NIST Global Standards Information Americas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Workshop on Oil and Gas for South America. Mar ... Inc. and other organizations involved with oil and gas standards and codes. ...

271

Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the Deepest Winter Mixed Layer Depths  

SciTech Connect

Modeling the global ocean-atmosphere carbon dioxide system is becoming increasingly important to greenhouse gas policy. These models require initialization with realistic three-dimensional (3-D) oceanic carbon fields. This report presents an approach to establishing these initial conditions from an extensive global database of ocean carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) system measurements and well-developed interpolation methods.

Goyet, C.; Healy, R.; Ryan, J.; Kozyr, A.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

GA-GPU: extending a library-based global address spaceprogramming model for scalable heterogeneouscomputing systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scalable heterogeneous computing (SHC) architectures are emerging as a response to new requirements for low cost, power efficiency, and high performance. For example, numerous contemporary HPC systems are using commodity Graphical Processing Units (GPU) ... Keywords: armci, ga, gas, global address space, global arrays, gpu, nwchem, pgas

Vinod Tipparaju; Jeffrey S. Vetter

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production Sectors Non-Extant Supply Sources Goods Shale Oil Agriculture AGRI Unconventional Gas EnergyMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Technology and Technical Change July 2004 #12;The MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change is an organization

274

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

275

Joint Variability of Global Runoff and Global Sea Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global land surface runoff and sea surface temperatures (SST) are analyzed to identify the primary modes of variability of these hydroclimatic data for the period 19052002. A monthly water-balance model first is used with global monthly ...

Gregory J. McCabe; David M. Wolock

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

277

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

278

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

279

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

280

Global Climate Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data The climate data at the ORNL DAAC are used primarily as driving variables in terrestrial biogeochemistry models. These models typically use data on temperature (min,max), precipitation, humidity (relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit, dew point), radiation (PFD in PAR, shortwave, direct/diffuse, and UV radiation, daylength), and wind velocity. Climate / meteorology data are required at hourly to monthly time scales, either point or gridded, at spatial scales ranging from regional to continental to global. The ORNL DAAC currently distributes climate data from several related projects: VEMAP-1 Hydroclimatology, and Global Historical Climatology Network. We are also now distributing climate data developed at the East Anglia Climate Research Unit and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Global Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from plants and animals to energy, and to determine the best conditions for doing so (see below). #12, and processes may have an enormous impact on the world's future energy consumption and environment. In orderGlobal Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY Global Energy Climate

Nur, Amos

282

Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the response of global water vapor to global warming in a series of fully coupled climate model simulations. We find that a roughly 7% per Kelvin rate of increase of water vapor with global surface temperature is robust only for rapid ...

Larissa Back; Karen Russ; Zhengyu Liu; Kuniaki Inoue; Jiaxu Zhang; Bette Otto-Bliesner

283

title Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS Model year month institution Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory address Berkeley abstract p A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas GHG and regional criteria pollutant emissions The model included representations of all GHGemitting sectors of the California economy including those outside the energy sector such as high global warming potential gases waste treatment agriculture and forestry in varying degrees of detail and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and

284

Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs).

285

Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas: Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir, as in contrast to injected gas volumes. Natural Gas: A gaseous mixture...

286

Global Warming Local Warning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

informed consumption and lifestyle decisions. "Green energy must be put at the heart of sustainable from the expected increase in freak and extreme weather conditions. My concern as Green Party MEP working to combat aviation subsidies, since air transport is the fastest growing source of greenhouse gas

Williams, Paul

287

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Global residential appliance standards  

SciTech Connect

In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US); Lebot, B. [Agence Francaise pour la Maitrise de l`Energie, Valbonne (FR)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Gas Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... automobile industry meeting more stringent more. Audit of EPA Protocol Gas Suppliers EPA Protocol gas mixture calibration ...

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

290

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://globalresearchalliance. References Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases [1] Background "The Alliance is a bottom-up network, founded on the voluntary, collaborative efforts of countries. It will coordinate research on agricultural greenhouse gas emission reductions by linking up existing and new research efforts across a range of sub-sectors and work areas. It will

291

GoGlobal Fall 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy and Social Welfare at the UCLA School of Public Affairs, and Visiting Professor of Global & International

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing Important Geologic CO2 Storage Carbon dioxide injection -- an important part of carbon capture and storage technology -- is underway as part of a pilot study of CO2 enhanced oil recovery in the Citronelle Field of Mobile County, Alabama. October 29, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global Climate Cycle Washington, D.C. -- Increased understanding of methane's role in the global climate cycle and the potential of methane hydrate as a future energy resource could result from a recent joint research expedition off the coast of northeastern Alaska involving the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). October 2, 2009 DOE to Unveil New Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results

293

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Carbon Emission Estimates image image Global Per Capita Carbon Emission Estimates...

294

Measurement techniques for local and global fluid dynamic quantities in two and three phase systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available measurement techniques for evaluation of global and local phase holdups, instantaneous and average phase velocities and for the determination of bubble sizes in gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid systems are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of various techniques are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying methods that can be employed on large scale, thick wall, high pressure and high temperature reactors used in the manufacture of fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas and its derivatives.

Kumar, S.; Dudukovic, M.P.; Toseland, B.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Arrhenius and global warming  

SciTech Connect

Although concern about global atmospheric warming has intensified in recent decades, research into the greenhouse effect actually began in the 19th century. Fourier and other scientists appreciated that without heat-absorbing gases in the atmosphere, the temperature on the ground would be considerably lower, making life as we know it impossible. In 1896, the Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius was the first to make a quantitative link between changes in carbon dioxide concentration and climate. Publication of his paper was celebrated at a recent Swedish workshop. 13 refs., 1 fig.

Uppenbrink, J.

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Global Energy Challenge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use. The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

Crabtree, George (ANL)

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

297

Global Laser Enrichment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPLICATION PUBLIC RESPONSES GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment LLC (GLE) hereby submits the additional information requested in the November 19, 2009 letter. Enclosure 1 of this letter contains the responses the questions. A separate letter has been submitted that contains a non-public version of these responses, which contains Export-Controlled and Security-Related Information. If there are any questions regarding this letter and its contents, please do not hesitate to contact myself, or Julie Olivier of my staff at 910-819-4799 or at Julie.Olivier@ge.com.

Uranium Enrichment Branch; Albert E. Kennedy; Albert E. Kennedy; Tammy Orr (gle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Global Laser Enrichment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PUBLIC VERSION GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment LLC (GLE) hereby submits revision 2 of the GLE License Application. Enclosure 1 contains revised Request for Additional Information responses. Enclosure 2 contains revised chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 11 of the GLE License Application. Enclosure 3 contains the revised pubic version of the Decommissioning Funding Plan. Non-Public versions of the revised License Application and the Decommissioning Funding Plan have been prepared and will be submitted under separate enclosure. If there are any questions regarding this letter and its contents, please do not hesitate to contact me at 910-819-4799 or at

Julie Olivier; Brian Smith Chief; Uranium Enrichment Branch; Julie Olivier; Tim Johnson (nrc; Tammy Orr (gle; Lori Butler (geh; Jerry Head (geh; Patricia Campbell (geh; Bob Crate (gle; Ken Givens (gle; Tom Owens (gle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Fact Sheet: U.S. and China Actions Matter for Global Energy Demand, for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fact Sheet: U.S. and China Actions Matter for Global Energy Demand, Fact Sheet: U.S. and China Actions Matter for Global Energy Demand, for Global Environmental Quality, and for the Challenge of Global Climate Change Fact Sheet: U.S. and China Actions Matter for Global Energy Demand, for Global Environmental Quality, and for the Challenge of Global Climate Change December 5, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis The U.S. is committed to working together with China to tackle current energy challenges the world faces, including cultivating sufficient investment, the development and deployment of new energy technologies, and addressing greenhouse gas emissions from producing and using energy. Our cooperation spans power generation, efficient buildings, sustainable transportation, emissions-free nuclear power, and clean fossil fuels. The U.S. and China are the world's largest energy consumers and are

300

Fact Sheet: U.S. and China Actions Matter for Global Energy Demand, for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S. and China Actions Matter for Global Energy Demand, S. and China Actions Matter for Global Energy Demand, for Global Environmental Quality, and for the Challenge of Global Climate Change Fact Sheet: U.S. and China Actions Matter for Global Energy Demand, for Global Environmental Quality, and for the Challenge of Global Climate Change December 5, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis The U.S. is committed to working together with China to tackle current energy challenges the world faces, including cultivating sufficient investment, the development and deployment of new energy technologies, and addressing greenhouse gas emissions from producing and using energy. Our cooperation spans power generation, efficient buildings, sustainable transportation, emissions-free nuclear power, and clean fossil fuels. The U.S. and China are the world's largest energy consumers and are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ENVIRONMENTALLY DRIVEN GLOBAL EVOLUTION OF GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Utilizing high-resolution large-scale galaxy formation simulations of the standard cold dark matter model, we examine global trends in the evolution of galaxies due to gravitational shock heating by collapse of large halos and large-scale structure. We find two major global trends. (1) The mean specific star formation rate (sSFR) at a given galaxy mass is a monotonically increasing function with increasing redshift. (2) The mean sSFR at a given redshift is a monotonically increasing function of decreasing galaxy mass that steepens with decreasing redshift. The general dimming trend with time merely reflects the general decline of gas inflow rate with increasing time. The differential evolution of galaxies of different masses with redshift is a result of gravitational shock heating of gas due to formation of large halos (groups and clusters) and large-scale structure that moves a progressively larger fraction of galaxies and their satellites into environments where gas has too high an entropy to cool to continue feeding resident galaxies. Overdense regions where larger halos are preferentially located begin to be heated earlier and have higher temperatures than lower density regions at any given time, causing sSFR of larger galaxies to fall below the general dimming trend at higher redshift than less massive galaxies and galaxies with high sSFR to gradually shift to lower density environments at lower redshift. We find that several noted cosmic downsizing phenomena are different manifestations of these general trends. We also find that the great migration of galaxies from blue cloud to red sequence as well as color-density relation, among others, may arise naturally in this picture.

Cen Renyue, E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

302

Study Climate and Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Study How We Study Prepare The Nation For Change Assess the U.S. Climate Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Study Climate and Global Change Print E-mail Deforestation What is global change? "Global change" refers to changes in the global environment that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life. This includes alterations in: Climate Land productivity Oceans or other water resources Atmospheric chemistry Ecological systems Demographic and socioeconomic trends What is global change research? According to the Global Change Research Act of 1990, "Global change research" refers to the study, monitoring, assessment, prediction, and information management activities used to describe and understand the:

303

Global Scratch Upgrade in Progress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Scratch Gets Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Improvements Will Include Higher Data Output Rates, Connection to PDSF October 29, 2013 The most used file system at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)-global scratch-just got an upgrade. As a result, some users may see their data output to global scratch reach up to 80 gigabytes per second. Although users will probably not see their 20-terabyte storage quotas increase, the upgrade ensures that global scratch remains flexible and paves the way for PDSF to eventually use the file system Because of the upgrade, users will also be able to better access their temporary data files or "scratch data" from any NERSC system, not just the one that generated it. Prior to the upgrade, Global scratch typically

304

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop biogeochemical cycles and global greenhouse gas budgets. Energy cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is a sugarcane changing land from grazed pasture to energy cane would affect greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4 and N2O) fluxes

DeLucia, Evan H.

305

Field validation of the DNDC model for greenhouse gas emissions in East Asian cropping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field validation of the DNDC model for greenhouse gas emissions in East Asian cropping systems annual variations of greenhouse gas emissions from cropping systems and effects of land management a powerful tool for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from terrestrial ecosystems. INDEX TERMS: 1610 Global

306

Environmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climatically important trace gas fluxes on regional and global scales, yet the magnitude of the transfer-generated turbulence in a shallow tidal sea, Nature, 400, 251­254. Raymond, P. A., and J. J. Cole (2001), Gas exchangeEnvironmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems

Ho, David

307

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Assessment of the global impact of aerosols on tropospheric oxidants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We present here a fully coupled global aerosol and chemistry model for the troposphere. The model is used to assess the interactions between aerosols and chemical oxidants in the troposphere, including (1) the conversion from gas-phase oxidants into the condensed phase during the formation of aerosols, (2) the heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surface of aerosols, and (3) the effect of aerosols on ultraviolet radiation and photolysis rates. The present study uses the global three-dimensional chemical/ transport model, Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 2 (MOZART-2), in which aerosols are coupled with the model. The model accounts for the presence of

Xuexi Tie; Sasha Madronich; Stacy Walters; David P. Edwards; Paul Ginoux; Natalie Mahowald; Renyi Zhang; Chao Lou; Guy Brasseur

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

BBSLA Kazakhstan (032610) Kazakh (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA Kazakhstan (032610) Kazakh (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION ??????????? ???????? ????????????? ...

310

BBSLA - Kazakhstan (032610) Russian (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA - Kazakhstan (032610) Russian (Global Version 031010) 1 ???????????? ?????????? ?? ????????????? ??????? ...

311

Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: pdf.wri.org/navigating_numbers.pdf References: Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy[1] Overview "This report examines greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the global, national, sectoral, and fuel levels and identifies implications of the data for international cooperation on global climate change. Emissions are assessed within the broader socioeconomic context faced by countries,

312

Greenhouse Gas Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Greenhouse Gas Basics October 7, 2013 - 10:01am Addthis Federal agencies must understand key terms and management basics to successfully manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect." This process keeps the planet habitable. International research has linked human activities to a rapid increase in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere, contributing to major shifts in the global climate. Graphic of the top half of earth depicting current arctic sea ice. A red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Current arctic sea ice is shown roughly 50% smaller than the 1979 depiction.

313

Advanced gas distribution research at IGT  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has made substantial progress on its multi-year program in demonstrating the technical feasibility of integrated, automated gas distribution systems. The objective of this program is to address automation of distribution as a total system, rather than automation of individual features. This work is geared towards developing a compatible, modular automation system to benefit gas utilities. The system must have an open architecture so that any manufacturer can produce equipment that will be compatible with all other system components. There are approximately 30 capabilities that the laboratory system will ultimately demonstrate, and 10 are now functional. These include: gas meter reading, bill calculation and printing, multiple rate billing, tamper detection, electronic reconfiguration, global commands, remote city gate station control, district meter reading, cathodic protection potential reading, and automatic differential pressure reading.

Rush, W.F. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonproliferation Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1 The Current Status of Gap and U.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals 2011 Jeff Galan, Deputy Project Manager U.S.-Origin Nuclear Remove Program National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 GTRI Mission and Goals GTRI is: A part of President Obama's comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other

315

Global emissions inventories  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry determines the concentrations of most of the important greenhouse gases except for carbon dioxide. The rate of removal of the greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is also controlled by atmospheric chemistry. The indirect effects of chemical forcing resulting from the chemical interactions of other species can also affect the concentrations of radiatively important gases such as ozone. In order to establish the contribution of any possible climatic change attributable to individual greenhouse gases, spatially and temporally resolved estimates of their emissions need to be established. Unfortunately, for most of the radiatively important species the global magnitudes of their individual fluxes are not known to better than a factor of two and their spatial distributions are even more poorly characterized. Efforts to estimate future projections of potential impacts and to monitor international agreements will require continued research to narrow the uncertainties of magnitude and geographical distribution of emissions.

Dignon, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Global Energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Mobil Corporation has undertaken voluntary actions to continuously improve energy efficiency in our operations for many years. From 1973 to 1999, we improved the energy efficiency of our refineries and chemical plants by over 35 percent - saving the cumulative equivalent of 1.8 billion barrels of oil and reducing carbon dioxide emissions by over 200 million tonnes. In 2000, we redoubled our efforts with deployment of our Global Energy Management System (GEMS), which utilizes international best practices and benchmarking to identify energy efficiencies at each of our refineries and chemical plants. Thus far, we have identified opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of these facilities by an additional 15 to 20 percent. At full implementation, savings are expected to total $500 million to $1 billion per year, with an associated reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of about 10 million tonnes per year - roughly equivalent to removing 1.5 million cars from the world's roads.

Eidt, B. D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

318

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

319

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

320

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

322

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

323

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

324

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

325

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

326

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

327

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

328

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

329

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

330

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

331

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

332

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

333

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

334

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

335

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

336

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

337

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

338

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

339

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

340

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

342

Global Warming* The Perfect Storm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrates Shale Oil Tar Sands ? ** #12;Caption if needed #12;"Free Will" Alternative 1. Phase Out Coal CO2 Oil Gas Coal GtC Reserve growth Proven reserves* Emissions (CDIAC) EIA IPCC CO2(ppmv) 600 400 200 100 300 0 500 *Oil & gas from EIA ** Unconventional oil & gas; uncertain, could be large Other Methane

Hansen, James E.

343

Russias Natural Gas Export Potential up to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent increases in natural gas reserve estimates and advances in shale gas technology make natural gas a fuel with good prospects to serve a bridge to a low-carbon world. Russia is an important energy supplier as it holds the world largest natural gas reserves and it is the worlds largest exporter of natural gas. Energy was one of the driving forces of Russias recent economic recovery from the economic collapse of 1990s. These prospects have changed drastically with a global recession and the collapse of oil and gas prices from their peaks of 2008. An additional factor is an ongoing surge in a liquefied natural gas (LNG) capacity and a development of Central Asias and the Middle East gas supplies that can compete with Russian gas in its traditional (European) and potential (Asian) markets. To study the long-term prospects for Russian natural gas, we employ the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy. While we consider the updated reserve estimates for all world regions, in this paper we focus on the results for Russian natural gas trade. The role of natural gas is explored in the context of several policy assumptions: with no greenhouse gas mitigation policy and scenarios of emissions targets in developed countries. Scenarios where Europe takes on an even more restrictive target of 80

Sergey Paltsev; Sergey Paltsev

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

345

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

346

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

347

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

348

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

349

NIST Global Standards Information Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ileana Martinez. Global standards & trade, Europe, Americas, e-Accessibility, biofuels, accreditation. ileana.martinez@nist.gov 301-975-2766. ...

350

Machine Learning for Global Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach for global optimization in which machine learning is used to predict ..... In Figure 1 we show the level curves of the 2dimensional Rastrigin function.

351

Status of fossil energy resources: A global perspective  

SciTech Connect

This article deals with recently status of global fossil energy sources. Fossil energy sources have been split into three categories: oil,coal, and natural gas. Fossil fuels are highly efficient and cheap. Currently oil is the fastest primary energy source in the world (39% of world energy consumption). Coal will be a major source of energy for the world for the foreseeable future (24% of world energy consumption). In 2030, coal covers 45% of world energy needs. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world energy consumption (23% of world energy consumption). Fossil fuel extraction and conversion to usable energy has several environmental impacts. They could be a major contributor to global warming and greenhouse gases and a cause of acid rain; therefore, expensive air pollution controls are required.

Balat, M. [SILA Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Eligibility...

353

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

354

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

355

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

356

Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

358

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

359

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas prices, successful application of horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, as well as significant investments made by natural gas companies in production...

360

Gas scrubbing liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowrie, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Natural Gas Processed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

362

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service Evolving Estimate in Natural Gas Monthly.

363

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and a weather snapshot. Monthly Natural Gas Monthly Natural and supplemental gas production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices in the...

364

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

365

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

366

February Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

367

November Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

368

January Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

369

March Natural Gas Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

370

May Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

371

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7, 2009 Next Release: May 14, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 6, 2009) Natural gas...

372

CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

373

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

374

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

375

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

376

Natural Gas Dry Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

377

Retrieval of Tropospheric Carbon Monoxide Profiles from High-Resolution Interferometer Observations: A New Digital Gas Correlation (DGC)Method and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) distributions can be retrieved from observations by spaceborne gas correlation radiometers and high-resolution interferometers. The Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) is a gas correlation ...

Jinxue Wang; John C. Gille; Paul L. Bailey; Liwen Pan; David Edwards; James R. Drummond

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Global petrochemical industry experiencing cyclic downturn  

SciTech Connect

The current deterioration of the petrochemical industry-particularly in the U.S. and Western Europe-is a cause of great concern to operators and analysts alike. Although the rapidly developing Asian market will continue to be a major factor into the next century, the immediate global outlook is for a weak market. Chem Systems Inc., Tarrytown, N.Y., discussed these issues at its annual petrochemical conference, held Jan. 13-14 in Houston. One of the few optimistic predictions of the meetings gas that the harbingers of the next industry cycle already can be seen in the U.S. economic recovery, and slow-down in new project planning, and a reduction in fixed costs. The paper describes the US market; market structure; the trend toward capacity integration; product forecasts; factors affecting the prices of propylene, aromatics, and benzene; the Asian market (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, Asian countries); regional trade; and the European market.

1993-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

379

Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Collett, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Topics: Pathways analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=1000821 References: A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry[1] CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) is a key technology option for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mitigation. Recent studies suggest that CCS would contribute 19% of the total global mitigation that is needed for halving global GHG emissions by 2050. Overview

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Statistical global metabolic control analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work introduces the concept of global sensitivity based on simultaneous variation of a complete set of enzymes, metabolite concentrations, and cofactors in finite ranges of concentrations. Perturbations are defined by finite ranges of concentrations ... Keywords: MCA metabolic control analysis, flux control coefficients, global sensitivity, homeostasis

Zelimir Kurtanjek

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Global and Regional Solutions Directorate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Pacific NW National Lab (PNNL) ­ Founding Director Joint Global Change Research Institute (PNNL/UMd) ­ ALD (PNNL) ­ Environmental and Health Sciences Directorate; Emerging Technologies ­ Chief Scientist ­ Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ­ Director ­ PNNL Global Studies Program ­ Other (PNNL): Center

Homes, Christopher C.

383

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;#12;CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME 4 VICE: INNOVATIVE AND WORLD-CLASS 18 CONTACT 26 CONTENTS 3GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;Queen THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELANDGLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME

Müller, Jens-Dominik

384

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Other Resources Other Resources Pew Center on Global Climate Change Pew Center brings together major organizations with critical scientific, economic, and technological expertise focused on global climate change and educates the public on associated risks, challenges, and solutions. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) The MIT joint program on the science and policy of global change provides research, independent policy analysis, and public education in global environmental change. IEA Greenhouse Gas Programme The IEA greenhouse gas R&D program (IEA GHG) aims to identify and evaluate fossil fuel-based GHG reduction technologies, disseminate results, and identify target technologies for appropriate and practical R&D. Nature Conservancy The Nature Conservancy sponsors projects that protect ecosystems and

385

Educational Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Global Climate Change Links Educational Global Climate Change Links Evidence of the importance of global climate change to the future generation is reflected in the increasing number of queries CDIAC receives from students and educators, from a range of educational levels. We have compiled a listing of some sites that we hope will be of interest and of use to those looking for information, fun, ideas, and ways that they can make a difference. These links were chosen because we have found them useful in responding to those with inquiring minds. These links will take the user outside of CDIAC, and are by no means comprehensive. We are not responsible for the content or intent of these outside links. Tools you can use! NOAA's Global Climate Dashboard - The Global Climate Dashboard is

386

Frequently Asked Global Change Questions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asked Global Change Questions Asked Global Change Questions This page lists global change questions that have been received at CDIAC and the answers that were provided to a diverse audience. If you have a question relating to carbon dioxide and global change and cannot find the answer you need here, you can "Ask Us a Question", and we will be glad to try to help you. Questions Should we grow trees to remove carbon in the atmosphere? What are the present tropospheric concentrations, global warming potentials (100 year time horizon), and atmospheric lifetimes of CO2, CH4, N2O, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CCl4, methyl chloroform, HCFC-22, sulphur hexafluoride, trifluoromethyl sulphur pentafluoride, perfluoroethane, and surface ozone? Where can I find information on the naming of halocarbons?

387

Feedstock Economics for Global Steam Crackers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high level of current profitability within the petrochemical industry has spurred an unprecedented number of announcements of new global capacity. Many of the announcements have been made by organizations with no previous background in petrochemicals, who believe they possess strategic competitive advantages for success in the business. The choice of cracking feedstocks has a tremendous impact on the future economic success of the venture. Feedstock determines the two major economic variables in ethylene plants: first cost and operating cost. For any particular ethylene plant design capacity, there is a range in investment cost, driven primarily by the choice of feedstock. In addition, feedstock costs represent over two-thirds of plant operating costs. This study presents the results of SRI work on determining the economics of ethylene plants based upon five alternative feedstocks, and then modifying the data for 10 global regions in which significant new ethylene capacity has been announced. The five feedstocks considered are: ethane, propane, butane, wide range naphtha, and atmospheric gas oil. The 10 regions considered in the study are the US Gulf Coast, Brazil, Western Canada, China, Indonesia, Japan, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Taiwan, and West Germany. The business climate considered in the study is the second half of 1989, and the market prices used for feedstock, utilities, products and labor represent average contract prices during the fourth quarter of 1989.

McCormack, G.; Pavone, T.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage by State About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through...

389

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Authors: Matthew T. Reagan and George J. Moridis Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates 2008, Vancouver, British Columbia, July 9-12, 2008 (http://www.icgh.org [external site]) Abstract: Paleoceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating past global climate. The implication is that global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate is the main culprit for a sequence of rapid global warming affects that occurred during the late Quaternary period. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed coupled thermo-hydrological-chemical simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor, and assessed the potential for methane release into the ecosystem. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and the effects of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that while many deep hydrate deposits are indeed stable during periods of rapid ocean temperature changes, shallow deposits (such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico) can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant carbon fluxes over a period of decades. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane and the formation of carbonates) to sequester the released carbon. This model will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

390

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Global Warming and Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST is producing new suites of primary gas standards for carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, and nitrous oxide in air at atmospheric levels ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

NIST Global Standards Information Home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... meter manufacturers and hydrogen gas producers concerned with ... Animal and vegetable fats and oils. ... and test for edible sunflower oil derived from ...

393

The kinematics of the diffuse ionized gas in NGC 4666  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global properties of the interstellar medium with processes such as infall and outflow of gas and a large scale circulation of matter and its consequences for star formation and chemical enrichment are important for the understanding of galaxy evolution. In this paper we studied the kinematics and morphology of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the disk and in the halo of the star forming spiral galaxy NGC 4666 to derive information about its kinematical properties. Especially, we searched for infalling and outflowing ionized gas. We determined surface brightness, radial velocity, and velocity dispersion of the warm ionized gas via high spectral resolution (R ~ 9000) Fabry-P\\'erot interferometry. This allows the determination of the global velocity field and the detection of local deviations from this verlocity field. We calculated models of the DIG distribution and its kinematics for comparison with the measured data. In this way we determined fundamental parameters such as the inclination and the scale h...

Voigtlnder, Pierre; Marcelin, Michel; Bomans, Dominik J; Dettmar, Ralf-Jrgen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Global Warming: Physics and Facts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers on: A tutorial on global atmospheric energetics and the greenhouse effect; global climate models: what and how; comparison of general circulation models; climate and the earth`s radiation budget; temperature and sea level change; short-term climate variability and predictions; the great ocean conveyor; trace gases in the atmosphere: temporal and spatial trends; the geochemical carbon cycle and the uptake of fossil fuel CO{sub 2}; forestry and global warming; the physical and policy linkages; policy implications of greenhouse warming; options for lowering US carbon dioxide emissions; options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and science and diplomacy: a new partnership to protect the environment.

Levi, B.G. [Physics Today, New York, NY (United States); Hafemeister, D. [Committee on Foreign Relations (U.S. Senate), Washington, DC (United States); Scribner, R. [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Global Warming: Physics and Facts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers on: A tutorial on global atmospheric energetics and the greenhouse effect; global climate models: what and how; comparison of general circulation models; climate and the earth's radiation budget; temperature and sea level change; short-term climate variability and predictions; the great ocean conveyor; trace gases in the atmosphere: temporal and spatial trends; the geochemical carbon cycle and the uptake of fossil fuel CO{sub 2}; forestry and global warming; the physical and policy linkages; policy implications of greenhouse warming; options for lowering US carbon dioxide emissions; options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and science and diplomacy: a new partnership to protect the environment.

Levi, B.G. (Physics Today, New York, NY (United States)); Hafemeister, D. (Committee on Foreign Relations (U.S. Senate), Washington, DC (United States)); Scribner, R. (Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States)) (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies Agency/Company /Organization: Pew Center on Global Climate Change Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Technical report Website: www.pewclimate.org/docUploads/aviation-and-marine-report-2009.pdf Cost: Free References: Greenhouse Gas emissions from aviation and marine transportation: mitigation potential and policies[1] "This paper provides an overview of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from aviation and marine transportation and the various mitigation options to

397

Natural Gas - Pub - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Natural Gas Markets Workshop International Natural Gas Markets Workshop EIA's Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Biofuels Analysis has scheduled an International Natural Gas Markets Workshop on Thursday, August 23, 2012, in our EIA offices. The workshop will focus on the international natural gas market as it exists today (with an emphasis on the European and Asian markets), and the outlook for the international natural gas market in the future. Confirmed expert speakers include: Jim Jensen, Jensen Associates; Ben Schlesinger, Benjamin Schlesinger and Associates; Thierry Bros, Societe Generale; Rob Smith, Facts Global Energy; Howard Rogers, Oxford Institute of Energy Studies, Edward Chow, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS); Ken Medlock, Rice University; and Frank Graves or Phil Hanser, The Brattle Group.

398

Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Environment Programme, Global Environment Facility Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website: ncsp.undp.org/document/managing-national-greenhouse-gas-inventory-proc Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Screenshot References: Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process[1] The objective of the handbook is to provide non-AnnexI Parties with a strategic and logical approach to a sustainable inventory process. About "The handbook was developed by United Nations Development Programme with

399

Greenhouse Gas Initiative Scenario Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Initiative Scenario Database Greenhouse Gas Initiative Scenario Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Greenhouse Gas Initiative Scenario Database Agency/Company /Organization: Science for Global Insight Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.iiasa.ac.at/web-apps/ggi/GgiDb/dsd?Action=htmlpage&page=about Cost: Free References: Greenhouse Gas Initiative Scenario Database[1] The GGI (Greenhouse Gas Initiative) scenario database documents the results of a set of greenhouse gas emission scenarios that were created using the IIASA Integrated Assessment Modeling Framework and previously documented in a special issue of the Technological Forecasting and Social Change.

400

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Technological Options to Address Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydro and Other 8% Coal 22% Coal 22% Gas 23% Gas 23% Coal 19% Coal 19% Gas 28% Gas 28% Fossil Fuels Will Continue as Key to World Economy 1999 data from International Energy...

402

Comparative Global Warming Impacts of Electric Vapor-Compression and Direct-fired Absorption Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the global warming impacts of electric vapor-compression and gas-fired absorption-cycle equipment for commercial cooling applications. Absorption chillers do not use ozone depleting refrigerants but substitution of alternative refrigerants in electrically driven vapor-compression cycle equipment also offers radically reduced or eliminated potential for stratospheric ozone depletion. Therefore, when comparing absorption-cycle and vapor-compression equipment, net global warming impacts...

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Expro Engineering Sponsorship Programme Expro International Group is an upstream oil and gas sector service company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and process flow from high-value oil and gas wells, from exploration and appraisal through to mature fieldThe Expro Engineering Sponsorship Programme Expro International Group is an upstream oil and gas for the development and delivery of innovative technologies to meet the needs of the oil and gas industry globally

Painter, Kevin

404

Global change research: Summaries of research in FY 1992  

SciTech Connect

Greenhouse gases result from both natural and man-made processes and include carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (N{sub x}0{sub y}), methane, chlorofluorocarbons, halogenated compounds, water vapor, and others. Since the industrial revolution, the atmospheric concentrations of several greenhouse gases have been increasing, primarily because of human activities. These increases have the potential to cause global climate change through increased radiative forcing. Global climate change is a significant issue for the Department of Energy (DOE) because energy production and use now contribute more than half of the total man-made emissions of greenhouse gases on a global basis. The missions of the Department`s Global Change Research Program are: To predict the future atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other energy-related greenhouse gases; to predict the future and magnitude of potential climate change caused by the enhanced greenhouse effect; to understand both the direct impacts of greenhouse-gas emissions on biota and the indirect consequences produced by climate change; to assess the impacts of global climate change on energy systems and energy demand; and to develop and assess the potential of mitigation and adaptation technologies and practices to offset or limit the impact of any potential climate change or to facilitate natural and societal adjustment to the environmental, social, and economic consequences of global climate changes. The information produced by these activities is necessary in order to assess the economic and environmental costs and benefits of both potential climate change caused by the effects of greenhouse gases and implementing different technologies and energy-policy options aimed at preventing, mitigating, or adapting to such change. This document describes the activities and products of the Global Change Research Program in FY 1992.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Global change research: Summaries of research in FY 1992  

SciTech Connect

Greenhouse gases result from both natural and man-made processes and include carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]), nitrogen oxides (N[sub x]0[sub y]), methane, chlorofluorocarbons, halogenated compounds, water vapor, and others. Since the industrial revolution, the atmospheric concentrations of several greenhouse gases have been increasing, primarily because of human activities. These increases have the potential to cause global climate change through increased radiative forcing. Global climate change is a significant issue for the Department of Energy (DOE) because energy production and use now contribute more than half of the total man-made emissions of greenhouse gases on a global basis. The missions of the Department's Global Change Research Program are: To predict the future atmospheric concentrations of CO[sub 2] and other energy-related greenhouse gases; to predict the future and magnitude of potential climate change caused by the enhanced greenhouse effect; to understand both the direct impacts of greenhouse-gas emissions on biota and the indirect consequences produced by climate change; to assess the impacts of global climate change on energy systems and energy demand; and to develop and assess the potential of mitigation and adaptation technologies and practices to offset or limit the impact of any potential climate change or to facilitate natural and societal adjustment to the environmental, social, and economic consequences of global climate changes. The information produced by these activities is necessary in order to assess the economic and environmental costs and benefits of both potential climate change caused by the effects of greenhouse gases and implementing different technologies and energy-policy options aimed at preventing, mitigating, or adapting to such change. This document describes the activities and products of the Global Change Research Program in FY 1992.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

Garcia, N.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

408

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

409

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

410

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

411

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

412

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

413

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

414

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

415

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

416

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

417

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

418

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

419

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

420

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

423

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

424

Endeavor Global | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Endeavor Global Endeavor Global Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Endeavor Global Name Endeavor Global Address 900 Broadway Place New York, New York Zip 10003 Coordinates 40.7391824°, -73.9897252° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7391824,"lon":-73.9897252,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

425

Global Warming and Extreme Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming and Extreme Weather Global Warming and Extreme Weather Speaker(s): Michael Wehner Date: November 28, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Surabi Menon Extreme weather events can have serious impacts on human and ecological systems. Changes in the magnitude and frequency of extreme weather associated with changes in the mean climate are likely the most serious consequence of human induced global warming. Understanding what the future portends is vital if society hopes to adapt to the very different world that awaits. In this talk, we will exploit simple extreme value theory to make predictions about the late 21st century climate. Current work on the relationship between global warming and the hurricane cycle will also be presented. The bottom line is that events that are considered rare today

426

BPL Global | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BPL Global BPL Global Jump to: navigation, search Name BPL Global Place Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip 15222 Product BPL Global is a Pittburgh based company that uses broadband over powerline (BPL) to intergrate offerings of advanced metering infrastructure and broadband internet. Coordinates 40.438335°, -79.997459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.438335,"lon":-79.997459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

427

THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: Greater Energy Security in a Cleaner, Safer World The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a comprehensive strategy to increase U.S. and global energy security, encourage clean development around the world, reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation, and improve the environment. A plentiful, reliable supply of energy is the cornerstone of sustained economic growth and prosperity. Nuclear power is the only proven technology that can provide abundant supplies of base load electricity reliably and without air pollution or emissions of greenhouse gasses. In order to help meet growing demand for energy at home and encourage the growth of prosperity around the globe, GNEP provides for the safe, extensive expansion of clean nuclear power.

428

Puzzles from the First Globalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the first globalization, 1870-1914, as in our own times, debates raged over the impact on domestic life of free movement across borders of goods, people, and capital. Then as today in the hard times that have followed ...

Berger, Suzanne

429

Global Circuit Model with Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) database have been introduced into the global circuit model developed by Tinsley and Zhou. Using the cloud-top pressure data and cloud type information, the authors ...

Limin Zhou; Brian A. Tinsley

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

EPS Global International Cancer Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sept.10-12th, 2010 Suzhou, China Welcome Message Dear Colleagues and Friends, It is my pleasure to announce that EPS Global International Cancer Conference will be held on...

431

Magnitude correlations in global seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

Sarlis, N. V. [Solid State Section and Solid Earth Physics Institute, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos GR-157 84, Athens (Greece)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas is an important energy source that contributes up to 25% of the total US energy reserves (DOE 2011). An increase in natural gas demand spurs further development of unconventional resources, including methane hydrate (Rajnauth 2012). Natural gas from methane hydrate has the potential to play a major role in ensuring adequate future energy supplies in the US. The worldwide volume of gas in the hydrate state has been estimated to be approximately 1.5 x 10^16 m^3 (Makogon 1984). More than 230 gas-hydrate deposits have been discovered globally. Several production technologies have been tested; however, the development of the Messoyakha field in the west Siberian basin is the only successful commercial gas-hydrate field to date. Although the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field was not a certainty, this current study determined the undeniable presence of gas hydrates in the reservoir. This study uses four models of the Messoyakha field structure and reservoir conditions and examines them based on the available geologic and engineering data. CMG STARS and IMEX software packages were used to calculate gas production from a hydrate-bearing formation on a field scale. Results of this analysis confirm the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field and also determine the volume of hydrates in place. The cumulative production from the field on January 1, 2012 is 12.9 x 10^9 m^3, and it was determined in this study that 5.4 x 10^9 m^3 was obtained from hydrates. The important issue of pressure-support mechanisms in developing a gas hydrate reservoir was also addressed in this study. Pressure-support mechanisms were investigated using different evaluation methods such as the use of gas-injection well patterns and gas/water injection using isothermal and non-isothermal simulators. Several aquifer models were examined. Simulation results showed that pressure support due to aquifer activity was not possible. Furthermore, it was shown that the water obtained from hydrates was not produced and remained in the reservoir. Results obtained from the aquifer models were confirmed by the actual water production from the field. It was shown that water from hydrates is a very strong pressure-support mechanism. Water not only remained in the reservoir, but it formed a thick water-saturated layer between the free-gas and gas-hydrate zone. Finally, thermodynamic behavior of gas hydrate decomposition was studied. Possible areas of hydrate preservation were determined. It was shown that the central top portion of the field preserved most of hydrates due to temperature reduction of hydrate decomposition.

Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Superior Energy Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

434

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901...

435

The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ameliorate the negative social impacts of global markets isenvironmental and social impacts and the royalty paymentscriticisms of the social impact of economic globalization

Vogel, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Global Energias Renovables SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energias Renovables SL Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Energias Renovables SL Place Madrid, Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spanish wind power developer. References Global...

437

Global Celsius SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Celsius SL Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Celsius SL Place Madrid, Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spanish wind project developer. References Global Celsius SL1...

438

Global Environment Facility (GEF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Global Environment Facility (GEF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Environment Facility Address...

439

Global Green Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Global Green Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Green Partners Place Los Altos,...

440

Sunrise Global Solar Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Sunrise Global Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Sunrise Global Solar Energy Place Taoyuan County, Taiwan Zip...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited)...

442

Global Alternative Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Alternative Fuels Place El Paso, Texas Zip 79922 Product Global Alternative Fuels processes virgin oils (palm, soybean,...

443

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Annual Plan 3 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program Report to Congress June 2013 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy |June 2013 Department of Energy |June 2013 Message from the Secretary The Nation needs to deploy American assets, innovation, and technology so that it can safely and responsibly develop more energy here at home and be a leader in the global energy economy. To this end, the Department of Energy (DOE) continues its work toward safe and responsible development of fossil fuels. This means giving American families and communities high confidence that air and water quality, and public health and safety will not be compromised.

444

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Plan Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program Report to Congress June 2013 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy |June 2013 Department of Energy |June 2013 Message from the Secretary The Nation needs to deploy American assets, innovation, and technology so that it can safely and responsibly develop more energy here at home and be a leader in the global energy economy. To this end, the Department of Energy (DOE) continues its work toward safe and responsible development of fossil fuels. This means giving American families and communities high confidence that air and water quality, and public health and safety will not be compromised.

445

Measurements of gas permeability on crushed gas shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, more attention has been given to unconventional gas reservoirs, including tight gas shales. Accurate description of gas transport and permeability measurements (more)

Guarnieri, R.V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Generalized Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Design Schematic Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capcity Design Schematic...

447

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

448

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corridors > Major U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates...

449

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

450

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transmission...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Transmission Path Diagram About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Transmission Path Natural...

451

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Other Heating...

452

CENOZOIC GLOBAL SEA LEVEL, SEQUENCES, AND THE NEW JERSEY TRANSECT: RESULTS FROM COASTAL PLAIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phillips Worldwide LNG, El Paso Global LNG, ExxonMobil Gas Marketing Company, Tractebel LNG North America Nitrogen Alaska 99.72 0.06 0.0005 0.0005 0.20 Algeria 86.98 9.35 2.33 0.63 0.71 Baltimore Gas & Electric 93 35 40 45 50 1965 1967 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999

453

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) An article that examines the global nuclear energy partnership. The Global Nuclear Energy...

454

Poultry Litter as an Energy Source and as a Means of Greenhouse Gas Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is nearing completion on an assessment of the opportunity for poultry-litter-to-energy processes to help solve both local and global environmental problems. The problems addressed are those of water pollution and solid waste disposal at the local level, and global warming due to greenhouse gas emissions at the global level. The processes assessed by TVA are combustion or gasification of poultry litter in thermal reactors or boilers for energy production, and also biol...

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

455

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

456

December Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DOEEIA-0130(9712) Distribution CategoryUC-950 Natural Gas Monthly December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC...

457

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

458

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

459

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to withdraw natural gas from storage to meet current demand. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 2,406 Bcf as of...

462

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas futures also reversed gains made in the previous week. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased by 63 Bcf...

463

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

464

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Res., 104(B10), 22985-23003. Collett, T.S. (1992), Potential of gas hydrates outlined, Oil Gas J., 90(25), 84-87. 70 Cook, A.E., Goldberg, D., and R.L. Kleinberg (2008),...

465

Natural gas annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Southern California Gas Co  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Southern California Gas Co ... 236,147,041 98,326,527 274,565,356 690,930 139,093,560 748,823,414 Lone Star Gas Co......

467

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,451,1,35,17,,,10,3,0,48...

468

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,13889,36,837,1016,,,1129,181,...

469

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,151,-1,1,6,,,0,0,0,36...

470

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,6305,-3,226,165,,,884,391,10,...

471

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,495,-3,48,11,,,113,0,31,60...

472

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,11457,-3,122,171,,,219,21,7,7...

473

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,877,0,37,79,,,93,32,2,62...

474

The economics of long-term global climate change  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide an overview of economic issues and research relevant to possible, long-term global climate change. It is primarily a critical survey, not a statement of Administration or Department policy. This report should serve to indicate that economic analysis of global change is in its infancy few assertions about costs or benefits can be made with confidence. The state of the literature precludes any attempt to produce anything like a comprehensive benefit-cost analysis. Moreover, almost all the quantitative estimates regarding physical and economic effects in this report, as well as many of the qualitative assertions, are controversial. Section I provides background on greenhouse gas emissions and their likely climatic effects and on available policy instruments. Section II considers the costs of living with global change, assuming no substantial efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Section III considers costs of reducing these emissions, though the available literature does not contain estimates of the costs of policies that would, on the assumptions of current climate models, prevent climate change altogether. The individual sections are not entirely compartmentalized, but can be read independently if necessary.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature  

SciTech Connect

In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

476

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association ConferenceMarch 12, 2004

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

477

Gas Turbine Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...times higher than atmospheric pressure.Ref 25The gas turbine was developed generally for main propulsion and power

478

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

with active programs. More information is available at: http:www.eia.doe.govcneafelectricitypagerestructuringrestructureelect.html. Information about natural gas...

479

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 6 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ... 7 Task 6: Numerical Models for...

480

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas gwp global" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural gas annual 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Residual gas analysis device  

SciTech Connect

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association Conference, March 12, 2004 Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, Administrator, Energy Information Administration

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

484

Landfill Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Landfill Gas Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLandfillGas&oldid267173"...

485

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves U.S. natural gas liquids proved reserves decreased 7 percent to 7,459 million ...

486

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofreplacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for households and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Exports...

488

Natural gas industry directory  

SciTech Connect

This directory has information on the following: associations and organizations; exploration and production; gas compression; gas processors; gathering and transmission companies; liquefied natural gas; local distribution companies; marketing firms; regulatory agencies; service companies; suppliers and manufacturers; and regional buyer`s guide.

NONE

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ Fossil backed by a growing portfolio of assets. #12;Shale Gas Geography 5 | MARCELLUS SHALE COALITION #12;Shale Permits Price #12;Pricing Trend of Oil and Gas in the US $- $5.00 $10.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00 USDper

Lee, Dongwon

490

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

491

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, storage, and usage of compressed gas cylinders. 2.0 POLICY Colorado School of Mines ("Mines" or "the, storage, and usage requirements outlined below. This policy is applicable school-wide including all, or electrical circuits. Flammable gas cylinders must be stored in the building's gas cylinder storage cage until

492

Gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

A core engine or gas generator is described for use in a range of gas turbine engines. A multi-stage compressor and a single stage supersonic turbine are mounted on a single shaft. The compressor includes a number of stages of variable angle and the gas generator has an annular combustion chamber.

MacDonald, A.G.

1976-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

493

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly highlights of activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry are presented. Feature articles for this issue are: Natural Gas Overview for Winter 1983-1984 by Karen A. Kelley; and an Analysis of Natural Gas Sales by John H. Herbert. (PSB)

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Making Global Illumination User Friendly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Making Global Illumination User Friendly Making Global Illumination User Friendly Title Making Global Illumination User Friendly Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-37860 Year of Publication 1995 Authors Ward, Gregory J. Conference Name 6th Eurographics Workshop on Rendering Date Published 06/1995 Conference Location Dublin, Ireland Call Number LBL-37860 Abstract Global illumination researchers tend to think in terms of mesh density and sampling frequency, and their software reflects this in its user interface. Advanced rendering systems are rife with long command lines and parameters for tuning the sample densities, thresholds and other algorithm-specific variables, and the novice user is quickly lost in a sea of possibilities. This paper details a successful effort of making one such global illumination system usable by people who understand their problems, even if they do not understand the methods needed to solve them, through an assisted oracle approach. A single program is introduced to map a small set of intuitive control variables to the rendering commands and parameter settings needed to produce the desired output in a reasonable time. This new executive program then serves as the basis for a graphical user interface that is both friendly in its appearance and reliable in its performance. Finally, we conclude with some future directions for improving this interface.

495

The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

Weiss, P.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

496

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

497

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

498

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

499

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

500

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................