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1

NYMEX Central Appalachian coal futures near-month contract final...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Release Date: January 29, 2015 Next Release Date: January 2016 NYMEX Central Appalachian coal futures near-month contract final settlement price history Data as of 12312014....

2

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

3

Gas hydrates: past and future geohazard?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...David Pyle, John Smellie and David Tappin Gas hydrates: past and future geohazard? Mark...University of Bristol, , Bristol, UK Gas hydrates are ice-like deposits containing a mixture of water and gas; the most common gas is methane. Gas hydrates...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Nov-14 View History Spot Price Henry Hub 4.59 4.05 3.91 3.92 3.78 4.12 1997-2014 NGPL Composite 10.17 9.94 9.69 9.86 8.75 2009-2014 Futures Prices Contract 1 4.59 4.02 3.90 3.92...

5

Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

6

Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

7

California State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

8

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

9

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

10

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

11

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

12

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

13

,"New York Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

14

,"California State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

15

,"Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2...

16

,"Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

17

,"Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

18

,"California Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

19

Gas hydrates: past and future geohazard?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...seafloor samples were recovered in the Black Sea...warm to support the solid gas hydrates, so...stored in other fossil fuel reservoirs. However...Kvenvolden (2007). Solid points are locations...hydrates have been recovered. Figure 4. This...trapped below the solid gas hydrate layer...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A Fuel of the Future: Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents a brief, up-to-date analysis of the world natural gas market. Along with a sketch of supply, demand, and price, some consideration will be given to the deregulation-privatization controve...

Ferdinand E. Banks

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Future of Transportation Finance: Gas Tax Plus and Beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Future of Transportation Finance: Gas Tax Plus and Beyond The Future of Transportation Finance ON TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND TECHNOLOGY 2005 JAMES L. OBERSTAR FORUM ON TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND TECHNOLOGY #12;This report summarizes the fourth James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over

Minnesota, University of

22

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

23

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

24

State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine Technologies State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine Technologies 2003 DEER Conference...

25

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 2, 2002 May 2, 2002 Spot and futures prices have rebounded strongly through yesterday's (Wednesday, May 1) trading from their 3-day slide at the end of last week, as lingering cold temperatures in parts of the Midwest and Northeast teamed with unseasonably warm temperatures in the Southeast and Southwest to boost gas demand. At the Henry Hub, 3 days of double-digit price increases brought the average spot price there to $3.79 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX futures market, the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub closed its tenure as the near-month contract on Friday, April 26 at $3.319 per MMBtu, a net increase of just $0.055 per MMBtu since becoming the near-month contract on March 26. Taking over as the near-month contract this past Monday (April 29), the June contract gained nearly 20 cents on its first day as the near-month contract, and by yesterday had risen to $3.735 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil, which had held above $27 per barrel since last Friday, declined by 74 cents yesterday, falling to $26.58 per barrel, or $4.58 per MMBtu, as tensions in the Middle East gradually ease.

26

An overview of current and future sustainable gas turbine technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work an overview of current and future sustainable gas turbine technologies is presented. In particular, the various gas turbine technologies are described and compared. Emphasis has been given to the various advance cycles involving heat recovery from the gas turbine exhaust, such as, the gas to gas recuperation cycle, the combined cycle, the chemical recuperation cycle, the Cheng cycle, the humid air turbine cycle, etc. The thermodynamic characteristics of the various cycles are considered in order to establish their relative importance to future power generation markets. The combined cycle technology is now well established and offers superior to any of the competing gas turbine based systems, which are likely to be available in the medium term for large-scale power generation applications. In small-scale generation, less than 50 MWe, it is more cost effective to install a less complex power plant, due to the adverse effect of the economics of scale. Combined cycle plants in this power output range normally have higher specific investment costs and lower electrical efficiencies but also offer robust and reliable performance. Mixed air steam turbines (MAST) technologies are among the possible ways to improve the performance of gas turbine based power plants at feasible costs (e.g. peak load gas turbine plants).

Andreas Poullikkas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Chapter 18 - Future Trends in the Gas Turbine Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The future of gas turbine systems design development and the gas turbine business is steered by several factors. Business and political factors are a far greater influence on technology than the average engineer feels comfortable acknowledging. The major change in the gas turbine and gas turbine systems industries over the past several years has been the changes in turbine fuels strategy. In the power generation and land-based turbine sector, coal has lost its “number 1” place in the USA, due mostly to the advent of natural gas fracking exploration and production. Coal still remains number 1 in countries like China and much of Eastern Europe, because of those countries huge coal reserves. Oxy-fuel combustion potentially can be used in plants based on both conventional and advanced technology. Studies have shown that plants equipped with oxy-fuel systems could reach nominal efficiencies in the 30% range with today’s steam turbines when fueled with natural gas and when capturing the CO2. With anticipated advances in gasification, oxygen separation, and steam turbine technology, plants using oxy-fuel systems are expected to achieve efficiencies in the mid-40% range, with near-100% CO2 capture and near-zero \\{NOx\\} emissions. “I am enough of an artist to draw freely on my imagination. Imagination is more important that knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles.” —Albert Einstein

Claire Soares

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

U.S. Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

29

Shell Gas to Liquids in the context of a Future Fuel Strategy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Shell Gas to Liquids in the context of a Future Fuel Strategy - Technical Marketing Aspects Shell Gas to Liquids in the context of a Future Fuel Strategy - Technical Marketing...

30

Arbitrage free cointegrated models in gas and oil future markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article we present a continuous time model for natural gas and crude oil future prices. Its main feature is the possibility to link both energies in the long term and in the short term. For each energy, the future returns are represented as the sum of volatility functions driven by motions. Under the risk neutral probability, the motions of both energies are correlated Brownian motions while under the historical probability, they are cointegrated by a Vectorial Error Correction Model. Our approach is equivalent to defining the market price of risk. This model is free of arbitrage: thus, it can be used for risk management as well for option pricing issues. Calibration on European market data and numerical simulations illustrate well its behavior.

Benmenzer, Grégory; Jérusalem, Céline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Gas-phase thermal degradation behavior of future jet fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a quantitative methodology for the precise determination of the gas-phase thermal stability of two model endothermic fuels (methyl cyclohexane and trans-decalin) and their dehydrogenation products (toluene and naphthalene) under high-controlled experimental conditions. Tetrahydrodicyclopentadiene (JP-10), a naphthenic future jet fuel, has also been tested for comparison purposes. On the basis of the previous studies, these laboratory investigations have been performed in a gas-phase environment with less than 1 ppm oxygen present. Exposure temperature has been selected as the parameter to be varied with the mean residence time held constant. Although recent studies in this laboratory indicate that changes in residence time can also effect a fuels thermal stability, a mean residence time of 0.5 s has been chosen to best simulate the crucial transport time of an on-board fuel. Specific questions to be addressed by this study are: (1) how do the thermal stabilities of the model endothermic fuels compare with their dehydrogenation products; (2) how does the thermal stability of a highly naphthenic future aircraft fuel (JP-10) compare with the model endothermic fuels; (3) can the differences in relative thermal stability be related to fuel structure; (4) and, on the basis of these tests, which endothermic fuels has the highest heat-sink potential

Taylor, P.H.; Rubey, W.A. (Univ. of Dayton Research Institute, OH (USA))

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

33

The future of oil and gas in Northern Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The North Slope accounts for about 98 percent of Alaska`s total oil production or about 1.6 MMBOPD (million barrels of oil per day). This makes Alaska the number two oil-producing State, contributing about 25% of the Nation`s daily oil production. Cumulative North Slope production at year-end 1993 was 9.9 BBO (billion barrels of oil). Natural gas from the North Slope is not marketable for lack of a gas transportation system. At year-end 1993, North Slope reserves as calculated by the State of Alaska stood at 6.1 BBO and 26.3 TCFG. By 1988, production from Prudhoe Bay and three other oil fields peaked at 2 MMBOPD; since then production has declined to the current rate of 1.6 MMBOPD in spite of six more oil fields coming into production. Undiscovered, economically recoverable oil resources, as of 1987, were estimated at 0-26 BBO (mean probability, 8 BBO) for the onshore region and adjacent State waters by USGS and 0-5 BBO (mean probability, future of existing North Slope oil fields and all future oil field development is the continued operation of TAPS (Trans-Alaska Pipeline System). Recent studies by the U.S. Department of Energy have assumed a range of minimum throughput rates to to illustrate the effects of a shutdown of TAPS. Using reserve and production rate numbers from existing fields, a TAPS shutdown is predicted for year-end 2014 assuming minimum rates of 200 MBOPD. In both cases, producible oil would be left in the ground: 1,000 MMBO for the 2008 scenario and 500 MMBO for the 2014 scenario. Because the time between field discovery or decision-to-develop and first production is about 10 years, new or discovered fields may need to be brought into production by 1998 to assure continued operation of the pipeline and maximum oil recovery.

Bird, K.J.; Cole, F.; Howell, D.G.; Magoon, L.B. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

World oil and gas resources-future production realities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Welcome to uncertainty was the phrase Jack Schanz used to introduce both layman and professionals to the maze of petroleum energy data that must be comprehended to achieve understanding of this critical commodity. Schanz was referring to the variables as he and his colleagues with Resources for the Future saw them in those years soon after the energy-awakening oil embargo of 1973. In some respects, the authors have made progress in removing uncertainty from energy data, but in general, we simply must accept that there are many points of view and many ways for the blindman to describe the elephant. There can be definitive listing of all uncertainties, but for this paper the authors try to underscore those traits of petroleum occurrence and supply that the author's believe bear most heavily on the understanding of production and resource availability. Because oil and gas exist in nature under such variable conditions and because the products themselves are variable in their properties, the authors must first recognize classification divisions of the resource substances, so that the reader might always have a clear perception of just what we are talking about and how it relates to other components of the commodity in question.

Masters, C.D.; Root, D.H.; Attanasi, E.D. (U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: August 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 5, 2009) Natural gas prices posted increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday, with price increases at the spot market ranging between 12 and 43 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.61 per MMBtu, increasing by 20 cents or 5.9 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for September delivery increased by 49 cents to $4.042 per MMBtu. The September futures contract closed above $4.00 per MMBtu for the first time since June 19 on Monday, reaching $4.031 per MMBtu. The near-month

36

THE LATTICE-GAS AND LATTICE BOLTZMANN METHODS: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE LATTICE-GAS AND LATTICE BOLTZMANN METHODS: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE LUO Li-Shi ICASE, Mail the lattice gas automata LGA and lattice Boltzmann equation LBE is presented in this article. The mathematical than a decade ago, the lattice-gas automata LGA and the lattice Boltzmann equation LBE were proposed

Luo, Li-Shi

37

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 20, 2011) Natural gas prices rose at most market locations during the week, as consumption increased. The Henry Hub spot price increased 19 cents from $4.14 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, April 13 to $4.33 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 20. Futures prices behaved similar to spot prices; at the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (May 2011) rose from $4.141 per MMBtu to $4.310 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

38

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 30, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 22, 2011) Natural gas prices fell slightly at most market locations from Wednesday, June 15 to Wednesday, June 22. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents from $4.52 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $4.42 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the July 2011 near-month futures contract fell by 26 cents, or about 6 percent, from $4.58 last Wednesday to $4.32 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,354 this week, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

39

The Future of Natural Gas AN INTERDISCIPLINARY MIT STUDYForeword and Acknowledgements The Future of Natural Gas is the fourth in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

series of MIT multidisciplinary reports examining the role of various energy sources that may be important for meeting future demand under carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions constraints. In each case, we explore the steps needed to enable competitiveness in a future marketplace conditioned by a CO 2 emissions price or by a set of regulatory initiatives. This report follows an interim report issued in June 2010. The first three reports dealt with nuclear power (2003), coal (2007) and the nuclear fuel cycle (2010 and 2011). A study of natural gas is more complex than these previous reports because gas is a major fuel for multiple end uses — electricity, industry, heating — and is increasingly discussed as a potential pathway to reduced oil dependence for transportation. In addition, the realization over the last few years that the producible unconventional gas resource in the U.S. is very large has intensified the discussion about natural gas as a “bridge ” to a low-carbon future. Recent indications of a similarly large global gas shale resource may also transform the geopolitical landscape for gas. We have carried out the integrated analysis reported here as a contribution to the energy, security and climate debate. Our primary audience is U.S. government, industry and academic leaders, and decision makers. However, the study is carried out with an international perspective. invested in advising us. However, the study is the responsibility of the MIT study group and the advisory committee members do not necessarily endorse all of its findings and recommendations, either individually or collectively. Finally, we are very appreciative of the support from several sources. First and foremost, we thank the American Clean Skies Foundation. Discussions with the Foundation led to the conclusion that an integrative study on the future of natural gas in a carbon-constrained world could contribute to the energy debate in an important way, and the Foundation stepped forward as the major sponsor. MIT Energy

unknown authors

40

Secretary Moniz: What the Natural Gas Boom Means for the Future of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moniz: What the Natural Gas Boom Means for the Future of Moniz: What the Natural Gas Boom Means for the Future of Renewables Secretary Moniz: What the Natural Gas Boom Means for the Future of Renewables May 23, 2013 - 2:34pm Addthis In a town hall meeting with Department employees, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz talks about how a boom in natural gas might be a boon for renewable energy. Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs More from Secretary Moniz See a video recap of Secretary Moniz's first day in office. Watch Secretary Moniz's swearing-in ceremony. Follow Secretary Moniz on Facebook and Twitter. In a new video released today by the Department of Energy, Secretary Ernest Moniz comments on how the United States should take advantage of the natural gas boom and use it as an opportunity to further develop renewable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The future of U.S. natural gas production, use, and trade Sergey Paltsev a,b,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The future of U.S. natural gas production, use, and trade Sergey Paltsev a,b,n , Henry D. Jacoby 19 May 2011 Available online 16 June 2011 Keywords: Natural gas Climate Policy International gas.S. regional detail, are applied to analysis of the future of U.S. natural gas. The focus is on uncertainties

42

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 20, 2011) Responding to extremely hot weather this week, natural gas prices moved up at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents from $4.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 13, to $4.64 per MMBtu yesterday, July 20. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) increased from $4.403 per MMBtu to $4.500 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,671 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

43

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 at 2:00 P.M. 1 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 9, 2011) Continuing its recent trend of languishing below the $4 per million Btu (MMBtu) mark, the Henry Hub natural gas spot price oscillated this week, and posted an overall net increase of 16 cents, from $3.39 per MMBtu last Wednesday, November 2, to $3.55 per MMBtu yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (December 2011) natural gas futures contract fell from $3.749 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.652 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,831 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, November 4, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

44

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 2, 2011) Natural gas prices showed continued relative weakness during the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub fell from $3.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) on February 23 to $3.79 per MMBtu on March 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 futures contract expired at $3.793 per MMBtu, having declined about 12 percent during its tenure as the near-month contract. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,745 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

45

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 29, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 21, 2011) Natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations across the United States, as moderate temperatures led to declines in demand. Prices at the Henry Hub fell from $4.01 per MMBtu last Wednesday, September 14, to $3.78 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (October 2011) dropped from $4.039 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.73 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,201 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

46

Stabilizing Hadron Resonance Gas Models against Future Discoveries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the stability of hadron resonance gas models by extending them to take care of undiscovered resonances through the Hagedorn formula. We find that the influence of unknown resonances on thermodynamics is large but bounded. Hadron resonance gases are internally consistent up to a temperature higher than the cross over temperature in QCD; but by examining quark number susceptibilities we find that their region of applicability seems to end even below the QCD cross over. We model the decays of resonances and investigate the ratios of particle yields in heavy-ion collisions. We find that observables such as hydrodynamics and hadron yield ratios change little upon extending the model. As a result, heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC are insensitive to a possible exponential rise in the hadronic density of states, thus increasing the stability of the predictions of hadron resonance gas models.

S. Chatterjee; R. M. Godbole; Sourendu Gupta

2009-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

47

The American Gas Centrifuge Past, Present, and Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The art of gas centrifugation was born in 1935 at the University of Virginia when Dr. Jesse Beams demonstrated experimentally the separation of chlorine isotopes using an ultra-high speed centrifuge. Dr. Beam’s experiment initiated work that created a rich history of scientific and engineering accomplishment in the United States in the art of isotope separation and even large scale biological separation by centrifugation. The early history of the gas centrifuge development was captured in a lecture and documented by Dr. Jesse Beams in 1975. Much of Dr. Beams lecture material is used in this paper up to the year 1960. Following work by Dr. Gernot Zippe at the University of Virginia between 1958 and 1960, the US government embarked on a centrifuge development program that ultimately led to the start of construction of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant in Piketon Ohio in the late 1970’s. The government program was abandoned in 1985 after investing in the construction of two of six planned process buildings, a complete supply chain for process and centrifuge parts, and the successful manufacture and brief operation of an initial complement of production machines that would have met 15 percent of the planned capacity of the constructed process buildings. A declining market for enriched uranium, a glut of uranium enrichment capacity worldwide, and the promise of a new laser based separation process factored in the decision to stop the government program. By the late 1990’s it had become evident that gas centrifugation held the best promise to produce enriched uranium at low cost. In1999, the United States Enrichment Corporation undertook an initiative to revive the best of the American centrifuge technology that had been abandoned fourteen years earlier. This is an exciting story and one that when complete will enable the United States to maintain its domestic supply and to be highly competitive in the world market for this important energy commodity. (auth)

Waters, Dean

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: March 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 25, 2009) Natural gas spot prices continued to decrease this week. The return of frigid temperatures for much of the report week in the Northeast, Southeast, and part of the Midwest did little to support any upward price movements in these regions. In fact, spot prices at all trading locations covered by this report either decreased or remained unchanged. Spot prices in the Northeast dipped below $5 per million Btu (MMBtu) for the first time in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) the near-month futures contract barely remained above $4 per MMBtu this week. The futures contract

49

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: June 4, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 27, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (May 20-27), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.49. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as moderate temperatures in most of the country limited demand. The futures contract for June delivery expired yesterday, May 27, at a price of $3.538 per MMBtu, which is the second-lowest monthly closing price for a NYMEX near-month contract in more than 6 years. Meanwhile, the price

50

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) Since Wednesday, December 22, natural gas spot prices have decreased sharply at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 87 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent to $6.18. Prices declined in each of the last three days of trading (December 27-29) as temperatures moderated following the coldest weather to date of the 2004-2005 heating season, which occurred during the holiday weekend. On Tuesday, December 28, the January futures contract at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) ended its tenure as the near-month contract, settling at $6.213 per MMBtu. On its first day of trading as the near-month contract, the NYMEX futures contract for February

51

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) Since Wednesday, October 26, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases exceeding $4 per MMBtu at most markets. On Wednesday, November 2, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $10.84 per MMBtu, decreasing $3.83 per MMBtu, or more than 26 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $13.832 per MMBtu, on Thursday, October 27, declining about 36 cents or nearly 3 percent since becoming the near-month contract on September 29. The futures contract for December delivery has declined $2.08 per MMBtu, or about 15 percent since becoming the new near-month contract on Friday, October 28, settling

52

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) December 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) Since Wednesday, December 22, natural gas spot prices have decreased sharply at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 87 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent to $6.18. Prices declined in each of the last three days of trading (December 27-29) as temperatures moderated following the coldest weather to date of the 2004-2005 heating season, which occurred during the holiday weekend. On Tuesday, December 28, the January futures contract at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) ended its tenure as the near-month contract, settling at $6.213 per MMBtu. On its first day of trading as the near-month contract, the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery closed yesterday (Wednesday, December 29) at $6.402 per MMBtu, which was down roughly 45 cents or 6.5 percent lower than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,849 Bcf as of December 24, which is 14.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $0.55 per barrel or about 1.2 percent since last Wednesday, falling to $43.69 per barrel or $7.53 per MMBtu.

53

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) Since Wednesday, October 26, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases exceeding $4 per MMBtu at most markets. On Wednesday, November 2, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $10.84 per MMBtu, decreasing $3.83 per MMBtu, or more than 26 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $13.832 per MMBtu, on Thursday, October 27, declining about 36 cents or nearly 3 percent since becoming the near-month contract on September 29. The futures contract for December delivery has declined $2.08 per MMBtu, or about 15 percent since becoming the new near-month contract on Friday, October 28, settling at $11.604 per MMBtu yesterday (November 2). Natural gas in storage was 3,168 Bcf as of October 28, which is about 2.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.10 per barrel, or about1.8 percent, on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $59.75 per barrel or $10.30 per MMBtu.

54

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at 4.345 as the near-month contract on October 30. The futures contracts for this winter registered slight gains of 1 to 2 cents per MMBtu on the week. Spot Prices ( per MMBtu)...

55

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: September 11, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 27, to Wednesday, September 3) Since Wednesday, August 27, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling more than $1 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $1.29 per MMBtu or about 15 percent, to $7.26 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (September 3) at $7.264 per MMBtu, declining $1.344 or about 16 percent in its first week as the near-month contract. Natural gas in storage was 2,847 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of August 29, which is about 4 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007),

56

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 14, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 6, 2010) Since Wednesday, December 30, natural gas spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases of more than 10 percent on the week. Prices at the Henry Hub climbed $0.68 per MMBtu, or about 12 percent, to $6.47 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, January 6, at $6.01 per MMBtu. The price of the near-month contract increased by 30 cents or about 5 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,123 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

57

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 3, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 18, 2009) Since Wednesday, November 11, natural gas spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases of up to 55 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed $0.15 per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, to $3.74 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, November 18, at $4.254 per MMBtu. The price of the near-month contract decreased by 25 cents or about 6 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was a record-setting 3,833 billion cubic feet

58

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 20, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 19, 2011) Natural gas prices posted modest net gains at most market locations across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price increased from $3.54 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, October 12, to $3.58 per MMBtu yesterday, October 19. Intra-week trading showed strong rallies followed by quick retreats. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (November 2011) gained about 10 cents on the week from $3.489 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.586 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,624 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, October 14, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

59

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 14, 2010) Natural gas prices moved significantly lower at market locations across the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub spot price averaged $4.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) in trading yesterday, July 14, decreasing $0.37 compared with the previous Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub decreased in 4 out the 5 trading sessions during the report week. The near-month contract settled yesterday at $4.31 per MMBtu, about $0.26 lower than the previous Wednesday. As of Friday, July 9, working gas in underground storage was 2,840

60

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2012 | Release Date: Jan. 19, 8, 2012 | Release Date: Jan. 19, 2012 | Next Release: Jan. 26, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices | Storage In the News: Natural Gas Futures Price Nears 10-Year Low Natural gas prices on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) settled at $2.488 per million British Thermal Units (MMBtu) on Tuesday, January 17. A near-month contract has not ended daily trading that low since March 5, 2002, nearly 10 years ago. Prices dropped again, slightly, the following day, settling at $2.472 per MMBtu on Wednesday. Near-month contract prices fell below $3 per MMBtu during August and September 2009, but recent drops are particularly notable because of the time of year. January is typically a month when natural gas prices are relatively high, the result of

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61

The Future of U.S. Natural Gas Production, Use, and Trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two computable general equilibrium models, one global and the other providing U.S. regional detail, are applied to analysis of the future of U.S. natural gas as an input to an MIT study of the topic. The focus is on ...

Paltsev, Sergey

62

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 26, 2006) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 26, 2006) Changes in natural gas spot prices were mixed this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 11-18), as colder weather boosted demand for space-heating in the eastern half of the country and moderate temperatures in part led to continued price declines in the West. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased 30 cents, or about 3.5 percent, to $8.85 per MMBtu, as colder weather returned to the East. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for February delivery dropped 47 cents per MMBtu yesterday (January 18) to $8.694, a 6-month low for the February 2006 contract, on expectations of moderate temperatures for the rest of the heating season. The near-month contract decreased roughly 54 cents since last Wednesday (January 11), and is now also trading at a 5-month low for a near-month contract. Natural gas in storage was 2,575 Bcf as of January 13, which is 16.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.85 per barrel, or nearly 3 percent, on the week to $65.76 per barrel or $11.34 per MMBtu.

63

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: March 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 18, 2009) Warmer temperatures moved into major population centers this report week, signaling the imminent end of winter and the corresponding reduction in demand related to space heating. Spot prices continued to decline, with the biggest decreases west of the Mississippi River. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.75. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased as temperatures climbed higher this week. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by 11 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.68, the lowest close for a near-month contract in about 6½ years.

64

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2009 30, 2009 Next Release: May 7, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 29, 2009) The direction of spot price movements was mixed this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 22-29). However, changes were relatively small regardless of direction. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.05 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.43. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as moderate temperatures in most of the country limited demand and a perception of strong supply continues. The futures contract for May delivery expired on Tuesday, April 28, at a price of $3.321 per MMBtu, which is the lowest monthly closing price for a NYMEX near-month contract

65

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 3, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 26, 2010) Current production during this report week remained relatively high, adding to a perception of a strong supply outlook. Natural gas prices drifted lower at markets across the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub spot price ended trading yesterday, May 26, at $4.19 per million Btu (MMBtu), a decrease of $0.09 compared with the previous Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub closed at $4.16 per MMBtu yesterday, which was its last day of trading as the near-month contract. This price

66

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: December 18, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, December 3, to Wednesday, December 10, 2008) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, with all trading regions registering losses with the exception of the Rocky Mountains. On the week, the spot prices at each market location outside the Rockies fell between 2 and 93 cents per MMBtu, with the Henry Hub registering a decrease of 80 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract declined each day for the first 3 days of the report and increased on Tuesday and Wednesday (December 9-10), resulting in a

67

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 20, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 12, 2011) Natural gas prices posted net losses at most market locations across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price fell from $3.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, October 5, to $3.54 per MMBtu yesterday, October 12. Despite overall decreases, intraweek trading showed some rallies, particularly near the end of the report week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (November 2011) fell about 8 cents on the week from $3.570 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.489 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,521 billion cubic feet

68

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: February 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices decreased in half of the trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week. Generally, areas east of the Rockies and particularly those that experienced frigid temperatures posted weekly price increases. However, there were some exceptions, including the Midcontinent and East Texas. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures trading for the near-month contract was fairly volatile, with daily price changes ranging between a 16-cent loss and a 16-cent increase. The March 2009 contract ended trading yesterday 18 cents higher than on the previous Wednesday.

69

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2008 7, 2008 Next Release: August 14, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, July 30, to Wednesday, August 6) Natural gas spot prices decreased this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, July 30-August 6), marking a fifth consecutive week of declines at many trading locations after the unprecedented run-up in prices earlier this year. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.31 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $8.70. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts were also lower relative to last week. After reaching a daily settlement high price for the week of $9.389 per MMBtu on Friday, August 1, the price of the near-month contract (September 2008) on Monday decreased

70

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 6, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 28, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday, April 21 – Wednesday, April, 28), as a late-season chill temporarily increased demand. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.23 to $4.19 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month futures contract bounced above $4 per MMBtu in the final days of trading before its monthly expiration. The May contract expired yesterday at $4.271 per MMBtu, which is $0.429 more than the April contract’s expiration price of $3.842 per MMBtu. As a result, the May contract is the

71

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: November 20, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, November 5, to Thursday, November 13) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday (November 5), failing to respond to the increase in heating load that occurred across much of the country, particularly in the Midwest and the Rocky Mountains. Since last Wednesday, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.31 after the intraweek run-up to more than $7 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract decreased in five of the six trading sessions covered by this report, resulting in a weekly net decrease of $0.931 per MMBtu. The

72

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Wednesday, November 10, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 3, 2010) Price changes were mixed this week, with much regional variation across the country. At the Henry Hub in Erath, Louisiana, prices posted a net decline on the week of 2 cents, falling from $3.37 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, October 27, to $3.35 per MMBtu on Wednesday, November 3. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the December 2010 futures contract (which became the near-month contract on October 28) rose $0.073 from $3.763 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.836 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage increased to 3,821 billion cubic feet

73

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2001 25, 2001 The industry stock build that began in April has continued into June as the latest weekly estimate indicates that more than 100 Bcf was again added to working gas storage levels. At the same time that natural gas stocks have been increasing, prices have been generally trending down. Prices at many major spot markets moved down most days last week and ended the week between 20 and 30 cents per MMBtu below Tuesday's prices. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (July) contract also ended the week down 25 cents from Tuesday's high of $3.981. Much of the country continued to enjoy moderate temperatures during last week, which saw the first day of summer (June 21) prices (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map).

74

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 7, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday, June 30–Wednesday, July 7), as much of the East Coast experienced the hottest regional temperatures of the year. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.23 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub closed yesterday, July 7, at $4.565 per MMBtu, which is $0.05 lower than the previous Wednesday. Although the near-month contract increased $0.24 per MMBtu at the beginning of the report week, on Thursday, July 1, likely in response

75

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 5, 2006, the reference case projections from 'Annual Energy Outlook 2007' (AEO 2007) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past six years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past six years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable-price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are 'biased' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2007. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past six AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2006), we once again find that the AEO 2007 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. Specifically, the NYMEX-AEO 2007 premium is $0.73/MMBtu levelized over five years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $0.73/MMBtu more than the AEO 2007 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2006'' (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 9, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005)'' were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. As some of you may be aware, we at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past four years, forward natural gas contracts (e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past four years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation (presuming that long-term price stability is valued). In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2005. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or, more recently (and briefly), http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past four AEO releases (AEO 2001-AE0 2004), we once again find that the AEO 2005 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEXAEO 2005 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$1.11/MMBtu levelized over six years--that we have seen over the last five years. In other words, on average, one would have to pay $1.11/MMBtu more than the AEO 2005 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming six years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation. Fixed-price renewables obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of six years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

78

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The release day for the Natural Gas Weekly Market Update will shift from Monday to Thursday effective for the week of April 8-12. This is the last issue to be published on Monday. There will be no issue released on Monday, April 8. The next issue will be released on Thursday, April 11. The release day for the Natural Gas Weekly Market Update will shift from Monday to Thursday effective for the week of April 8-12. This is the last issue to be published on Monday. There will be no issue released on Monday, April 8. The next issue will be released on Thursday, April 11. Overview: Monday, April 1, 2002 Spot prices fell sharply after Tuesday, March 26, during last week's holiday-shortened trading, as unseasonably cold temperatures began to moderate around midweek in many high gas consumption areas. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) With the exception of the expiring near-month contract, futures contract prices also trended down, but the decreases were relatively modest. By Thursday's end of trading (both spot and futures markets were closed for Good Friday, March 29), the Henry Hub average spot price had declined by $0.35 per MMBtu since the previous Friday (March 22) to $3.19. The NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub expired on Tuesday on an upswing, gaining almost 15 cents in 2 days to close out trading at $3.472 per MMBtu. The new near-month contract (May delivery) ended trading on Thursday at $3.283 per MMBtu, down just over 9 cents in 2 days as the near-month contract. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil continued its steady rise, with modest gains early in the week punctuated by a 42-cent per barrel increase on Thursday. The WTI spot price at week's end was $26.21 per barrel ($4.52 per MMBtu), up $0.62 per barrel over the previous Friday. This is the highest price for WTI since the third week of September 2001.

79

The future of natural gas consumption in Beijing, Guangdong and Shanghai: An assessment utilizing MARKAL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas could possibly become a si0gnificant portion of the future fuel mix in China. However, there is still great uncertainty surrounding the size of this potential market and therefore its impact on the global gas trade. In order to identify some of the important factors that might drive natural gas consumption in key demand areas in China, we focus on three regions: Beijing, Guangdong, and Shanghai. Using the economic optimization model MARKAL, we initially assume that the drivers are government mandates of emissions standards, reform of the Chinese financial structure, the price and available supply of natural gas, and the rate of penetration of advanced power generating and end-use. The results from the model show that the level of natural gas consumption is most sensitive to policy scenarios, which strictly limit SO2 emissions from power plants. The model also revealed that the low cost of capital for power plants in China boosts the economic viability of capital-intensive coal-fired plants. This suggests that reform within the financial sector could be a lever for encouraging increased natural gas use.

BinBin Jiang; Chen Wenying; Yu Yuefeng; Zeng Lemin; David Victor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: August 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 5, 2009) Natural gas prices posted increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday, with price increases at the spot market ranging between 12 and 43 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.61 per MMBtu, increasing by 20 cents or 5.9 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for September delivery increased by 49 cents to $4.042 per MMBtu. The September futures contract closed above $4.00 per MMBtu for the first time since June 19 on Monday, reaching $4.031 per MMBtu. The near-month

82

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 8 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell for a third consecutive week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 10-17), as temperatures for most of the nation continued to be moderate to seasonal. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, for the smallest week-on-week decrease in the nation. Spot gas traded there yesterday (Wednesday, November 17) at $6.06 per MMBtu. Price declines at the majority of market locations ranged from around a dime to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the price for the near-month natural gas futures contract (for December delivery) fell by almost 40 cents on the week, settling yesterday at $7.283 per MMBtu. EIA reported that working gas inventories in underground

83

Applying Learning Curves to Modeling Future Coal and Gas Power Generation Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Other potential improvements to the model include an expansion to cover competing energy technologies not included in the current model such as nuclear, wind, and solar. ... Given the dominance of power plant emissions of greenhouse gases, and the growing worldwide interest in CO2 capture and storage (CCS) as a potential climate change mitigation option, the expected future cost of power plants with CO2 capture is of significant interest. ... Bergek, A.; Tell, F.; Berggren, C.; Watson, J.Technological Capabilities and Late Shakeouts: Industrial Dynamics in the Advanced Gas Turbine Industry, 1987–2002 Industrial and Corporate Change 2008, 17 ( 2) 335– 392 ...

Chris Ordowich; John Chase; Daniel Steele; Ripudaman Malhotra; Michiaki Harada; Keiji Makino

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2008 7, 2008 Next Release: July 24, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview The report week ended July 16 registered significant price declines at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the largest decreases occurring in the Arizona/Nevada, California, and Louisiana trading regions. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 94 cents per million British thermal units (MMBtu) to $11.15 as of yesterday. Similarly, at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for all futures contracts in the 12-month strip declined between 44.6 and 69.7 cents per MMBtu. The near-month contract on Monday settled below $12-per MMBtu for the first time in 6 weeks, dropping to $11.398 per MMBtu as of

85

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 7) 31, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 7) Spot and futures prices fluctuated over the past week (Wednesday, October 23 to Wednesday, October 30), with cash prices moving up from 6 to 35 cents per MMBtu at most market locations in response to rising demand from colder-than-normal temperatures, while futures prices for contracts for delivery through the impending heating season drifted lower. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 9 cents from the previous Wednesday (October 23) to $4.33 per MMBtu in yesterday's (October 30) trading. The expired near-month contract for November delivery ended trading on Tuesday, October 29 at $4.126 per MMBtu, recording a net gain of $0.085 since beginning as the prompt month contract on September 27. The new near-month contract, for December delivery, began with a gain of just under 13 cents, to settle at $4.389 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, October 25 increased to 3,172 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 6.3 percent. In contrast to natural gas spot prices, crude oil prices continued to soften. After dropping over $1 per barrel the previous week, the average spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell another $1.36 per barrel to end trading on Wednesday, October 30 at $26.85, or $4.63 per MMBtu.

86

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 3, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 10) October 3, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 10) Spot and futures prices moved up strongly for the week (Wednesday, September 25 through Wednesday, October 2) as Tropical Storm Isidore and then Hurricane Lili caused significant production curtailments in the Gulf of Mexico and onshore Texas and Louisiana. The average spot price at the Henry Hub yesterday (Wednesday, October 2), at $4.24 per MMBtu, was 49 cents higher than a week ago. However, the amount of gas actually delivered at October 2 prices is likely to be small, as operations at the Henry Hub near Erath, LA, were essentially shut down for at least 48 hours because of Lili's impending arrival. On the NYMEX, the expiring near-month contract for October delivery ended trading on Thursday, September 26 with a sizeable gain of over 19 cents per MMBtu, closing at $3.686. Taking over as the near-month contract, the futures contract for November delivery promptly gained $0.152 per MMBtu to settle at $4.041 on Friday. Natural gas in storage reached 3,038 Bcf on September 27, which exceeds the average of the past 5 years by 10 percent. With continuing turmoil in the Middle East and uncertainty surrounding the conflict with Iraq over weapons inspections keeping oil prices high, the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil hovered above $30 per barrel throughout the week. WTI ended trading Wednesday (October 2) at an average of $30.59 per barrel, or about $5.27 per MMBtu, down a dime per barrel from the previous Wednesday.

87

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell for a third consecutive week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 10-17), as temperatures for most of the nation continued to be moderate to seasonal. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, for the smallest week-on-week decrease in the nation. Spot gas traded there yesterday (Wednesday, November 17) at $6.06 per MMBtu. Price declines at the majority of market locations ranged from around a dime to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the price for the near-month natural gas futures contract (for December delivery) fell by almost 40 cents on the week, settling yesterday at $7.283 per MMBtu. EIA reported that working gas inventories in underground storage were 3,321 Bcf as of Friday, November 12, which is 9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined for a fourth consecutive week, dropping $1.85 per barrel ($0.32 per MMBtu), or nearly 4 percent, from last Wednesday's level, to trade yesterday at $46.85 per barrel ($8.08 per MMBtu).

88

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 3, 2009 Next Release: August 20, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 12, 2009) Reversing gains from the previous week, natural gas prices posted declines in both the spot and futures markets, with decreases in the spot markets of up to 48 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price fell 25 cents, or 7 percent, closing at $3.36 per MMBtu on Wednesday, August 12. The natural gas futures contract for September 2009 at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) fell 56 cents, or 14 percent, on the week, closing at $3.479 on Wednesday. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the price of the September 2009 contract peaked at $4.042 on August 5.

89

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The release day for the Natural Gas Weekly Market Update will shift from The release day for the Natural Gas Weekly Market Update will shift from Monday to Thursday effective for the week of April 8-12. This is the last issue to be published on Monday. There will be no issue released on Monday, April 8. The next issue will be released on Thursday, April 11. Overview: Monday, April 1, 2002 Spot prices fell sharply after Tuesday, March 26, during last week's holiday-shortened trading, as unseasonably cold temperatures began to moderate around midweek in many high gas consumption areas. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) With the exception of the expiring near-month contract, futures contract prices also trended down, but the decreases were relatively modest. By Thursday's end of trading (both spot and futures markets were closed for Good Friday, March 29), the Henry

90

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

typical of an advanced combined cycle gas turbine), the $comparison between a combined cycle gas turbine and a fixed-

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

typical of an advanced combined cycle gas turbine), the $comparison between a combined cycle gas turbine and a fixed-

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison between a combined cycle gas turbine and a fixed-typical of an advanced combined cycle gas turbine), the $

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest and Gulf Coast contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 9 to 35 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, July 21. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 21-28), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 14 cents per MMBtu to $5.77. In contrast to the decrease in spot prices, natural gas futures prices increased this week owing at least in part to higher crude oil and petroleum product prices. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $6.048 per MMBtu on Wednesday, July 28, after increasing 11.7 cents in its last week of trading. The September contract takes over as the near-month contract at nearly a dime premium to the August contract, closing yesterday (July 28) at $6.142 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, July 23, increased to 2,297 Bcf, which is 3.1 percent above the 5-year average. Crude oil prices rose this week to recent historical highs, in part owing to concerns over supply from Russia. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.18 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $42.81 per barrel, or $7.38 per MMBtu.

94

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 at 2:00 P.M. 1 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 9, 2011) Continuing its recent trend of languishing below the $4 per million Btu (MMBtu) mark, the Henry Hub natural gas spot price oscillated this week, and posted an overall net increase of 16 cents, from $3.39 per MMBtu last Wednesday, November 2, to $3.55 per MMBtu yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (December 2011) natural gas futures contract fell from $3.749 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.652 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,831 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, November 4, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

95

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 2, 2011) Natural gas prices showed continued relative weakness during the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub fell from $3.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) on February 23 to $3.79 per MMBtu on March 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 futures contract expired at $3.793 per MMBtu, having declined about 12 percent during its tenure as the near-month contract. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,745 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

96

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 4, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 27, 2011) As last weekÂ’s Eastern heat wave subsided, natural gas prices declined at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub decreased 18 cents from $4.64 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 20, to $4.46 per MMBtu yesterday, July 27. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) decreased from $4.500 per MMBtu to $4.370 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,714 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 22, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

97

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 29, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 21, 2011) Natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations across the United States, as moderate temperatures led to declines in demand. Prices at the Henry Hub fell from $4.01 per MMBtu last Wednesday, September 14, to $3.78 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (October 2011) dropped from $4.039 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.73 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,201 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

98

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 20, 2011) Responding to extremely hot weather this week, natural gas prices moved up at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents from $4.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 13, to $4.64 per MMBtu yesterday, July 20. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) increased from $4.403 per MMBtu to $4.500 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,671 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

99

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2009 15, 2009 Next Release: January 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 14, 2009) In the eastern half of the Lower 48 States, temperatures were significantly lower this report week, resulting in sharp price increases in the Northeast as space-heating demand rose. In the West and in the producing regions along the Gulf coast, however, a respite from cold weather provided some softening in natural gas spot prices. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.42 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.47. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract decreased in four out of the five trading sessions this report week. The futures contract for February delivery fell during the

100

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 4) 6, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 4) In contrast to last year's late February price spikes, spot and futures prices this week continued drifting lower as temperatures were seasonably cool across most of the country. Since Wednesday, February 18, natural gas spot prices have decreased between 10 and 30 cents per MMBtu at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 23 cents per MMBtu or 4 percent to $5.10. Yesterday (Wednesday, February 25), the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $5.15 per MMBtu, which was 21 cents less than last Wednesday's price and 59 cents less than its debut as the near-month contract at $5.74. Natural gas in storage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: June 4, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 27, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (May 20-27), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.49. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as moderate temperatures in most of the country limited demand. The futures contract for June delivery expired yesterday, May 27, at a price of $3.538 per MMBtu, which is the second-lowest monthly closing price for a NYMEX near-month contract in more than 6 years. Meanwhile, the price

102

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest and Gulf Coast contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 9 to 35 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, July 21. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 21-28), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 14 cents per MMBtu to $5.77. In contrast to the decrease in spot prices, natural gas futures prices increased this week owing at least in part to higher crude oil and petroleum product prices. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $6.048 per MMBtu on Wednesday, July 28, after increasing 11.7 cents in its last week of trading. The September contract takes over as the near-month contract at nearly a dime premium to the August contract,

103

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: March 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 25, 2009) Natural gas spot prices continued to decrease this week. The return of frigid temperatures for much of the report week in the Northeast, Southeast, and part of the Midwest did little to support any upward price movements in these regions. In fact, spot prices at all trading locations covered by this report either decreased or remained unchanged. Spot prices in the Northeast dipped below $5 per million Btu (MMBtu) for the first time in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) the near-month futures contract barely remained above $4 per MMBtu this week. The futures contract

104

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) Natural gas spot prices weakened in the opening days of June as concerns lingered over high storage inventories levels and mild weather limited gas demand in the key market areas of the Midwest and Northeast. Net storage injections for the week ending May 31 were 105 Bcf, bringing the total inventory level in the country to 1,893 Bcf, according to EIA estimates. Since Wednesday, May 29, prices at most trading locations have dropped by 16 cents or less. At the NYMEX, prices for futures contracts have declined more sharply. In the first week of trading as the near-month contract, the price for a futures contract for July delivery fell to $3.260 per MMBtu by yesterday's close, a drop of $0.245 per MMBtu since the

105

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19, to Wednesday, March 26) 19, to Wednesday, March 26) Released: March 27, 2008 Next release: April 3, 2008 · Since Wednesday, March 19, natural gas prices increased on both the spot and futures markets. · The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 14 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or 1.5 percent on the week, averaging $9.25 per MMBtu yesterday. · One day ahead of its expiration as the near-month contract, the price of the April 2008 futures contract settled at $9.572 per MMBtu, increasing about 55 cents or 6 percent since last Wednesday. · Natural gas in storage was 1,277 Bcf as of March 21, which is 2.7 percent above the 5-year average. · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.58 per barrel on the week to $105.83 per barrel or $18.25 per

106

Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.5±0.2, 1.3±0.6, and 2.2±1.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hale of the Energy Information Administration for supporting and reviewing this work. Keywords: Natural Gas

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 26, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 4) February 26, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 4) In contrast to last year's late February price spikes, spot and futures prices this week continued drifting lower as temperatures were seasonably cool across most of the country. Since Wednesday, February 18, natural gas spot prices have decreased between 10 and 30 cents per MMBtu at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 23 cents per MMBtu or 4 percent to $5.10. Yesterday (Wednesday, February 25), the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $5.15 per MMBtu, which was 21 cents less than last Wednesday's price and 59 cents less than its debut as the near-month contract at $5.74. Natural gas in storage decreased to 1,267 Bcf as of February 20, which is about 11.4 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved up $1.86 per barrel or about 5 percent since last Wednesday to $37.28 per barrel or $6.43 per MMBtu.

109

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) Natural gas spot prices weakened in the opening days of June as concerns lingered over high storage inventories levels and mild weather limited gas demand in the key market areas of the Midwest and Northeast. Net storage injections for the week ending May 31 were 105 Bcf, bringing the total inventory level in the country to 1,893 Bcf, according to EIA estimates. Since Wednesday, May 29, prices at most trading locations have dropped by 16 cents or less. At the NYMEX, prices for futures contracts have declined more sharply. In the first week of trading as the near-month contract, the price for a futures contract for July delivery fell to $3.260 per MMBtu by yesterday's close, a drop of $0.245 per MMBtu since the previous Wednesday. Crude oil prices provided little impetus for price advances. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell $0.62 per barrel for the week, trading on Wednesday, June 5 at $25.02 per barrel, or $4.31 per MMBtu.

110

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 7) 31, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 7) Compared with Wednesday, July 23, natural gas spot prices were lower at all locations in the Lower 48 States in trading on July 30. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 19 cents or about 4 percent to $4.69 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub closed on Tuesday, July 29 at $4.693 per MMBtu, down roughly 18 cents or 4 percent since last Wednesday. The NYMEX futures contract for September delivery became the near month contract on Wednesday, July 30, settling at $4.668 per MMBtu (or 18 cents less than last Wednesday's price.) Natural gas in storage increased to 2,032 Bcf as of Friday, July 25, which is about 12 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.56 per barrel or roughly 4 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $30.69 per barrel or $5.29 per MMBtu.

111

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 21) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 21) Natural gas spot prices and the near-month futures price showed a week-to-week decline as the pace of storage injections indicate adequate supplies, despite continued shut-in production in the Gulf of Mexico owing to Hurricane Ivan's impact. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 6-13), the price at the Henry Hub decreased 61 cents or about 10 percent to $5.39 per MMBtu. Prices in production areas along the Gulf Coast and Texas generally fell between 40 and 75 cents per MMBtu, while Midcontinent price declines were less than 36 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery ended the week at $6.851, a decline of roughly 19 cents per MMBtu or slightly more than 2.8 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage increased to 3,159 Bcf as of Friday, October 8, which is about 7.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.88 per barrel, or 3.6 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday (October 13) at $53.86 per barrel or $9.29 per MMBtu.

112

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 6, 2007) 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 6, 2007) Since Wednesday, June 20, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Rocky Mountains and Northeast regions. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 65 cents per MMBtu, or 9 percent, since Wednesday, June 20, to $6.74 per MMBtu, posting its lowest level since March 19. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (June 27) at $6.929 per MMBtu, falling 46 cents per MMBtu, or 6 percent since last Wednesday, June 20. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub posted a decline of $1.012 per MMBtu or nearly 13 percent. Natural gas in storage was 2,443 Bcf as of June 22, which is 18 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $0.48 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $68.98 per barrel or $11.89 per MMBtu.

113

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 20, 2006) 13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 20, 2006) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week led to an easing of natural gas spot and futures prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 5. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 5-12), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 9 cents per MMBtu, or about 1.3 percent, to $6.79. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery fell 26.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.808 yesterday (April 12), the lowest closing price for a near-month contract in over a month (March 10). The first week of net injections this season brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,714 Bcf as of Friday, April 7, which is 63.4 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.77 per barrel on the week to $68.53 per barrel, or $11.82 per MMBtu.

114

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19, to Wednesday, March 26) 19, to Wednesday, March 26) Released: March 27, 2008 Next release: April 3, 2008 · Since Wednesday, March 19, natural gas prices increased on both the spot and futures markets. · The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 14 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or 1.5 percent on the week, averaging $9.25 per MMBtu yesterday. · One day ahead of its expiration as the near-month contract, the price of the April 2008 futures contract settled at $9.572 per MMBtu, increasing about 55 cents or 6 percent since last Wednesday. · Natural gas in storage was 1,277 Bcf as of March 21, which is 2.7 percent above the 5-year average. · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.58 per barrel on the week to $105.83 per barrel or $18.25 per MMBtu. In yesterday's trading alone, however, the WTI price jumped $4.68 per barrel or about 4 percent.

115

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2001 , 2001 The overall decline in spot prices accelerated last week, as continued below-normal temperatures in significant portions of the country suppressed electricity demand for air-conditioning use and storage injections once again hit record-setting levels. Temperatures averaged in the 80s for most of the eastern half of the nation, with slightly cooler temperatures prevailing along much of the populous West coast. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Futures market prices reinforced the general price weakness, with contracts for future deliveries falling 5 days in a row. NYMEX Natural Gas Futures Near Month Contract Settlement Price, Henry Hub Spot Price, and West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Price Prices: The key factors of increased supply and very little weather-generated swing

116

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: September 11, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 27, to Wednesday, September 3) Since Wednesday, August 27, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling more than $1 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $1.29 per MMBtu or about 15 percent, to $7.26 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (September 3) at $7.264 per MMBtu, declining $1.344 or about 16 percent in its first week as the near-month contract. Natural gas in storage was 2,847 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of August 29, which is about 4 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007),

117

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 8) , 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 8) Natural gas spot prices surged upward in the past three days, bringing price levels significantly above those of a week ago (Wednesday, March 24) in all regional markets. At the Henry Hub, the price for spot gas increased $0.28 per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 24-31), or about 5 percent, trading yesterday at $5.63. Taking over as the near-month futures contract on Tuesday, March 30, the NYMEX contract for May delivery moved up sharply, ending trading yesterday at its highest-ever settlement price of $5.933 per MMBtu. EIA reported that natural gas inventories were 1,014 Bcf as of Friday, March 26, which is 7.7 percent less than the preceding 5-year average for the week. Despite anticipation

118

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 14, 2010) Natural gas prices moved significantly lower at market locations across the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub spot price averaged $4.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) in trading yesterday, July 14, decreasing $0.37 compared with the previous Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub decreased in 4 out the 5 trading sessions during the report week. The near-month contract settled yesterday at $4.31 per MMBtu, about $0.26 lower than the previous Wednesday. As of Friday, July 9, working gas in underground storage was 2,840

119

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 7, 31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 7, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased significantly in the Lower 48 States this week as Tropical Storm Ernesto moved north along the east coast, easing the threat to Gulf of Mexico natural gas supplies. The spot price at the Henry Hub dropped 79 cents, or about 11 percent this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 23 to 30) to $6.40 per MMBtu. In its first day of trading as the near month contract, the price of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for October delivery settled at $6.29 per MMBtu yesterday (August 30), which is 72 cents, or about 10 percent, less than last Wednesday's price. As of Friday, August 25, 2006, natural gas in storage was 2,905 Bcf or 12.4 percent above the 5-year average. The

120

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 3, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 18, 2009) Since Wednesday, November 11, natural gas spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases of up to 55 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed $0.15 per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, to $3.74 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, November 18, at $4.254 per MMBtu. The price of the near-month contract decreased by 25 cents or about 6 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was a record-setting 3,833 billion cubic feet

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121

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 24) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 24) Spot and futures prices moved up for the second week in a row. Price increases for the week (Wednesday, April 9 to Wednesday, April 16) were generally around a half dollar in both the spot and futures markets-about twice the increase in spot prices (in most markets) the previous week, and three times the increase in the near-month (May delivery) futures contract price. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 51 cents on the week, to $5.62 per MMBtu, an increase of nearly 10 percent. The settlement price for the May contract increased by just over 9 percent for the week, gaining a cumulative $0.482 to settle yesterday (Wednesday, April 16) at $5.677 per MMBtu. These price increases occurred despite a gradual warming trend since last Wednesday in every region of the country except in the West. Working gas in storage was 623 Bcf as of April 11, which was 49 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average, and a new record low level over the 9 years of EIA data. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose for the week by 23 cents per barrel, to $29.16 per barrel ($5.03 per MMBtu) in yesterday's trading.

122

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 8) 1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 8) Natural gas spot prices surged upward in the past three days, bringing price levels significantly above those of a week ago (Wednesday, March 24) in all regional markets. At the Henry Hub, the price for spot gas increased $0.28 per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 24-31), or about 5 percent, trading yesterday at $5.63. Taking over as the near-month futures contract on Tuesday, March 30, the NYMEX contract for May delivery moved up sharply, ending trading yesterday at its highest-ever settlement price of $5.933 per MMBtu. EIA reported that natural gas inventories were 1,014 Bcf as of Friday, March 26, which is 7.7 percent less than the preceding 5-year average for the week. Despite anticipation of yesterday's OPEC decision to curtail oil production by up to 1 million barrels per day, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil declined on four of the five trading days of the week, trading yesterday at $35.75 ($6.16 per MMBtu), down $1.31 per barrel ($0.23 per MMBtu) on the week.

123

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 7, 2006) 31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 7, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased significantly in the Lower 48 States this week as Tropical Storm Ernesto moved north along the east coast, easing the threat to Gulf of Mexico natural gas supplies. The spot price at the Henry Hub dropped 79 cents, or about 11 percent this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 23 to 30) to $6.40 per MMBtu. In its first day of trading as the near month contract, the price of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for October delivery settled at $6.29 per MMBtu yesterday (August 30), which is 72 cents, or about 10 percent, less than last Wednesday's price. As of Friday, August 25, 2006, natural gas in storage was 2,905 Bcf or 12.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.25 this week to $70.20 per barrel or $12.10 per MMBtu yesterday.

124

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 21) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 21) The emergence of more spring-like temperatures in most regions of the country, ample natural gas storage supplies, and lower oil prices resulted in natural gas spot prices easing 7 to 43 cents per MMBtu in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 6. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 6-13), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 39 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $7.07. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery fell 58 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.978 yesterday (April 13), the first close below $7 for a near-month contract since March 28. A second week of net injections brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,293 Bcf as of Friday, April 8, which is 26.3 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $5.67 per barrel on the week to $50.21 per barrel, or $8.66 per MMBtu.

125

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H[sub 2] and CO, usually containing CO[sub 2]) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H{sub 2} and CO, usually containing CO{sub 2}) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

128

Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

129

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 13) May 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 13) Upward pressure on spot and futures natural gas prices continued for a second consecutive week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 28-May 5), owing to continuing concerns over gas supplies and higher crude oil prices. A 42-cent per MMBtu price increase at the Henry Hub on Tuesday (May 4) appeared to be related to the increase in futures prices the previous day, when the near-month contract moved past the $6-mark to a close of $6.231. The Henry Hub spot price increase on Tuesday and a 2-cent increase last Friday (April 30) were more than enough to offset declines in the other three trading sessions this week, resulting in a net gain on the week of 30 cents per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub was higher on the week by about 34 cents per MMBtu, closing yesterday (May 5) at $6.31. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, April 30, increased to 1,227 Bcf, which is 2.2 percent below the 5-year average. Owing to geopolitical concerns and perceived low gasoline supplies heading into the summer driving season, crude oil prices rose to almost $40 per barrel this week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.46 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $39.69 per barrel, or $6.84 per MMBtu.

130

Date Issue Brief # ISSUE BRIEF Natural Gas: A Bridge to a Low?Carbon Future?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Issue Brief 09?11Resources for the Future Resources for the Future is an independent, nonpartisan think tank that, through its social science research, enables policymakers and stakeholders to make better, more informed decisions about energy, environmental, natural resource, and public health issues. Headquartered in Washington, DC, its research scope comprises programs in nations around the world.

Stephen P. A. Brown; Alan J. Krupnick; Margaret A. Walls; Stephen P. A. Brown; Alan J. Krupnick; Margaret A. Walls

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 4) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 4) Natural gas spot prices spiked significantly higher for the second consecutive week, while futures prices for delivery months beyond November saw smaller, yet still substantial, increases. The November contract expired yesterday (Wednesday, October 27) at nearly the identical price of last Wednesday's settlement, up $0.003 on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, October 21-28) to end trading at $7.626 per MMBtu. Taking over as the near-month contract, the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery settled yesterday at $8.775 per MMBtu, an increase of $0.235 per MMBtu, or almost 3 percent, since last Wednesday. The price for spot gas at the Henry Hub jumped $0.87 per MMBtu on the week, an increase of 12 percent, as spot gas traded yesterday at $8.12, topping $8 for the first time since early March 2003. Working gas inventories were 3,249 Bcf as of Friday, October 22, which is 6.9 percent greater than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil reached a record-high $56.37 per barrel ($9.72 per MMBtu) on Tuesday (October 26), only to drop in yesterday's trading on news that last week's crude oil stocks build was about double the market's expectations. WTI ended trading yesterday at $52.52 per barrel ($9.06 per MMBtu), down $2.41 per barrel ($0.42 per MMBtu), or over 4 percent, from last Wednesday's level.

132

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 14) August 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 14) With little in the way of fundamental changes, spot and futures prices showed modest gains for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, July 30-August 6). The Henry Hub spot price gained a nickel on the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, August 6) at $4.71 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the near-month futures contract (for September delivery) settlement price increased by $0.077 to $4.745 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas inventories were 2,106 Bcf as of Friday, August 1, which is 10 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. Crude oil prices showed more upward movement, as a terrorist bombing in Indonesia and continuing unsettled conditions in Iraq contributed to concerns about oil supply as the market looks toward the upcoming winter. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.08 per barrel, or 21 cents per MMBtu, on the week to $31.77 per barrel ($5.48 per MMBtu) in yesterday's trading.

133

Spindletop salt-cavern points way for future natural-gas storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spindletop underground natural-gas storage complex began operating in 1993, providing 1.7 bcf of working-gas capacity in its first cavern. The cavern and related facilities exemplify the importance and advantages of natural-gas storage in leached salt caverns. Development of a second cavern, along with continued leaching of the initial cavern, target 5 bcf of available working-gas capacity in both caverns by the end of this year. The facilities that currently make up the Spindletop complex include two salt dome gas-storage wells and a 24,000-hp compression and dehydration facility owned by Sabine Gas; two salt dome gas-storage wells and a 15,900-hp compression and dehydration facility owned by Centana; a 7,000-hp leaching plant; and three jointly owned brine-disposal wells. The paper discusses the development of the storage facility, design goals, leaching plant and wells, piping and compressors, dehydration and heaters, control systems, safety and monitoring, construction, first years operation, and customer base.

Shotts, S.A.; Neal, J.R.; Solis, R.J. (Southwestern Gas Pipeline Inc., The Woodlands, TX (United States)); Oldham, C. (Centana Intrastate Pipeline Co., Beaumont, TX (United States))

1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

134

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 23) 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 23) Natural gas spot and futures price movements were mixed for the week, as Hurricane Ivan pushed prices upward in Gulf of Mexico production areas and in consuming markets east of the Mississippi, but had little effect on prices elsewhere. Likewise, on the NYMEX, the price for the near-month contract (for October delivery) got a significant, brief boost from Ivan, while the November contract price was nearly flat for the week and out-month contracts fell in price. At yesterday's price of $5.16 per MMBtu, the Henry Hub spot price reflected a gain of 47 cents or 10 percent on the week. The October futures contract price increased $0.193 per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, on the week to settle yesterday at $4.824. EIA

135

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2009 30, 2009 Next Release: May 7, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 29, 2009) The direction of spot price movements was mixed this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 22-29). However, changes were relatively small regardless of direction. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.05 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.43. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as moderate temperatures in most of the country limited demand and a perception of strong supply continues. The futures contract for May delivery expired on Tuesday, April 28, at a price of $3.321 per MMBtu, which is the lowest monthly closing price for a NYMEX near-month contract

136

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: March 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 18, 2009) Warmer temperatures moved into major population centers this report week, signaling the imminent end of winter and the corresponding reduction in demand related to space heating. Spot prices continued to decline, with the biggest decreases west of the Mississippi River. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.75. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased as temperatures climbed higher this week. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by 11 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.68, the lowest close for a near-month contract in about 6½ years.

137

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 14) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 14) With little in the way of fundamental changes, spot and futures prices showed modest gains for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, July 30-August 6). The Henry Hub spot price gained a nickel on the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, August 6) at $4.71 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the near-month futures contract (for September delivery) settlement price increased by $0.077 to $4.745 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas inventories were 2,106 Bcf as of Friday, August 1, which is 10 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. Crude oil prices showed more upward movement, as a terrorist bombing in Indonesia and continuing unsettled conditions in Iraq

138

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 21) 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 21) Natural gas spot prices and the near-month futures price showed a week-to-week decline as the pace of storage injections indicate adequate supplies, despite continued shut-in production in the Gulf of Mexico owing to Hurricane Ivan's impact. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 6-13), the price at the Henry Hub decreased 61 cents or about 10 percent to $5.39 per MMBtu. Prices in production areas along the Gulf Coast and Texas generally fell between 40 and 75 cents per MMBtu, while Midcontinent price declines were less than 36 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery ended the week at $6.851, a decline of roughly 19 cents per MMBtu or slightly more than 2.8 percent since last

139

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, November 19, 2001 Monday, November 19, 2001 Last week, the NYMEX futures contract price for December delivery at the Henry Hub continued the generally downward trend that began in late October. The contract ended last week's trading at $2.637 per MMBtu-nearly 55 cents lower than the $3.183 recorded when it began as the near-month contract on October 30. Spot prices also experienced a similar pattern and reportedly declined well over $1.00 per MMBtu at most major market locations. The spot price at the Henry Hub on Friday hit its lowest level in more than two and a half years. The continued warmer-than-normal weather in most parts of the country appears to be a major contributing factor in the almost 3-week decline in natural gas prices. (Temperature Map) (Temperature Deviation Map) Another factor is the relatively high stocks that continued to increase in the second week of November. Working gas in storage now stands at its highest level since November 1998. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped by more than $2.00 per barrel on Thursday and ended the week at $18.05, or $3.11 per MMBtu-its lowest level in over 2 years.

140

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) Natural gas spot prices across the country surged to record highs this week as yet another Arctic blast of cold arrived, this time reaching as far south as Texas. Prices in the Northeast were the highest in the country at more than $20 per MMBtu for much of the week, but prices also tripled since last Wednesday to $18 and more at production-area trading locations along the Gulf Coast and in Texas. On the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub had a net change of $4.26 per MMBtu to an average of $10.36 yesterday (Wednesday, February 26). The NYMEX contract for March delivery ended its run as the near-month futures contract on Wednesday, settling at just over $9.13 per MMBtu, or $3 higher on the week. As of February 21, natural gas in storage was 1,014 Bcf, or 33.4 percent below the 5-year average for this week. Crude oil prices climbed $1.90 per barrel yesterday to an average of $37.96, or $6.54 per MMBtu, which is near a 12-year high.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 9, 2011) The Henry Hub spot price fell during the week from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, February 2, to $4.22 per MMBtu on Wednesday, February 9. The price decline occurred in spite of very cold weather across the United States. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price fell from $89.78 per barrel, or $15.48 per MMBtu, on Thursday to $85.59 per barrel, or $14.76 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near month futures contract (March 2011) fell by 39 cents from $4.429 per MMBtu to $4.044 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell below the 5-year average for the

142

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, to Wednesday, April 16) 9, to Wednesday, April 16) Released: April 17, 2008 Next release: April 24, 2008 · Since Wednesday, April 9, natural gas spot prices increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. Currently, spot prices exceed the average spot prices of the 2007-2008 heating season by about 25 percent. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 16) at $10.433 per million Btu (MMBtu), posting a 38-cent increase and reaching the highest price for a near-month contract since January 2006. · Natural gas in storage was 1,261 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 11, which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.91 per barrel on the week to $114.80 per barrel or $19.79 per MMBtu.

143

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) 23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) Natural gas spot and futures prices trended down for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 15-22). The cold front that moved into major gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast for the weekend and lingered into the first part of this week had minimal impact on prices. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price fell 24 cents for the week to $3.38 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the near-month contract (June delivery) declined for 5 straight trading sessions before recording a small increase of $0.064 per MMBtu in May 22 trading, to settle at $3.459. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which had held at or above $28 per barrel since last Thursday, fell nearly $1 on Tuesday, May 21, following the American Petroleum Institute's announcement of an unexpected build in crude oil stocks of 5.5 million barrels for the week ended Friday, May 17. For the week (May 15-22), the WTI price was down $0.99, at $27.01 per barrel, or $4.66 per MMBtu.

144

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 27) 0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 27) Natural gas spot prices declined at nearly all trading locations for a third consecutive week (March 12-19) as temperatures became more spring-like and space-heating demand slackened. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased $0.58 per MMBtu, or 10 percent, to $5.20. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub fell to its lowest point since becoming the near-month contract, decreasing for the week about $0.59 per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, March 19) at $5.278. Natural gas in storage decreased to a record low of 636 Bcf as of Friday, March 14, which is more than 50 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $7.86 per barrel or about 21 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $30.01 per barrel or $5.17 per MMBtu.

145

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 12) 5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 12) Since Wednesday, April 27, natural gas spot prices have decreased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States, as springtime temperatures prevailed in most areas. Spot prices at the Henry Hub decreased 62 cents or about 9 percent to $6.49 per MMBtu, while spot price declines were generally greater in West Texas at between 72 and 80 cents per MMBtu. Yesterday (May 4), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub, which became the near-month contract on April 28, settled at $6.630 per MMBtu, declining 17 cents or about 3 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,455 Bcf as of April 29, which is 25.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.15 per barrel or about 2 percent on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $50.22 per barrel or $8.66 per MMBtu.

146

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 8) May 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 8) Spot natural gas prices at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States dropped $0.25-$0.50 per MMBtu this week (Wednesday, April 23-Wednesday, April 30) as springtime temperatures prevailed in most areas. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 33 cents per MMBtu to $5.25, while spot price declines in the Northeast were generally greater at between $0.36 and $0.50. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery, which became the near-month contract on Tuesday, April 29, has declined 29 cents since last Wednesday. The June contract settled at $5.385 yesterday (April 30). Natural gas in storage increased to 741 Bcf as of Friday, April 25, which is about 43.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.95 per barrel or about 7 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $26.09 per barrel or $4.50 per MMBtu.

147

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, to Wednesday, April 16) 9, to Wednesday, April 16) Released: April 17, 2008 Next release: April 24, 2008 · Since Wednesday, April 9, natural gas spot prices increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. Currently, spot prices exceed the average spot prices of the 2007-2008 heating season by about 25 percent. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 16) at $10.433 per million Btu (MMBtu), posting a 38-cent increase and reaching the highest price for a near-month contract since January 2006. · Natural gas in storage was 1,261 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 11, which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

148

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: November 20, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, November 5, to Thursday, November 13) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday (November 5), failing to respond to the increase in heating load that occurred across much of the country, particularly in the Midwest and the Rocky Mountains. Since last Wednesday, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.31 after the intraweek run-up to more than $7 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract decreased in five of the six trading sessions covered by this report, resulting in a weekly net decrease of $0.931 per MMBtu. The

149

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: February 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices decreased in half of the trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week. Generally, areas east of the Rockies and particularly those that experienced frigid temperatures posted weekly price increases. However, there were some exceptions, including the Midcontinent and East Texas. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures trading for the near-month contract was fairly volatile, with daily price changes ranging between a 16-cent loss and a 16-cent increase. The March 2009 contract ended trading yesterday 18 cents higher than on the previous Wednesday.

150

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 6, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 28, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday, April 21 – Wednesday, April, 28), as a late-season chill temporarily increased demand. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.23 to $4.19 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month futures contract bounced above $4 per MMBtu in the final days of trading before its monthly expiration. The May contract expired yesterday at $4.271 per MMBtu, which is $0.429 more than the April contract’s expiration price of $3.842 per MMBtu. As a result, the May contract is the

151

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 7, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday, June 30–Wednesday, July 7), as much of the East Coast experienced the hottest regional temperatures of the year. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.23 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub closed yesterday, July 7, at $4.565 per MMBtu, which is $0.05 lower than the previous Wednesday. Although the near-month contract increased $0.24 per MMBtu at the beginning of the report week, on Thursday, July 1, likely in response

152

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: December 18, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, December 3, to Wednesday, December 10, 2008) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, with all trading regions registering losses with the exception of the Rocky Mountains. On the week, the spot prices at each market location outside the Rockies fell between 2 and 93 cents per MMBtu, with the Henry Hub registering a decrease of 80 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract declined each day for the first 3 days of the report and increased on Tuesday and Wednesday (December 9-10), resulting in a

153

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Wednesday, November 10, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 3, 2010) Price changes were mixed this week, with much regional variation across the country. At the Henry Hub in Erath, Louisiana, prices posted a net decline on the week of 2 cents, falling from $3.37 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, October 27, to $3.35 per MMBtu on Wednesday, November 3. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the December 2010 futures contract (which became the near-month contract on October 28) rose $0.073 from $3.763 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.836 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage increased to 3,821 billion cubic feet

154

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 20, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 12, 2011) Natural gas prices posted net losses at most market locations across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price fell from $3.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, October 5, to $3.54 per MMBtu yesterday, October 12. Despite overall decreases, intraweek trading showed some rallies, particularly near the end of the report week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (November 2011) fell about 8 cents on the week from $3.570 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.489 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,521 billion cubic feet

155

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2008 7, 2008 Next Release: August 14, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, July 30, to Wednesday, August 6) Natural gas spot prices decreased this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, July 30-August 6), marking a fifth consecutive week of declines at many trading locations after the unprecedented run-up in prices earlier this year. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.31 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $8.70. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts were also lower relative to last week. After reaching a daily settlement high price for the week of $9.389 per MMBtu on Friday, August 1, the price of the near-month contract (September 2008) on Monday decreased

156

Meeting future exhaust emissions standards using natural gas as a vehicle fuel: Lessons learned from the natural gas vehicle challenge '92  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge '92, organized by Argonne National Laboratory and sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Energy, Mines, and Resources - Canada, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and many others, resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck, donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers strived to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine-out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student-modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors in achieving good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Meeting future exhaust emissions standards using natural gas as a vehicle fuel: Lessons learned from the natural gas vehicle challenge `92  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge `92, organized by Argonne National Laboratory and sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Energy, Mines, and Resources - Canada, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and many others, resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck, donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers strived to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine-out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student-modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors in achieving good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: July 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 15, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose during the week in all trading locations. Price increases ranged between 6 cents and 48 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the biggest increases occurring in the Rocky Mountain region. During the report week, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 15 cents or 5 percent to $3.37 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas near-month contract (August 2009) decreased 7 cents to $3.283 per MMBtu from $3.353 the previous week. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the August 2009 contract has lost 66 cents. As of Friday, July 10, 2009, working gas in storage rose to 2,886

159

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of better understanding fuel price risk and the role thatonly to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e. , the risk thatsuch attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of better understanding fuel price risk and the role thatonly to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e. , the risk thatsuch attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our

Bolinger, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of better understanding fuel price risk and the role thatonly to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e. , the risk thatsuch attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

NYMEX Coal Futures - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NYMEX Coal Futures Near-Month Contract Final Settlement Price 2013 NYMEX Coal Futures Near-Month Contract Final Settlement Price 2013 Data as of: December 13, 2013 | Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 30, 2013 U.S. coal exports, chiefly Central Appalachian bituminous, make up a significant percentage of the world export market and are a relevant factor in world coal prices. Because coal is a bulk commodity, transportation is an important aspect of its price and availability. In response to dramatic changes in both electric and coal industry practices, the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) after conferring with coal producers and consumers, sought and received regulatory approval to offer coal futures and options contracts. On July 12, 2001, NYMEX began trading Central Appalachian Coal futures under the QL symbol.

163

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 25-August 1) as tropical storm activity increased and weather-related demand returned along with normal summertime heat in large market areas in the East. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 62 cents per MMBtu, or 11.1 percent, to $6.19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery expired last Friday (July 27) at $6.11 per MMBtu. Although the price of the expiring contract in the last couple days of trading rose slightly, the expiration price was still the second lowest of the year (the January 2007 contract expired at $5.838). Taking over as the near-month contract, the September 2007 contract increased in price by $0.29 per MMBtu on the week to $6.352. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,840 Bcf as of Friday, July 27. This level of working gas in underground storage exceeds the maximum level of the previous 5 years. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.75 per barrel on the week to $76.49 per barrel. On a Btu basis, the crude oil price is now more than double the price of natural gas at $13.19 per MMBtu.

164

China's fuel gas sector: History, current status, and future prospects Chi-Jen Yang a,c,*, Yipei Zhou b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as shale gas, coal-bed methane, and coal-to-natural-gas), and recent pricing reforms, appear likely: manufactured gas (coal gas), Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), and natural gas. Manufactured gas, which is often gas, mostly hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and other hydrocarbons; 2) natural gas

Jackson, Robert B.

165

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2001 23, 2001 Another mid-summer week of relatively mild temperatures in many of the nation's major gas consuming market regions and a large estimate of net injections of working gas into storage put downward pressure on spot and futures prices. Some parts of New England saw high temperatures only in the 70s for several days last week, while highs in the 80s stretched down the mid-Atlantic region as far as northern Georgia and well into the Midwest. On the West Coast, highs rarely exceeded 80 degrees, with a number of locations reporting highs in the 60s. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Spot prices declined for the week in nearly all markets, with spot gas at the Henry Hub trading at $2.95 per MMBtu on Friday, down $0.21 from the previous Friday. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery fell even more, ending the week down $0.295 per MMBtu at $2.955-the first sub-$3 settlement for a near-month contract since April 11 of last year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell four days in a row and traded on Wednesday and Thursday below $25 per barrel before recovering Friday to $25.60 per barrel, or $4.41 per MMBtu. This, too, is the first time since last April that WTI has fallen below $25 per barrel, and is the second week in a row of losses of $1 or more per barrel.

166

STATE OF THE ART AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS IN NATURAL GAS ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current, state of the art natural gas engines provide the lowest emission commercial technology for use in medium heavy duty vehicles. NOx emission levels are 25 to 50% lower than state of the art diesel engines and PM levels are 90% lower than non-filter equipped diesels. Yet, in common with diesel engines, natural gas engines are challenged to become even cleaner and more efficient to meet environmental and end-user demands. Cummins Westport is developing two streams of technologies to achieve these goals for medium-heavy and heavy-heavy duty applications. For medium-heavy duty applications, lowest possible emissions are sought on SI engines without significant increase in complexity and with improvements in efficiency and BMEP. The selected path builds on the capabilities of the CWI Plus technology and recent diesel engine advances in NOx controls, providing potential to reduce emissions to 2010 values in an accelerated manner and without the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction or NOx Storage and Reduction technology. For heavy-heavy duty applications where high torque and fuel economy are of prime concern, the Westport-Cycle{trademark} technology is in field trial. This technology incorporates High Pressure Direct Injection (HPDI{trademark}) of natural gas with a diesel pilot ignition source. Both fuels are delivered through a single, dual common rail injector. The operating cycle is entirely unthrottled and maintains the high compression ratio of a diesel engine. As a result of burning 95% natural gas rather than diesel fuel, NOx emissions are halved and PM is reduced by around 70%. High levels of EGR can be applied while maintaining high combustion efficiency, resulting in extremely low NOx potential. Some recent studies have indicated that DPF-equipped diesels emit less nanoparticles than some natural gas vehicles [1]. It must be understood that the ultrafine particles emitted from SI natural gas engines are generally accepted to consist predominantly of VOCs [2], and that lubricating oil is a major contributor. Fitting an oxidation catalyst to the natural gas engine leads to a reduction in nanoparticles emissions in comparison to engines without aftertreatment [2,3,4]. In 2001, the Cummins Westport Plus technology was introduced with the C Gas Plus engine, a popular choice for transit bus applications. This incorporates drive by wire, fully integrated, closed loop electronic controls and a standard oxidation catalyst for all applications. The B Gas Plus and the B Propane Plus engines, with application in shuttle and school buses were launched in 2002 and 2003. The gas-specific oxidation catalyst operates in concert with an optimized ring-pack and liner combination to reduce total particulate mass below 0.01g/bhphr, combat ultrafine particles and control VOC emissions.

Dunn, M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

167

Current status and future development of coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coated particles were first invented by Roy Huddle in Harwell 1957. Through five decades of development, the German UO2 coated particle and US LEU UCO coated particle represent the highly successful coated particle designs up to now. In this paper, current status as well as the failure mechanisms of coated particle so far is reviewed and discussed. The challenges associated with high temperatures for coated particles applied in future VHTR are evaluated. And future development prospects of advanced coated particle suited for higher temperatures are presented. According to the past coated fuel particle development experience, it is unwise to make multiple simultaneous changes in the coated particle design. Two advanced designs which are modifications of standard German UO2 coated particle (UO2? herein) and US UCO coated particle (TRIZO) are promising and feasible under the world-wide cooperations and efforts.

X.W. Zhou; C.H. Tang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 23) 16, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 23) Natural gas spot prices at many trading locations this week surged close to their highest levels for the month, but then eased yesterday (May 15) as cooler weather relieved a heat wave in the South and a recent run-up in the price of crude oil abated. On Tuesday, the NYMEX closing price of $3.855 per MMBtu for the futures contract with June delivery was the highest price for a near-month contract since June 2001. But by the end of trading the next day, prices had subsided along with a drop in crude oil prices. After reaching a high of $29.17 per barrel on Tuesday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped Wednesday to an average of $28.17 per barrel, or $4.86 per MMBtu. This was an increase of 3 percent since last Wednesday.

169

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 5) 9, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 5) Spot prices in most regional markets ended the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 21-28) lower, despite severe cold in the Northeast beginning Friday (January 23) and continuing through the weekend. As a result, prices in the Northeast market proved the major exception to the downward trend, as cash prices moved up sharply at most locations in the region. At the Henry Hub, the spot price was 23 cents per MMBtu lower on the week, or about 4 percent, ending with yesterday's (Wednesday, January 28) level of $6.04. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery showed a modest gain of nearly 6 cents on its final day of trading, closing out at $5.775 per MMBtu. The contract for March delivery assumes the near-month position beginning today (Thursday, January 29). The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories were 2,063 Bcf as of Friday, January 23, which is 8.6 percent greater than the previous 5-year (1999-2003) average. West Texas Intermediate crude oil on the spot market fell $1.90 per barrel, or $0.26 per MMBtu, since last Wednesday (January 21), ending trading yesterday at $33.63 per barrel, or $5.80 per MMBtu.

170

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 13) March 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 13) Spot prices at many major markets declined significantly from last Wednesday's (February 26) levels as temperatures moderated somewhat over the weekend and again on Tuesday and Wednesday (March 5-6). The spot price at the Henry Hub declined $2.55 per MMBtu from last Wednesday's level, despite peaking for the week at $10.65 on Friday, to end trading yesterday (Wednesday, March 6) at $7.81. The NYMEX futures contract for April delivery began trading as the near-month contract on Thursday, February 27, and promptly surged to its all-time high to date of $8.101 per MMBtu on Friday, before settling yesterday at $7.021. Natural gas stocks fell to 838 Bcf as of February 28, which is nearly 42 percent below the 5-year average. As of yesterday, the WTI spot price had dropped $1.10 per barrel (or $0.19 per MMBtu) from its price-spike level of $37.96 per barrel last Wednesday, to $36.86 per barrel, or $6.36 per MMBtu.

171

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 3, 2001 December 3, 2001 Spot prices at the Henry Hub remain low for this time of year, as prices declined 16 cents from Friday-to-Friday. The spot price rose $0.50 per MMBtu from Monday to Wednesday, and then fell almost 60 cents by Friday to trade for $1.77 at the end of the week. Concern about the final resolution of the surprising decline of the Enron Corporation appears to be contributing to the price variability on the spot market. On the NYMEX futures market the December contract closed on Wednesday at $2.316 per MMBtu, more than $1.00 below what it began trading for as the near-month contract in late October. The unseasonably warm temperatures that have dominated the weather in much of the country continued last week in the eastern portion of the country. (Temperature Map) (Temperature Deviation Map) In addition, the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6 to 10 day forecast is calling for a warm weather pattern to continue into early December. Because of the combination of warmer-than-normal temperatures and favorable prices, this year's refill season has continued into the 2nd half of November with an estimated 12 Bcf added to working gas stocks during the third week of last month. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved up about $0.85 per barrel on Friday and ended the week at $19.50 or about $3.36 per MMBtu.

172

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2001 8, 2001 Prices ended the week up slightly from where they started as a brief heat wave in the eastern half of the country caused a rise in prices (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) that was somewhat undone by the return of moderate temperatures and the report of another hefty stock build. On a Friday-to-Friday basis, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.25 to $3.88 per MMBtu compared with an increase of $0.23 to $0.33 at other major supply points in the eastern half of the country. In the same time period, the near-month (July delivery) futures contract was up less than 6 cents to $3.979 per MMBtu as of Friday, June 15, 2001. Prices in California rose substantially last Monday after coming off high inventory flow orders (OFOs) but ended the week close to or lower than the previous week due to another round of OFOs. For the past 7 weeks, weekly storage injections neared or exceeded 100 Bcf, bringing stocks to within less than a 1 percent difference from average levels. The string of record-breaking stock builds appears attributable to moderate spring temperatures and reduced cooling demand by natural-gas-fired electricity generation.

173

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 24) 17, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 24) Spot and futures prices fell significantly during the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 9-16), as working gas inventories continued to grow strongly, intense summer heat was limited almost exclusively to the mountainous regions of the West, and Hurricane Claudette's immediate effect on prices was minimal. In trading at the Henry Hub, spot prices fell 56 cents from the previous Wednesday (July 9), to an even $5 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for August delivery dipped below $5 per MMBtu, as it closed yesterday (July 16) at $4.934 per MMBtu-the first sub-$5 settlement for a near-month contract in nearly 4 months. EIA reported that working gas inventories were 1,866 Bcf as of Friday, July 11, which is 13.9 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded in a narrow range between $31.04 and $31.60 per barrel for the week. It ended trading yesterday with a decline of 40 cents per barrel to $31.20, or about $5.38 per MMBtu, as oil markets also reacted to Hurricane Claudette's limited impact on infrastructure and production. For the week, WTI showed a modest gain of $0.33 per barrel ($0.03 per MMBtu).

174

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24, 2001 24, 2001 Mild temperatures and moderate demand helped prices to decline gradually last week as markets returned to relatively normal operation. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot market price for natural gas ended the week at $2.04 per million Btu, down 37 cents per million Btu from the previous Friday. On the futures market, the near-month (October) NYMEX contract settled on Friday at $2.103 per million Btu - off close to 60 cents from the previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell steadily from $28.85 per barrel ($4.974 per million Btu) on Monday to $ 25.50 or $4.40 per million Btu on Friday. Prices: Spot prices at many major market locations took a downward turn last

175

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2001 0, 2001 Spot market prices at the Henry Hub trended upward most days last week reaching a high of $2.40 per MMBtu on Thursday before ending the week at $2.35-20 cents higher than the previous Friday. This increase occurred as market fundamentals were generally unchanged last week with continued weakness in weather-related demand along with persistent strong natural gas supplies and above average stock levels. On the weather front moderate temperatures prevailed in most parts of the country again last week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the NYMEX futures market, the near-month October contract also moved up last week to the end the week at $2.50 per MMBtu. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude gained $0.80 per barrel last week and finished at $28.05 or

176

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2008 7, 2008 Next Release: July 24, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview The report week ended July 16 registered significant price declines at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the largest decreases occurring in the Arizona/Nevada, California, and Louisiana trading regions. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 94 cents per million British thermal units (MMBtu) to $11.15 as of yesterday. Similarly, at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for all futures contracts in the 12-month strip declined between 44.6 and 69.7 cents per MMBtu. The near-month contract on Monday settled below $12-per MMBtu for the first time in 6 weeks, dropping to $11.398 per MMBtu as of

177

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: March 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 4, 2009) A late winter cold spell in major population centers in the Lower 48 States this report week temporarily boosted space-heating demand in most of the country. Prices at trading locations throughout the country were slightly higher for the report week. The Henry Hub spot price increased $0.03 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.23. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), trading of the March contract ended during the report week with a final or expiration price of $4.056 per MMBtu, the lowest expiration price for a near-month NYMEX contract since the October 2002 contract. Nonetheless, futures prices were

178

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, , 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 25-August 1) as tropical storm activity increased and weather-related demand returned along with normal summertime heat in large market areas in the East. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 62 cents per MMBtu, or 11.1 percent, to $6.19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery expired last Friday (July 27) at $6.11 per MMBtu. Although the price of the expiring contract in the last couple days of trading rose slightly, the expiration price was still the second lowest of the year (the January 2007 contract expired at $5.838). Taking over as the near-month contract, the September 2007

179

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October , 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 10) Spot and futures prices moved up strongly for the week (Wednesday, September 25 through Wednesday, October 2) as Tropical Storm Isidore and then Hurricane Lili caused significant production curtailments in the Gulf of Mexico and onshore Texas and Louisiana. The average spot price at the Henry Hub yesterday (Wednesday, October 2), at $4.24 per MMBtu, was 49 cents higher than a week ago. However, the amount of gas actually delivered at October 2 prices is likely to be small, as operations at the Henry Hub near Erath, LA, were essentially shut down for at least 48 hours because of Lili's impending arrival. On the NYMEX, the expiring near-month contract for October delivery ended trading on Thursday, September 26 with a sizeable gain of over 19 cents per MMBtu, closing at

180

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19, 2001 19, 2001 Last week, the NYMEX futures contract price for December delivery at the Henry Hub continued the generally downward trend that began in late October. The contract ended last week's trading at $2.637 per MMBtu-nearly 55 cents lower than the $3.183 recorded when it began as the near-month contract on October 30. Spot prices also experienced a similar pattern and reportedly declined well over $1.00 per MMBtu at most major market locations. The spot price at the Henry Hub on Friday hit its lowest level in more than two and a half years. The continued warmer-than-normal weather in most parts of the country appears to be a major contributing factor in the almost 3-week decline in natural gas prices. (Temperature Map) (Temperature Deviation Map) Another factor is the relatively high

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181

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) 10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and lack of any significant cooling or heating load through much of the Lower 48 States led to an easing of natural gas spot prices since Wednesday, May 2. Furthermore, the formation of the first tropical storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane Season 3 weeks prior to the beginning of the traditional hurricane season appeared to have no impact on the spot markets in the Lower 48 States. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 2-9), the Henry Hub spot price declined 18 cents per MMBtu, or 2.4 percent, to $7.46. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains for all contracts with the exception of the near-month contract, possibly reflecting an expected tightness in supply over the summer months. While the NYMEX contract for June delivery decreased 1 cent per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.720 yesterday (May 9), contracts through the end of the injection season all increased, albeit only by an average of 0.3 percent. Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,747 Bcf as of Friday, May 4, which is 20.5 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.24 per barrel on the week to $61.54 per barrel, or $10.61 per MMBtu.

182

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2001 7, 2001 With the return of above-average storage refill estimates for the third week of August and relatively widespread normal temperatures, prices moved down at most major markets last week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot market price ended the week down 46 cents per MMBtu at $2.77. On the futures market, the near-month (September) NYMEX contract ended trading on Friday at $2.706 per MMBtu-off close to $0.60 from the previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil remained at or above $27.20 per barrel each day last week and ended the week at $28.30 or $4.88 per MMBtu. Prices: Spot prices at most major market locations began the week down from the previous Friday, then trended up slightly at mid-week. However, following the release of the American Gas Association (AGA) weekly storage estimate on Wednesday for the previous week, prices moved down between 25 and 35 cents per MMBtu at key regional markets. Prices fell further in the Rockies, with most trading points there down a few cents either side of a half dollar. Spot gas at the Henry Hub traded at its lowest level since July 2 when it traded for $2.93 per MMBtu. Prices at other major markets all were below $3.00 at the end of the week. Some examples of these were: Katy in East Texas at $2.78 per MMBtu, Waha in West Texas at $2.71, and Midcontinent in Oklahoma at $2.65. The lowest prices reported were found in the Rockies where prices were mostly less than $2.20 per MMBtu.

183

The Prospects for Constraining Dark Energy withFuture X-ray Cluster Gas Mass Fraction Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the ability of a future X-ray observatory, with capabilities similar to those planned for the Constellation-X mission, to constrain dark energy via measurements of the cluster X-ray gas mass fraction, fgas. We find that fgas measurements for a sample of {approx}500 hot (kT{approx}> 5keV), X-ray bright, dynamically relaxed clusters, to a precision of {approx}5 percent, can be used to constrain dark energy with a Dark Energy Task Force (DETF; Albrecht et al. 2006) figure of merit of 20-50. Such constraints are comparable to those predicted by the DETF for other leading, planned 'Stage IV' dark energy experiments. A future fgas experiment will be preceded by a large X-ray or SZ survey that will find hot, X-ray luminous clusters out to high redshifts. Short 'snapshot' observations with the new X-ray observatory should then be able to identify a sample of {approx}500 suitably relaxed systems. The redshift, temperature and X-ray luminosity range of interest has already been partially probed by existing X-ray cluster surveys which allow reasonable estimates of the fraction of clusters that will be suitably relaxed for fgas work to be made; these surveys also show that X-ray flux contamination from point sources is likely to be small for the majority of the targets of interest. Our analysis uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method which fully captures the relevant degeneracies between parameters and facilities the incorporation of priors and systematic uncertainties in the analysis. We explore the effects of such uncertainties, for scenarios ranging from optimistic to pessimistic. We conclude that the fgas experiment offers a competitive and complementary approach to the best other large, planned dark energy experiments. In particular, the fgas experiment will provide tight constraints on the mean matter and dark energy densities, with a peak sensitivity for dark energy work at redshifts midway between those of supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillation/weak lensing/cluster number counts experiments. In combination, these experiments should enable a precise measurement of the evolution of dark energy.

Rapetti, David; Allen, Steven W.

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2012 | Release Date: Apr. 26, 25, 2012 | Release Date: Apr. 26, 2012 | Next Release: May 3, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices | Storage In the News: NYMEX Prices for the Coming 12 Months Remain Low. Prices for natural gas for contract months between May 2012 and April 2013 have fallen significantly over the past year. At the end of April 2011, prices for May 2012 (now the near-month contract) were trading close to $5.00 per million British thermal units (MMBtu), but are currently near $2.00 per MMBtu. In the last month, the 12-month futures prices have fallen about 30 cents across the board. While prices have risen in the past few days, they still are well below their levels of one month ago. The continued low prices are the result of a relatively warm winter and

186

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

187

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 6, 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 6, 2007) Since Wednesday, June 20, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Rocky Mountains and Northeast regions. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 65 cents per MMBtu, or 9 percent, since Wednesday, June 20, to $6.74 per MMBtu, posting its lowest level since March 19. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (June 27) at $6.929 per MMBtu, falling 46 cents per MMBtu, or 6 percent since last Wednesday, June 20. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub posted a decline of $1.012 per MMBtu or nearly 13 percent. Natural gas in storage was 2,443 Bcf as of June 22, which is 18

188

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 7) 31, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 7) Compared with Wednesday, July 23, natural gas spot prices were lower at all locations in the Lower 48 States in trading on July 30. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 19 cents or about 4 percent to $4.69 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub closed on Tuesday, July 29 at $4.693 per MMBtu, down roughly 18 cents or 4 percent since last Wednesday. The NYMEX futures contract for September delivery became the near month contract on Wednesday, July 30, settling at $4.668 per MMBtu (or 18 cents less than last Wednesday's price.) Natural gas in storage increased to 2,032 Bcf as of Friday, July 25, which is about 12 percent below the 5-year

189

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 20, 2006) 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 20, 2006) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week led to an easing of natural gas spot and futures prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 5. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 5-12), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 9 cents per MMBtu, or about 1.3 percent, to $6.79. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery fell 26.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.808 yesterday (April 12), the lowest closing price for a near-month contract in over a month (March 10). The first week of net injections this season brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,714 Bcf as of Friday, April 7, which is 63.4 percent above the 5-year average

190

Emissions Implications of Future Natural Gas Production and Use in the U.S. and in the Rocky Mountain Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enhanced prospects for natural gas production raise questions about the balance of impacts on air quality, as increased emissions from production activities are considered alongside the reductions expected when natural gas is burned in place of other fossil fuels. ... dispersion model that has been widely used in the assessment of gaseous and particulate air pollution (ozone, fine [PM2.5], and coarse [PM10] particulate matter). ... Edwards, P.; Brown, S.; Roberts, J.; Ahmadov, R.; Banta, R.; deGouw, J.; Dubé, W.High winter ozone pollution from carbonyl photolysis in an oil and gas basin Nature 2014, 10.1038/nature13767 ...

Jeffrey D. McLeod; Gregory L. Brinkman; Jana B. Milford

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 21) 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 21) The emergence of more spring-like temperatures in most regions of the country, ample natural gas storage supplies, and lower oil prices resulted in natural gas spot prices easing 7 to 43 cents per MMBtu in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 6. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 6-13), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 39 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $7.07. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery fell 58 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.978 yesterday (April 13), the first close below $7 for a near-month contract since March 28. A second week of net injections brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,293 Bcf as of Friday, April 8, which is

192

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 18, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 10, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board this week, likely in response to cooling temperatures as well as weak economic news. The Henry Hub spot price fell 17 cents from $4.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, August 3, to $4.09 per MMBtu yesterday, August 10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month contract (September 2011) fell by $0.087 per MMBtu, from $4.090 last Wednesday to $4.003 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage was 2,783 Bcf as of Friday, August 5, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

193

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

194

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 9, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant increases at all market locations since last Wednesday, September 2. The Henry Hub spot price increased 47 cents from the previous Wednesday's price of $2.25 per MMBtu. However, intraweek trading was volatile, with natural gas prices falling below $2 per million Btu (MMBtu) at the Henry Hub on Friday, September 4 and rising to $2.72 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract for delivery in October 2009 rose by 11.4 cents to $2.829 per MMBtu, an increase of about 4 percent from the previous

195

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2008 3, 2008 Next Release: October 30, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 22) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week increased as a result of cold weather in some major gas consuming areas of the country, several ongoing pipeline maintenance projects, and the continuing production shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico region. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month contract (November 2008) increased on the week to $6.777 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) as of yesterday (October 22). The net weekly increase occurred during a week in which the price increased in three trading sessions. As of Friday, October 17, working gas in underground storage totaled

196

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 19, 2011) Natural gas prices fell at most market locations across the country, as bitterly cold weather subsided. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas price fell 7 cents from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, January 12, to $4.48 per MMBtu on Wednesday, January 19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract (February 2011) rose slightly, from $4.531 per MMBtu on January 12 to $4.561 yesterday. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell by $1 over the week, from $91.85 per barrel on January 12 ($15.84 per MMBtu) to

197

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2001 1, 2001 From Friday, June 1 to Friday, June 8, cash prices fell again, as cooler-than-normal temperatures prevailed from midweek on in the northern half of the nation as well as in some areas along the Gulf of Mexico (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Price declines in cash markets ranged from pennies to over $1.00 per MMBtu, with most points down 9-15 cents. At the Henry Hub, the price fell 8 cents to $3.63 per MMBtu. The near-month (July delivery) futures contract lost less than 1 cent for the week, settling on Friday, June 8 at $3.922 per MMBtu. Once again, weekly storage injections topped 100 Bcf, approaching or exceeding regional records for the report week. Prices: It was a week of contrasting price movements in cash markets. Spot prices responded on Monday to demand-increasing weather extremes (hot weather in Texas and the Gulf Coast; near-winter temperatures in the Rockies) with increases of 20 cents or more at most locations. Further gains of a nickel to a dime occurred on Tuesday as Tropical Storm Allison headed for landfall in the western Gulf. However, gains began to erode Wednesday with the American Gas Association's (AGA) announcement of storage injections of 117 Bcf. Spot prices continued to trend down for the rest of the week. Allison was no threat to production assets, and her heavy rains and persistent cloud cover over much of east Texas, Louisiana, and southern Arkansas eased utility demand significantly. Price drops were most pronounced in California, where moderate temperatures and adequate electricity supplies obliterated early-week gains. Both PG&E and SOCAL issued high-inventory operational flow orders (OFO) on Friday. On SOCAL, prices were down nearly $6 from their Tuesday highs to $3.54 per MMBtu on Friday. This is the first time since May 2000 that the SOCAL price was less than at the Henry Hub. At Rockies price points, where the effects of warming temperatures, lack of demand in California, and major pipeline maintenance projects had gas backing up throughout the region, prices fell under $2.00 per MMBtu at several locations for the first time since early November 1999. The average spot price in the Rockies on Friday was $1.76 per MMBtu.

198

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) 23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) Natural gas spot and futures prices trended down for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 15-22). The cold front that moved into major gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast for the weekend and lingered into the first part of this week had minimal impact on prices. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price fell 24 cents for the week to $3.38 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the near-month contract (June delivery) declined for 5 straight trading sessions before recording a small increase of $0.064 per MMBtu in May 22 trading, to settle at $3.459. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which had held at or above $28 per barrel since last Thursday, fell nearly $1 on Tuesday, May

199

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 27) 0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 27) Natural gas spot prices declined at nearly all trading locations for a third consecutive week (March 12-19) as temperatures became more spring-like and space-heating demand slackened. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased $0.58 per MMBtu, or 10 percent, to $5.20. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub fell to its lowest point since becoming the near-month contract, decreasing for the week about $0.59 per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, March 19) at $5.278. Natural gas in storage decreased to a record low of 636 Bcf as of Friday, March 14, which is more than 50 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $7.86 per barrel or about 21 percent

200

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 8) May 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 8) Spot natural gas prices at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States dropped $0.25-$0.50 per MMBtu this week (Wednesday, April 23-Wednesday, April 30) as springtime temperatures prevailed in most areas. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 33 cents per MMBtu to $5.25, while spot price declines in the Northeast were generally greater at between $0.36 and $0.50. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery, which became the near-month contract on Tuesday, April 29, has declined 29 cents since last Wednesday. The June contract settled at $5.385 yesterday (April 30). Natural gas in storage increased to 741 Bcf as of Friday, April 25, which is about 43.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 9, 2011) The Henry Hub spot price fell during the week from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, February 2, to $4.22 per MMBtu on Wednesday, February 9. The price decline occurred in spite of very cold weather across the United States. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price fell from $89.78 per barrel, or $15.48 per MMBtu, on Thursday to $85.59 per barrel, or $14.76 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near month futures contract (March 2011) fell by 39 cents from $4.429 per MMBtu to $4.044 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell below the 5-year average for the

202

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 12) 5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 12) Since Wednesday, April 27, natural gas spot prices have decreased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States, as springtime temperatures prevailed in most areas. Spot prices at the Henry Hub decreased 62 cents or about 9 percent to $6.49 per MMBtu, while spot price declines were generally greater in West Texas at between 72 and 80 cents per MMBtu. Yesterday (May 4), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub, which became the near-month contract on April 28, settled at $6.630 per MMBtu, declining 17 cents or about 3 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,455 Bcf as of April 29, which is 25.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.15 per barrel or about

203

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 8, 2010) In response to cold weather across much of the United States, natural gas spot prices increased across the board this report week (December 1 – December 8). Though most increases were less than 50 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), prices at a number of trading points (notably in the Northeast and Florida) increased by several dollars. The Henry Hub spot price rose 25 cents, from $4.21 per MMBtu to $4.46 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the natural gas near-month contract (January 2011) also increased, rising from $4.269 per MMBtu on December 1 to $4.606 per MMBtu on December 8.

204

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 9, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased at all trading locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, December 2. The Henry Hub price rose by 60 cents, or almost 13 percent, to $5.27 per million Btu (MMBtu) on the week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the January 2010 natural gas contract rose about 37 cents to $4.898 per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price was higher than price of the near-month contract during 3 days of the report week. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil contract fell by $5.95, or 8 percent, to $70.67 per barrel or $12.18 per MMBtu.

205

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: June 18, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 10, 2009) Since Wednesday, June 3, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the Henry Hub spot price falling to $3.56 per million Btu (MMBtu), about a 7 percent decline from the previous WednesdayÂ’s level of $3.81 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price for the July contract fell from $3.766 to $3.708 over the week, about a 2 percent decline. Prices for contracts beyond the near month and August 2009, however, increased. Natural gas in storage was 2,443 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of June 5, which is 21.8 percent above the 5-year (2004-2008) average, after an

206

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 7, 2009) Since last Wednesday, September 30, natural gas prices rose across the board, with increases ranging between 37 cents and $1.32 per million Btu (MMBtu). Natural gas prices oscillated by large amounts at most market locations across the United States. The Henry Hub began the report week at $3.24 per MMBtu, fell to $2.32 on October 2, and ended trading yesterday at $3.70 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the near-month contract for November ended the week at $4.904 per MMBtu, a slight increase from the previous weekÂ’s value of $4.841 per MMBtu.

207

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24, 2001 24, 2001 Mild temperatures and moderate demand helped prices to decline gradually last week as markets returned to relatively normal operation. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot market price for natural gas ended the week at $2.04 per million Btu, down 37 cents per million Btu from the previous Friday. On the futures market, the near-month (October) NYMEX contract settled on Friday at $2.103 per million Btu - off close to 60 cents from the previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell steadily from $28.85 per barrel ($4.974 per million Btu) on Monday to $ 25.50 or $4.40 per million Btu on Friday. Prices: Spot prices at many major market locations took a downward turn last week. Prices at the Henry Hub closed on Monday at $2.35 per million Btu, down 6 cents per million Btu from the previous Friday, and fell between 3 and 17 cents each day that followed. On Friday, prices dropped to $2.04 per million Btu, the lowest level since November 1999. Similarly, prices at many locations throughout the country fell throughout the week. At the New York and Chicago citygates, prices fell from $2.69 and $2.39 per million Btu to $2.30 and $2.04, respectively. Prices in the west at the Northern California (PG&E) and Southern California (SoCal) hubs climbed on Tuesday before falling to $1.67 and $1.79 on Friday. In the Rockies, prices fell below the $1 mark for the first time since 1998 as prices at some locations in Wyoming ranged between $0.83 and $1.10 on Friday. These price drops have occurred in part because industrial demand has continued to soften in the wake of the events of September 11, and in part because temperatures remain mild throughout much of the country.

209

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 2, 2011) The previous report week's increasing prices gave way to relatively consistent declines across a large part of the country over this report week. The Henry Hub spot price showed a slight increase over the weekend, but closed down 26 cents for the week to $3.39 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on November 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the higher valued December 2011 natural gas contract moved into position as the near-month contract and declined by 2.6 cents per MMBtu to close the week at $3.749 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3794 billion cubic

210

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 26, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 11, natural gas spot prices increased at all markets in the Lower 48 States except one, despite the lack of weather-related demand in much of the country. The restoration of production at the Independence Hub to the level prevailing prior to the April 8 shut-in had limited effect on prices. For the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 44 cents to $12.93 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also increased on the week, with the weekly increase of the near-month contract exceeding those observed at spot market locations in the eastern half of the country.

211

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 4, 2002 March 4, 2002 Spot prices wound up slightly higher for the week (Friday to Friday) after trading within relatively narrow ranges with only regional exceptions. On the NYMEX futures market, the March contract expired on Tuesday, February 26, 2002, at $2.388 per MMBtu, ending with a gain of $0.321 per MMBtu since becoming the near-month contract on January 29. Tuesday also saw the largest increase in spot prices, as a huge Arctic air mass expanded from the Central Plains States into the Midwest and Southwest, bringing some of the coldest temperatures thus far this winter. Daily average temperatures on Tuesday through Thursday in major cities in the Central and Southwest regions ranged from 6 to 18 degrees below normal and up to 8 degrees below normal in the Midwest. Equally sharp temperature drops were seen in the Southeast by Wednesday. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot price gained a nickel on Tuesday, but for the week was up by only 9 cents, to $2.49 per MMBtu. The new near-month contract, for April delivery at the Henry Hub, ended the week at $2.359 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil moved above $22 per barrel for the first time since early November, gaining $1.45 for the week and ending trading on Friday at $22.37 per barrel, or $3.86 per MMBtu.

212

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2001 2, 2001 The overall decline in spot prices accelerated last week, as continued below-normal temperatures in significant portions of the country suppressed electricity demand for air-conditioning use and storage injections once again hit record-setting levels. Temperatures averaged in the 80s for most of the eastern half of the nation, with slightly cooler temperatures prevailing along much of the populous West coast. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Futures market prices reinforced the general price weakness, with contracts for future deliveries falling 5 days in a row. NYMEX Natural Gas Futures Near Month Contract Settlement Price, Henry Hub Spot Price, and West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Price Prices: The key factors of increased supply and very little weather-generated swing demand sent prices lower in spot markets throughout the country, with the majority showing declines every day of the week. Average temperatures last week were as much as 7 degrees below normal in the usually high summertime electricity demand areas of the Midwest, Southeast, Gulf Coast, and eastern Texas. In addition, temperatures were normal to slightly below normal in southern California, and cooler still in northern California. By Friday, the low end of the common trading range for spot gas at the Henry Hub fell below $3.00 per MMBtu for the first time since April 2000, and by the end of Friday trading, the Henry Hub midpoint price had dropped $0.69 per MMBtu from the previous Friday to an even $3. Spot prices under $2 per MMBtu were seen at some Rockies trading points on Friday. Only in the Northeast were prices able to buck the downward trend, where hot, muggy weather early in the week had New York citygate prices rising for several days to the week's high point on Wednesday of $4.34 per MMBtu-up 27 cents from the previous Friday. But by Thursday, with temperatures beginning to moderate, Northeast prices joined in the overall downward trend so that by Friday, the price at TRANSCO Zone 6 for New York delivery had fallen to $3.50 per MMBtu. While spot prices jumped on Monday on both SOCAL and PG&E as these systems lifted their respective weekend high-inventory operational flow orders (OFO), the over $2 increase on SOCAL (to around $6.06 per MMBtu) and nearly 25-cent increase on PG&E (to about $4.00) were easily overwhelmed by the week-long demand weakness. By Friday, the spot price on SOCAL had fallen to $3.83 per MMBtu, while on PG&E, spot prices fell nearly a dollar from the previous Friday, dipping below $3 at $2.79 per MMBtu.

213

Assessing the impact of energy saving measures on the future energy demand and related GHG (greenhouse gas) emission reduction of Croatia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the light of European energy-climate package and its measures for increasing security of supply, decreasing the impact on environment and stimulating sustainability, Croatia as a new EU (European Union) member state needs to reconsider and develop new energy policy towards energy efficiency and renewable energy sources. Croatian long-term energy demand and its effect on the future national GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions are analysed in this paper. For that purpose the NeD model was constructed (National energy demand model). The model is comprised out of six modules, each representing one sector: industry, transport, households, services, agriculture and construction. The model is based on bottom up approach. The analysis has shown that energy policy measures, identified through this paper, can potentially achieve energy savings up to 157 PJ in the year 2050, which presents a 40% decrease to referent (frozen efficiency) scenario. Results obtained in this paper were also compared to the Croatian National Energy Strategy for the years 2020 and 2030. It was shown that if already implemented policies were properly taken into account the actual final energy demand for the year 2030 would be 43% lower than projected by the Croatian National Energy Strategy.

Tomislav Pukšec; Brian Vad Mathiesen; Tomislav Novosel; Neven Dui?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview: Monday, June 04, 2001 Stock builds slowed from their recent pace, even though spot prices continued their downward trend to end the week at the Henry Hub at $3.71 per MMBtu, which is a Friday-to-Friday decline of $0.14 per MMBtu. The NYMEX contract price for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled Tuesday at $3.738, the lowest close-out of a near month contract since the May 2000 contract. The July contract price was $3.930 per MMBtu on Friday, $0.103 lower than a week earlier. Mild weather in the Northeast and Midwest continued to suppress prices on the Eastern Seaboard, while a short burst of warm temperatures in southern California early in the week had the opposite effect on prices in that region. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Net injections to storage for the week ended Friday, May 25 were 99 Bcf, breaking a 4-week string of 100-plus net injections.

215

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 13) 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 13) Spot prices at many major markets declined significantly from last Wednesday's (February 26) levels as temperatures moderated somewhat over the weekend and again on Tuesday and Wednesday (March 5-6). The spot price at the Henry Hub declined $2.55 per MMBtu from last Wednesday's level, despite peaking for the week at $10.65 on Friday, to end trading yesterday (Wednesday, March 6) at $7.81. The NYMEX futures contract for April delivery began trading as the near-month contract on Thursday, February 27, and promptly surged to its all-time high to date of $8.101 per MMBtu on Friday, before settling yesterday at $7.021. Natural gas stocks fell to 838 Bcf as of February 28, which is nearly 42 percent below the 5-year average. As of yesterday, the WTI spot price had dropped $1.10 per

216

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 16, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 23) May 16, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 23) Natural gas spot prices at many trading locations this week surged close to their highest levels for the month, but then eased yesterday (May 15) as cooler weather relieved a heat wave in the South and a recent run-up in the price of crude oil abated. On Tuesday, the NYMEX closing price of $3.855 per MMBtu for the futures contract with June delivery was the highest price for a near-month contract since June 2001. But by the end of trading the next day, prices had subsided along with a drop in crude oil prices. After reaching a high of $29.17 per barrel on Tuesday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped Wednesday to an average of $28.17 per barrel, or $4.86 per MMBtu. This was an increase of 3 percent

217

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 26, 19 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 26, 2006) Changes in natural gas spot prices were mixed this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 11-18), as colder weather boosted demand for space-heating in the eastern half of the country and moderate temperatures in part led to continued price declines in the West. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased 30 cents, or about 3.5 percent, to $8.85 per MMBtu, as colder weather returned to the East. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for February delivery dropped 47 cents per MMBtu yesterday (January 18) to $8.694, a 6-month low for the February 2006 contract, on expectations of moderate temperatures for the rest of the heating season. The near-month contract decreased roughly 54 cents since last Wednesday (January 11), and is now

218

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) Natural gas spot prices across the country surged to record highs this week as yet another Arctic blast of cold arrived, this time reaching as far south as Texas. Prices in the Northeast were the highest in the country at more than $20 per MMBtu for much of the week, but prices also tripled since last Wednesday to $18 and more at production-area trading locations along the Gulf Coast and in Texas. On the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub had a net change of $4.26 per MMBtu to an average of $10.36 yesterday (Wednesday, February 26). The NYMEX contract for March delivery ended its run as the near-month futures contract on Wednesday, settling at just over $9.13 per MMBtu, or $3 higher on the week. As of

219

Abstract-Coal and hydro will be the main sources of electric energy in Chile for the near future, given that natural gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, given that natural gas from neighbouring Argentina is not longer available and LNG price projections, the most economic technologies define the system's development. Availability of natural gas from Argentina on import of natural gas from Argentina since 2004 created an unbalance in the Chilean electric market

Dixon, Juan

220

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 25, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 17, 2011) Natural gas prices across the country declined this week, as relief from the high temperatures earlier this month continued to lessen air conditioning load. The Henry Hub spot price fell 12 cents from $4.09 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, August 10, to $3.97 per MMBtu yesterday, August 17, falling below $4 for the first time since March of 2010. Prices at numerous points across the country also averaged below $4 yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month contract (September 2011) fell by $0.070 per MMBtu, from $4.003 per MMBTU last Wednesday to $3.933 yesterday.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2001 16, 2001 After trending up during the first four days of last week, spot prices at the Henry Hub moved down $0.14 on Friday to end trading for the week at $3.16 per MMBtu. Daily settlement prices on the NYMEX also moved up most of the week before dropping almost $0.18 per MMBtu on Friday as the near-month August contract ended the week at $3.250. Spot and near-month futures prices last year at this time were 32 and 28 percent higher and would go even higher during the end of the year. Contributing to the generally lower prices is the generally moderate temperatures thus far this summer in most parts of the country. The National Weather Service reports that during the first three weeks of this summer season, cooling degree-days were almost 5 percent below normal. Much of the country

222

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 14, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 6, 2011) Continuing last weekÂ’s net decline, the Henry Hub price this week fell 8 cents from $4.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 30, to $4.17 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 6. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (May 2011) contract fell from $4.355 per MMBtu to $4.146 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,579 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 1, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes Incorporated, rose by 11 to 891. A new study released by EIA estimated technically recoverable shale

223

Future Accelerators (?)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

John Womersley

2003-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

224

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

225

Future energy loads for a large-scale adoption of electric vehicles in the city of Los Angeles: Impacts on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Using plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) has become an important component of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction strategy in the transportation sector. Assessing the net effect of \\{PEVs\\} on GHG emissions, however, is dependent on factors such as type and scale of electricity generation sources, adoption rate, and charging behavior. This study creates a comprehensive model that estimates the energy load and GHG emissions impacts for the years 2020 and 2030 for the city of Los Angeles. For 2020, model simulations show that the PEV charging loads will be modest with negligible effects on the overall system load profile. Contrary to previous study results, the average marginal carbon intensity is higher if PEV charging occurs during off-peak hours. These results suggest that current economic incentives to encourage off-peak charging result in greater GHG emissions. Model simulations for 2030 show that PEV charging loads increase significantly resulting in potential generation shortages. There are also significant grid operation challenges as the region?s energy grid is required to ramp up and down rapidly to meet PEV loads. For 2030, the average marginal carbon intensity for off-peak charging becomes lower than peak charging mainly due to the removal of coal from the power generation portfolio.

Jae D. Kim; Mansour Rahimi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2002 25, 2002 After moving down at mid-week, spot prices at most major market locations rebounded and climbed to levels not seen in over 6 months. At the Henry Hub prices gained $0.35 on Friday to end the week at $3.54 per MMBtu, the highest reported daily mid-point price since June 25, 2001. On the NYMEX the futures contract for April delivery ended trading on Friday at $3.326 per MMBtu. This is $0.90 per MMBtu higher or 37 percent above its settlement price when it began to trade as the near-month contract on February 27. Much of the country had cooler-than-normal temperatures last week, especially in the Northern Plains and the Northeast. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil continued to climb, exceeding $25 most days last week, and ended trading on Friday at $25.56 or $4.40 per MMBtu.

227

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2001 10, 2001 Price surges on Monday and Friday of last week overshadowed 3 straight days of decreases midweek, as nearly every major market location showed Friday-to-Friday gains. At the Henry Hub, the spot price gained 36 cents from the previous Friday to end the week at $2.11 per million Btu (MMBtu). On the futures market, in its first full week of trading as the near-month contract, the price of the NYMEX contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.133 per MMBtu to settle on Friday at $2.568. The unseasonably warm temperatures that have blanketed nearly the entire country east of the Rocky Mountains continued, with specific-day high-temperature records being set at numerous locations in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent (Temperature Map)(Temperature Deviation Map). On Thursday, the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell nearly $1.00 per barrel, as the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) announced that it would delay an expected oil-production cut that it hopes will shore up sagging world crude oil prices. For the week (Friday-to-Friday), the WTI spot price fell $0.43 per barrel to $19.08, or $3.29 per MMBtu.

228

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 9, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant increases at all market locations since last Wednesday, September 2. The Henry Hub spot price increased 47 cents from the previous Wednesday's price of $2.25 per MMBtu. However, intraweek trading was volatile, with natural gas prices falling below $2 per million Btu (MMBtu) at the Henry Hub on Friday, September 4 and rising to $2.72 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract for delivery in October 2009 rose by 11.4 cents to $2.829 per MMBtu, an increase of about 4 percent from the previous

229

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 19, 2011) Natural gas prices fell at most market locations across the country, as bitterly cold weather subsided. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas price fell 7 cents from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, January 12, to $4.48 per MMBtu on Wednesday, January 19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract (February 2011) rose slightly, from $4.531 per MMBtu on January 12 to $4.561 yesterday. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell by $1 over the week, from $91.85 per barrel on January 12 ($15.84 per MMBtu) to

230

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2008 3, 2008 Next Release: October 30, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 22) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week increased as a result of cold weather in some major gas consuming areas of the country, several ongoing pipeline maintenance projects, and the continuing production shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico region. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month contract (November 2008) increased on the week to $6.777 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) as of yesterday (October 22). The net weekly increase occurred during a week in which the price increased in three trading sessions. As of Friday, October 17, working gas in underground storage totaled

231

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 18, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 10, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board this week, likely in response to cooling temperatures as well as weak economic news. The Henry Hub spot price fell 17 cents from $4.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, August 3, to $4.09 per MMBtu yesterday, August 10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month contract (September 2011) fell by $0.087 per MMBtu, from $4.090 last Wednesday to $4.003 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage was 2,783 Bcf as of Friday, August 5, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

232

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

233

NATURAL GAS: Diversity for Profit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS: Diversity for Profit ... "The current and future natural gas shortage may be a blessing in disguise. ... Getting involved will mean increased profitability by becoming an integrated total energy company and not just a marketer of natural gas, was the repeated message of the Institute of Gas Technology. ...

1969-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Driving the Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Future the Future A r g o n n e ' s v e h i c l e s ys t e m s r e s e A r c h 3 2 v e h i c l e s y s t e m s r e s e a r c h At Argonne National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Research, our goal is to accelerate the development and deployment of vehicle technologies that help reduce our nation's petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Our Vehicle Systems research focuses on maximizing vehicle performance and efficiency through in-depth studies of the interactions and integration of components and controls in a large, complex vehicle system. Working with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the automotive industry, we investigate the potential of vehicle technologies ranging from alternative fuels to advanced powertrains, such as plug-in hybrids and electric vehicles. Funding

235

Water: The Future’s Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 444. UC  Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 203. [4

Benavente, Carlos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: June 18, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 10, 2009) Since Wednesday, June 3, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the Henry Hub spot price falling to $3.56 per million Btu (MMBtu), about a 7 percent decline from the previous WednesdayÂ’s level of $3.81 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price for the July contract fell from $3.766 to $3.708 over the week, about a 2 percent decline. Prices for contracts beyond the near month and August 2009, however, increased. Natural gas in storage was 2,443 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of June 5, which is 21.8 percent above the 5-year (2004-2008) average, after an

237

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 7, 2009) Since last Wednesday, September 30, natural gas prices rose across the board, with increases ranging between 37 cents and $1.32 per million Btu (MMBtu). Natural gas prices oscillated by large amounts at most market locations across the United States. The Henry Hub began the report week at $3.24 per MMBtu, fell to $2.32 on October 2, and ended trading yesterday at $3.70 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the near-month contract for November ended the week at $4.904 per MMBtu, a slight increase from the previous weekÂ’s value of $4.841 per MMBtu.

238

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 8, 2010) In response to cold weather across much of the United States, natural gas spot prices increased across the board this report week (December 1 – December 8). Though most increases were less than 50 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), prices at a number of trading points (notably in the Northeast and Florida) increased by several dollars. The Henry Hub spot price rose 25 cents, from $4.21 per MMBtu to $4.46 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the natural gas near-month contract (January 2011) also increased, rising from $4.269 per MMBtu on December 1 to $4.606 per MMBtu on December 8.

239

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 9, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased at all trading locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, December 2. The Henry Hub price rose by 60 cents, or almost 13 percent, to $5.27 per million Btu (MMBtu) on the week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the January 2010 natural gas contract rose about 37 cents to $4.898 per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price was higher than price of the near-month contract during 3 days of the report week. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil contract fell by $5.95, or 8 percent, to $70.67 per barrel or $12.18 per MMBtu.

240

Question 2: Gas procurement strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is a collection of responses from natural gas distribution company representatives to questions on how the start-up of the natural gas futures market has changed gas procurement strategies, identification of procurement problems related to pipeline capacity, deliverability, or pregranted abandonment of firm transportation, the competition of separate utility subsidiaries with brokers, marketers, and other gas suppliers who sell gas to large-volume industrial or other 'noncore' customers.

Carrigg, J.A.; Crespo, J.R.; Davis, E.B. Jr.; Farman, R.D.; Green, R.C. Jr.; Hale, R.W.; Howard, J.J.; McCormick, W.T. Jr.; Page, T.A.; Ryan, W.F.; Schrader, T.F.; Schuchart, J.A.; Smith, J.F.; Stys, R.D.; Thorpe, J.A.

1990-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

242

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

243

Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

244

Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

245

Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

246

Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

247

Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

248

Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

249

Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids,...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

250

California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

251

Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

252

Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications for prevention strategies interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended

253

Quantifying Environmental Drivers of Future Tropical Forest Extent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Future changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, and their associated influences on climate, will affect the future sustainability of tropical forests. While dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) represent the processes by which ...

Peter Good; Chris Jones; Jason Lowe; Richard Betts; Ben Booth; Chris Huntingford

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Japan considers nuclear-free future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... It’s official: nuclear power will have a much smaller role in Japan’s energy future than was once thought. Since the meltdowns and gas explosions at ... and gas explosions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in March 2011, all of Japan’s remaining reactors have been shut down for inspections and maintenance. Last week the ...

David Cyranoski

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

255

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas spot prices generally declined this report week (June 17-24), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.19 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.80. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for natural gas decreased as prices for most energy products fell amid concerns over the economy. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery decreased by 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.761. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday, June 19, is

256

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 2, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 7 and 68 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $2.25 per MMBtu, decreasing by 51 cents or 18 percent. As of yesterday, the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub was the lowest since February 15, 2002, when natural gas at this location traded at $2.18 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

257

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 31, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 7) Spot and futures prices fluctuated over the past week (Wednesday, October 23 to Wednesday, October 30), with cash prices moving up from 6 to 35 cents per MMBtu at most market locations in response to rising demand from colder-than-normal temperatures, while futures prices for contracts for delivery through the impending heating season drifted lower. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 9 cents from the previous Wednesday (October 23) to $4.33 per MMBtu in yesterday's (October 30) trading. The expired near-month contract for November delivery ended trading on Tuesday, October 29 at $4.126 per MMBtu, recording a net gain of $0.085 since beginning as the prompt month contract on September 27. The new

258

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2001 30, 2001 Prices rose slightly mid-week with the return of summer weather and a reported slowing of net injections to storage for the prior week. Temperatures for the week reverted close to normal in the Northeast and as much as 3 degrees above normal in the Midwest. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) In a pattern typical for this summer, spot prices declined toward the end of the week as a cool front pervaded the eastern half of the country. However, the spot price at the Henry Hub was able to hold onto a 12-cent gain over the week to close at $3.07 per MMBtu on Friday. The August contract finished as the near-month contract on a slightly higher note on the last day of trade to close at $3.167 per MMBtu due to short-covering and a forecast for warmer weather in the upcoming week. The August contract ended less than 2 cents lower than the July contract for the lowest closure since May of last year. On the West Coast, the cancellation of high-linepack operational flow orders allowed prices to buoy upward by about $1 per MMBtu early in the week. As coastal areas remained cool though, price declines offset much of the gain. For only the third week in the last 2 months, the American Gas Association (AGA) estimated net injections to storage at less than 100 Bcf as they reported 84 Bcf for the week ended Friday, July 20. An OPEC agreement to reduce production quotas by 1 million barrels per day helped prop-up crude oil prices. As of Friday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate was $27.05 per barrel, or $4.66 per MMBtu, $1.45 per barrel more than a week earlier.

259

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 15) 8 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 15) A massive cold front that began flowing into the Plains States over this past weekend and spread south and eastward sent spot prices sharply upward for the first two days of this week. Coupled with the generally smaller net increases seen during the holiday-shortened New Year's week (Monday, December 29-Friday, January 2), spot prices have gained more than $1 per MMBtu since Wednesday, December 24, at nearly every market location. At the Henry Hub, the spot price rose 27 cents per MMBtu during New Year's week, and jumped 86 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, December 31, for a net increase of $1.13 per MMBtu since Christmas, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, January 7) at $6.63. On the NYMEX, the contract for January delivery expired on Monday, December 29, with a final settlement price of $6.150 per MMBtu. The contract for February delivery opened as the near-month contract the following day with a settlement price of $6.600 per MMBtu, and has gained $0.278 per MMBtu since then with settlement yesterday at $6.878. EIA reported that natural gas inventories were 2,567 Bcf as of Friday, January 2, which is 8.3 percent greater than the previous 5-year (1999-2003) average for the week. Since Wednesday, December 24, West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil on the spot market has traded between $32.51 and $33.71 per barrel. WTI ended trading yesterday at $33.57 per barrel, or $5.79 per MMBtu, up $1.06 per barrel ($0.18 per MMBtu) from the previous Wednesday (December 29).

260

Natural Gas Supply in Denmark -A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power generators of which most are natural gas fired, leads to the natural assumption that the future the consumption of natural gas for heat and power generation is emphasized. General results and threeNatural Gas Supply in Denmark - A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the Liberalized Gas Market

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture ­ Livestock, Crops and Land Use Report from a multidisciplinary research platform. Phase I (2009 ­ 2012) #12;Future Agriculture ­ Livestock Waldenström Utgivningsår: 2012, Uppsala Utgivare: SLU, Framtidens lantbruk/Future Agriculture Layout: Pelle

262

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 2, 2011) The previous report week's increasing prices gave way to relatively consistent declines across a large part of the country over this report week. The Henry Hub spot price showed a slight increase over the weekend, but closed down 26 cents for the week to $3.39 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on November 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the higher valued December 2011 natural gas contract moved into position as the near-month contract and declined by 2.6 cents per MMBtu to close the week at $3.749 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3794 billion cubic

263

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 26, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 11, natural gas spot prices increased at all markets in the Lower 48 States except one, despite the lack of weather-related demand in much of the country. The restoration of production at the Independence Hub to the level prevailing prior to the April 8 shut-in had limited effect on prices. For the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 44 cents to $12.93 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also increased on the week, with the weekly increase of the near-month contract exceeding those observed at spot market locations in the eastern half of the country.

264

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 to Wednesday, December 12) 5 to Wednesday, December 12) Released: December 13 Next release: December 20, 2007 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 5-12), as cooler temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. On the week the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.22. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for January delivery rose about 22 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.408. · Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a healthy supply picture as the winter heating season progress. As of Friday, December 7, working gas in storage was 3,294 Bcf, which is 8.5 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average.

265

Securing Our Energy Future  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Our Energy Our Energy Securing Our Energy Future Future World Energy Demand Growing Dramatically 12 1400 1200 10 1000 2000 2050 2100 Population of Population of Industrialized Countries Industrialized Countries Wo W rl r d o ld Po P pu p la l ti t on o o u a i n Wo W rl r d E d ne n rg r y o l E e gy Co C ns n um u pt p io i n o s m t on Population (Billions) Energy Consumption (Qbtu / yr) 8 800 6 600 4 400 2 200 0 0 1900 1950 Year U.S. Electricity Generation by Fue U.S. Electricity Generation by Fuel Electric Generation by Fuel 1980 - 2030 (billion kilowatt-hours) 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Renewables/Other Nuclear Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Source: EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Why Do We Keep Coal in the Mix? Why Do We Keep Coal in the Mix? World Energy Reserves World Energy Reserves Source: Energy Information Administration/ International Reserves Data

266

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 5, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 21-28), with price decreases generally occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and price increases dominant in trading locations in the eastern parts of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.20 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased for the report week, continuing a trend of rising prices that has occurred in futures markets for many commodities this spring, including futures prices for crude oil. The futures contract for June delivery, for

267

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

268

Energy Options for the Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Options Options for the Future * John Sheffield, 1 Stephen Obenschain, 2,12 David Conover, 3 Rita Bajura, 4 David Greene, 5 Marilyn Brown, 6 Eldon Boes, 7 Kathyrn McCarthy, 8 David Christian, 9 Stephen Dean, 10 Gerald Kulcinski, 11 and P.L. Denholm 11 This paper summarizes the presentations and discussion at the Energy Options for the Future meeting held at the Naval Research Laboratory in March of 2004. The presentations covered the present status and future potential for coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, wind, solar, geo- thermal, and biomass energy sources and the effect of measures for energy conservation. The longevity of current major energy sources, means for resolving or mitigating environmental issues, and the role to be played by yet to be deployed sources, like fusion, were major topics of presentation and discussion. KEY WORDS: Energy; fuels; nuclear; fusion; efficiency; renewables.

269

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 1, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the lower 48 States, although prices generally rose in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain areas. The Henry Hub spot price fell on the week from $3.99 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.73 per MMBtu, its lowest value since April 1, 2010. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2010 natural gas futures contract fell about 3 percent from $3.896 per MMBtu to $3.762 per MMBtu. During the report week, the September 2010 natural gas futures contract expired at $3.651, having lost about $1.176 per MMBtu during its

270

Restricted Natural Gas Supply Case (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The restricted natural gas supply case provides an analysis of the energy-economic implications of a scenario in which future gas supply is significantly more constrained than assumed in the reference case. Future natural gas supply conditions could be constrained because of problems with the construction and operation of large new energy projects, and because the future rate of technological progress could be significantly lower than the historical rate. Although the restricted natural gas supply case represents a plausible set of constraints on future natural gas supply, it is not intended to represent what is likely to happen in the future.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Gas Surplus Sparks Dispute  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Witness after witness at the Energy & Natural Resources Committee hearing heralded the recent flood of natural gas from fracking as “a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity” and discussed policy options to encourage development of this resource. ... Jack N. Gerard, head of the American Petroleum Institute, urged minimal government restraints, saying natural gas production from fracking supports some 1.7 million U.S. jobs, with more planned for the future. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal Transportation Pathways in China://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal uncertainty in future energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions projections for China is the evolution

273

Living a Sustainable Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Living a Sustainable Future Living a Sustainable Future August 1, 2013 Biomass to fuel project The Laboratory's biomass team is working to solve the energy crisis through...

274

Nuclear and Particle Futures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear and Particle Futures Nuclear and Particle Futures The Lab's four Science Pillars harness capabilities for solutions to threats- on national and global scales. Contacts...

275

OSCARS-Future-Tech  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OSCARS and Future Tech Engineering Services The Network OSCARS How It Works Who's Using OSCARS? OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers...

276

Active stewardship: sustainable future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stewardship: sustainable future Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with some of the...

277

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

27, 2001 27, 2001 With the return of above-average storage refill estimates for the third week of August and relatively widespread normal temperatures, prices moved down at most major markets last week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot market price ended the week down 46 cents per MMBtu at $2.77. On the futures market, the near-month (September) NYMEX contract ended trading on Friday at $2.706 per MMBtu-off close to $0.60 from the previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil remained at or above $27.20 per barrel each day last week and ended the week at $28.30 or $4.88 per MMBtu. Prices: Spot prices at most major market locations began the week down from the previous Friday, then trended up slightly at mid-week. However, following

278

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2001 10, 2001 Price surges on Monday and Friday of last week overshadowed 3 straight days of decreases midweek, as nearly every major market location showed Friday-to-Friday gains. At the Henry Hub, the spot price gained 36 cents from the previous Friday to end the week at $2.11 per million Btu (MMBtu). On the futures market, in its first full week of trading as the near-month contract, the price of the NYMEX contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.133 per MMBtu to settle on Friday at $2.568. The unseasonably warm temperatures that have blanketed nearly the entire country east of the Rocky Mountains continued, with specific-day high-temperature records being set at numerous locations in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent (Temperature Map)(Temperature Deviation Map).

279

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2002 4, 2002 Spot prices wound up slightly higher for the week (Friday to Friday) after trading within relatively narrow ranges with only regional exceptions. On the NYMEX futures market, the March contract expired on Tuesday, February 26, 2002, at $2.388 per MMBtu, ending with a gain of $0.321 per MMBtu since becoming the near-month contract on January 29. Tuesday also saw the largest increase in spot prices, as a huge Arctic air mass expanded from the Central Plains States into the Midwest and Southwest, bringing some of the coldest temperatures thus far this winter. Daily average temperatures on Tuesday through Thursday in major cities in the Central and Southwest regions ranged from 6 to 18 degrees below normal and up to 8 degrees below normal in the Midwest. Equally sharp temperature drops were seen in the

280

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2001 3, 2001 Spot prices at the Henry Hub remain low for this time of year, as prices declined 16 cents from Friday-to-Friday. The spot price rose $0.50 per MMBtu from Monday to Wednesday, and then fell almost 60 cents by Friday to trade for $1.77 at the end of the week. Concern about the final resolution of the surprising decline of the Enron Corporation appears to be contributing to the price variability on the spot market. On the NYMEX futures market the December contract closed on Wednesday at $2.316 per MMBtu, more than $1.00 below what it began trading for as the near-month contract in late October. The unseasonably warm temperatures that have dominated the weather in much of the country continued last week in the eastern portion of the country. (Temperature Map) (Temperature Deviation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2001 11, 2001 From Friday, June 1 to Friday, June 8, cash prices fell again, as cooler-than-normal temperatures prevailed from midweek on in the northern half of the nation as well as in some areas along the Gulf of Mexico (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Price declines in cash markets ranged from pennies to over $1.00 per MMBtu, with most points down 9-15 cents. At the Henry Hub, the price fell 8 cents to $3.63 per MMBtu. The near-month (July delivery) futures contract lost less than 1 cent for the week, settling on Friday, June 8 at $3.922 per MMBtu. Once again, weekly storage injections topped 100 Bcf, approaching or exceeding regional records for the report week. Prices: It was a week of contrasting price movements in cash markets. Spot prices

282

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2001 8, 2001 Prices ended the week up slightly from where they started as a brief heat wave in the eastern half of the country caused a rise in prices (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) that was somewhat undone by the return of moderate temperatures and the report of another hefty stock build. On a Friday-to-Friday basis, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.25 to $3.88 per MMBtu compared with an increase of $0.23 to $0.33 at other major supply points in the eastern half of the country. In the same time period, the near-month (July delivery) futures contract was up less than 6 cents to $3.979 per MMBtu as of Friday, June 15, 2001. Prices in California rose substantially last Monday after coming off high inventory flow orders (OFOs) but ended the week close to or

283

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

284

Global Energy Futures: With International Futures (IFs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dr. Hughes presents and discusses the results of simulations on alternative energy futures composed in collaboration with SNL's Sustainability Innovation Foundry.

Hughes, Barry

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, to Wednesday, February 20) 13, to Wednesday, February 20) Released: February 21, 2008 Next release: February 28, 2008 Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (February 13-20), as frigid temperatures returned to regions of the country that rely on the fuel for space heating. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.73 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $9.08. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for March delivery rose about 58 cents per MMBtu on the week to $8.965. As of Friday, February 15, working gas in storage was 1,770 Bcf, which is 5.8 percent above the 5-year (2003-2007) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $7.58 per barrel, trading yesterday at $100.86 per barrel or $17.39 per MMBtu.

286

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2007 to Thursday, January 30, 2008) 23, 2007 to Thursday, January 30, 2008) Released: January 31, 2008 Next release: February 7, 2008 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, January 23-30), as frigid temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.33 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $8.17. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered increases. The futures contract for March delivery rose by about 46 cents per MMBtu on the week to $8.045. · As of Friday, January 25, working gas in storage was 2,262 Bcf, which is 3.9 percent above the 5-year (2003-2007) average. For the report week, EIA recorded the largest implied net withdrawal (274 Bcf) in its 14-year database of weekly storage statistics.

287

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 1, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 23, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices rose at almost all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 2 and 23 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.43 per MMBtu, increasing by 15 cents or about 5 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for October delivery increased by 10 cents to $3.860 per MMBtu. The November contract also posted gains this week, albeit much smaller at 4

288

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 11, 2009) With little impact on production in the Gulf of Mexico from Hurricane Ida and moderate temperatures in many parts of the country, natural gas spot prices decreased sharply this report week (November 4-11). The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.90 to $3.59 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also moved lower as the threat of an interruption in supplies from the hurricane passed. The futures contract for December delivery decreased by $0.22 on the report week to $4.503 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (November 6) is

289

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 3, 2009 Next Release: July 30, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 22, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose this report week, as prices for energy products generally increased and the economic outlook improved. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.49. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased significantly. The price of the futures contract for August delivery closed yesterday, July 22, at $3.793 per MMBtu, more than 50 cents higher than the closing price the previous Wednesday. Working gas in underground storage as of Friday, July 17, is estimated to have been 2,952 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 18.4

290

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: November 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 28, 2009) Natural gas prices posted decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at virtually all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 6 and 46 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, a couple trading locations did post gains this week. The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell 21 cents or about 4 percent, ending trading yesterday at $4.59 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for November delivery expired yesterday at $4.289 per MMBtu, falling 81 cents or about 16 percent since last Wednesday. The December

291

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 27, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 19, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (August 12-19), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.34 to $3.02 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as supplies continued to be viewed as more than adequate to address near-term demand, including heating-related demand increases this winter. The futures contract for September delivery decreased by $0.36 on the week to $3.12 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday is estimated to

292

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

293

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. , 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 8, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 30, 2010) Since Wednesday, June 23, natural gas spot prices decreased across the lower 48 States, with declines of as much as $0.68 per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.37, or about 7 percent, averaging $4.53 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, June 30. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.616 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.24 or about 5 percent since the previous Wednesday. The futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired in trading on Monday, June 28, at $4.717 per MMBtu, climbing $0.39 per MMBtu during its

294

Gas turbine noise control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of gas turbine powered generators and pumping stations are likely to increase over the next two decades. Alternative fuel systems utilizing fluidized coal beds are likely in the near future and direct combustion of pulverized coal is also a possibility. The primary problem of generally unacceptable noise levels from gas turbine powered equipment affects both community noise and hearing conservation alike. The noise criteria of such plant remain a significant design factor. The paper looks at the technical and historical aspects associated with the noise generation process and examines past present and possible future approaches to the problem of silencing gas turbine units; adequately specifying the acoustical criteria and ratings; evaluates the techniques by which these criteria should be measured; and correlates these with the typical results achieved in the field.

Louis A. Challis and Associates Pty. Ltd.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 24, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 16, 2011) With imports (particularly from outside North America) becoming less significant to U.S. natural gas markets, spot natural gas prices this report week appeared largely unaffected by international events that have had large impacts on other energy commodities. As weather turned spring-like in many parts of the country and storage withdrawals continued to slow dramatically, the Henry Hub spot price increased just $0.04 to $3.85 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased slightly for delivery in the near-term. The futures contract for

296

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: July 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 8, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Price decreases at the spot market ranged between 1 and 44 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a few points in the lower 48 States posted small increases. During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $3.22 per MMBtu, decreasing by 11 percent since last Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for August delivery lost 44.2 cents and ended the report week at $3.353 per MMBtu. The price for the August 2009 contract has posted a

297

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 25, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 17, 2011) Natural gas prices across the country declined this week, as relief from the high temperatures earlier this month continued to lessen air conditioning load. The Henry Hub spot price fell 12 cents from $4.09 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, August 10, to $3.97 per MMBtu yesterday, August 17, falling below $4 for the first time since March of 2010. Prices at numerous points across the country also averaged below $4 yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month contract (September 2011) fell by $0.070 per MMBtu, from $4.003 per MMBTU last Wednesday to $3.933 yesterday.

298

Future Perfect Partnering with Portuguese Environmental Protection Agency  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Future Perfect Partnering with Portuguese Environmental Protection Agency Future Perfect Partnering with Portuguese Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Aviation Sector EU Emissions Trading Scheme Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Future Perfect Partnering with Portuguese Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Aviation Sector EU Emissions Trading Scheme Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Language: English References: Future Perfect Partnering with Portuguese Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Aviation Sector EU Emissions Trading Scheme[1]

299

New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future August 31, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas. Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas. Jenny Hakun What Are Methane Hydrates? Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. The substance looks remarkably like white ice, but it does not behave like ice. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas.

300

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil… (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Chapter 1 - Natural Gas Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is the most energy-efficient fossil fuel; it offers important energy-saving benefits when it is used instead of oil or coal. Although the primary use of natural gas is as a fuel, it is also a source of hydrocarbons for petrochemical feedstocks and a major source of elemental sulfur, an important industrial chemical. Its popularity as an energy source is expected to grow substantially in the future because natural gas can help achieve two important energy goals for the twenty-first century: providing the sustainable energy supplies and services needed for social and economic development and reducing adverse impacts on global climate and the environment in general. Natural gas consumption and trade have been growing steadily over the past two decades, and natural gas has strengthened its position in the world energy mix. Although natural gas demand declined in 2009, as a result of the economic slowdown, it is expected to resume growth in both emerging and traditional markets in the coming decades. Such increase in the near future will be driven because of additional demand in current uses, primarily power generation. There is yet little overlap between the use of natural gas and oil in all large markets. However, there are certain moves in the horizon, including the electrifying of transportation, that will push natural gas use to ever higher levels. This book gives the reader an introduction to natural gas by describing the origin and composition of natural gas, gas sources, phase behavior and properties, and transportation methods. Keywords: Absolute Open Flow, bulk modulus of elasticity, coal-bed methane, cricondenbar, cricondentherm, Expected Ultimate Recovery, gas deviation factor, higher heating value, Inflow Performance Relationship, kerogen, laminar flow, liquefied natural gas, primary thermogenic gas, pyrobitumen, secondary thermogenic gas, super-compressibility factor, thiol, Tubing Performance Curve, turbulent flow, unconventional gas resources, Wobbe Index, Wobbe Number.

Saeid Mokhatab; William A. Poe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Liquefied Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Natural gas plays a vital role in the U.S. energy supply and in achieving the nation's economic and environmental goals. One of several supply options involves increasing imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to ensure that American consumers have adequate supplies of natural gas for the future. Natural gas consumption in the United States is expected to increase slightly from about 24.3 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2011 to 26.6 Tcf by 2035. Currently, most of the demand for natural gas in the United States is met with domestic production and imports via pipeline from Canada. A small percentage of gas supplies are imported and received as liquefied natural gas. A significant portion of the world's natural gas resources are

303

The role of trader positions in spot and futures prices for WTI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We extend the analysis of causal relations between trader positions and oil prices and the process of price discovery by estimating a cointegrating vector autoregression (CVAR) model that expands the cash-and-carry relation between spot and futures prices to quantify long- and short-run relations among oil prices, trader positions, interest rates, and oil inventories. Results indicate that oil inventories and trader positions are needed to generate cointegration between spot and futures prices. The presence of trader positions and oil inventories suggest that both play a role in price discovery. Furthermore, the cointegrating relation for price loads into the equation for both oil prices and trader positions. This suggests a bi-directional simultaneous adjustment process between oil prices and trader positions. This expands the unidirectional causal relation from oil prices to trader positions that is generated by previous studies. Additional results suggest that price discovery occurs in the market for heavily traded near-month futures contracts, but discovery for thin far-month futures markets occurs in the spot market. Together, these results suggest mechanisms by which speculation could affect oil prices but the results presented here are moot regarding their effects.

Marek Kolodziej; Robert K. Kaufmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Hydrogen, the Once and Future Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen, the Once and Future Fuel ... Assuming fossil fuels will be depleted or their use restricted by limits on greenhouse gas emissions, new sources of organic feedstocks will be required, and hydrogen will be needed as a chemical feed in the production process. ...

Catherine E. Gregoire-Padró

1998-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2001 9, 2001 Prices headed up the middle of last week despite seasonal or cooler temperatures everywhere but California (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) and the July 4th holiday, regarded as one of the lowest natural gas consumption days. As expected, the resulting 10-cent-per-MMBtu gain at the Henry Hub on Thursday compared with the previous Friday was undone the following day. The futures price for August delivery was able to stay ahead of the previous week by 12.2 cents to settle at $3.218 on Friday. Spot natural gas prices for large packages in southern California increased as much as $2.71 per MMBtu as temperatures soared and gas-fired power plants endeavored to meet air conditioning demand. Prices started to recede as temperatures abated by the end of the week. Strong gas supplies across the country supported another hefty net addition to storage of 105 Bcf.

306

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 10, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 2, 2010) Since Wednesday, May 26, natural gas spot prices increased across the lower 48 States, with gains of up to $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu), at most market locations. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.13 per MMBtu, or about 3 percent, averaging $4.32 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, June 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.42 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.25 or about 6 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,357 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May

307

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 4, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 24, 2010) Natural gas prices declined across the board, continuing a downward trend from the previous week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price closed at $4.91 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, February 24, a decline of about 10 percent from $5.47 per MMBtu on February 17. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March 2010 delivery, which expired yesterday, fell 11 percent on the week, from $5.386 per MMBtu to $4.816 per MMBtu. With an implied net withdrawal of 172 billion cubic feet (Bcf), working gas in storage decreased to 1,853 Bcf as of Friday, February 19,

308

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 7, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 31, natural gas spot prices climbed at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with increases of as much as 8 percent. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.15, or about 4 percent, to $4.08 per million Btu (MMBtu), in a week of trading shortened by the Good Friday holiday on April 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 7, at $4.02 per MMBtu, rising by $0.15 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,669 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

309

Future Climate Engineering Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Associations from around the world are part of the project `Future Climate - Engineering Solu- tions'. Within the project the participating associations have been developing national climate plansFuture Climate Engineering Solutions Joint report 13 engineering participating engeneering

310

Earth'future climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...their visions of the future I. Astronomy and Earth sciences compiled by J. M. T. Thompson Earth'future climate Mark A. Saunders 1 1 Benfield...provide informed scientific projections for Earth's climate into the next millennium. This...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M. M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Biomass Energy in a Carbon Constrained Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Energy in a Carbon Constrained Future Biomass Energy in a Carbon Constrained Future Speaker(s): William Morrow Date: September 3, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Eric Masanet Two areas of research will be presented: potential roles that domestically sourced biomass energy could play in achieving U.S. environmental and petroleum security goals, and possible pathways for achieving California's long-term greenhouse gas reduction goals. Biomass energy is viewed by many in the electricity and transportation fuel sectors as offering benefits such as greenhouse gas emissions reductions and petroleum fuel substitution. For this reason a large-scale biomass energy industry future is often anticipated although currently biomass energy provides only a small contribution to these sectors. Agriculture models, however,

316

Combating Future Threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Future Combating Future Threats Andy Clark On 21 September BCS, The Chartered...leadership debate about future security threats. Andy Clark, Head of Forensics at Detica...and where are they? These are different threats. Smartphones are powerful, connected......

Andy Clark

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

CHARTING BC'S ECONOMIC FUTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARTING BC'S ECONOMIC FUTURE discussionguide 100communityconversations #12;1 Thank you for agreeing to participate in this Community Conversation about BC's economic future. Each year Simon Fraser is "Charting BC's Economic Future". Faced with an increasingly competitive global economy, it is more important

Kavanagh, Karen L.

318

Renewable Electricity Futures Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Electricity Futures Study End-use Electricity Demand Volume 3 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U Sandor, D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study

319

Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash September 28, 2010 - 5:35pm Addthis Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the

320

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 14, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 6, 2011) Continuing last weekÂ’s net decline, the Henry Hub price this week fell 8 cents from $4.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 30, to $4.17 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 6. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (May 2011) contract fell from $4.355 per MMBtu to $4.146 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,579 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 1, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes Incorporated, rose by 11 to 891. A new study released by EIA estimated technically recoverable shale

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling[1] Logo: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jointly sponsored by Greenhouse Gas Inventory & Research (GIR) Center of

322

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: July 3, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, June 18-25), with price decreases generally occurring in producing areas in the Gulf of Mexico region and price increases at trading locations in the Rockies, the Midcontinent, and the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.76. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After trading at $13.20 per MMBtu on Monday, the futures contract for July delivery decreased by 45 cents in value over the next 2 days and ended the

323

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2008 30, 2008 Next Release: November 6, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 29) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States decreased from Wednesday to Wednesday, October 22-29, with relatively large declines of more than 10 percent occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and more modest price movements in the eastern half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.36 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.58. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week. The futures contract for November delivery, for which the final day of trading was yesterday (October 29), decreased by

324

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 1, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 23, 2010) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, June 16, completely reversing the previous weekÂ’s gains. However, spot prices remain significantly higher than they were 3 weeks ago. Prices at most market locations fell between 10 and 25 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) this week, with most locations ending the week below $5 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.804 per MMBtu, decreasing by 17 cents or about 4 percent during the report week. In

325

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 7, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 16, 2009) Changes in natural gas spot prices this report week (December 9-16) reflected extremely cold weather conditions moving across the country. In response to varying levels of demand for space heating, spot prices increased east of the Mississippi River but declined in the West. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.30 to $5.57 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also rose with expectations of higher demand in response to this monthÂ’s trend of colder-than-normal temperatures. The futures contract for

326

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: February 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 11, 2009) Natural gas prices decreased this week as space-heating demand slackened with a break from the bitter cold of prior weeks. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.33 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week as the economic downturn is expected to be accompanied with a large-scale reduction in demand for all energy products, thus affecting prices for energy in forward markets. The futures contract for February 2009 delivery decreased by 6.5 cents per MMBtu on the week to

327

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 20, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 12, 2011) Wholesale natural gas prices at most market locations east of the Mississippi River moved higher this week as a bitter cold moved into the eastern half of the country. West of the Mississippi River, a gradual warming trend resulted in lower prices. During the report week (January 5-12), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.03 to $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased during the report week, likely in part due to forecasts of continuing cold weather and improving economic conditions. The futures

328

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 11, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 3, 2010) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, limiting demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices declined, with the biggest decreases occurring at markets in the Rocky Mountains and the Midcontinent. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.15 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by $0.10 on the week to $4.76 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 26, working gas in underground storage was

329

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 28, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 20, 2010) A reprieve from the extreme cold in much of the country during this report week limited space-heating demand, resulting in price declines. The biggest decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (January 13-20), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.07 to $5.54 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for February delivery decreased by $0.24 on the week to $5.496 per MMBtu. As of Friday, January 15, working gas in underground storage was 2,607 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year

330

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 1, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 24, 2010) The natural gas market is transitioning to spring, a “shoulder” season of lower demand between the relatively high-demand periods of winter and summer. As space-heating demand ebbed during the report week, prices declined across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price ended trading yesterday, March 24, at $4.02 per million Btu (MMBtu), a decrease of $0.25 compared with the previous Wednesday, March 17. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices continued to decline as storage inventories appeared more than adequate and domestic production remained strong. The futures contract for April

331

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 24, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 16, 2011) A reprieve from extreme cold in much of the country this week limited space-heating demand, contributing to price declines. The biggest price decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (February 9-16), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.29 to $3.93 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for March delivery decreased by $0.12 on the week to $3.92 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 11, working gas in underground storage was 1,911 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 6.3 percent below the 5-year

332

Future Perfect Partnering with California Air Resources Board (CARB) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Future Perfect Partnering with California Air Resources Board (CARB) Future Perfect Partnering with California Air Resources Board (CARB) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Future Perfect Partnering with California Air Resources Board (CARB) Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Language: English References: Future Perfect Partnering with California Air Resources Board (CARB)[1] Logo: Future Perfect Partnering with California Air Resources Board (CARB) In the winter of 2008, Future Perfect (FP) began collaborating with the

333

Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook was undertaken to characterize the global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market and to examine recent trends and future prospects in the LNG market.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas Use for Transportation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emissions reduction. * NG use can provide a pathway for future bio-based fuels (e.g., biogas and gas + biomass-to-liquids GBTL). Natural Gas Use in Transportation Offers...

335

Life Cycle Boundaries and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Beef Cattle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Beef cattle are estimated to directly contribute 26% of U.S. agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and future climate change policy may target reducing these emissions.… (more)

Dudley, Quentin M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

,"Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2...

337

,"Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

338

,"Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

339

,"Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

340

,"Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

,"California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2...

342

,"Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

343

,"Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2...

344

,"Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million...

345

,"California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

346

,"Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

347

,"Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million...

348

Chapter 10 - Coal and Coalbed Gas: Outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The future of coal and coalbed gas future is intertwined as source and reservoir rocks. Coal generates coalbed gas during coalification (e.g. thermogenic gas) and methanogenesis (biogenic gas). These gas types occur as singular and mixed accumulations. Accumulation of biogenic coalbed gas has received worldwide research and development interests on sustaining production. The new coal-to-biogenic coalbed gas technology centers on stimulating indigenous microbes in coal and associated groundwater with bioengineered nutrients and amendments to “farm” gas from abandoned wells and non-gas-producing coals. Coal mainly as a basic fuel for electric power generation since the Industrial Revolution continues to be utilized despite environmental concerns. The outlook of coal is dimmed in the United States where natural gas has replaced power generation. However, in Asia and Europe continued economic growth is going to be fueled by coal and coalbed gas as liquefied natural gas will rely on combustion from more efficient, high-temperature power plants in the future.

Romeo M. Flores

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use.

350

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

LANCE HAYS

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

351

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally moved in opposite directions for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 29-October 6), as spot prices fell at most market locations, while futures prices continued to climb higher. In yesterday's (Wednesday, October 6) trading at the Henry Hub, the spot price for natural gas averaged $6.00 per MMBtu, down 23 cents per MMBtu, or close to 4 percent, from the previous Wednesday. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery gained $0.134 per MMBtu on the week, or about 2 percent, as it settled yesterday at $7.045. Settlement prices for contracts for gas delivery in December 2004 through March 2005 rose much more sharply, with increases ranging from just over 40 cents to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 3,092 Bcf as of Friday, October 1, which is 6.9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose $2.45 per barrel (42 cents per MMBtu) on the week, or about 5 percent, to yesterday's record-high price of $51.98 per barrel ($8.96 per MMBtu).

352

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 1, 2007) 25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 1, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally decreased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, October 17-24), as moderate weather prevailed across much of the Lower 48 States. Although tropical storms entering the Gulf of Mexico production region-evidenced by a system currently moving through the Caribbean-could still disrupt supplies, the passing of at least the most active part of the hurricane season may help explain the price declines. On the week the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.01 per MMBtu to $6.10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant decreases. The futures contract for November delivery declined about 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $6.972. Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a healthy supply picture ahead of the winter heating season. As of Friday, October 19, working gas in storage was 3,443 Bcf, which is 7.2 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.11 per barrel, ending trading yesterday at $88.30, or $15.22 per MMBtu.

353

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2007 to Thursday, January 3, 2008) 26, 2007 to Thursday, January 3, 2008) Released: January 4, 2008 Next release: January 10, 2008 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Thursday, December 26, 2007, to January 3, 2008), as frigid temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.90 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.84. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for February delivery rose about 51 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.674. · Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a ready supply source to meet peak demand as the winter heating season progresses. As of Friday, December 28, working gas in storage was 2,921 Bcf, which is 8.2 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average.

354

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Natural Gas July 30, 2009 DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. May 18, 2009 DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and nearby states, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, can now provide petroleum companies and related service providers with the geologic, geographic, and engineering data needed to tap into these resources.

355

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Energy Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Natural Gas November 20, 2013 Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S. Projects Will Determine Whether methane Hydrates Are an Economically and Environmentally Viable Option for America's Energy Future November 15, 2013 Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas The Department of Energy announced the conditional authorization for Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC to export liquefied natural gas to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement with the U.S. This is the fifth conditional authorization the Department has announced. October 31, 2013 Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project

356

Natural gas monthly, August 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis presents the most recent data on natural gas prices, supply, and consumption from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The presentation of the latest monthly data is followed by an update on natural gas markets. The markets section examines the behavior of daily spot and futures prices based on information from trade press, as well as regional, weekly data on natural gas storage from the American Gas Association (AGA). This {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} closes with a special section comparing and contrasting EIA and AGA storage data on a monthly and regional basis. The regions used are those defined by the AGA for their weekly data collection effort: the Producing Region, the Consuming Region East, and the Consuming Region West. While data on working gas levels have tracked fairly closely between the two data sources, differences have developed recently. The largest difference is in estimates of working gas levels in the East consuming region during the heating season.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

DOE Gas Hydrate R&D: Shale Gas Déjŕ Vu?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

More than 30 years ago, DOE looked into the future and saw the potentially large benefit of developing promising but difficult-to-extract unconventional natural gas resources, particularly those from shale formations. As a result, it began sponsoring research and development (R&D), partnering with industry and academia, and, among other things, invested about $137 million in the Eastern Gas Shale Program between 1978 and 1992.

358

Future of Telecommunications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... . G. Radley, of the Post Office Research Station at Dollis Hill, spoke on Telecommunications of the future. He pointed out that in 1914, although wire telephony had been ...

1941-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Materials for the Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the Future The Lab's four Science Pillars harness capabilities for solutions to threats- on national and global scales. Contacts Pillar Champion Mary Hockaday Email Pillar...

360

My Amazing Future 2012  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory's My Amazing Future program gives 8th grade women the opportunity to experience careers in science and engineering.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Future Metropolitan Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

care for the design of this landscape, for its water, air,The Future Metropolitan Landscape Peter Bosselmann and Denirather to an urbanized landscape with multiple centers,

Bosselmann, Peter; Ruggeri, Deni

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 1, 2007) 22, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 1, 2007) As the weather has made the transition from extreme cold to much more moderate conditions this week, natural gas spot prices have declined in much of the country. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 14-21), the Henry Hub spot price declined $1.40 per MMBtu to $7.51 as prices for next-day delivery responded to reduced demand for space-heating. However, the bitter and widespread cold of the first 2 weeks of February likely contributed to revised expectations of future storage levels, leading to increased futures prices this week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price for the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub increased 41 cents per MMBtu or about 5.6 percent. Generally, futures prices for delivery months through next summer increased by more than 4 percent. Working gas in storage as of Friday, February 16, was 1,865 Bcf, which is 10.8 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.40 per barrel on the week to $59.40, or $10.24 per MMBtu.

363

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2007) As the bitter cold has evolved to more moderate temperatures, natural gas spot prices have eased through most of the country. During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 14-21), the Henry Hub spot price declined 4 cents per MMBtu to $6.82. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts were slightly higher, as increases Tuesday and yesterday (March 20 and 21) more than offset decreases that occurred in the 3 previous trading days. The futures contract for April delivery, which is the first contract following the current heating season, increased 7.7 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.160. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and decreasing prices for competing fuels likely contributed to falling natural gas spot prices this week. Working gas in storage as of Friday, March 16, was 1,533 Bcf, which is 18.5 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.17 per barrel on the week to $56.98, or $9.82 per MMBtu.

364

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) 16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) Winter-like conditions in much of the East this past weekend transitioned to above-normal temperatures, contributing to a further decline in natural gas spot prices this week (Wednesday, February 8 - Wednesday, February 15). On the week the Henry Hub spot price declined 57 cents per MMBtu to $7.31. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant declines. The futures contract for March delivery, which is the last contract for the current heating season, declined 66.9 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.066. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and falling prices for competing fuels likely contributed to falling natural gas prices this week. Working gas in storage as of Friday, February 10, was 2,266 Bcf, which is 43.9 percent above the 5-year (2001-2005) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.90 per barrel on the week to $57.61, or $9.93 per MMBtu.

365

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 4, 2009 Next Release: May 21, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 13, 2009) Since Wednesday, May 6, natural gas spot prices rose at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 49 and 95 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed by 75 cents per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $4.42 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, May 13, at $4.333 per MMBtu, increasing by 45 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 2,013 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 8, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

366

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview - May 21, 2001 Somewhat warmer temperatures early in the week, especially in the South, provided a lift to natural gas spot and futures prices. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) However, a report of another large stock build and a revised forecast for normal to below-normal temperatures over a larger area of the country turned the week's gains into losses. On a week-to-week basis, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.10 to end Friday, May 18 at $4.15 per MMBtu, while the NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.013 to $4.291 per MMBtu. At 119 Bcf, net injections to storage for the week ended May 11, 2001, were the highest value for the 8-year period of weekly AGA data.

367

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: August 21, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 6, to Wednesday, August 13) Since Wednesday, August 6, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling between $0.20 and 0.77 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $0.59 per MMBtu or about 7 percent, to $8.11 per MMBtu—its lowest level since February 8, 2008. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (August 12) at $8.456 per MMBtu, declining $0.31 or about 4 percent since Wednesday, August 6. Natural gas in storage was 2,567 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

368

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 20, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 12, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes ranging between 6 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, May 12, at $4.18 per MMBtu, 18 cents higher than the preceding week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.284 per MMBtu, increasing by 29 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,089 billion cubic feet (Bcf)

369

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 18, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 10, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 3, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with decreases of as much as 11 percent. Prices at the Henry Hub declined $0.32, or about 7 percent, to $4.44 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, March 10, at $4.56 per MMBtu, falling by $0.20 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,626 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 5, about 1 percent above the 5-year average (2005-2009). The implied

370

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: June 12, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Spot gas at most market locations (outside the Rocky Mountain Region) traded above $10 per million Btu (MMBtu) this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday), with many points registering prices in excess of $12 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub moved higher by 38 cents per MMBtu compared with its settlement price a week ago, ending yesterday (June 4) at $12.379 MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 1,806 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 30, which is 0.1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased

371

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: October 23, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For week ending Wednesday, October 15) Since Wednesday, October 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the California, West Texas, and Arizona/Nevada regions, with prices rising as much as 76 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub rose 6 cents per MMBtu or about 1 percent, to $6.64 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (October 15) at $6.592 per MMBtu, declining 15 cents per MMBtu or about 2 percent since last Wednesday, October 8. Natural gas in storage was 3,277 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

372

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: February 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 18, 2009) Since Wednesday, February 11, natural gas spot prices declined at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 3 and 78 cents per MMBtu. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 33 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 7 percent, to $4.35 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 18) at $4.214 per MMBtu, declining 32 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,996 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 13, which is about 8.4 percent above the 5-year average

373

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: November 14, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, November 5) Since Wednesday, October 29, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Midwest, Northeast, and Alabama/Mississippi regions, with gains of up to $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) in a week of highly variable prices. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 36 cents per MMBtu or about 5 percent, to $6.94 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (November 5) at $7.249 per MMBtu, climbing 47 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent since last Wednesday, October 29. Natural gas in storage was 3,405 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

374

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 6, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 29, 2009) Since Wednesday, July 22, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations, with decreases of as much as 19 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 8 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $3.41 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday, July 29, at $3.379 per MMBtu, decreasing by 41 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,023 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of July 24, which is about 19 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

375

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: December 11, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, December 3, 2008) Since Wednesday, November 26, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, although selected markets posted relatively modest gains on the week. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 5 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or less than 0.5 percent, to $6.48 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (December 3) at $6.347 per MMBtu, falling 53 cents per MMBtu or about 8 percent since last Wednesday, November 26. Natural gas in storage was 3,358 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

376

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: July 31, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, July 16, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling more than $1 per MMBtu at most locations during the period. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 11 percent, to $9.89 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $9.788 per MMBtu, declining $1.61 or about 14 percent since Wednesday, July 16. Natural gas in storage was 2,396 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of July 18, which is about 1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net injection of 84 Bcf.

377

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 30, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 22, 2010) Since Wednesday, September 15, natural gas spot prices fell at most markets across the lower 48 States, with declines of less than 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, selected markets in the Rocky Mountains and at the Florida citygate posted considerably larger declines, falling by as much as $0.51 per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.04 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $4.02 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, September 22. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.966 per

378

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: May 22, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices increased in a majority of regions of the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 7-14).The Henry Hub spot price increased $0.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.51, the highest average price recorded at the Henry Hub in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also continued on an upward trend that has resulted in weekly price increases in 6 of the last 7 report weeks. The futures contract for June delivery increased 27.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to approximately $11.60. During the week ending Friday, May 9, estimated net injections of natural gas into underground storage totaled the largest volume to date

379

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: July 10, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 25, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices rising up to 5 percent during the period. Prices at the Henry Hub increased 55 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 4 percent, to $13.31 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterdayat $13.389 per MMBtu, rising 52 cents or about 4 percent since Wednesday, June 25. Natural gas in storage was 2,118 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of June 27, which is about 3 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net injection of 85 Bcf.

380

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 27, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 19, 2010) Since last Wednesday, May 12, natural gas spot prices generally rose at market locations across the lower 48 States, with only a few exceptions. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price increased about 2 percent since last Wednesday, from $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.28 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the June 2010 futures contract fell about 3 percent, from $4.284 per MMBtu to $4.158 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price dropped about 8 percent, from $75.65 per barrel ($13.05 per MMBtu) to $69.91 per barrel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2009 7, 2009 Next Release: September 3, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 26, 2009) Since Wednesday, August 19, natural gas spot prices fell at all market locations, with decreases ranging between 10 and 39 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 26 cents per MMBtu, or about 9 percent, to $2.76 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, August 26, at $2.91 per MMBtu, decreasing by 21 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,258 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of August 21, which is about 18 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

382

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: March 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 11, 2009) Since Wednesday, March 4, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 59 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell 31 cents per MMBtu, or about 7 percent, to $3.92 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, March 11, at $3.80 per MMBtu, declining 54 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,681 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 6, which is about 13 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

383

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2008 2, 2008 Next Release: May 29, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, May 14, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States. However, a price rally yesterday (May 21) contributed to price increases at some market locations since last Wednesday, May 14. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 11 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 1 percent, to $11.40 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $11.64 per MMBtu, rising 4 cents or less than 1 percent since Wednesday, May 14. Natural gas in storage was 1,614 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 16, which is slightly below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an

384

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: January 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 7, 2009) Since Wednesday, December 31, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States except in the Northeast region. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 26 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or about 5 percent, to $5.89 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 7) at $5.872 per MMBtu, climbing 22 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since last Wednesday, December 31. Natural gas in storage was 2,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 2, which is about 3 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

385

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: April 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 8, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 1, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 40 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell by 6 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $3.50. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 8, at $3.63 per MMBtu, declining by 7 cents or about 2 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 3, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

386

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 2, 2009) Natural gas spot prices soared this week, following significant, albeit smaller decreases in trading the prior week. Spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States by more than a dollar per million Btu (MMBtu). The only exception occurred at the Leidy location in the Northeast, which rose by 84 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week at $4.67 per MMBtu, $1.35 per MMBtu higher than last Wednesday. Trading at the Henry Hub ended yesterdayÂ’s session 14 cents higher than the January 2010 contract. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

387

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 29, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 21, 2009) Since Wednesday, October 14, natural gas spot prices increased at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes generally ranging between $0.31 and $1.14 per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed 98 cents per MMBtu, or about 26 percent, to $4.80 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, October 21, at $5.10 per MMBtu, increasing by 66 cents or about 15 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was a record-setting 3,734 billion cubic feet

388

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 21, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 13, 2010) Natural gas spot prices posted gains at most markets across the lower 48 States since Wednesday, October 6, accompanied by double-digit increases in trading since the holiday weekend. Price increases on the week ranged up to 25 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the Henry Hub natural gas spot price increasing $0.02 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $3.58 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, October 13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.696 per MMBtu, falling by $0.169, or about 4 percent, since the previous Wednesday.

389

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 at 2:00 P.M. 0 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 18, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Tuesday, November 9, 2010) Since Wednesday, November 3, natural gas spot prices rose across the lower 48 States, increasing between $0.25 and $1.12 per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub rose $0.41 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $3.76 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.21 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.37, or about 10 percent, since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage totaled 3,840 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of November 5, about 10 percent above the 5-year (2005-2009) average, and

390

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 2, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 25, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 18, natural gas spot prices fell at most markets across the lower 48 States. Although a majority of markets posted declines of as much as $1.36 per million Btu (MMBtu), selected western market locations posted relatively narrow gains on the week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.36 per MMBtu, or about 8 percent, averaging $3.99 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, August 25, falling below $4 per MMBtu for the first time since May 7. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.871 per

391

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2009 16, 2009 Next Release: April 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 15, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with some exceptions including those in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent. Despite this weekÂ’s upticks at most locations, natural gas spot prices remain at relatively low levels and have continued to trade within a limited range for the past 4 weeks. The Henry Hub spot market prices gained about 10 cents or 2.9 percent per million Btu (MMBtu), ending trading yesterday at $3.60 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 15) at $3.693

392

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: October 2, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 17, to Wednesday, September 24) Since Wednesday, September 17, natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices rising as much as $2.02 per MMBtu but climbing less than $1 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 33 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent, to $8.15 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (September 24) at $7.679 per MMBtu, declining 23 cents per MMBtu or about 3 percent since last Wednesday, September 17. Natural gas in storage was 3,023 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

393

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Hanford Story: Future  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Future Chapter of the Hanford Story illustrates the potential and possibilities offered by a post-cleanup Hanford. From land use plans and preservation at Hanford to economic development and tourism opportunities, the Future chapter touches on a variety of local economic, cultural and environmental perspectives.

396

FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY Delivering Innovation The Future Logistics Living Lab is a collaboration between NICTA, SAP and Fraunhofer. Australia's first Living Lab provides a platform for industry and research to work together, to investigate real-world problems and to demonstrate innovative technology

Heiser, Gernot

397

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

Hand, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

Hand, M.; Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Volatility in natural gas and oil markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using daily futures price data, I examine the behavior of natural gas and crude oil price volatility since 1990. I test whether there has been a significant trend in volatility, whether there was a short-term increase in ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

FutureGen_factsheet.cdr  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vision Vision for Tomorrow's Clean Energy FutureGen - A Sequestration and Hydrogen Research Initiative Responding to the President's Initiatives The Technology The Integrated Sequestration and Hydrogen Research Initiative is a $1 billion government/ industry partnership to design, build and operate a nearly emission-free, coal-fired electric and hydrogen production plant. The 275-megawatt prototype plant will serve as a large scale engineering laboratory for testing new clean power, carbon capture, and coal-to-hydrogen technologies. It will be the cleanest fossil fuel-fired power plant in the world. The project is a direct response to the President's Climate Change and Hydrogen Fuels Initiatives. President Bush emphasized the importance of technology in stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere with two major policy announcements: the National Climate

404

Fermilab | Plan for the Future | Fermilab's Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fermilab's Future Fermilab's Future 2013-2015 Next Fermilab's research program for 2015 and beyond New facilities at Fermilab, the nation's dedicated particle physics laboratory, would provide thousands of scientists from across the United States and around the world with world-class scientific opportunities. In collaboration with the Department of Energy and the particle physics community, Fermilab is pursuing a strategic plan that addresses fundamental questions about the physical laws that govern matter, energy, space and time. Fermilab is advancing plans for the best facilities in the world for the exploration of neutrinos and rare subatomic processes, far beyond current global capabilities. The proposed construction of a two-megawatt high-intensity proton accelerator, Project X, would enable a comprehensive

405

FutureGen Project Launched | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FutureGen Project Launched FutureGen Project Launched FutureGen Project Launched December 6, 2005 - 4:29pm Addthis Government, Industry Agree to Build Zero-Emissions Power Plant of the Future WASHINGTON, DC -- Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy has signed an agreement with the FutureGen Industrial Alliance to build FutureGen, a prototype of the fossil-fueled power plant of the future. The nearly $1 billion government-industry project will produce electricity and hydrogen with zero-emissions, including carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. The initiative is a response to President Bush's directive to develop a hydrogen economy by drawing upon the best scientific research to address the issue of global climate change. Today's announcement marks the official

406

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

407

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

408

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

409

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

410

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

411

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

412

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

413

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

414

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

415

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

416

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

417

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

418

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

419

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

420

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

DeMeo, E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Collaborative future event recommendation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate a method for collaborative ranking of future events. Previous work on recommender systems typically relies on feedback on a particular item, such as a movie, and generalizes this to other items or other ...

Minkov, Einat

422

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) 7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices increased slightly this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 9-16), despite the usual lull in demand during this shoulder period between the winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The upward price trend likely resulted from a variety of factors, including rising prices for competing petroleum products (as evidenced by an increase in the underlying crude oil price). Additionally, concerns over current and future supplies do not appear to have eased. The official start of the hurricane season is imminent, and the first named tropical storm appeared this week. However, imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly in the past few months. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 16 cents per MMBtu, or 2 percent, to $7.62. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the contract for June delivery increased 17.0 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.890 yesterday (May 16). EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 1,842 Bcf as of Friday, May 11, reflecting an implied net injection of 95 Bcf. This level of working gas in underground storage is 20.6 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.03 per barrel on the week to $62.57 per barrel, or $10.79 per MMBtu.

423

Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

Heinonen, Olli [Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

424

Preparing for the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 12 Preparing for the Future Story by Kathy Wythe Preparing for the Future University establishes water management degree program Texas A&M University launched an interdisci-plinary water management degree programduring the fall... 2005 semester with 12 stu-dents seeking either master?s or doctorate degrees in water management and hydrologic sciences. The degree program, the first in Texas, includes 42 faculty members in 12 departments from four differ- ent colleges, said Ron...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Buying Hedge with Futures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Economist, Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service. Many bulk purchasers of agricultural com- modities need price risk management tools to help stabilize input prices. Livestock feeders... anticipating future feed needs or grain export- ers making commitments to sell grain are two users of agricultural commodities who could benefit from input price management strate- gies. A common tool is a buying, or long, hedge using futures. Producers...

Welch, Mark; Kastens, Terry L.

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

426

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 2007) 14, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices decreased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 6-13) as weather-related demand was limited amid close-to-normal temperatures for this time of year. Easing prices also likely resulted in part from reduced supply uncertainty in response to the amount of natural gas in underground storage (mostly for use during the winter heating season but also available for periods of hot weather in the summer). Supplies from international sources have grown considerably this spring, as imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly even as natural gas supplies from Canada (transported by pipeline) likely have decreased. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 23 cents per MMBtu, or 2.9 percent, to $7.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the contract for July delivery decreased 47.2 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.608 yesterday (June 13). EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,255 Bcf as of Friday, June 8, reflecting an implied net injection of 92 Bcf. This level of working gas in underground storage is 19.3 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.20 per barrel on the week to $66.17 per barrel, or $11.41 per MMBtu.

428

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 20, 2007) 13, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 20, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 6-13), as tropical storms threatened to disrupt supplies and pipeline explosions in Mexico stirred concerns of supply security. Hurricane Humberto is still active near the Texas-Louisiana border at the time of this writing, and Tropical Depression 8 in the South Atlantic is apparently moving toward Puerto Rico and the general direction of the Gulf of Mexico (where these storms might cause energy-producing platforms to be evacuated and supplies to be shut in). However, companies have not yet announced significant shut-in production or damage from the weather. On the week the Henry Hub spot price increased 32 cents per MMBtu to $6.13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for October delivery rose 63.3 cents per MMBtu on the week to $6.438. Working gas in storage as of Friday, September 7, was 3,069 Bcf, which is 9.3 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil recorded yet another record high, increasing $4.11 per barrel on the week to $79.85, or $13.77 per MMBtu.

429

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 8, 2006) June 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 8, 2006) Natural gas spot prices were virtually unchanged at most market locations in the Lower 48 States during the holiday-shortened trading week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 24-31), while futures prices increased. The spot price at the Henry Hub decreased by 4 cents per MMBtu on the week, or less than 1 percent, to $5.97 per MMBtu. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the June contract expired at $5.925 per MMBtu on May 26, marking the lowest contract closing price since the October 2004 futures contract closed at $5.723 per MMBtu. The settlement price for the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents on the week, settling yesterday (May 31) at $6.384 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories of working gas in underground storage were 2,243 Bcf as of Friday, May 26, which is 45.9 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.95 per barrel, or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday (May 24), trading yesterday at $71.42 per barrel ($12.31 per MMBtu).

430

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 28) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 28) Increased natural gas demand owing to falling temperatures this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 13-20) combined with higher petroleum prices to lift spot and futures gas prices dramatically. The result at the Henry Hub was a net gain on the week of $1.86 per MMBtu, or 35 percent, to $7.25. After gaining value in the past three trading days, the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub ended the week at $7.623 per MMBtu, a net increase of 77.2 cents. Natural gas in storage continues to build at a rate that could result in the highest inventories in years by the start of the traditional heating season (November 1). As of Friday, October 15, inventories were 3,223 Bcf, which is 7.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $1.07 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (October 20) closing price of $54.93 per barrel, or $9.47 per MMBtu.

431

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 17) 10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 17) Natural gas spot and futures prices have generally decreased for the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, February 2-9). The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 18 cents, or about 3 percent, while prices at most other regional markets ended the week with decreases of between 2 and 42 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub decreased $0.211 per MMBtu, or slightly over 3 percent, settling yesterday (February 9) at $6.165 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported working gas in underground storage of 1,906 Bcf, which reflects an implied net decrease of 176 Bcf. West Texas Intermediate crude oil on the spot market fell $1.20 per barrel, or about $0.21 per MMBtu, since last Wednesday (February 2), ending trading yesterday at $45.45 per barrel, or $7.84 per MMBtu.

432

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 19) 12 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 19) Spot and futures natural gas prices this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 4-11) partly recovered from the prior week's sharp decline, owing to warmer temperatures moving into parts of the South and cool temperatures in the Rockies. The Henry Hub spot price increased 14 cents per MMBtu to $6.63. The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub was higher on the week by about 5 cents per MMBtu, closing yesterday (May 11) at $6.683. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, May 6, increased to 1,509 Bcf, which is 22.3 percent above the 5-year average. Before declining sharply yesterday, crude oil spot prices appeared to be supporting higher natural gas prices, with the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) price increasing more than $1.50 per barrel since Wednesday (May 4) to over $52. The net change in the WTI price on the week was 17 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1 percent, as the price dropped $1.37 per barrel yesterday to $50.39 per barrel, or $8.69 per MMBtu.

433

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 30, 2007) 23, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 30, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices eased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 15-22), as Hurricane Dean failed to have a significant impact on U.S. production in the Gulf of Mexico and moderate temperatures limited demand. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price declined $1.46 per MMBtu, or 20 percent, to $5.84. Trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) also resulted in large price decreases. The NYMEX contract for September delivery decreased $1.286 per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $5.578 yesterday (August 22). Working gas inventories reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report were 2,926 Bcf as of Friday, August 17, which is 12.8 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.06 per barrel on the week to $69.30 per barrel, or $11.95 per MMBtu.

434

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 16, 2006) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 16, 2006) Despite the slightly colder weather that dominated the country this week, natural gas spot and futures prices generally decreased for the week (February 1-8). The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 83 cents, or about 10 percent, while prices at most other regional markets ended the week with decreases averaging 58 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 99 cents per MMBtu, or slightly over 11 percent, settling yesterday (February 8) at $7.735 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported working gas in underground storage of 2,368 Bcf as of February 3, which reflects an implied net decrease of 38 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.10 per barrel, or more than 6 percent since last Wednesday (February 1), ending trading yesterday at $62.51 per barrel, or $10.78 per MMBtu.

435

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, to Wednesday, April 2) 26, to Wednesday, April 2) Released: April 3, 2008 Next release: April 10, 2008 · Natural gas spot prices increased in all trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 26-April 2). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.34 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $9.59. Frigid temperatures continued for a portion of the week in the Northeast and for most of the week in the West, likely boosting space-heating demand. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered increases, albeit less than in spot markets. The futures contract for May delivery rose about 15 cents per MMBtu on the week to $9.832. · With the traditional heating season not quite over, natural gas withdrawals from underground storage continued through last week. As of Friday, March 28, working gas in storage was 1,248 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 0.5 percent above the 5-year (2003-2007) average.

436

Future Climate Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada (Figure 1), the site of a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this AMR provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the infiltration model (USGS 2000) and for the total system performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) at YM. Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one method, among many, of establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Revision 00 of this AMR was prepared in accordance with the ''Work Direction and Planning Document for Future Climate Analysis'' (Peterman 1999) under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-97NV12033 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The planning document for the technical scope, content, and management of ICN 01 of this AMR is the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (BSC 2001a). The scope for the TBV resolution actions in this ICN is described in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department''. (BSC 2001b, Addendum B, Section 4.1).

James Houseworth

2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

437

Vision of the Future Grid | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vision of the Future Grid Vision of the Future Grid Vision of the Future Grid Vision of the Future Grid The GTT developed a draft vision (below) which describes a future electricity system and lists several key attributes of that system. In its current form, this vision incorporates comments made by stakeholders during meetings organized by the GTT. The vision will continue to evolve and be refined as the GTT engages with the broader stakeholder community. Vision of the Future Grid A seamless, cost-effective electricity system, from generation to end-use, capable of meeting all clean energy demands and capacity requirements, with: Significant scale-up of clean energy (renewables, natural gas, nuclear, clean fossil) Universal access to consumer participation and choice (including

438

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 3, 2009 Next Release: January 29, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Thursday, January 22, 2009) Bitter cold in much of the eastern half of the country failed to boost prices this report week (Wednesday, January 14, to Thursday, January 22), as continued concerns over the economy and the perception of a healthy supply picture dominated price movements. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.75 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.72. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week as the economic downturn is expected to be accompanied with a large-scale reduction in demand for all energy products, thus affecting prices for energy in forward markets. The futures contract

439

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 2, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 25, 2011) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand at electric power plants in order to meet air-conditioning needs. Prices moved higher at most trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Southeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.21 to $4.36 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased as the weather outlook suggested higher weather-related consumption for the remaining days of May. The futures contract for June

440

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 1, 2010) Following the Thanksgiving Day holiday weekend, prices moved up significantly this week as wintry weather moved into much of the country. The most severe weather to date this season is increasing space-heating demand from nearly coast to coast and as far south as Florida. During the report week (November 24-December 1), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.39 to $4.21 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased during the report week in response to indications of warmer weather in the outlook and amid reports of growth in supply. The futures

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20, 2008 20, 2008 Next Release: December 4, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, November 19, 2008) Wintry weather moved into major population centers in the Lower 48 States this report week, boosting demand related to space heating from the Midcontinent to the eastern half of the country. Prices increased throughout the country, with the biggest increases in the Midcontinent. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.11 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.76. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased for the report week as the second week of the heating season began. The futures contract for December delivery increased by 34 cents per

442

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 31, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 23, 2011) Colder weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices moved higher at all trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.33 to $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased significantly as the weather outlook suggested higher consumption for the remaining days of March. The futures contract for April delivery

443

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

444

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 21, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell during the week at locations across the country, with declines ranging from 12 to 62 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price fell 19 cents, or about 5 percent, averaging $3.96 per MMBtu yesterday, April 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the value of the futures contract for May 2010 delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 6 percent, from $4.199 per MMBtu on April 14 to $3.955 per MMBtu on April 21. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price fell 3 percent since last Wednesday to $82.98 per barrel, or $14.31 per MMBtu.

446

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 to Wednesday, December 19) 12 to Wednesday, December 19) Released: December 20 Next release: January 4, 2008 · Since Wednesday, December 12, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 4 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or less than 1 percent to $7.18 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (December 19) at $7.179 per MMBtu, falling 23 cents or 3 percent since Wednesday, December 12. · Natural gas in storage was 3,173 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of December 14, which is 9 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $3.30 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $91.11 per barrel or $15.71 per MMBtu.

447

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 19, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 11, 2010) Summer heat and increased demand this week were insufficient to sustain the natural gas price level, as prices at trading locations across the lower 48 States posted decreases. Overall, spot price at most locations in the lower 48 States fell between 30 and 45 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a number of locations posted price decreases of as much as 52 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, August 11, 39 cents lower than the preceding week, at $4.38 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract

448

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 14, 2010) While natural gas spot prices inched lower at a number of market locations, prices at the majority of points in the lower 48 States increased since last Wednesday, April 7. Overall, spot prices in the lower 48 States varied between a 3-percent increase and a 3-percent decrease on the week. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, April 14, 7 cents higher than the preceding week, at $4.15 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.199 per

449

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 23, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 15, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 8–15), likely supported by demand in the electric power sector from late-season heat and associated air-conditioning demand in much of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.06 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the October futures contract increased in 4 out of 5 trading days for a total gain during the report week of about $0.18 per MMBtu. The price of the

450

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 13) January 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 13) Since Wednesday, December 29, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub declined 34 cents, or about 6 percent, to $5.84 per MMBtu. Yesterday (January 5), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.833 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 57 cents since last Wednesday (December 29). Natural gas in storage was 2,698 Bcf as of December 31, which is about 12 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.28 per barrel, or less than 1 percent, on the week to $43.41 per barrel or $7.484 per MMBtu.

451

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2007 to Thursday, January 23, 2008) 16, 2007 to Thursday, January 23, 2008) Released: January 24, 2008 Next release: January 31, 2008 · Since Wednesday, January 16, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, with the exception of the Northeast and Florida, and a few scattered points in Louisiana, Alabama/Mississippi, and the Rocky Mountains. · Prices at the Henry Hub declined 39 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 5 percent, to $7.84 per MMBtu. · The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 23) at $7.621 per MMBtu, falling 51 cents or 6.3 percent since Wednesday, January 16. · Natural gas in storage was 2,536 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 18, which is 7.4 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007).

452

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 12, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 4, 2011) Wholesale natural gas prices at market locations in the lower 48 States moved higher this week as cold weather persisted in some consuming regions. Prices also increased at the beginning of the report week as the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released data (on April 28) showing the refill of storage inventories following last winter has proceeded slower than in recent years. During the report week (April 27-May 4), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.24 to $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices

453

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2008 8, 2008 Next Release: September 4, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 20, to Wednesday, August 27) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, August 20-27), as tropical storm Gustav appeared to be heading into the Gulf of Mexico and industry initiated precautionary safety measures likely to result in the evacuation of offshore Gulf of Mexico platforms. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.53 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $8.55. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of declining prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. Early in the report week, the price of the near-term contract (September 2008) had

454

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 8, 2010) Price changes during the week were mixed, but in most areas, these changes were moderate. The Henry Hub price rose slightly from $3.73 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, September 1, to $3.81 per MMBtu yesterday. The report week was shortened due to the Labor Day holiday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the October 2010 futures contract rose about 5 cents, from $3.762 per MMBtu on September 1 to $3.814 per MMBtu on September 8. Working natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 3, was 3,164 Bcf, following an implied net injection of 58 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s

455

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2008 0, 2008 Next Release: July 17, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices declined sharply this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, July 2-9), with the largest decreases generally occurring in consuming regions in the Northeast and Midwest. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.22 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.09. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After the August 2008 contract reached a daily settlement price of $13.578 per MMBtu (a record high for this contract) on July 3, the price decreased by $1.57 per MMBtu over the next three trading sessions and ended the week

456

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. , 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 8, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 30, 2009) Since Wednesday, September 23, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations, with decreases generally ranging between 10 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 19 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $3.24 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, September 30, at $4.84 per MMBtu, increasing by 9 cents or about 2 percent during the report week. The contract for October delivery expired on September 28 at $3.73 per MMBtu, increasing nearly 70 cents per MMBtu or 21 percent during its

457

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, to Wednesday, February 13) 6, to Wednesday, February 13) Released: February 14, 2008 Next release: February 21, 2008 · Since Wednesday, February 6, natural gas spot prices increased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 41 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 5 percent, to $8.35 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 13) at $8.388 per MMBtu, climbing 39 cents or about 5 percent since Wednesday, February 6. · Natural gas in storage was 1,942 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 8, which is 5.9 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil climbed $6.12 per barrel on the week to $93.28 per barrel or $16.08 per MMBtu.

458

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) November 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) Since Wednesday, October 27, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub declined 86 cents, or about 11 percent, to $7.26 per MMBtu. Yesterday (November 3), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $8.752 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 2 cents since last Wednesday (October 27). Natural gas in storage was 3,293 Bcf as of October 29, which is 7.8 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.62 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week to $50.90 per barrel or $8.776 per MMBtu.

459

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: April 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 25, 2009) Spot prices increased at all trading locations this week, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. Many market locations ended the week with spot prices above $4 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.38 to $4.13 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased, climbing by $0.65 to $4.329 for the April 2009 contract. Prices for the April 2009 contract reached their highest levels since February 13, 2009, on March 24. Natural gas in storage was 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

460

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 25, 2007) 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 25, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased since Wednesday, October 10, at nearly all market locations. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.32 per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $7.11 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub rose 45 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $7.458 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, October 12, was 3,375 Bcf, which is 6.7 percent above the 5-year average. Despite the seemingly favorable supply conditions and little weather-related natural gas demand, natural gas prices continued their upward movement of the past 6 weeks. The Henry Hub spot price exceeded the $7-per MMBtu mark in this week's trading for the first time in 2 months. One factor in the recent run-up in prices may be the relatively low imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to the Lower 48 States. LNG imports have averaged less than 1 Bcf per day during the first half of October, based on the sendout data published on companies' websites. LNG cargoes instead are heading to Europe and Asia, where buyers continue to purchase LNG at much higher prices than have prevailed in U.S. markets. A likely influence on natural gas prices is the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which reached yet another record high on Tuesday, but decreased slightly during yesterday's trading to $87.19 per barrel or $15.03 per MMBtu. On the week, however, the WTI increased $5.89 per barrel or about 7 percent.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Lower prices and a report of another considerable net injection to stocks were featured in last week's gas markets. As of Friday, May 11, 2001, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.24 from the previous Friday to $4.25 per MMBtu. The NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.212 for the week to $4.278 per MMBtu. A record-setting 108 Bcf was added to natural gas stocks for the week ended May 4, 2001. The demand for cooling is still somewhat limited as mild temperatures prevailed around most of the country. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Prices Mid-week prices were at the lowest level since early August. Even with an end-of-the-week influence from the futures market that caused a slight upturn, spot prices at the major supply hubs were $0.25 to $0.65 cents per MMBtu lower on a week-to-week basis with Katy, Texas ending at $4.23; the Henry Hub, Louisiana at $4.25; Midcon, Oklahoma at $4.11; and Opal, Wyoming at $3.30. Prices at the Chicago and New York citygates were lower as well, registering $4.35 and $4.65 at week's end, off a respective $0.27 and $0.20 per MMBtu for the week. SoCal provided the only exception to the generally lower trend as demand increased because of warmer temperatures. Natural gas prices receded before temperatures did, though. The effect of unscheduled maintenance on the PG&E Gas Transmission system was imperceptible to PG&E's large-volume purchasers. By Friday, the PG&E customers were paying $3.51 less at $4.18 while SoCal's citygate price was only $0.47 lower at $11.92.

462

Introduction to Futures Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Chicago. To reduce their risk exposure, grain dealers began selling ?To Arrive? contracts, which specified the future date (usually the month) a speci- fied quantity of grain would be delivered to a particular location at a price identified... in the contract. Fixing the price in advance of deliv- ery reduced the grain dealer?s risk and made it easier to obtain credit to finance grain purchas- es from farmers. The ?To Arrive? contracts were a forerunner of the futures contracts traded today. Although...

Mintert, James R.; Welch, Mark

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

463

Future Climate Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this report provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the following reports: ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]), ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504]), ''Features, Events, and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170012]), and ''Features, Events, and Processes in SZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170013]). Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one available forecasting method for establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The selection of different methods is directly dependent on the available evidence used to build a forecasting argument. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. While alternative analyses are possible for the case presented for Yucca Mountain, the evidence (data) used would be the same and the conclusions would not be expected to drastically change. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Other alternative approaches could include simulation of climate over the 10,000-year period; however, this modeling extrapolation is well beyond the bounds of current scientific practice and would not provide results with better confidence. A corroborative alternative approach may be found in ''Future Climate Analysis-10,000 Years to 1,000,000 Years After Present'' (Sharpe 2003 [DIRS 161591]). The current revision of this report is prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]).

C. G. Cambell

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

464

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Notice: Holiday Notice: Due to the federal holiday in observance of Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 21, 2002, the next issue of the Natural Gas Weekly Update will be published on Tuesday, January 22, 2002. Overview: Monday, January 14, 2002 Natural gas prices were generally lower last week as the fundamentals of ample working gas in storage and very little temperature-driven swing demand dominated the market. With little in the way of market-changing developments, trading in both the spot and futures markets tended to occur in relatively small price ranges throughout the week. The warming trend begun late in the previous week continued nearly unabated through last week, with the heavy gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast recording many of the greatest deviations above daily normal temperatures. Philadelphia, New York City, and Buffalo, NY had at least 3 days of temperatures that were 10 or more degrees above normal; Chicago's temperature reached an unusually warm 26 degrees above normal on Wednesday. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Spot prices at the Henry Hub moved down moderately from the previous week, ending trading on Friday at $2.31, down 5 cents from the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub declined by $0.071 from the previous Friday, settling on Friday, January 11 at $2.204 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil also fell, dipping below $20 per barrel for the first time in the New Year, ending trading last Friday at $19.67 per barrel, or $3.39 per MMBtu, down $1.80 per barrel, or $0.31 per MMBtu, from Friday, January 4.

466

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

467

Future of Optical Astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... I BELIEVE that optical astronomy in Great Britain has now reached, for virtually the first time in its history, ... studied in universities and in Government and industrial laboratories; but with two exceptions, optical astronomy is studied almost entirely in university laboratories only, and its future largely depends on ...

D. E. BLACKWELL

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Quantum motor and future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a popular language, the possibilities of the Casimir expulsion effect are presented, which can be the basis of quantum motors. Such motors can be in the form of a special multilayer thin film with periodic and complex nanosized structures. Quantum motors of the type of the Casimir platforms can be the base of transportation, energy and many other systems in the future.

Fateev, Evgeny G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Quantum motor and future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a popular language, the possibilities of the Casimir expulsion effect are presented, which can be the basis of quantum motors. Such motors can be in the form of a special multilayer thin film with periodic and complex nanosized structures. Quantum motors of the type of the Casimir platforms can be the base of transportation, energy and many other systems in the future.

Evgeny G. Fateev

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

470

Simulation in the future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seven panelists, all simulation consultants, give their view of the future of simulation. There is some consistency in the views with four areas being mentioned by three of the panelists, and four areas being mentioned by two of the panelists. However, ...

Jerry Banks

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Food for the Future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...harnessing free sources of energy, includ-ing the...volcanoes, and thermal gradients of the...exchangers, wind converters, and tide tur-bines...with quantities of energy of the magnitude...Fresh Water from the Ocean (Con-servation...P. C. Putnam, Energy in the Future (Van...

J. G. Harrar

1955-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

472

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 25, 2013 March 25, 2013 Image of how methane hydrates can form in arctic and marine environments. | Illustration by the Energy Department. Data from Alaska Test Could Help Advance Methane Hydrate R&D Methane Hydrates present an enormous energy resource. The Energy Department is working to advance technologies and reap the possible benefits for a more secure energy future. March 22, 2013 ARPA-E Announces $40 Million for Research Projects to Develop Cleaner and Cheaper Transportation Choices for Consumers Two New ARPA-E Programs Will Engage Nation's Brightest Scientists, Engineers and Entrepreneurs in Research Competition to Improve Vehicle Manufacturing Techniques and Natural Gas Conversion January 10, 2013 Today shale gas accounts for about 25 percent of our natural gas production. And experts believe this abundant supply will mean lower energy costs for millions of families; fewer greenhouse gas emissions; and more American jobs. | Photo courtesy of the EIA.

473

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

474

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

475

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

476

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

477

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

478

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

479

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

480

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures near-month" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

482

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

483

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

484

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

485

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

486

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

487

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

488

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

490

Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Natural gas from methane hydrate has the potential to play a major role in ensuring adequate future energy supplies in the US. The worldwide volume of gas in the hydrate state has been estimated to be approximately 1.5 x 10^16 m^3 (Makogon 1984). More than...

Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

491

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.194 2.268 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.360 2.318 2.252 2.250 2.305 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.470 2.246 2.359 2.417 2.528 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.554 2.639 2.585 2.383 2.369 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.347 2.411 2.358 2.374 2.356 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.252 2.253 2.345 2.385 2.418 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.296 2.232 2.248 2.292 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.208 2.180 2.171 2.146 2.188 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.167 2.196 2.156 2.116 2.096 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.050 2.104 2.163 2.124 2.103 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.055 2.107 2.077 1.981 2.072 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.066 2.062 2.058 2.075 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.144 2.069 2.097 2.085 2.066 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.068 2.089 2.131 2.163 2.187

492

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.347 2.355 2.109 2.111 1.941 2.080 1.963 1.693 1.619 1.721 1.771 1.700 1995 1.426 1.439 1.534 1.660 1.707 1.634 1.494 1.557 1.674 1.790 1.961 2.459 1996 2.483 2.458 2.353 2.309 2.283 2.544 2.521 2.049 1.933 2.481 3.023 3.645 1997 3.067 2.065 1.899 2.005 2.253 2.161 2.134 2.462 2.873 3.243 3.092 2.406 1998 2.101 2.263 2.253 2.465 2.160 2.168 2.147 1.855 2.040 2.201 2.321 1.927 1999 1.831 1.761 1.801 2.153 2.272 2.346 2.307 2.802 2.636 2.883 2.549 2.423 2000 2.385 2.614 2.828 3.028 3.596 4.303 3.972 4.460 5.130 5.079 5.740 8.618 2001 7.825 5.675 5.189 5.189 4.244 3.782 3.167 2.935 2.213 2.618 2.786 2.686