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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix A.1 Natural Gas Price Data for Futures Market andSTEO Error A.1 Natural Gas Price Data for Futures Market andforecasts for natural gas prices as reported by the Energy

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Arbitrage free cointegrated models in gas and oil future markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we present a continuous time model for natural gas and crude oil future prices. Its main feature is the possibility to link both energies in the long term and in the short term. For each energy, the future returns are represented as the sum of volatility functions driven by motions. Under the risk neutral probability, the motions of both energies are correlated Brownian motions while under the historical probability, they are cointegrated by a Vectorial Error Correction Model. Our approach is equivalent to defining the market price of risk. This model is free of arbitrage: thus, it can be used for risk management as well for option pricing issues. Calibration on European market data and numerical simulations illustrate well its behavior.

Benmenzer, Grégory; Jérusalem, Céline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Update on Petroleum, Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline.of the Market for Natural Gas Futures. Energy Journal 16 (Modeling Forum. 2003. Natural Gas, Fuel Diversity and North

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

U.S. Natural Gas Markets: Recent Trends and Prospects for the Future  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The purpose of this study is to examine recent trends and prospects for the future of the U.S. natural gas market. Natural gas prices rose dramatically in 2000 and remained high through the first part of 2001, raising concerns about the future of natural gas prices and potential for natural gas to fuel the growth of the U.S. economy. Pages

Andy S. Kydes

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy futures markets are ‘hubs’ that price and marketenergy price fluctuations. In theory, futures market pricesenergy prices, including most prominently, energy futures markets.

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Future power market shares of coal, natural gas generators depend ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas combined-cycle capacity represented only 7% of total capacity in the region in 2011, but is projected to rise to 11% in 2040 in the Reference Case.

7

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and imports U.S. electricity and gas markets includingrepresentation of electricity and natural gas markets,initially to conduct electricity restructuring analysis in

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy price fluctuations. In theory, futures market prices summarize privately available informationEnergy; Brookhaven National Laboratory Canadian Energy Research Institute U.S. Energy Information Administration Energy Marketsinformation about future energy prices, including most prominently, energy futures markets.

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information about natural gas supply and demand. As amarket Calibrating natural gas supply and demand conditionsnation-wide natural gas market, equalizing supply with

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about natural gas supply and demand. As a result, someCalibrating natural gas supply and demand conditions withelectricity and natural gas markets, demand-side management

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models andFutures Markets  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this article is to compare the accuracy of forecasts for natural gas prices as reported by the Energy Information Administration's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) and the futures market for the period from 1998 to 2003. The analysis tabulates the existing data and develops a statistical comparison of the error between STEO and U.S. wellhead natural gas prices and between Henry Hub and U.S. wellhead spot prices. The results indicate that, on average, Henry Hub is a better predictor of natural gas prices with an average error of 0.23 and a standard deviation of 1.22 than STEO with an average error of -0.52 and a standard deviation of 1.36. This analysis suggests that as the futures market continues to report longer forward prices (currently out to five years), it may be of interest to economic modelers to compare the accuracy of their models to the futures market. The authors would especially like to thank Doug Hale of the Energy Information Administration for supporting and reviewing this work.

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market and STEO Error Forecast Error from 1998 to 2003 (2 Futures Market and STEO Error Forecast Error from 1998to 2003 (Months 13- Forecast from 1998 to 2003 (Months 1-12)

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

A statistical analysis of the natural gas futures market : the interplay of sentiment, volatility and prices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper attempts to understand the price dynamics of the North American natural gas market through a statistical survey that includes an analysis of the… (more)

Fazzio, Thomas J. (Thomas Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

index.html. Appendix A.1 Natural Gas Price Data for FuturesError STEO Error A.1 Natural Gas Price Data for Futuresof forecasts for natural gas prices as reported by the

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A statistical analysis of the natural gas futures market : the interplay of sentiment, volatility and prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper attempts to understand the price dynamics of the North American natural gas market through a statistical survey that includes an analysis of the variables influencing the price and volatility of this energy ...

Fazzio, Thomas J. (Thomas Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

LNG price parity with oil clouds future of European gas market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Europe's international gas trade may have to mark time while the gas industry determines whether the fuel can remain competitive in the wake of Algeria's recent political victory - a high price for its LNG exports to France. Potential gas buyers will face sellers seeking to emulate the $5.10/million Btu price level. The latest conflict, between Algeria and Italy, is preventing start-up of the completed trans-Mediterranean pipeline. Large gas-price increases across Europe would prompt bulk steam-raisers to move to other fuels; the premium household and commercial markets would not be able to absorb the surplus. If the trend of LNG price parity with crude continues, gas could lose a substantial share of its European market and LNG projects will continue to be abandoned.

Vielvoye, R.

1982-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

17

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All U.S. energy markets including exports and imports U.S.Energy Markets All U.S. energy markets including imports andenergy markets All U.S. energy markets including imports and

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory Canadian Energy Research Institute U.S.Administration Energy Markets All U.S. energy marketsAll Canadian and U.S. energy markets All U.S. energy markets

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the forecast. In 1978 the Natural Gas Policy Act was passedof Other Natural Gas Price Forecasts Researchers and policyresearchers and policy makers who utilize natural gas prices

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

against the risk of energy price fluctuations. In theory,The poor track record of energy price forecasting models hasof information about future energy prices, including most

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Natural Gas Futures Market  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presentation by James Todaro, February 2001, to the Bangladesh Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources

Information Center

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Futures oil market outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We expect the broader expansion of global economic activity in 1995 to more than offset the anticipated slowdown in the US economic growth. This should result in worldwide oil demand growth in excess of 1 million barrels per day and firmer oil prices. This comes on the heels of nearly identical growth in 1994 and should be followed by an even larger increase in 1996. This year`s demand growth comes against a backdrop of flat OPEC production and an increase in non-OPEC supplies that will fall short of the expected increase in consumption. Some degree of political upheaval in at least a half dozen important oil exporting nations could also have implication for crude supplies. One major wildcard that remains for global oil markets is the status of the United Nations` sanctions on Iraqi exports and the timing of when these sanctions are to be eased or lifted completely.

Saucer, J. [Smith Barney, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Noncommercial Trading in the Energy Futures Market  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

How do futures markets affect spot market prices? This is one of the most pervasive questions surrounding futures markets, and it has been analyzed in numerous ways for many commodities.

Information Center

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Signposts of Change in Evolving Natural Gas Markets: Key Factors Affecting Expected Future Supply and Demand for Natural Gas in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the North American natural gas industry has undergone a major restructuring as a result of the so-called “shale revolution.” This is an amazing situation when one considers the magnitude of the changes the shale revolution has spurred not only in domestic natural gas markets, but across many sectors of the overall economy. In essence, the shale revolution is a “black swan” event that many industry observers consider to have been a once in more than ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

25

Economics and regulation of petroleum futures markets  

SciTech Connect

Because the futures market in petroleum products is a relatively recent phenomenon, the implications of public policies formulated for that market have not yet been fully explored. To provide the Office of Competition of the Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to assess policy alternatives, Resource Planning Associates, Inc. (RPA) was asked to analyze the development of the futures market in No. 2 oil, assess the potential for futures markets in other petroleum products, and identify policy alternatives available to DOE. To perform this analysis, the criteria for a viable futures market was established first. Then, the experience to date with the 18-month-old futures market in No. 2 oil was examined, and the potential for viable futures markets in No. 6 oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and crude oil was assessed. Finally, how existing DOE regulations and prospective actions might affect petroleum futures market development was investigated.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................. 36 Figure 28: LNG Flows from Terminal year. · Delivery of natural gas was expected from proposed LNG facilities on the east and west coasts.S. electricity demand. Future LNG supply could be affected by construction and expansion of LNG terminals

27

Global Natural Gas Market Trends, 2. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides an overview of major trends occurring in the natural gas industry and includes a concise look at the drivers behind recent rapid growth in gas usage and the challenges faced in meeting that growth. Topics covered include: an overview of Natural Gas including its history, the current market environment, and its future market potential; an analysis of the overarching trends that are driving a need for change in the Natural Gas industry; a description of new technologies being developed to increase production of Natural Gas; an evaluation of the potential of unconventional Natural Gas sources to supply the market; a review of new transportation methods to get Natural Gas from producing to consuming countries; a description of new storage technologies to support the increasing demand for peak gas; an analysis of the coming changes in global Natural Gas flows; an evaluation of new applications for Natural Gas and their impact on market sectors; and, an overview of Natural Gas trading concepts and recent changes in financial markets.

NONE

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Future of natural gas supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides many data for the web reader and only some graphs will be presented at the conference.-World-production of natural gas (NG) Reliable data s very difficult to get, as very often the data does not specify if it is gross or gross minus reinjected or marketed, wet or dry values. The loss is usually hidden. Nonhydrocarbons gases are important in some fields. Production data varies from sources for what is called marketed World Production marketed 2001 2002

Jean Laherrere

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Global Natural Gas Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the characteristics of global gas markets. These markets have entered a period of supplier strength and high prices as global demand growth has outpaced supply growth. The report systematically evaluates developments in global liquefaction andfor the principal consuming nationsin domestic production, market growth, pipelines, and regasification. While containing a great deal of detail, the report probes myriad announcements of commercial activities to help interpret the evolving comp...

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

30

Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ Fossil backed by a growing portfolio of assets. #12;Shale Gas Geography 5 | MARCELLUS SHALE COALITION #12;Shale Permits Price #12;Pricing Trend of Oil and Gas in the US $- $5.00 $10.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00 USDper

Lee, Dongwon

31

Price distortions in the commodity futures markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Speculation is not monolithic; it comes in many forms. A certain level of speculation is required for commodity futures markets to function. On the other hand, certain types of trading activities by speculators may damage ...

Helfrich, Devin B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

U.S. Natural Gas Markets: Mid-Term Prospects for Natural Gas Supply  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This service report describes the recent behavior of natural gas markets with respect to natural gas prices, their potential future behavior, the potential future supply contribution of liquefied natural gas and increased access to Federally restricted resources, and the need for improved natural gas data.

Philip Budzik

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Future Contracts and Options Commodity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the concurrent use of both cash and futures markets · Consider the case of a flour mill which has made heavy forward sales of flour, that requires more uncommitted wheat that the mill owns. ­ to hedge these flour sales, the mill needs to secure more wheat contracts in future when there is enough resources from

Boisvert, Jeff

34

Future gas consumption in the United States. [Monograph  

SciTech Connect

The ninth biennial market report on consumption and forecasts of future demand provides a planning tool for consumers and government officials as well as for the natural-gas industry. The report summarizes the actual 1980 consumption by market sector, notes changes in consumption patterns and market restrictions, and presents an operational forecast of sales to each sector through 1995 and in each of eleven regions surveyed by the Gas Requirements Committee. 9 references, 4 figures, 11 tables. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

North American Natural Gas Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Natural Gas Market Outlook: Through 2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Market Outlook: Through 2020. Continued optimism about market growth (32 Tcf in 2020) Increasing wellhead prices to $2.81 Mcf ($98) in 2020

37

Natural Gas Marketed Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wellhead Price Marketed Production Period: Monthly Annual Wellhead Price Marketed Production Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 2,085,518 2,166,183 2,097,434 2,188,208 2,188,379 2,104,808 1973-2013 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 116,480 112,975 102,113 109,113 102,493 105,284 1997-2013 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 1989-2013 Alaska 29,725 27,904 25,445 23,465 23,613 25,916 1989-2013 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 California NA NA NA NA NA NA 1989-2013 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 1989-2013 Florida NA NA NA NA NA NA 1989-2013

38

Northeast Natural Gas Market in 2030  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

LNG imports have grown substantially in recent years and they are expected to grow sevenfold by 2030. A review of the industry and infrastructure in the Northeast shows a region with limited indigenous production, so the region relies on flows into the area for most of the natural gas it consumes. A key source of supply is the LNG import terminal located in Everett, Massachusetts, which provides about 20 percent of regional supply. The United States needs additional LNG imports to meet future natural gas demand, however, building new LNG terminals in the Northeast or elsewhere involves a number of tradeoffs that will depend on energy markets and local acceptance.

Information Center

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

1 Regulation of Gas Marketing Activities in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study linking the Mexican market for natural gas with the North American market and the implications of these links on efficient marketing of gas in Mexico. We argue that PEMEX should be permitted to enter into spot contracts or future contracts to sell gas, however, the price of gas should always be the net back price based on the Houston Ship Channel at the time of delivery. PEMEX should not be permitted to discount the price of gas from the Houston netback price even in a nondiscriminatory fashion. This arrangement is transparent, it is easy to enforce and does not eliminate any legitimate market options for any of the parties involved. PEMEX or consumers of gas can use the Houston market for hedging of speculative transactions.

Dagobert L. Brito; Juan Rosellon; Mexico D. F

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Pipeline constraints in wholesale natural gas markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Natural gas markets in the United States depend on an extensive network of pipelines to transport gas from production fields to end users. While these… (more)

Avalos, Roger George.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Gas turbines for the future  

SciTech Connect

Utility gas turbine technology has been advancing fairly rapidly, one reason being that it shares in the benefits of the research and development for aviation gas turbines. In general, turbine progress is characterized by large, incremental advances in performance. At intervals of approx. 15 yr, new-generation turbines are introduced, refined, and eventually installed in relatively large numbers. A new generation of turbines is being readied for the market that will have power ratings into the 130- to 150-MW range (simple cycle), significantly higher than the 70 to 100 MW now in service. When the new turbines are installed in combined-cycle plants, the efficiency levels are expected to rise from the present value of approx. 42% higher heating value to approx. 46%.

Cohn, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Market Design Analysis Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Market Design Analysis Tool OBJECTIVE Power market design plays a critical role in the outcomes related to power system reliability and market efficiency. However, translation of market rules/designs into the complex mathematical market clearing mechanism is not a trivial

43

Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Marketed Production ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

44

Market failures and government policies in gas markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This memorandum analyses the fundamental characteristics of the natural gas market and its consequences for government policies. In the past, the European gas market was dominated by state-owned monopolists but since the start of the liberalisation, privatisation and re-regulation in the early 1990s, the market has fundamentally changed. Nevertheless, governments are still involved in the gas industry, not only in gas exporting countries such as Russia, but also in a country like the Netherlands where the government has imposed a cap on production from the main gas field (Groningen) as well as owns shares in the main wholesale trader (Gasunie Trade & Supply) which has the obligation to accept all gas offered by producers on the small fields. In the main report of this project we present a cost-benefit analysis of the Dutch gas-depletion policy. In this memorandum we explore the natural-gas market more broadly, looking for factors why government intervention may be needed using the welfare-economic approach according to which government intervention should be based on the presence of market failures. After a brief description of the main characteristics of the gas industry, we systematically analyse sources of market failures, such as geopolitical factors, economies of scale and externalities, and finally go into the question which policy options may be chosen to address those market failures.

Machiel Mulder; Gijsbert Zwart

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Market Analysis for Natural Gas Compression Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas compression market offers huge growth potential for the electric utility industry. As utilities search for ways to expand electricity sales, a combination of economic, environmental, and regulatory factors are further encouraging the use of electric motors in a market that has long been dominated by gas-driven systems. This report provides information and strategies that can help utilities capture a larger share of the gas compression market.

1997-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Northeast Natural Gas Market in 2030  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9/27/2006: The Northeast Natural Gas Market in 2030. This presentation contains content that your browser may not be able to show properly.

47

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

48

Energy Efficiency and Emerging Markets for Greenhouse Gas Trading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy industry is evolving into a competitive and globally integrated commodity market. The development of the Ozone Transport Commission NOx market has closely followed that of the SO2 market. The cost of these commodities has become an important economic input into the generation of electricity in the United States. The commoditization of the Greenhouse Gases will likely develop in a similar fashion but on a global scale, becoming another economic input into electricity generation. It will be critical to the future competitiveness of each energy related company to closely monitor the Greenhouse Gas Market.

Ferguson, M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

h presentation slides: Natural Gas and hydrogen Infrastructure opportunities: markets and Barriers to Growth Matt Most, Encana Natural Gas 1 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl...

50

Economics of EV Market/Future of EV Industry | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economics of EV MarketFuture of EV Industry Economics of EV MarketFuture of EV Industry Economics of EV MarketFuture of EV Industry Economics of EV MarketFuture of EV Industry...

51

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

longer-term market-based forecasts that can be used to more-AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Priceslong-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Natural Gas Market Regionalization and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas producers, pipeline companies, electric utilities, and other end users all have a stake in understanding the dynamics of regional gas prices. This is especially true with evolving linkages between natural gas and power prices. This report addresses problems that appeared in the natural gas market during the winter of 1995/96 and again in 1996/97 when regional gas prices departed dramatically from their historic norms. Are regional gas price relationships becoming increasingly unpredictable?

1998-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

53

Advanced fuel cells and their future market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advantages of fuel cells over competing technologies are outlined. These include higher fuel-efficiency (and thus lower fuel costs) and financial credits that may help reduce the effective introductory capital costs and thus help broaden the market. The credits for fuel cells result from their modularity, relative independence of efficiency on size and load, dispersibility, and rapid installation time. The fuel cell of primary interest in the United States and Japan is the PAFC (whose operation is limited by materials problems to ca. 200{degrees}C), because it is the most highly developed for use with natural gas or clean light distillate fuels. Competing fuel cell (FC) technologies are the alkaline fuel cell (AFC, limited to 80{degrees}C if inexpensive construction materials are used), the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC, 650{degrees}C), and the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC, 1000{degrees}C). The author focuses on the MCFC in this paper.

Appleby, A.J. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production...

55

Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade...

56

South Dakota Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic...

57

Natural Gas Market Centers: A 2008 Update  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report looks at the current status of market centers in today's natural gas marketplace, examining their role and their importance to natural gas shippers, pipelines, and others involved in the transportation of natural gas over the North American pipeline network.

Information Center

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

58

Noise Traders, Market Sentiment, and Futures Price Behavior by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The noise trader sentiment model of De Long, Shleifer, Summers, and Waldmann (1990a) is applied to futures markets. The theoretical results predict that overly optimistic (pessimistic) noise traders result in market prices that are greater (less) than fundamental value. Thus, returns can be predicted using the level of noise trader sentiment. The null rational expectations hypothesis is tested against the noise trader alternative using a commercial market sentiment index as a proxy for noise trader sentiment. Fama-MacBeth cross-sectional regressions test if noise traders create a systematic bias in futures prices. The time-series predictability of futures returns using known sentiment levels is tested in a Cumby-Modest market timing framework and a more general causality specification. The empirical results lead to the following conclusions. First, there is no evidence that noise trader sentiment creates a systematic bias in futures prices. Second, predictable market returns using noise trader sentiment is not characteristic of futures markets in general. Third, futures market returns at weekly intervals are characterized by low-order positive autocorrelation with relatively small autoregressive parameters. In those instances where there is evidence of noise trader effects, it is at best limited to isolated markets and particular specifications. Noise Traders, Market Sentiment, and Futures Price Behavior

Dwight R. S; Scott H. Irwin; Raymond M. Leuthold; Dwight R. S; Ers Is Manager

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Recent Natural Gas Market Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

sectors U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Volumes and prices for pipeline and LNG imports and exports Underground Natural Gas Storage - Stocks of working and base gas...

60

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:29:02 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9050NM2" "Date","New Mexico...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Natural Gas Market Centers: A 2008 Update  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas - April 2009 1 Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas - April 2009 1 Natural gas market centers first began to develop in the late 1980s following the implementation of the initial open- access transportation initiative under the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) Order 436 (1985). 1 Market centers since have become a key component of the North American natural gas transportation network (see box, "Market Center Development"). Located at strategic points on the pipeline grid, these centers offer essential transportation service for shippers between pipeline interconnections, as well as provide these shippers with many of the physical and administrative support services formerly handled by the natural gas pipeline company as "bundled" sales services.

62

Solar future: 1978. [Market forecast to 1992  

SciTech Connect

The growth in sales of solar heating equipment is discussed. Some forecasts are made for the continued market growth of collectors, pool systems, and photovoltaics. (MOW)

Butt, S.H.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Excessive Speculation and Market Manipulation The Guar Futures Trading Fiasco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent guar trading scandal gives a peek into the murky world of Indian commodity futures markets and reveals how commodity exchanges are acting like casinos for speculators, moving away from their avowed objectives of price discovery and price risk management in an efficient and orderly manner. Guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) is a drought resistant crop grown mainly in Rajasthan and parts of Haryana and Punjab. The sowing season for guar seed begins in July and the crop is ready for harvesting in October. Most guar farmers sell their produce to traders at the farm gate and nearby markets. A part of produce is also kept by farmers for seed, animal feed and fodder purposes. India is the largest producer of guar seed in the world and accounts for 80 percent of the world’s total guar seed production. Guar gum, extracted from guar seed, is used as a thickening agent and additive in food products such as soups and ice-creams. Of late, the global demand for guar gum is growing rapidly because of its use in “hydraulic fracking ” process to extract oil and gas from shale. Almost 80 percent of country’s total production is exported to US, China and Europe. Considered as a narrow commodity due to its limited potential for cultivation in peculiar agroclimatic conditions, the total area under guar seed production was 2.9 million hectares in 2011. The prices of guar seed and guar gum vary from year to year depending on the monsoon conditions. Since 2004, guar seed and guar gum contracts are being traded in the Indian commodity futures markets.

Strong Export

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Wind Generation in the Future Competitive California Power Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to develop improved methods for assessing the viability of wind generation in competitive electricity markets. The viability of a limited number of possible wind sites is assessed using a geographic information system (GIS) to determine the cost of development, and Elfin, an electric utility production costing and capacity expansion model, to estimate the possible revenues and profits of wind farms at the sites. This approach improves on a simple profitability calculation by using a site-specific development cost calculation and by taking the effect of time varying market prices on revenues into account. The first component of the work is to develop data characterizing wind resources suitable for use in production costing and capacity expansion models, such as Elfin, that are capable of simulating competitive electricity markets. An improved representation of California wind resources is built, using information collected by the California Energy Commission (CE C) in previous site evaluations, and by using a GIS approach to estimating development costs at 36 specific sites. These sites, which have been identified as favorable for wind development, are placed on Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs) and development costs are calculated based on distances to roads and transmission lines. GIS is also used to develop the potential capacity at each site by making use of the physical characteristics of the terrain, such as ridge lengths. In the second part of the effort, using a previously developed algorithm for simulating competitive entry to the California electricity market, the Elfin model is used to gauge the viability of wind farms at the 36 sites. The results of this exercise are forecasts of profitable development levels at each site and the effects of these developments on the electricity system as a whole. Under best guess assumptions, including prohibition of new nuclear and coal capacity, moderate increase in gas prices and some decline in renewable capital costs, about 7.35 GW of the 10 GW potential capacity at the 36 specific sites is profitably developed and 62 TWh of electricity produced per annum by the year 2030. Most of the development happens during the earlier years of the forecast. Sensitivity of these results to future gas price scenarios is also presented. This study also demonstrates that an analysis based on a simple levelized profitability calculation approach does not sufficiently capture the implications of time varying prices in a competitive market.

Sezgen, O.; Marnay, C.; Bretz, S.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Managing electricity reliability risk through the futures markets  

SciTech Connect

In competitive electricity markets, the vertically integrated utilities that were responsible for ensuring system reliability in their own service territories, or groups of territories, often cease to exist. Typically, the burden falls to an independent system operator (ISO) to insure that enough ancillary services (AS) are available for safe, stable, and reliable operation of the grid, typically defined, in part, as compliance with officially approved engineering specifications for minimum levels of AS. In order to characterize the behavior of market participants (generators, retailers, and an ISO) in a competitive electricity market with reliability requirements, we model a spot market for electricity and futures markets for both electricity and AS. By assuming that each participant seeks to maximize its expected utility of wealth and that all markets clear, we solve for the optional quantities of electricity and AS traded in each market by all participants, as well as the corresponding market-clearing prices. We show that future prices for both electricity and AS depend on expectations of the spot price, statistical aspects of system demand, and production cost parameters. More important, our model captures the fact that electricity and AS are substitute products for the generators, implying that anticipated changes in the spot market will affect the equilibrium futures positions of both electricity and AS. We apply our model to the California electricity and AS markets to test its viability.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices, An  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article compares realized Henry Hub spot market prices for natural gas during the three most recent winters with futures prices as they evolve from April through the following February, when trading for the March contract ends.

Lejla Alic

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Natural Gas Industry and Markets  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2004 and is intended as a supplement to the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Natural Gas Annual 2004 (NGA). Unless otherwise stated, all data and figures in this report are based on summary statistics published in the NGA 2004.

Information Center

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

68

Gas marketing: Does size equal survival?  

SciTech Connect

The thought is enough to make many homeowners cringe: competing natural gas marketers calling them at home in the evening, pushing their brands and services much like AT and T, MCI and Sprint hawk long-distance telephone service today. Another thought is enough to make many gas marketers cringe: a half-dozen or fewer giant mega-marketers selling virtually all the natural gas in the US, and they and their company are not among them. Yet both thoughts are likely to become realities, say many in the natural gas industry. If so, each would represent an intriguing turn of events for the newest segment of the industry, one that barely existed 10 or 15 years ago. The paper discusses the recent history of the gas marketing sector, the changes taking place in the industry, and the biggest problem--the lack of a uniform electronic standard or bulletin board system for dispatching, nominating, and monitoring gas purchase as they move across the country.

Katz, M.G.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Managing Electricity Reliability Risk Through the Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-47645 Managing Electricity Reliability Risk Through the Futures Markets Afzal S. Siddiqui Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley for Operations Research and the Management Sciences INFORMS Annual Meeting in San Antonio, TX, November 2000

70

Agent-based competitive simulation: exploring future retail energy markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future sustainable energy systems will need efficient, clean, low-cost, renewable energy sources, as well as market structures that motivate sustainable behaviors on the part of households and businesses. "Smart grid" components can help consumers manage ...

Carsten Block; John Collins; Wolfgang Ketter

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Distributed Resources Strategic Review: Market Drivers Impacting Future Business Prospects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This strategic review analyzes and interprets the impact of utility industry restructuring and regulatory reform on the future market for distributed generation (DG) and, more broadly, distributed resources (DR).

1998-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

72

Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

120313 View History Spot Price Henry Hub 3.871 3.871 3.871 3.853 1997-2013 Futures Prices Contract 1 3.818 3.895 3.895 3.954 3.988 3.976 1994-2013 Contract 2 3.864 3.899 3.899...

73

47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Venezuela and Petrozuata (Conoco-Philips/PDVSA joint venture); Ecopetrol­ Colombia; PEMEX, Mexico ­ Colombia, Pipeline System 4 for PEMEX ­ Mexico. Have experience and background of oil/gas fields. Consulting and on-the-job solutions for Corrosion, Paraffin and Asphaltene Control of Pemex, Mexico; YPF

74

Volatility in natural gas and oil markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using daily futures price data, I examine the behavior of natural gas and crude oil price volatility since 1990. I test whether there has been a significant trend in volatility, whether there was a short-term increase in ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.0 2.75 1997-2012 NGL Composite 12.91 15.20 8.99 11.83 15.12 10.98 2007-2012 Futures Prices Contract 1 7.114 8.899 4.159 4.382 4.03 2.83 1994-2012 Contract 2 7.359 9.014 4.428...

77

Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

13 View History Spot Price Henry Hub 3.69 3.55 3.47 3.62 3.68 3.87 1997-2013 Futures Prices Contract 1 3.64 3.56 3.50 3.60 3.66 3.87 1994-2013 Contract 2 3.76 3.65 3.57 3.65 3.71...

78

Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.62 3.43 3.62 3.68 1997-2013 NGL Composite 9.48 9.06 9.57 10.21 2009-2013 Futures Prices Contract 1 4.07 3.81 3.64 3.41 3.62 3.65 1994-2013 Contract 2 4.11 3.82 3.64 3.45 3.70...

79

Deregulating UK Gas and Electricity Markets: How is Competition...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

markets, the effects of economic regulation on quality of service and the evolution of tariff structures in the gas and electricity markets. Catherine has advised economic...

80

National gas survey. Volume I, Chapter 9. Future domestic natural gas supplies. Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

This report presents four separate forecasts for the future gas supplies for the 1971--1990 period. The forecasts were prepared by the Federal Power Commission staff, and all forecasts are made with the assumption that the domestic market will be able to absorb all the gas that might become available during the specified period. Information is included for future available supplies from the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf as well as from conventional sources and from gas that might be produced as a result of stimulation of low-permeability reservoirs. The general assumptions used for the future gas supply projections are included in the appendix of the report. The data are presented in 65 separate tables and 14 figures. (BLM)

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

REVISED NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pipeline reverses and expands to allow the flow of regasified LNG from the Costa Azul LNG terminal in Baja natural gas LNG terminal in Southern California and one assuming dry hydro conditions. For all cases the "lower 48" states was expected to increase by 1.6 percent per year. · Proposed LNG facilities on the East

82

Natural gas market under the Natural Gas Policy Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This first of a series of analyses presents data on the exploration, development, production, and pricing of US natural gas since the passage of the Natural Gas Policy Act in 1978. Designed to give pricing incentives for new-well activity, the NGPA has apparently eliminated many of the pricing differences that existed between interstate and intrastate markets. Estimates of the annual production volumes in trillion CF/yr of gas for the categories defined by the NGPA include new gas 4.5, new onshore wells 4.1, high-cost unconventional gas 0.7, and stripper wells 0.4. Preliminary statistics on the end-use pricing of natural gas suggest that significant changes in the average wellhead prices have not caused correspondingly large increases in the price of delivered gas.

Carlson, M.; Ody, N.; O'Neill, R.; Rodekohr, M.; Shambaugh, P.; Thrasher, R.; Trapmann, W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Alabama--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

84

Calif--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Calif--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

85

Louisiana--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

86

Texas--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

87

6. State Regulators Promote Consumer Choice in Retail Gas Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends 113 6. State Regulators Promote Consumer Choice in Retail Gas Markets Restructur ...

88

Natural Gas Marketer Prices and Sales To Residential and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania natural gas choice market. The supplier must furnish a bond or other security in an amount ... natural gas prices were derived solely from LDCs who

89

Top 5 producing states' combined marketed natural gas output rose ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Combined marketed natural gas production from the top five natural gas producing states—Texas, Louisiana, Wyoming, Oklahoma, and Colorado—increased by about 7.5% ...

90

The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2004 Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, February 2006 1 This special report provides an overview of the ...

91

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal supply. The natural gas supply covers six categories:renewables, oil supply, natural gas supply, natural gasnation-wide natural gas market, equalizing supply with

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Shale Gas and the Outlook for U.S. Natural Gas Markets and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Shale Gas and the Outlook for U.S. Natural Gas Markets and Global Gas Resources ... Associated with oil Coalbed methane Net imports Non-associated ...

93

Future trends in oil and gas visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The question that this panel wishes to explore is: What are the future visualization trends and requirements for the oil and gas industry to efficiently handle and explore the ever-increasing volume and variety of available data?It has been proven many ...

Francine Evans; William Volz; Geoffrey Dorn; Bernd Fröhlich; David M Roberts

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

GTI online - matching gas technologies with global gas markets  

SciTech Connect

The International Centre for Gas Technology Information (ICGTI) is a technology information centre of the International Energy Agency (IEA). Its members account for more than half the world`s natural gas production and consumption. ICGTI has established a web site, GTI Online (http://www.icgti.org). GTI Online is designed to cover all aspects of the gas industry from production to end-use as well as supporting technologies, including market assessment, national energy policies, environmental information and computing and modeling techniques. It si designed to use existing information sources whenever possible, so as not to duplicate public and/or commercial efforts. It is intended to fill the gap in providing useful international information to both the US and global market.

Lang, M., Manor, D.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The U.S. Natural Gas Market in Focus  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tight gas . 26% . 21% . Flame - The U.S. Natural Gas Market in Focus, Howard Gruenspecht, April 17, 2012 . 13 . Oil to natural gas price ratio remains high over the ...

96

Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AC03- 76SF00098. The report “Easing the Natural Gas Crisis:Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increased Deployment ofRestoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

When Barriers to Markets Fail: Pipeline Deregulation, Spot Markets, and the Topology of the Natural Gas Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth in Unbundled Natural Gas Transportation Services:Mergers and their Potential Impact on Natural Gas Markets."Natural Gas Monthly, DOE/EIA-0525. \\Vashington, D.C. : U.S.

De Vany, Arthur; Walls, W. David

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Comparison of coal-based systems: marketability of medium-Btu gas and SNG (substitute natural gas) for industrial applications. Final report, July 1979-March 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In assessing the marketability of synthetic fuel gases from coal, this report emphasizes the determination of the relative attractiveness of substitute natural gas (SNG) and medium-Btu gas (MBG) for serving market needs in eight industrial market areas. The crucial issue in predicting the marketability of coal-based synthetic gas is the future price level of competing conventional alternatives, particularly oil. Under a low oil-price scenario, the market outlook for synthetic gases is not promising, but higher oil prices would encourage coal gasification.

Olsen, D.L.; Trexel, C.A.; Teater, N.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The development of a UK natural gas spot market  

SciTech Connect

The growth of a natural gas spot market in the United Kingdom (UK) is a radical innovation for the industry. Spot markets turned the oil industry inside out, and will do the same for gas. Such a development seemed all but impossible to gas industry experts three years ago. The role and likely form of a spot market are now at the center of current industry debate about the designing of a daily balancing regime to replace unitary management by British Gas. This paper examines parallels between the evolution of spot markets for oil in the 1980`s and the current UK gas industry. 12 refs., 1 fig.

Roeber, J. [Joe Roeber Associates, London (United Kingdom)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Future market for ceramics in vehicle engines and their impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ceramic engine components have potential to improve vehicle fuel economy. Some recent tests have also shown their environmental benefits, particularly in reducing particulate emissions in heavy-duty diesel engines. The authors used the data from a survey of the US vehicle engine and component manufacturers relating to ceramic engine components to develop a set of market penetration models. The survey identified promising ceramic components and provided data on the timing of achieving introductory shares in light and heavy-duty markets. Some ceramic components will penetrate the market when the pilot-scale costs are reduced to one-fifth of their current values, and many more will enter the market when the costs are reduced to one-tenth of the current values. An ongoing ceramics research program sponsored by the US Department of Energy has the goal of achieving such price reductions. The size and value of the future ceramic components market and the impacts of this market in terms of fuel savings, reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, and potential reduction in other criteria pollutants are presented. The future ceramic components market will be 9 million components worth $29 million within 5 years of introduction and will expand to 692 million components worth $3,484 million within 20 years. The projected annual energy savings are 3.8 trillion Btu by 5 years, increasing to 526 trillion Btu during the twentieth year. These energy savings will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 41 million tons during the twentieth year. Ceramic components will help reduce particulate emissions by 100 million tons in 2030 and save the nation`s urban areas $152 million. The paper presents the analytical approach and discusses other economic impacts.

Vyas, A.; Hanson, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research; Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research]|[Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Impact of Varying Natural Gas Prices on the Potential Distributed Resources Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of the potential market for distributed resources (DR) have typically assumed that long-term gas rates will increase in a gradual and uniform fashion; however, natural gas rates can peak at very high rates as they did in late 2000 and early 2001. This project studied the response of the DR market to changes in future gas prices in a range of plausible scenarios. It suggests that relatively high natural gas prices and non-uniform annual price fluctuations may strongly affect the size and character...

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

102

Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

103

Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

104

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

105

Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Marketed Production ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

106

Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

107

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

108

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

109

Natural Gas Market Centers and Hubs: A 2003 Update  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report looks at the current status of market centers/hubs in today's natural gas marketplace, examining their role and their importance to natural gas shippers, marketers, pipelines, and others involved in the transportation of natural gas over the North American pipeline network.

Information Center

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Interdependencies of Electricity Markets with Gas Markets A Case Study of Transmission System Operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amount of LNG imported will depend crucially on the development of the natural gas reserves in the region distribution companies, transmission companies, liquefied natural gas importers, and associate member companies and the Natural Gas markets and the conditions and influences on both markets. Load-growth influences the need

Rudnick, Hugh

111

,"Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

112

,"Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","10...

113

,"Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

114

Vertical Structures in the Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the last decade, the global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market altered substantially. Significant investments have been realized, traded volumes increased and contracting structures gained… (more)

Rüster, Sophia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Natural Gas Markets: Recent Changes and Key Drivers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov Natural Gas Markets: Recent Changes and Key Drivers for

116

Markets expect Marcellus growth to drive Appalachian natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions.

117

,"California--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

118

Flexible Mid-Sized Gas Turbine: Preliminary Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study estimates the sales potential of Flexible Mid-Sized Gas Turbine (FMGT) plants for the U.S. market over the period 2000-2015.

1998-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

119

An Analysis of Price Volatility in Natural Gas Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Market prices respond to shifts in supply and demand, and the degree of price response relates to the price elasticity of both. Natural gas prices have been particularly

120

NGL Market Development Example Virtual Workshop on Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ethane in Remote Basins Alberta Ethane Market Vantage Pipeline. EIA Workshop 2012 3 NGL Recovery Decisions “Must-Recover” NGLs due to sales gas specs:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Analysis of Price Volatility in Natural Gas Markets  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article presents an analysis of price volatility in the spot natural gas market, with particular emphasis on the Henry Hub in Louisiana.

Erin Mastrangelo

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

122

Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deployment of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency,” canGas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help? Ryan Wiser and MarkProponents of renewable energy technologies identify these

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through Increased Deployment of Renewable Energy and EnergyNatural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help? Ryan Wiserenergy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy technologies

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

,"Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

125

,"Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1998 ,"Release Date:","7312013"...

126

Testing for market integration crude oil, coal, and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Prompted by the contemporaneous spike in coal, oil, and natural gas prices, this paper evaluates the degree of market integration both within and between crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets. Our approach yields parameters that can be readily tested against a priori conjectures. Using daily price data for five very different crude oils, we conclude that the world oil market is a single, highly integrated economic market. On the other hand, coal prices at five trading locations across the United States are cointegrated, but the degree of market integration is much weaker, particularly between Western and Eastern coals. Finally, we show that crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets are only very weakly integrated. Our results indicate that there is not a primary energy market. Despite current price peaks, it is not useful to think of a primary energy market, except in a very long run context.

Bachmeier, L.J.; Griffin, J.M. [Texas A& amp; M Univ, College Station, TX (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Natural Gas Market Centers and Hubs: A 2003 Update  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Centers and Hubs: A 2003 Update Market Centers and Hubs: A 2003 Update Energy Information Administration - October 2003 1 This special report looks at the current status of market centers/hubs in today=s natural gas marketplace, examining their role and their importance to natural gas shippers, marketers, pipelines, and others involved in the transportation of natural gas over the North American pipeline network. Questions or comments on the contents of this article should be directed to James Tobin at james.tobin@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-4835. The establishment of market centers and hubs is a rather recent development in the natural gas marketplace. They evolved, beginning in the late 1980s, as an outgrowth of gas

128

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003). Balancing Natural Gas Policy - Fueling the Demands ofThis lead to the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) in 1978 whichnatural gas markets, demand-side management programs, development of renewable sources, and environmental policies. ”

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is on the rise, natural gas demand is expected to grow 2.4%has resulted in higher natural gas demand and volatility andelectricity and natural gas markets, demand-side management

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Winter (November-March) natural gas futures prices at lowest ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Henry Hub, in Erath, Louisiana, is the physical delivery location for the NYMEX natural gas futures contract. Sabine Pipeline is the operator of the Henry Hub.

131

Emergence of Natural Gas Market Centers  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Discusses the value of market centers in today's marketplace, highlighting their importance in capacity and financial transactions

Information Center

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The viability of biomass as transportation fuel depends upon the allocation of limited resources for fuel, power, and products. By focusing on mature markets, this report identifies how biomass is projected to be most economically used in the long term and the implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and petroleum use. In order to better understand competition for biomass between these markets and the potential for biofuel as a market-scale alternative to petroleum-based fuels, this report presents results of a micro-economic analysis conducted using the Biomass Allocation and Supply Equilibrium (BASE) modeling tool. The findings indicate that biofuels can outcompete biopower for feedstocks in mature markets if research and development targets are met. The BASE tool was developed for this project to analyze the impact of multiple biomass demand areas on mature energy markets. The model includes domestic supply curves for lignocellulosic biomass resources, corn for ethanol and butanol production, soybeans for biodiesel, and algae for diesel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Ruth, M.; Mai, T.; Newes, E.; Aden, A.; Warner, E.; Uriarte, C.; Inman, D.; Simpkins, T.; Argo, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

SciTech Connect

On December 14, 2009, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2010 were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in itigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings.

Bolinger, Mark A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

134

Homeowners survey: gas utilities and the residential solar market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market potential for a gas/solar energy market in the residential sector prompted the American Gas Association's Solar Energy Committee to analyze national homeowner data collected by Gallup for the Solar Energy Research Institute to see if it applies to gas-utility diversification. The survey results show that the public is interested in utility involvement. Key findings in the survey cover not only attitudes, but profile potential buyers, project market shares, and note regional-attitude differences. The utilities that diversify in this way could improve their relations with both customers and regulators as well as increasing their profits. 4 figures, 17 tables. (DCK)

Pilgrim, B.F.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Global Gas Markets - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

BSA – 28 years of gas and energy advisory services. Economics, pipeline tariffs, contracting, price risks. –Research & training –Negotiation of gas contracts

137

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Marketed Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

138

U.S. Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1973: 1,948,000: 1,962,000: 1,907,000: 1,814,000 ...

139

Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 7,188,900: 7,495,414 ...

140

Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1989: 545,995: 498,336: 541,753: 518,207: 525,157 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

U.S. Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1900's: 128,000: 180,000 ...

142

Michigan Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1989: 12,129: 12,715: 12,637: 12,663: 12,812 ...

143

Michigan Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 33,589: 40,480 ...

144

Colorado Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1989: 22,256: 19,088: 17,871: 15,564: 16,010 ...

145

Illinois Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Illinois Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 5,144: 4,380 ...

146

Analyzing money distributions in `ideal gas' models of markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze an ideal gas like models of a trading market. We propose a new fit for the money distribution in the fixed or uniform saving market. For the marketwith quenched random saving factors for its agents we show that the steady state income ($m$) distribution $P(m)$ in the model has a power law tail with Pareto index $\

Chatterjee, A; Stinchcombe, Robert B; Chatterjee, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.; Stinchcombe, Robin B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Mitigation of Energy and Natural Gas Market Risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the landscape of market risk management for owners of gas-fired capacity. Gas generation is experiencing a second boom, though not as great as the boom that began a decade ago. Whereas overbuilding of capacity was foreseeable then, the underpinnings of gas' new prominence appear more durable, though not without risk. This report reviews factors driving new gas-fired plants and describes the many facets of energy risk management. The report addresses the regulatory setting affecting u...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Testing share & load growth in competitive residential gas markets  

SciTech Connect

The residential market stands as the next frontier for natural gas unbundling. In California, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and elsewhere, states have introduced pilot programs and other unbundling efforts to target residential gas consumers. These efforts are hardly surprising. The residential market, presently dominated by the regulated local distribution companies, appears lucrative. In 1995, the residential sector of the U.S. natural gas industry consumed 4,736 trillion Btu of natural gas or 32 percent of all natural gas delivered by LDCs in that year. U.S. residential consumers accounted for $28.7 billion or 59 percent of the gas utility industry`s total revenues. Nevertheless, despite all the enthusiasm industry representatives have recently expressed in trade publications and public forums, the creation of a competitive residential market may prove a very slow process. Marketers appear cautious in taking the responsibility of serving residential consumers, and for very good reasons. Gaining a sizable portion of this market requires substantial investment in mass marketing, development of name recognition, acquisition of appropriate technology and employment of skillful personnel. Moreover, residential customers do not behave rationally in a {open_quotes}neoclassical{close_quotes} economic sense. They react not only to a price but to several qualitative factors that have yet to be studied by LDCs and marketers. This article offers results from creating a software program and model that answer two basic questions: (1) What share of the residential natural gas market can be realistically captured by non-regulated suppliers? (2) Will residential unbundling increase total throughput for gas utilities? If so, by how much?

Lonshteyn, A. [Boston Gas Company, MA (United States)

1998-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1.1 History of Natural Gaspdf/table13.pdf> History of Natural Gas Regulation TheUnderstanding the history of the natural gas market helps to

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Economic evaluation and market analysis for natural gas utilization. Topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past decade, the U.S. has experienced a surplus gas supply. Future prospects are brightening because of increased estimates of the potential size of undiscovered gas reserves. At the same time, U.S. oil reserves and production have steadily declined, while oil imports have steadily increased. Reducing volume growth of crude oil imports was a key objective of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source to liquid products derived from crude oil to help meet market demand. The purpose of this study was to (1) analyze three energy markets to determine whether greater use could be made of natural gas or its derivatives and (2) determine whether those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The following three markets were targeted for possible increases in gas use: transportation fuels, power generation, and chemical feedstock. Gas-derived products that could potentially compete in these three markets were identified, and the economics of the processes for producing those products were evaluated. The processes considered covered the range from commercial to those in early stages of process development. The analysis also evaluated the use of both high-quality natural gas and lower-quality gases containing CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} levels above normal pipeline quality standards.

Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.; Rezaiyan, A.J.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION ENI USA GAS MARKETING LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENI USA GAS MARKETING LLC ENI USA GAS MARKETING LLC FE DOCKET NO. lO·152-LNG PROPOSED ACTIONS: Eni USA Gas Marketing LlC (Eni USA), a Delaware limited liability company with its primary place of business in Houston, Texas, filed an application with the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) on November 30,2010, seeking authorization to export previously imported liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the Cameron LNG Terminal in Cameron Parish, louisiana to any country not prohibited by u.s. law or policy. The Application was submitted pursuant to section 3 of the Natural Gas Act and 10 CFR part 590 of the Department of Energy's (DOE) regulations. No new facilities or modification to any existing facilities at the Cameron LNG Terminal are required in order for Eni USA to export LNG from that faci

152

The North American natural gas liquids markets are chaotic  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors test for deterministic chaos (i.e., nonlinear deterministic processes which look random) in seven Mont Belview, Texas hydrocarbon markets, using monthly data from 1985:1 to 1996:12--the markets are those of ethane, propane, normal butane, iso-butane, naptha, crude oil, and natural gas. In doing so, they use the Lyapunov exponent estimator of Nychka, Ellner, Gallant, and McCaffrey. They conclude that there is evidence consistent with a chaotic nonlinear generation process in all five natural gas liquids markets.

Serletis, A.; Gogas, P. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Economics)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

U.S. Natural Gas Market Assessment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

T?his has raised concerns about the availability of natural gas for next winter which is reflected in today’s average spot gas pr\\?ce levels.

154

Markets indicate possible natural gas pipeline constraints ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

155

Market Impacts of Changing Natural Gas Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is in the midst of a multifaceted and rapid expansion of its natural gas supply infrastructure, spanning every segment of the industry from drilling and production to transportation, storage, and capabilities to import liquefied natural gas (LNG). This report takes stock of these many developments at a time of great change, pointing to their implications for the gas and electric industries.

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Market Integration for Natural Gas in Europe 1 by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the degree of market integration in French gas imports. Are there substantial price differences between gas from different export countries, and do prices move together? Furthermore, we analyze to what extent the French, German and Belgian markets are integrated. The long-term takeor-pay contracts are described and analyzed. Time series of Norwegian, Dutch and Russian gas export prices are examined for the period 1990-1997. Cointegration tests show that that the different border prices for gas to France move proportionally over time, indicating that the Law of One Price holds. Although one could expect different producer countries to have different supply obligations, we do not find any significant differences in mean prices. When the study is extended to an inter-country analysis including Germany and Belgium, we find that national markets are highly integrated.

Frank Asche; Petter Osmundsen; Ragnar Tveterås

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

High-temperature gas reactor (HTGR) market assessment, synthetic fuels analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is an update of assessments made in TRW's October 1979 assessment of overall high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) markets in the future synfuels industry (1985 to 2020). Three additional synfuels processes were assessed. Revised synfuel production forecasts were used. General environmental impacts were assessed. Additional market barriers, such as labor and materials, were researched. Market share estimates were used to consider the percent of markets applicable to the reference HTGR size plant. Eleven HTGR plants under nominal conditions and two under pessimistic assumptions are estimated for selection by 2020. No new HTGR markets were identified in the three additional synfuels processes studied. This reduction in TRW's earlier estimate is a result of later availability of HTGR's (commercial operation in 2008) and delayed build up in the total synfuels estimated markets. Also, a latest date for HTGR capture of a synfuels market could not be established because total markets continue to grow through 2020. If the nominal HTGR synfuels market is realized, just under one million tons of sulfur dioxide effluents and just over one million tons of nitrous oxide effluents will be avoided by 2020. Major barriers to a large synfuels industry discussed in this study include labor, materials, financing, siting, and licensing. Use of the HTGR intensifies these barriers.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

North American Natural Gas Markets: Selected technical studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) was established in 1976 at Stanford University to provide a structural framework within which energy experts, analysts, and policymakers could meet to improve their understanding of critical energy problems. The ninth EMF study, North American Natural Gas Markets, was conducted by a working group comprised of leading natural gas analysts and decision-makers from government, private companies, universities, and research and consulting organizations. The EMF 9 working group met five times from October 1986 through June 1988 to discuss key issues and analyze natural gas markets. This third volume includes technical papers that support many of the conclusions discussed in the EMF 9 summary report (Volume 1) and full working group report (Volume 2). These papers discuss the results from the individual models as well as some nonmodeling analysis related to US natural gas imports and industrial natural gas demand. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Huntington, H.G.; Schuler, G.E. (eds.)

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

North American Natural Gas Markets: Selected technical studies. Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) was established in 1976 at Stanford University to provide a structural framework within which energy experts, analysts, and policymakers could meet to improve their understanding of critical energy problems. The ninth EMF study, North American Natural Gas Markets, was conducted by a working group comprised of leading natural gas analysts and decision-makers from government, private companies, universities, and research and consulting organizations. The EMF 9 working group met five times from October 1986 through June 1988 to discuss key issues and analyze natural gas markets. This third volume includes technical papers that support many of the conclusions discussed in the EMF 9 summary report (Volume 1) and full working group report (Volume 2). These papers discuss the results from the individual models as well as some nonmodeling analysis related to US natural gas imports and industrial natural gas demand. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Huntington, H.G.; Schuler, G.E. [eds.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daily price history of 1st-nearby NYMEX natural gas futuresNatural Gas Futures Prices Figure 1 focuses on the historythe daily history of the average 5-year natural gas futures

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Mixed Complementarity-Based Equilibrium Model of Natural Gas Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new multiseasonal, multiyear, natural gas market equilibrium model based on the concept of a competitive equilibrium involving the market participants: producers, storage reservoir operators, peak gas operators, pipeline operators, marketers, ... Keywords: games/group decisions: noncooperative, industries: petroleum/natural gas, marketing: competitive strategy, natural resources: energy, programming: complementarity

Steven A. Gabriel; Supat Kiet; Jifang Zhuang

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Future of Transportation Finance: Gas Tax Plus and Beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Future of Transportation Finance: Gas Tax Plus and Beyond The Future of Transportation Finance ON TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND TECHNOLOGY 2005 JAMES L. OBERSTAR FORUM ON TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND TECHNOLOGY #12;This report summarizes the fourth James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over

Minnesota, University of

163

2007 FINAL NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................. 66 Figure 49: LNG Flows from Terminal the flow of regasified LNG from the Costa Azul LNG terminal in Baja California. The intrastate pipeline natural gas (LNG) terminal in Southern California, and one assuming dry hydro conditions. This final

164

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

165

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

166

Residential gas heat pump assessment: A market-based approach  

SciTech Connect

There has been considerable activity in recent years to develop technologies that could reduce or levelize residential and light-commercial building space cooling electrical use and heating/cooling energy use. For example, variable or multi-speed electric heat pumps, electric ground-source heat pumps, dual-fuel heat pumps, multi-function heat pumps, and electric cool storage concepts have been developed; and several types of gas heat pumps are emerging. A residential gas heat pump (GHP) benefits assessment is performed to assist gas utility and equipment manufacturer decision making on level of commitment to this technology. The methodology and generic types of results that can be generated are described. National market share is estimated using a market segmentation approach. The assessment design requires dividing the 334 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAS) of the US into 42 market segments of relatively homogeneous weather and gas/electric rates (14 climate groupings by 3 rate groupings). Gas and electric rates for each MSA are evaluated to arrive at population-weighted rates for the market segments. GHPs are competed against 14 conventional equipment options in each homogeneous segment.

Hughes, P.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Future of Electricity (and Gas) Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is less than 20% of final energy consumption, even if other sectors managed to achieve a highly ambitious 10% renewables target, electricity would be required to acheive around a 35% renewable share to meet the overall target (see DUKES Table 1... analyses of how current and future policy can achieve this in the context of the UK. 3 Note climate change concern could be relatively greater than or less than actual climate change. 2 countries who operate within the context of EU energy...

Pollitt, Michael G.

168

Writedowns, soft gas markets trim profits of OGJ independents' group  

SciTech Connect

A widely expected rise in 1990 profits stemming from a runup in oil prices did not happen for the group of 50 U.S. independent oil and gas companies the Oil and Gas Journal tracks. Instead, a string of special charges spurred big losses for a number of companies. In addition, an unexpectedly weak natural gas market also helped dampen upstream earnings for independents with reserves portfolios dominated by gas. As a result, overall profits for the OGJ group of independents slipped 2.3% in 1990 from 1989 levels. That occurred despite the group's increase of 13% in revenues, largely on the strength of oil production and prices climbing 16% and 25%, respectively. The group's gas production rose 8%, while gas prices remained flat. A few companies heavily skewed to oil saw profits about double year to year. However, the squeeze on revenues and profits from lower gas prices often more than offset increased gas production for many of the companies dependent on gas sales for most of their revenues. The situation was even worse for companies that shut in gas rather than sell it at less than replacement costs, thereby slicing, gas sales volumes as well. The depressed North American gas market has lasted into 1991, and oil prices have fallen from second half 1990 highs. Industry expectations are that oil prices overall will be lower in 1991 than they were last year, so it falls generally to increased gas prices and production in the second half to buoy profits enough to keep pace with 1990 levels. Prospects in 1991 are for big asset writedowns and plunging profits for U.S. independents if oil prices fall much below current levels and gas prices don't rally in the second half.

Williams, B.; Biggs, J.B.

1991-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

169

From: Mark Bolinger and Ryan Wiser, Berkeley Lab (LBNL) Subject: Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices Date: January 4, 2010 1. Introduction, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better

170

June 2003VOLATILITY IN NATURAL GAS AND OIL MARKETS * by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using daily futures price data, I examine the behavior of natural gas and crude oil price volatility since 1990. I test whether there has been a significant trend in volatility, whether there was a short-term increase in volatility during the time of the Enron collapse, and whether natural gas and crude oil price volatilities are interrelated. I also measure the persistence of shocks to volatility and discuss its implications for gas- and oil-related contingent claims.

Robert S. Pindyck; Robert S. Pindyck

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Natural gas contracts in an emerging competitive market  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is being viewed by many as the fuel of the 1990s and beyond because of its environmental qualities, relatively low cost and significant domestic resource base. However, in the Fall of 1991, a group of electric utility executives met with then Deputy Secretary of Energy Henson Moore and asserted that an inability to obtain long term gas contracts meant that supplies are unreliable and construction of gas-fueled generating stations is being discouraged. This study was requested by the Deputy Secretary to address the issues surrounding long-term gas contracts and supply reliability. The relationship between supply reliability and contracts is explained in terms of the number of buyers and sellers in a market. With the appropriate state regulatory policies, utilities can contract for gas and obtain reliable supplies at competitive market prices. Public utility commissioners are encouraged to permit utilities a free choice in signing gas contracts, but to allow only competitive market prices to be reflected in allowable fuel costs.

Sutherland, R.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Natural gas contracts in an emerging competitive market  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is being viewed by many as the fuel of the 1990s and beyond because of its environmental qualities, relatively low cost and significant domestic resource base. However, in the Fall of 1991, a group of electric utility executives met with then Deputy Secretary of Energy Henson Moore and asserted that an inability to obtain long term gas contracts meant that supplies are unreliable and construction of gas-fueled generating stations is being discouraged. This study was requested by the Deputy Secretary to address the issues surrounding long-term gas contracts and supply reliability. The relationship between supply reliability and contracts is explained in terms of the number of buyers and sellers in a market. With the appropriate state regulatory policies, utilities can contract for gas and obtain reliable supplies at competitive market prices. Public utility commissioners are encouraged to permit utilities a free choice in signing gas contracts, but to allow only competitive market prices to be reflected in allowable fuel costs.

Sutherland, R.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Canadian gas exports in the U. S. market: 1995 evaluation and outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report summarizes data and information relating to the North American natural gas industry including supply (US, Canada, regional), demand (focusing on US sectoral demand), prices, and transportation capacities. Section 1 presents a review of industry events in 1995 and section 2 contains forecasts to the year 2000. Section 3 reviews regulatory developments which affect current and future exports of Canadian natural gas, including rolled-in versus incremental tolling, unbundling of local distribution companies, policies on market-based rates, and incentive regulation. The appendix summarizes the current electric industry restructuring process in the United States.

Not Available

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

U.S. Natural Gas Markets and Perspectives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

presentation slides: u.s. Natural Gas markets and perspectives Bill Liss, GTI 1 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary report - appeNDIX e 2 OctOber 2011 |...

175

II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or biodiesel use in Europe. Nevertheless, the EU directive sets a target for the use of biofuels15 II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17 The previous chapter analysed mandatory blends and utilization targets as policy measures that can provide incentives for expanded

176

The dynamics of commodity spot and futures markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I discuss the short-run dynamics of commodity prices, production, and inventories, as well as the sources and effects of market volatility. I explain how prices, rates of production, and inventory levels are interrelated, ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Mathematical and computer modelling reports: Modeling and forecasting energy markets with the intermediate future forecasting system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS), which is the model used to forecast integrated energy markets by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The model contains representations of supply and demand for all of the ...

Frederic H. Murphy; John J. Conti; Susan H. Shaw; Reginald Sanders

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Market Transparency and Forward Contracts: an Application to the Wholesale Market for Natural Gas ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a n-firm oligopoly model of strategic behavior in forward and spot markets that incorporates explicitly (i) firm heterogeneity in costs and in aversion to risk, and (ii) the extent to which the forward market is transparent. We show that the equilibrium hedge ratio of a firm is independent of the demand intercept parameter and of the marginal cost of the firm, increases as the firm becomes more risk-averse and as demand volatility goes up, while it decreases as the rival firms become more risk-averse. Moreover, the hedge ratio of a firm decreases as the forward market becomes more transparent and increases as the number of competitors goes up. Using data from the Dutch wholesale market for natural gas where we observe the number of players, spot and forward sales, churn rates and spot prices, we find evidence that strategic reasons play an important role at explaining the observed firms ’ inverse hedge ratios. In order to assess how transparent the market really is, we estimate the model structurally. According to our estimates, the Dutch market for forward natural gas contracts appears to be quite transparent,

Remco Eijkel; José L. Moraga-gonzález

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Gas Market Transition: Impacts of Power Generation on Gas Pricing Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power sector is beginning to influence the natural gas market, affecting both total natural gas demand and aspects of natural gas price behavior. This report offers a single source that quantifies these influences. With the addition of new gas-fired generating capacity, the use of gas generation in the power sector has grown steadily. However, this progression was arrested after 2002 when the brunt of overbuilding was felt, and gas use in the power sector migrated to ever more efficient units. While ...

2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

180

Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Effect of Increased Natural Gas Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets as requested by the Office of Fossil Energy January 2012 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Effects of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets i Contacts The Office of Energy Analysis prepared this report under the guidance of John Conti, Assistant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

BTU convergence spawning gas market opportunities in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The so-called BTU convergence of US electric power and natural gas sectors is spawning a boom in market opportunities in the US Northeast that ensures the region will be North America`s fastest growing gas market. That`s the view of Catherine Good Abbott, CEO of Columbia Gas Transmission Corp., who told a Ziff Energy conference in Calgary that US Northeast gas demand is expected to increase to almost 10 bcfd in 2000 and more than 12 bcfd in 2010 from about 8 bcfd in 1995 and only 3 bcfd in 1985. The fastest growth will be in the US Northeast`s electrical sector, where demand for gas is expected to double to 4 bcfd in 2010 from about 2 bcfd in 1995. In other presentations at the Ziff Energy conference, speakers voiced concerns about the complexity and speed of the BTU convergence phenomenon and offered assurances about the adequacy of gas supplies in North American to meet demand growth propelled by the BTU convergence boom. The paper discusses the gas demand being driven by power utilities, the BTU convergence outlook, electric power demand, Canadian production and supply, and the US overview.

NONE

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

U.S. Imputed Value of Natural Gas Market Production (Cost)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imputed Value of Natural Gas Market Production (Cost) U.S. Imputed Value of Natural Gas Market Production (Cost) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

183

U.S. marketed natural gas production levels off in the first half ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. marketed natural gas production has flattened since late 2011, mainly in response to lower natural gas prices. Nevertheless, volumes remain at historically high ...

184

The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Overview The natural gas industry in 2003 experienced sustained high prices, supported at least in part by pressure on supplies as gas in storage was rebuilt from historic lows in the early part of the year. The national annual average natural gas wellhead price was $4.88 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf), which is the highest wellhead price (based on 2003 constant dollars) in the Energy Information Administration's historical data series dating to 1930. U.S. marketed production was virtually unchanged compared with the previous year at 19.9 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), despite the high prices and an increased number of drilling rigs employed in the commercial development of gas deposits. Imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) mitigated supply declines, reaching a record

185

SMART II+ : the spot market agent research tool version 2.0 plus natural gas.  

SciTech Connect

Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate complex infrastructure interdependencies including those between the electric power and natural gas markets. The electric power and natural gas markets are undergoing fundamental transformations. These transformations include major changes in electric generator fuel sources. Electric generators that use natural gas as a fuel source are rapidly gaining market share. Electric generators using natural gas introduce direct interdependency between the electric power and natural gas markets. The interdependencies between the electric power and natural gas markets introduced by these generators can be investigated using the emergent behavior of CAS model agents.

North, M. J. N.

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

186

Microeconomics of the ideal gas like market models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a framework based on microeconomic theory from which the ideal gas like market models can be addressed. A kinetic exchange model based on that framework is proposed and its distributional features have been studied by considering its moments. Next, we derive the moments of the CC model (Eur. Phys. J. B 17 (2000) 167) as well. Some precise solutions are obtained which conform with the solutions obtained earlier. Finally, an output market is introduced with global price determination in the model with some necessary modifications.

Chakrabarti, Anindya S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variance Analysis of Wind and Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz, and Douglas J. Arent National Renewable Energy Laboratory Roger Cooke Resources for the Future Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52790 January 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz,

188

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daily price history of 1st-nearby NYMEX natural gas futuresthe daily history of the average 5-year natural gas futuresNatural Gas Futures Prices F igure 1 focuses on the history

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daily price history of 1st-nearby NYMEX natural gas futuresNatural Gas Futures Prices F igure 1 focuses on the historynatural gas prices. Figure 1 shows the daily price history

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Assessment of the possibility of forecasting future natural gas curtailments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides a preliminary assessment of the potential for determining probabilities of future natural-gas-supply interruptions by combining long-range weather forecasts and natural-gas supply/demand projections. An illustrative example which measures the probability of occurrence of heating-season natural-gas curtailments for industrial users in the southeastern US is analyzed. Based on the information on existing long-range weather forecasting techniques and natural gas supply/demand projections enumerated above, especially the high uncertainties involved in weather forecasting and the unavailability of adequate, reliable natural-gas projections that take account of seasonal weather variations and uncertainties in the nation's energy-economic system, it must be concluded that there is little possibility, at the present time, of combining the two to yield useful, believable probabilities of heating-season gas curtailments in a form useful for corporate and government decision makers and planners. Possible remedial actions are suggested that might render such data more useful for the desired purpose in the future. The task may simply require the adequate incorporation of uncertainty and seasonal weather trends into modeling systems and the courage to report projected data, so that realistic natural gas supply/demand scenarios and the probabilities of their occurrence will be available to decision makers during a time when such information is greatly needed.

Lemont, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Developing biotechnology company's future positioning strategy in prefilled syringe market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal for the thesis is to develop a recommendation for Amgen's future prefilled syringe strategy related to its drug process development, supplier relationship management plan, supply and sourcing, and procurement. ...

Lee, Joonhaeng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals March 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Energy Information Administration / Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals

193

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

SciTech Connect

On December 17, 2008, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO 2009) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof), differences in capital costs and O&M expenses, or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired or nuclear generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers; and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal, uranium, and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 12, 2007, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO 2008) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof) or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers (though its appeal has diminished somewhat as prices have increased); and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

Bolinger, Mark A; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Power Delivery System and Electricity Markets for the Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is in draft form pending approval by EPRI Power Delivery & Markets Group Council. Upon approval, the report will be reformatted and issued as a final report by October 31, 2003. The Electricity Roadmap Initiative is an ongoing collaborative exploration of the opportunities for electricity-based innovation over the next 20 years and beyond. Thus far, over 150 organizations have participated with EPRI and its members in shaping a comprehensive vision of how to further increase electricity's val...

2003-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

196

Natural Gas Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, January 2006 1 The natural gas product fed into the mainline gas transportation system in the United States must meet specific quality measures in order for the pipeline grid to operate properly. Consequently, natural gas produced at the wellhead, which in most cases contains contaminants 1 and natural gas liquids, 2 must be processed, i.e., cleaned, before it can be safely delivered to the high-pressure, long-distance pipelines that transport the product to the consuming public. Natural gas that is not within certain specific gravities, pressures, Btu content range, or water content levels will

197

Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy technologies identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but a recent report by Berkeley Lab evaluates one such benefit in detail: by displacing gas-fired electricity generation, RE reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE. The Berkeley Lab report summarizes recent modeling studies that have evaluated the impact of RE deployment on gas prices, reviews the reasonableness of the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model.

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

CMI\\Emissions\\CC policy and gas 10/12/05 1Climate change policy and its effect on market power in the gas market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The European Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) limits CO2 emissions from covered sectors, especially electricity until December 2007, after which a new set of Allowances will be issued. The paper demonstrates that the impact of controlling the quantity rather than the price of carbon is to reduce the elasticity of demand for gas, amplifying the market power of gas suppliers, and also amplifying the impact of gas price increases on the price of electricity. A rough estimate using just British data suggests that this could increase gas market power by 50%. Key words Climate change, emissions trading, market power, gas, quotas vs taxes JEL classification

David Newbery; David Newbery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Power Industry Development Paths and Natural Gas Market Risks: Cycles of Markets, Drilling, and Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current natural gas market is depressed by a combination of unusual factorsa great excess of supply and weak demand. Excess supply comes from the momentum of exploration and production (EP) to the new U.S. gas shale plays, a phenomenon barely 18 months old and a game-changing event in the industry. Weak demand comes from the "Great Recession." The seeds for correcting this imbalance would appear to be a dramatic cutback in drilling, which has collapsed over the past year and which is a principal focu...

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Cointegration Rank Test of Market Linkages with an Application to the U.S. Natural Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to interstate natural gas pipelines." Contemporary Policys policy of open access has made natural gas markets more

Walls, W. David

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY AND MARKETS IN 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 This special report provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Natural Gas Annual 2002 (NGA). Unless otherwise stated, all data in this report are based on summary statistics published in the NGA 2002. Questions or comments on the contents of this report should be directed to William Trapmann at william.trapmann@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-6408. Overview The natural gas industry and markets experienced a number of key changes during 2002. Current supplies of production and net imports decreased by about 750 billion cubic feet (Bcf) in 2002, so storage stocks were drawn down to meet an increase in consumption. Average prices in 2002 declined from the relatively high levels of 2001.

202

The American Gas Centrifuge Past, Present, and Future  

SciTech Connect

The art of gas centrifugation was born in 1935 at the University of Virginia when Dr. Jesse Beams demonstrated experimentally the separation of chlorine isotopes using an ultra-high speed centrifuge. Dr. Beam’s experiment initiated work that created a rich history of scientific and engineering accomplishment in the United States in the art of isotope separation and even large scale biological separation by centrifugation. The early history of the gas centrifuge development was captured in a lecture and documented by Dr. Jesse Beams in 1975. Much of Dr. Beams lecture material is used in this paper up to the year 1960. Following work by Dr. Gernot Zippe at the University of Virginia between 1958 and 1960, the US government embarked on a centrifuge development program that ultimately led to the start of construction of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant in Piketon Ohio in the late 1970’s. The government program was abandoned in 1985 after investing in the construction of two of six planned process buildings, a complete supply chain for process and centrifuge parts, and the successful manufacture and brief operation of an initial complement of production machines that would have met 15 percent of the planned capacity of the constructed process buildings. A declining market for enriched uranium, a glut of uranium enrichment capacity worldwide, and the promise of a new laser based separation process factored in the decision to stop the government program. By the late 1990’s it had become evident that gas centrifugation held the best promise to produce enriched uranium at low cost. In1999, the United States Enrichment Corporation undertook an initiative to revive the best of the American centrifuge technology that had been abandoned fourteen years earlier. This is an exciting story and one that when complete will enable the United States to maintain its domestic supply and to be highly competitive in the world market for this important energy commodity. (auth)

Waters, Dean

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Future power market shares of coal, natural gas generators ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, financial analysis, Congressional reports. ... Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Full Release Note: ...

204

Price Discovery in the Natural Gas Markets of the United States and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of the U.S. and Canada natural gas spot markets are evolving through deregulation policies and technological advances. Economic theory suggests that these markets will be integrated. The key question is the extent of integration among the markets. This thesis characterizes the degree of dynamic integration among 11 major natural gas markets, six from the U.S. and five from Canada, and determines each individual markets’ role in price discovery. This is the first study to include numerous Canadian markets in a North American natural gas market study. Causal flows modeling using directed acyclic graphs in conjunction with time series analysis are used to explain the relationships among the markets. Daily gas price data from 1994 to 2009 are used. The 11 natural gas market prices are tied together with nine long-run co-integrating relationships. All markets are included in the co-integration space, providing evidence the markets are integrated. Results show the degree of integration varies by region. Further results indicate no clear price leader exists among the 11 markets. Dawn market is exogenous in contemporaneous time, while Sumas market is an information sink. Henry Hub plays a significant role in the price discovery of markets in the U.S. Midwest and Northeast, but little to markets in the west. The uncertainty of a markets’ price depends primarily on markets located in nearby regions. Policy makers may use information on market integration for important policy matters in efforts of attaining efficiency. Gas traders benefit from knowing the price discovery relationships.

Olsen, Kyle

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The 'Supply-of-Storage' for Natural Gas in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Hedging Effectiveness of Natural Gas Futures. ” EnergyCommission. (2002). “Natural Gas Supply and Infrastructureand Price Dynamics in Natural Gas City Gate Markets. ”

Uria, Rocio; Williams, Jeffrey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A market and engineering study of a 3-kilowatt class gas turbine generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market and engineering studies were performed for the world's only commercially available 3 kW class gas turbine generator, the IHI Aerospace Dynajet. The objectives of the market study were to determine the competitive ...

Monroe, Mark A. (Mark Alan)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the accuracy of two methods to forecast natural gas prices: using the Energy Information Administration's ''Annual Energy Outlook'' forecasted price (AEO) and the ''Henry Hub'' compared to U.S. Wellhead futures price. A statistical analysis is performed to determine the relative accuracy of the two measures in the recent past. A statistical analysis suggests that the Henry Hub futures price provides a more accurate average forecast of natural gas prices than the AEO. For example, the Henry Hub futures price underestimated the natural gas price by 35 cents per thousand cubic feet (11.5 percent) between 1996 and 2003 and the AEO underestimated by 71 cents per thousand cubic feet (23.4 percent). Upon closer inspection, a liner regression analysis reveals that two distinct time periods exist, the period between 1996 to 1999 and the period between 2000 to 2003. For the time period between 1996 to 1999, AEO showed a weak negative correlation (R-square = 0.19) between forecast price by actual U.S. Wellhead natural gas price versus the Henry Hub with a weak positive correlation (R-square = 0.20) between forecasted price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price. During the time period between 2000 to 2003, AEO shows a moderate positive correlation (R-square = 0.37) between forecasted natural gas price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price versus the Henry Hub that show a moderate positive correlation (R-square = 0.36) between forecast price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price. These results suggest that agencies forecasting natural gas prices should consider incorporating the Henry Hub natural gas futures price into their forecasting models along with the AEO forecast. Our analysis is very preliminary and is based on a very small data set. Naturally the results of the analysis may change, as more data is made available.

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

208

Canadian Canola: Effects of the Respecification of the Futures Contract on Market Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canada’s canola market is not efficient, i.e., future and spot prices do not converge as the delivery date approaches. The Winnipeg Commodity Exchange recognized the inefficiency, and moved the reference point on July 1, 1996 from Vancouver, where about 60 percent of Canada’s canola is exported, to Saskatoon and other inland cities where canola is grown. Canola and soybeans are close substitutes, and the movement of the reference point should have made canola prices mirror soybean prices closer because of an improved futures market. This result did not occur, largely because (1) the Canadian government does not permit canola to move to Vancouver by rail until it has been sold to an exporter and (2) these government restrictions have discouraged the private sector from improving upon the storage and transportation system. This paper shows that the 1995 reforms simply moved the futures market ahead of the bottleneck in the delivery process and failed to make the canola market efficient. It concludes that Canadian government attempts to regulate the transportation of canola prevent the achievement of market efficiency; such efficiency could be realized by

Darren M. Field

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Global gas processing will strengthen to meet expanding markets  

SciTech Connect

The worldwide LPG industry continues to expand faster than the petroleum industry -- 4%/year for LPG vs. 2%/year for petroleum in 1995 and less than 1%/year in the early 1990s. This rapid expansion of LPG markets is occurring in virtually every region of the world, including such developing countries as China. The Far East is the focus of much of the LPG industry`s attention, but many opportunities exist in other regions such as the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. The investment climate is improving in all phases of downstream LPG marketing, including terminaling, storage, and wholesale and retail distribution. The world LPG supply/demand balance has been relatively tight since the Gulf War and should remain so. Base demand (the portion of demand that is not highly price-sensitive) is expanding more rapidly than supplies. As a result, the proportion of total LPG supplies available for price-sensitive petrochemical feedstock markets is declining, at least in the short term. The paper discusses importers, price patterns, world LPG demand, world LPG supply, US NGL supply, US gas processing, ethane and propane supply, butane, isobutane, and natural gasoline supply, and US NGL demand.

Haun, R.R. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C.; Gist, R.L. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes of Terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes of Terrestrial Ecosystems in the Western. Sleeter Chapter 9 of Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes in Ecosystems.L., Hawbaker, T.J., and Sleeter, B.M., 2012, Projected future carbon storage and greenhouse gas fluxes

Fleskes, Joe

211

Compressed natural gas fuel may be the future for Phoenix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It's the law: the future must include cleaner air, and alternative fuels for vehicular engines is one way to achieve it. In Phoenix, a city beset by moderate air quality problems, equipment managers of the Public Works Department's (PWD) fleet say their future seems to be with compressed natural gas (CNG). CNG fuels a pair of refuse packer trucks that have been operating for a year with few, if any, problems. The object of buying and running them, was to see if one can run an alternate fuels vehicle on a regular route. Can the trucks adapt, can the drivers adapt So far the answer is yes. The trucks are among an assortment of municipal vehicles running on CNG and propane. CNG makes sense for Phoenix because it's modestly priced and readily available locally.

Berg, T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

late January 2008, extend its natural gas futures strip anComparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Priceslong-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series toAEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the EIA’s natural gas price forecasts in AEO 2004 and AEOon the AEO 2005 natural gas price forecasts will likely onceof AEO 2005 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this “hybrid” NYMEX-EIA gas price projection still does notonly a portion of the gas price forecast – through 2010 –of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Miscellaneous: Uruguay energy supply options study assessing the market for natural gas - executive summary.  

SciTech Connect

Uruguay is in the midst of making critical decisions affecting the design of its future energy supply system. Momentum for change is expected to come from several directions, including recent and foreseeable upgrades and modifications to energy conversion facilities, the importation of natural gas from Argentina, the possibility for a stronger interconnection of regional electricity systems, the country's membership in MERCOSUR, and the potential for energy sector reforms by the Government of Uruguay. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of several fuel diversification strategies on Uruguay's energy supply system. The analysis pays special attention to fuel substitution trends due to potential imports of natural gas via a gas pipeline from Argentina and increasing electricity ties with neighboring countries. The Government of Uruguay has contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to study several energy development scenarios with the support of several Uruguayan institutions. Specifically, ANL was asked to conduct a detailed energy supply and demand analysis, develop energy demand projections based on an analysis of past energy demand patterns with support from local institutions, evaluate the effects of potential natural gas imports and electricity exchanges, and determine the market penetration of natural gas under various scenarios.

Conzelmann, G.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

217

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices  

SciTech Connect

On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2006'' (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

218

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2006'' (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 5, 2006, the reference case projections from 'Annual Energy Outlook 2007' (AEO 2007) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past six years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past six years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable-price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are 'biased' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2007. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past six AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2006), we once again find that the AEO 2007 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. Specifically, the NYMEX-AEO 2007 premium is $0.73/MMBtu levelized over five years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $0.73/MMBtu more than the AEO 2007 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

Natural Gas Marketer Prices and Sales To Residential and Commercial Customers: 2002-2005  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report compares residential and commercial prices collected from natural gas marketers and local distribution companies in MD, NY, OH and PA from 2002-2005 and gives the history and status of natural gas choice programs in those States.

Amy Sweeney

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

European gas market study sees limited role for LNG imports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the Western European gas market published by the European Investment Bank concludes that although the share of imports will grow, existing suppliers Algeria, Russia, and Norway can meet projected demand until and perhaps even beyond 2010. {open_quotes}Alternative sources are not necessary, although Europe might call upon long-distance suppliers to diversify supply sources,{close_quotes} says study author Bertrand Rossert. The gas demand in Western Europe is estimated to grow from 335 bcm in 1995 to 390 bcm by 2000 and 410-450 bcm in 2010, led by the power and residential sectors. Demand in the electricity sector in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, and the U.K. should grow rapidly from 40 bcm in 1995 to 70 bcm in 2000 and at a slower rate thereafter. Beyond 2005, the expansion of gas-fired generation will depend on nuclear power policies. (In Eastern Europe, projections are more problematic because of political and economic uncertainties, but could grow from 70 bcm in 1995 to 100 bcm in 2005 and around 110 bcm in 2010).

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Proceedings of the Chinese-American symposium on energy markets and the future of energy demand  

SciTech Connect

The Symposium was organized by the Energy Research Institute of the State Economic Commission of China, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University from the United States. It was held at the Johns Hopkins University Nanjing Center in late June 1988. It was attended by about 15 Chinese and an equal number of US experts on various topics related to energy demand and supply. Each presenter is one of the best observers of the energy situation in their field. A Chinese and US speaker presented papers on each topic. In all, about 30 papers were presented over a period of two and one half days. Each paper was translated into English and Chinese. The Chinese papers provide an excellent overview of the emerging energy demand and supply situation in China and the obstacles the Chinese planners face in managing the expected increase in demand for energy. These are matched by papers that discuss the energy situation in the US and worldwide, and the implications of the changes in the world energy situation on both countries. The papers in Part 1 provide historical background and discuss future directions. The papers in Part 2 focus on the historical development of energy planning and policy in each country and the methodologies and tools used for projecting energy demand and supply. The papers in Part 3 examine the pattern of energy demand, the forces driving demand, and opportunities for energy conservation in each of the major sectors in China and the US. The papers in Part 4 deal with the outlook for global and Pacific region energy markets and the development of the oil and natural gas sector in China.

Meyers, S. (ed.)

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

SciTech Connect

On December 9, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005)'' were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. As some of you may be aware, we at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past four years, forward natural gas contracts (e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past four years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation (presuming that long-term price stability is valued). In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2005. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or, more recently (and briefly), http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past four AEO releases (AEO 2001-AE0 2004), we once again find that the AEO 2005 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEXAEO 2005 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$1.11/MMBtu levelized over six years--that we have seen over the last five years. In other words, on average, one would have to pay $1.11/MMBtu more than the AEO 2005 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming six years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation. Fixed-price renewables obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of six years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

224

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On December 9, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005)'' were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. As some of you may be aware, we at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past four years, forward natural gas contracts (e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past four years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation (presuming that long-term price stability is valued). In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2005. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or, more recently (and briefly), http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past four AEO releases (AEO 2001-AE0 2004), we once again find that the AEO 2005 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEXAEO 2005 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$1.11/MMBtu levelized over six years--that we have seen over the last five years. In other words, on average, one would have to pay $1.11/MMBtu more than the AEO 2005 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming six years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation. Fixed-price renewables obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of six years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

Storage and capacity rights markets in the natural gas industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents a different approach at looking at market power in capacity rights markets that goes beyond the functional aspects of capacity rights markets as access to transportation services. In particular, ...

Paz-Galindo, Luis A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through IncreasedIntroduction Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as aenergy (RE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

EPRI/GRI Load Shape Workshop: Load Data Analysis for Gas and Electric Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Load shapes, representing usage patterns in the electric and gas industry, are a key factor in energy company operations and management. In the emerging restructured energy market, retail energy suppliers market energy to final customers and must arrange for electricity generation or gas delivery to meet their customers' needs. EPRI and GRI sponsored a two-day workshop in June, 1999 that addressed a range of issues associated with load shapes, including modeling, profiling for retail market settlement, r...

1999-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Natural Gas Market Model: Equations and data sources  

SciTech Connect

In 1981, EIA began a major study of the impact of natural gas deregulation. Through 1981, the major product of that study was the August 1981 EIA analysis paper entitled ''Analysis of Economic Effects of Accelerated Deregulation of Natural Gas Prices.'' That paper will be referred to as the ''Deregulation Study'' below. The Natural Gas Market Model (NGMM) was the primary model used to produce the forecasts discussed in the Deregulation Study. A modified version of NGMM has been used in the initial runs of the EIA Extended Short-term Forecasting System (ESFS), which is still under development. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive description of what NGMM is, and of the inputs used with NGMM for the Deregulation Study. The Deregulation Study, and the many documentation reports it cites, contain much information about the substantive studies which led up to the forecasts; however, it does not provide enough detail on how these studies were brought together to permit either a replication or an in-depth evaluation of the forecasts. EIA standards require that models be documented in enough detail to permit replication. This report attempts to fill that gap in documentation, on the basis of a line-by-line audit of the model code, interviews with the model developers, and a replication of the model in the user-oriented system Troll. The report mentions the mechanics of how the solutions are obtained, but not in complete detail. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Werbos, P.J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

WNGSR provides insight into natural gas markets and the broader ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR) measures how much natural gas is available for withdrawal–working natural gas–in the Nation's underground storage ...

230

Competition in a Network of Markets: The Natural Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the behavior of natural gas prices. Twodata sets arethe industry, natural gas prices could not be equalized4. ~d .. Figure 9. Natural Gas Spot Prices by Region

Walls, W. David

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development task 5 -- market study of the gas fired ATS. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), in partnership with the Department of Energy, will develop a family of advanced gas turbine-based power systems (ATS) for widespread commercialization within the domestic and international industrial marketplace, and to the rapidly changing electric power generation industry. The objective of the jointly-funded Program is to introduce an ATS with high efficiency, and markedly reduced emissions levels, in high numbers as rapidly as possible following introduction. This Topical Report is submitted in response to the requirements outlined in Task 5 of the Department of Energy METC Contract on Advanced Combustion Systems, Contract No, DE AC21-93MC30246 (Contract), for a Market Study of the Gas Fired Advanced Turbine System. It presents a market study for the ATS proposed by Solar, and will examine both the economic and siting constraints of the ATS compared with competing systems in the various candidate markets. Also contained within this report is an examination and analysis of Solar`s ATS and its ability to compete in future utility and industrial markets, as well as factors affecting the marketability of the ATS.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through IncreasedHeightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

When Barriers to Markets Fail: Pipeline Deregulation, Spot Markets, and the Topology of the Natural Gas Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Congress passed the Natural Gas Policy Act in 1978. The Actthe Natural Gas Act." Southern Regu- latory Policyfor natural gas. Introduction Regulatory policies suppressed

De Vany, Arthur; Walls, W. David

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Analysis of the market and product costs for coal-derived high Btu gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE analyzed the market potential and economics of coal-derived high-Btu gas using supply and demand projections that reflect the effects of natural gas deregulation, recent large oil-price rises, and new or pending legislation designed to reduce oil imports. The results indicate that an increasingly large market for supplemental gas should open up by 1990 and that SNG from advanced technology will probably be as cheap as gas imports over a wide range of assumptions. Although several studies suggest that a considerable market for intermediate-Btu gas will also exist, the potential supplemental gas demand is large enough to support both intermediate - and high-Btu gas from coal. Advanced SNG-production technology will be particularly important for processing the US's abundant, moderately to highly caking Eastern coals, which current technology cannot handle economically.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasts (or any other forecast, for that matter) in makingcase natural gas price forecast, but to also examine a wideAEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

Bolinger, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a portion of the gas price forecast – through 2010 – can beAEO 2006 reference case forecast to conduct a 25-yearAEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9: Two Alternative Price Forecasts (denoted by open circlesAEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Priceslong-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range of different plausible price projections, using eitherthat renewables can provide price certainty over even longerof AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hedging Future Gas Price Risk with Wind Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices: By displacing gas-fired generation, incremental wind generation reduces demand for natural gas Department Increased Renewables Penetration Displaces Natural Gas Demand Projected Gas Displacement in 2020 Energy Technologies Division · Energy Analysis Department Natural Gas Prices Are High and Volatile 0 2 4

240

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Natural Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .versus AEO and Henry Hub Natural Gas Prices . . . . . .

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gas Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .versus AEO and Henry Hub Natural Gas Prices . . . . . .

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX) - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The natural gas liquids (NGL) composite price is derived from daily Bloomberg spot price data for natural gas liquids at Mont Belvieu, Texas, ...

243

Competition in a Network of Markets: The Natural Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth in Unbundled Natural Gas Transportation Services:Purchasesby Interstate Natural Gas Pipelines Companies,1987.U.S. GPO, 1988. . Natural Gas Monthly. WashingtonD.C. : U.S.

Walls, W. David

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation, RE reduces natural gas demand and thus putsTheory of a Shifting Natural Gas Demand Curve The reportinward shift in the natural gas demand curve, leading to a

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Current and Future Costs for Parabolic Trough and Power Tower Systems in the US Market: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is employed to estimate the current and future costs for parabolic trough and molten salt power towers in the US market. Future troughs are assumed to achieve higher field temperatures via the successful deployment of low melting-point, molten-salt heat transfer fluids by 2015-2020. Similarly, it is assumed that molten salt power towers are successfully deployed at 100MW scale over the same time period, increasing to 200MW by 2025. The levelized cost of electricity for both technologies is predicted to drop below 11 cents/kWh (assuming a 10% investment tax credit and other financial inputs outlined in the paper), making the technologies competitive in the marketplace as benchmarked by the California MPR. Both technologies can be deployed with large amounts of thermal energy storage, yielding capacity factors as high as 65% while maintaining an optimum LCOE.

Turchi, C.; Mehos, M.; Ho, C. K.; Kolb, G. J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Current and future costs for parabolic trough and power tower systems in the US market.  

SciTech Connect

NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is employed to estimate the current and future costs for parabolic trough and molten salt power towers in the US market. Future troughs are assumed to achieve higher field temperatures via the successful deployment of low melting-point, molten-salt heat transfer fluids by 2015-2020. Similarly, it is assumed that molten salt power towers are successfully deployed at 100MW scale over the same time period, increasing to 200MW by 2025. The levelized cost of electricity for both technologies is predicted to drop below 11 cents/kWh (assuming a 10% investment tax credit and other financial inputs outlined in the paper), making the technologies competitive in the marketplace as benchmarked by the California MPR. Both technologies can be deployed with large amounts of thermal energy storage, yielding capacity factors as high as 65% while maintaining an optimum LCOE.

Turchi, Craig (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Mehos, Mark Steven (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Competition in a Network of Markets: The Natural Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC). Under the NGA, pipelines wereby for gas users, the FERC authorized transportation ofcustomer-owned gas. The FERC approved transportation

Walls, W. David

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policynatural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Markets expect Marcellus growth to drive Appalachian natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas prices in the Mid-Atlantic have ... Growth is mostly from dry gas production in northeastern Pennsylvania. ... (Wetzel County , WV) and Natrium ...

250

Technology and market assessment of gas-fueled vehicles in New York State. Volume III. Institutional barriers and market assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume III deals primarily with the institutional barriers and market forces affecting the potential conversion of vehicles in New York State (NYS) to gaseous fuels. The results of a market research survey are presented along wth the current supply conditions for fuels in NYS. The indigenous resources of gaseous fuels in NYS are identified and quantified. The potential number of vehicles in NYS that are favorable candidates for conversion are estimated, and the effect of these potential gaseous-fueled vehicles on NYS gaseous fuels supplies is presented. The market research survey found that fleet managers appear to be more aware of the specifics of LPG vehicles relative to CNG vehicles. In those fleets with some LPG or CNG vehicles, a tentativeness to further conversion was detected. Many fleet managers are deferring conversion plans due to uncertain conversion costs and future fuel prices. The need for fleet manager education about gaseous fuel vehicle (GFV) operation and economics was identified. NYS currently has an excess supply of natural gas and could support a significant GFV population. However, the pipeline system serving NYS may not be able to serve a growing GFV population without curtailment in the future if natural gas demands in other sectors increase. LPG supply in NYS is dependent primarily on how much LPG can be imported into NYS. A widespread distribution system (pipeline and truck transport) exists in NYS and could likely support a signficant LPG vehicle population. It is estimated that about 35% of the passenger cars and 43% of the trucks in NYS are potential candidates for conversion to CNG. For LPG, about 36% and 46% of passenger cars and trucks are potential candidates. Applying a gross economic screen results in an estimated potential liquid fuel displacement of 1.3 billion gallons in 1990. 20 figs., 63 tabs.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Converting LPG caverns to natural-gas storage permits fast response to market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulation of Canada`s natural-gas industry in the late 1980s led to a very competitive North American natural-gas storage market. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., began looking for method for developing cost-effective storage while at the same time responding to new market-development opportunities and incentives. Conversion of existing LPG-storage salt caverns to natural-gas storage is one method of providing new storage. To supply SaskEnergy Inc., the province`s local distribution company, and Saskatchewan customers, TransGas previously had developed solution-mined salt storage caverns from start to finish. Two Regina North case histories illustrate TransGas` experiences with conversion of LPG salt caverns to gas storage. This paper provides the testing procedures for the various caverns, cross-sectional diagrams of each cavern, and outlines for cavern conversion. It also lists storage capacities of these caverns.

Crossley, N.G. [TransGas Ltd., Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1996-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .> History of Natural Gas Regulation The natural gas marketto oversee the regulation of natural gas sales by regulating

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Advanced Gas Storage Concepts: Technologies for the Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This full text product includes: 1) A final technical report titled Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts, Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage and presentations from two technology transfer workshops held in 1998 in Houston, Texas, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (both on the topic of Chilled Gas Storage in Mined Caverns); 2) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project, Final Report 1 October 1997 - 31 May 1999; 3) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project Phase II: Conceptual Design and Economic Study, Final Report 9 June - 10 October 1999; 4) A final technical report titled Commerical Potential of Natural Gas Storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC) and presentations from a DOE-sponsored workshop on Alternative Gas Storage Technologies, held Feb 17, 2000 in Pittsburgh, PA; and 5) Phase I and Phase II topical reports titled Feasibility Study for Lowering the Minimum Gas Pressure in Solution-Mined Caverns Based on Geomechanical Analyses of Creep-Induced Damage and Healing.

Freeway, Katy (PB-KBB Inc.) [PB-KBB Inc.; Rogers, R.E. (Mississippi State University) [Mississippi State University; DeVries, Kerry L.; Nieland, Joel D.; Ratigan, Joe L.; Mellegard, Kirby D. (RESPEC) [RESPEC

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lowering gas and electricity bills for consumers. Thirteenelectricity rates and will also reduce residential, commercial, and industrial gas bills.bills as well as an assumed one-for-one pass-through to consumers of reductions in electricity-

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Markets indicate possible natural gas pipeline constraints in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... This difference reflects expectations about the likelihood of capacity constraints associated with moving natural gas on pipelines ...

256

Natural Gas Market Centers and Hubs: A 2003 Update  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (emergency interconnects), to receive supply via a major trunkline, or to fulfill exchange gas commitments with other pipeline companies. ...

257

Texas Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Area: Period: Download ... 8.51: 3.81: 4.70 : 1967-2010: Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 6,123,180: 6,960,693: 6,818,973: 6,715,294: 7,112,863:

258

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

underestimate natural gas prices. The trends changed afterestimate natural gas prices. These trends suggest that

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

History of Natural Gas Regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pdf/table13.pdf> History of Natural Gas Regulation The

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Gas Turbines of the Future: Hydrogen and Oxy-Combustion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Materials issues related to higher efficiency power plants, like hydrogen or oxy-fuel fired gas turbines, require materials with higher temperature  ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Emerging Oil & Gas Supplies: Future Prospects for Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The shale gas & tight oil technology story is only beginning, with much yet to be written • Technology is creating new resources out of rocks

262

Time series analysis of the lead-lag relationship of freight futures and spot market prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes the relationship between the physical and paper shipping markets. The main objective is to find if one market leads the other by a specific time period so that market players can take advantage from ...

Gavriilidis, Nikolaos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Top 5 producing states' combined marketed natural gas output rose ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary › All Reports ... Due primarily to drilling programs in the Marcellus shale ... Alaska is the country's second leading natural gas producer in terms of ...

264

IMPACTS OF MARKET LIBERALISATION ON THE EU GAS INDUSTRY Paper for the 1 st Austrian-Czech-German Conference on Energy Market Liberalisation in Central and Eastern Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents an analysis of the effects of the EU Gas Directive on the EU gas industry in the next ten years. First, it briefly reviews the current driving factors for increasing competition in the EU gas markets. Second, the different directions of implementation of EU Gas Directive are discussed. Finally we give an assessment of impacts of the different directions of implementation of the Gas Directive, thereby focusing on structural changes of the gas industry and the scope for reduction of consumer gas prices. Note that our assessment of the impacts is partly based on an analysis of recent trends in the EU gas market and partly on calculations with a recently developed model of the EU gas market on company level. The paper summarises the main observations of a study conducted by ECN last year in the framework of a larger scenario study for the EC, DG17, in the Shared Analysis Project, ‘Economic Foundations for Energy Policy in Europe to 2020 ’ managed by FhG-ISI. For the complete results of the ECN study, see report ‘Impacts of Market Liberalisation on the EU Gas Industry’, September 1999, forthcoming. Note that the analysis is limited to the gas market and does not include other impacts, i.e. on energy conservation, emissions, etc. Acknowledgement

F. Van Oostvoorn; M. G. Boots Abstract

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 9: Two Alternative Price Forecasts (denoted by openComparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast toNYMEX Futures Prices Date: December 6, 2006 Introduction On

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Demand and Supply Natural Gas Demand and Supply Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Natural Gas Demand and Supply Figure 82. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2025 (trillion cubic feet). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Figure 83. Natural gas production by source, 1990-2025 (trillion cubic feet). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Projected Increases in Natural Gas Use Are Led by Electricity Generators In the AEO2005 reference case, total natural gas consumption increases from 22.0 trillion cubic feet in 2003 to 30.7 trillion cubic feet in 2025. In the electric power sector, natural gas consumption increases from 5.0 trillion cubic feet in 2003 to 9.4 trillion cubic feet in 2025 (Figure 82),

267

Structural and regulatory reform of the European natural gas market : does the current approach secure the public service obligations?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The European natural gas market is in a state of flux. In order to better secure the public service obligations – supply security, competitiveness and… (more)

Spanjer, Abdelkader Rainaldo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Secretary Moniz: What the Natural Gas Boom Means for the Future of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moniz: What the Natural Gas Boom Means for the Future of Moniz: What the Natural Gas Boom Means for the Future of Renewables Secretary Moniz: What the Natural Gas Boom Means for the Future of Renewables May 23, 2013 - 2:34pm Addthis In a town hall meeting with Department employees, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz talks about how a boom in natural gas might be a boon for renewable energy. Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs More from Secretary Moniz See a video recap of Secretary Moniz's first day in office. Watch Secretary Moniz's swearing-in ceremony. Follow Secretary Moniz on Facebook and Twitter. In a new video released today by the Department of Energy, Secretary Ernest Moniz comments on how the United States should take advantage of the natural gas boom and use it as an opportunity to further develop renewable

269

Gas Balancing Rules Must Take into account the Trade-off between Offering Pipeline Transport and Pipeline Flexibility in Liberalized Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyses the value and cost of line-pack flexibility in liberalized gas markets through the examination of the techno-economic characteristics of gas transport pipelines and the trade-offs between the different ...

Keyaerts, Nico

270

EIA Report 9/13/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts. Prices. NYMEX Futures Prices ... Gulf of Mexico Oil & Natural Gas Facts Energy Information Administration: Gulf of ...

271

Deregulating UK Gas and Electricity Markets: How is Competition Working for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deregulating UK Gas and Electricity Markets: How is Competition Working for Deregulating UK Gas and Electricity Markets: How is Competition Working for Residential Consumers? Speaker(s): Catherine Waddams Date: April 15, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Chris Marnay Retail gas and electricity prices were deregulated in the UK in April 2002, following introduction of retail choice for residential consumers between 1996 and 1999. We use information from consumer surveys, including a panel survey over three years, to analyse consumer attitudes and behaviour. In particular we explore how awareness changed, whether those who were actively considering switching in one wave of the survey had actually done so by the next round, whether individuals become willing to switch for smaller price gains as the markets matured, and how expectations

272

The future of U.S. natural gas production, use, and trade Sergey Paltsev a,b,n  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The future of U.S. natural gas production, use, and trade Sergey Paltsev a,b,n , Henry D. Jacoby 19 May 2011 Available online 16 June 2011 Keywords: Natural gas Climate Policy International gas.S. regional detail, are applied to analysis of the future of U.S. natural gas. The focus is on uncertainties

273

,"Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marketed Production (MMcf)" Marketed Production (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1998 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1140_ralf_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1140_ralf_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:29 AM"

274

,"Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marketed Production (MMcf)" Marketed Production (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1140_r5f_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1140_r5f_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:29 AM"

275

Residential gas appliance market needs assessment. Final Topical report, April 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Gas research Institute (GRI) commissioned SRI International (SRI) to assess the R D needs of the residential gas appliance industry. The objectives in the project were to: Identify and rank the residential gas appliance industry's R D needs as perceived by industry groups (appliance manufacturers, major components and materials suppliers, and distributors/dealers/retailers); Select those needs that an industry-wide R D program (as opposed to individual company efforts) can best meet; and, Assemble a database characterizing the residential gas appliance market and the factors driving demand.

Wachter, G.T.; Gutman, P.V.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Climate change policy and its effect on market power in the gas market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emitted per MWh of electricity produced in a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) of 50% efficiency. (The spark spread is the base-load price of electricity for the month ahead less the cost of the gas needed at 50% efficiency to CMI\\Emissions\\CC policy... about 35 €/MWh to over 70 €/MWh, prompting a spate of complaints to the European Commission, who in response announced a sector inquiry into gas and electricity in June 2005 (European Commission, 2005). A considerable part of the price rise could...

Newbery, David

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

Natural Gas Supply in Denmark -A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Supply in Denmark - A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the Liberalized Gas Market of the markets of natural gas and electricity and the existence of an abundance of de-centralized combined heat and power generators of which most are natural gas fired, leads to the natural assumption that the future

278

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1.1 History of Natural Gas8 4.1 U.S. Wellhead and AEO Natural Gas8 4.2 U.S. Wellhead and Henry Hub Natural Gas

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

4. Marketed production of natural gas in selected states and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual 11 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 T e x a s g o s L o u i s i a n a W y o m i n O k l

280

The effect of LNG on the relationship between UK and Continental European natural gas markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-term relationship between the prices of natural gas in the United Kingdom and oil-indexed natural gas in the North West European market is the result of seasonal arbitrage. This paper empirically investigates this long-term relationship and offers two main contributions: (i) To the best knowledge of the author, this is the first study to take into account important UK spot gas market drivers such as seasonality, temperature and gas storage injection/withdrawal behaviour when examining the structural relationship between UK and Continental European markets. (ii) The effect of UK import capacity extensions since 2005, through both pipeline and LNG regasifcation capacity, on this longterm relationship will be analyzed. The results suggest that there is a signifcant structural break in 2006 when the two markets decouple and move from an old to a new, much weaker, long-term relationship. From the end of 2008 onwards, the time at which UK LNG imports started to increase, this long-term relationship appears to break down altogether.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Market  

... and its contributions to society and the economy; The marketing group values suggestions from researchers regarding companies to approach.

282

MODELLING THE ROLE OF TRADING COMPANIES IN THE DOWNSTREAM EUROPEAN GAS MARKET: A SUCCESSIVE OLIGOPOLY APPROACH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of successive oligopoly is used to analyse the European natural gas market, focusing on the role of trading companies and their interaction with gas producers. Producers of natural gas are assumed to form an oligopoly, while downstream within-country traders of gas can be represented either as local oligopolists or perfect competitors. The model therefore has a two-level structure, in which producers engage in competition a la Cournot, and each producer is a Stackelberg leader with respect to traders, who may be Cournot oligopolists or perfect competitors. Several conclusions emerge. First, successive oligopoly (so-called "double marginalisation") yields higher prices and lower consumer welfare than if oligopoly exists only on one level. Second, due to the high concentration of traders, oligopoly in the trading market distorts prices more than oligopoly in production. Third, trader profits depends on whether producers can price discriminate among consuming sectors. If such price discrimination is possible, producers collect a greater share of the margins on end-use prices. Finally, when the number of traders increases, end-use prices approach competitive levels. Thus, it is important to prevent monopolistic structures in the downstream gas market. In the case where oligopolistic trading

Maroeska G. Boots; Fieke A. M. Rijkers; Benjamin F. Hobbs

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Imputed Wellhead Value of Natural Gas Marketed Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thousand Dollars) Thousand Dollars) Data Series: Quantity of Production Imputed Wellhead Value Wellhead Price Marketed Production Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History U.S. 124,074,399 1989-2006 Alabama 2,167,627 2,010,736 2,489,704 1,020,599 994,688 0 1989-2011 Alaska 2,576,028 2,439,193 2,944,546 1,163,554 1,185,249 0 1989-2011 Arizona 3,484 3,913 3,710 2,269 753 0 1989-2011 Arkansas 1,739,324 1,782,837 3,891,921 2,330,692 3,556,609 0 1989-2011 California 2,038,915 2,033,054 2,483,126 1,095,181 1,396,916 0 1989-2011 Colorado 7,361,709 5,680,388 9,642,428 4,812,014 6,250,380 0 1989-2011

284

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

SciTech Connect

New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

Restructuring and renewable energy developments in California:using Elfin to simulate the future California power market  

SciTech Connect

We provide some basic background information on support for renewable in California on the expected operation of the power pool and bilateral markets, and on the three key policy types modeled here. We discuss the Elfin production cost and expansion planning model as well as key assumptions that we made to model the future California pool. We present results from the successful Elfin models runs. We discuss the implications of the study, as well as key areas for future research. Additional information on results, Elfin's expansion planning logic, and resource options can be found in the appendices.

Kirshner, Dan; Kito, Suzie; Marnay, Chris; Pickle, Steve; Schumacher, Katja; Sezgen,Osman; Wiser, Ryan

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Associates, citing NYMEX natural gas bid-offer spreadAnalysis of the Market for Natural Gas Futures. ” The EnergyProfiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts:

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature MarketProjected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2013 Prepared by NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 managed by Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DC-A36-08GO28308 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

288

Unbundling the retail gas market: Current activities and guidance for serving residential and small customers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restructuring of retail gas services has followed a typical pattern for previously heavily regulated industries: large customers are initially given rights to purchase unbundled services from different entities, with the same rights dispersed over time to smaller customers. For about ten years now industrial customers in most states have been able to {open_quotes}play the market{close_quotes}. Since the passage of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 636 in 1992, interest has centered on expanding service unbundling to small retail customers, including residential customers. Importantly, the Order prohibited pipelines from providing bundled sales service. This is not surprising - in the telecommunications industry, for example, the unbundling of wholesale services was a strong stimulant for developing competition in the local exchange market. The push for small-customer service unbundling has derived from the basic but politically attractive idea that all retail customers should directly benefit from competitive forces in the natural gas industry. When one looks at the movement of prices since 1985, it is easy to see that large retail customers have enjoyed more favorable prices than other retail customers. For example, over the period 1985 to 1994 gas prices to industrial customers and electric utilities fell around 23 percent and 36 percent, respectively. In comparison, gas prices to residential customers increased by around 5 percent while gas prices to commercial customers decreased slightly by about 1 percent. This report examines various aspects of unbundling to small retail gas customers, with special emphasis on residential customers.

Costello, K.W.; Lemon, J.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix B. Summary Tables Table B1. U.S. Annual Average Values from 2015 to 2025 low/ low/ high/ high/ low/ low/ high/ high/ low/ low/ high/ high/ low/ low/ high/ high/ baseline slow rapid slow rapid baseline slow rapid slow rapid baseline slow rapid slow rapid baseline slow rapid slow rapid NATURAL GAS VOLUMES (Tcf) Net Exports (1.90) (0.29) 0.11 0.17 1.74 (1.32) 0.32 0.70 0.79 2.35 (2.72) (1.17) (0.88) (0.73) 0.66 (2.00) (0.38) 0.01 0.07 1.64 gross imports 3.62 3.70 3.70 3.74 3.76 3.19 3.25 3.26 3.27 3.31 4.27 4.42 4.53 4.48 4.68 3.70 3.78 3.79 3.82 3.85

290

The future of U.S. natural gas production, use, and trade Sergey Paltsev a,b,n  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capture and storage (CCS), and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants are modeled as perfect subThe future of U.S. natural gas production, use, and trade Sergey Paltsev a,b,n , Henry D. Jacoby 19 May 2011 Available online 16 June 2011 Keywords: Natural gas Climate Policy International gas

291

,"Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marketed Production (MMcf)" Marketed Production (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1998 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1140_r19f_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1140_r19f_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:28 AM"

292

Implied marketing covenant in oil and gas leases: some needed changes for the 80's  

SciTech Connect

Anticipating an increase in litigation on the lessee's duty to market natural gas which has been discovered on the leasehold, the authors review the lessee's obligation under the implied covenant to market. In light of the increased pressures on the lessee by federal regulations and the downturn in demand, any reevaluation of the nearly 100-year-old covenant should focus on the standard of conduct and standard of proof by which a lessee's marketing activities are to be judged; i.e., a review of the continued viability of the reasonably prudent operator standard. A review of case law finds that in those instances where the parties to a lease share a common interest in production, the lessee should be allowed to exercise his business judgement without fear of second guessing by judge or jury. The increase of the standard of proof to a clear and convincing evidence level achieves an acceptable compromise.

Kramer, B.M.; Pearson, C.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Future of Coal in a Greenhouse Gas Constrained World Howard Herzog1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Future of Coal in a Greenhouse Gas Constrained World Howard Herzog1 , James Katzer1 1 M coal can make to the growing world energy demand during a period of increasing concern about global pursue in the short-term so that we can utilize coal in the longer-term and reduce its associated CO2

294

The Future of U.S. Natural Gas Production, Use, and Trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two computable general equilibrium models, one global and the other providing U.S. regional detail, are applied to analysis of the future of U.S. natural gas as an input to an MIT study of the topic. The focus is on ...

Paltsev, Sergey

295

me m Progra earch s Re International Gas Market Workshop Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

m me Themes s earch Progra • European Price Transition from oil indexation to hub a tural Gas Re pricing. • Europe and Asia LNG ‘Tug of War’

296

Gas Market Transition: Buildup of Power Sector Demand: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Just how fast is natural gas demand for power generation growing in response to the many new gas-fired units being built? This simple question has a far from simple answer, due to confusing streams of data, the interplay between new efficient gas combined cycle units and existing capacity, and the surprisingly low overall levels of capacity utilization observed among the new units. This report dissects each component of gas use in the power sector and provides a novel, integrated view of near term trends...

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

297

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9050sd2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9050sd2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:02 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9050SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" 25749,0 27575,0 27941,0 28306,0 29036,914 29402,1193 29767,1155 30132,2331

298

Market Opportunities for Electric Drive Compressors for Gas Transmission, Storage, and Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is great interest in the large potential market for electric drives in the gas transmission, gas storage, and gas processing industries. Progressive electric utilities and astute vendors are moving to meet the needs of these industries as they confront rapid changes and new realities. New policy and economic considerations, brought on by changes in environmental and business regulations and new compressor/driver technology, are causing these gas industry companies to consider electric motors for replacement of older gas engines and for new compressor installations. In ozone nonattainment regions, bringing gas compressor stations into compliance with NOx emission regulations is a must. Outside those regions, new electric drives are being considered because of their improved operating efficiencies and lower costs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), working through the EPRI Chemicals and Petroleum Office, is providing leadership in the efforts to further dialogue among gas companies, electric utilities, and vendors. EN strategists is working closely with EPRI, the electric utilities, and the gas transmission companies to promote consideration of The Electric Option.

Parent, L. V.; Ralph, H. D.; Schmeal, W. R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Efficient Retail Pricing in Electricity and Natural Gas Markets: A Familiar Problem with New Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A long line of research investigates whether the retail prices of electricity and natural gas send proper signals about scarcity in order to induce efficient consumption. Historically, regulated utilities have not designed tariffs that set marginal prices equal to marginal costs. Currently, some jurisdictions are opening the retail sectors of the gas and electricity industry to competition via “retail choice”. These new regimes replace imperfect regulation with imperfect competition as the process by which retail tariffs are formed. We discuss the challenges in evaluating the efficiency of these new pricing regimes and present descriptive evidence of how pricing has changed in markets with retail choice.

Steven L. Puller; Jeremy West

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Bringing Alaska North Slope Natural Gas to Market (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

At least three alternatives have been proposed over the years for bringing sizable volumes of natural gas from Alaskas remote North Slope to market in the lower 48 States: a pipeline interconnecting with the existing pipeline system in central Alberta, Canada; a GTL plant on the North Slope; and a large LNG export facility at Valdez, Alaska. NEMS explicitly models the pipeline and GTL options [63]. The what if LNG option is not modeled in NEMS.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Prices, exploration & production, pipelines, storage . U.S. Natural Gas Markets: Recent Trends and Prospects for the Future. Released: May 1, 2001.

302

The wholesale market for electricity in England and Wales : recent developments and future reforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The England and Wales wholesale electricity market is about to undergo major reform (NETA). I describe and analyse the proposed arrangements, contrasting them with those currently in operation. I argue that while NETA will ...

Sweeting, Andrew

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

EPRG WORKING PAPER A Nuclear Future? UK Government Policy and the Role of the Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meeting carbon targets requires decarbonising electricity. The least cost strategy involves nuclear power. In a liberalised electricity market, the price of electricity is set by fossil generation whose input costs are volatile but correlated with electricity prices. Nuclear power lacks that hedged and its finance is threatened by low and uncertain EUA prices. The increasing share of intermittent renewables exacerbates price risk. I propose changes to market design and the transmission access regime, while in the absence of an EU-wide reform to the ETS, a carbon tax seems the cheapest and fiscally most responsible way to deliver decarbonised electricity. Keywords JEL Classification Nuclear power, intermittent renewables, wholesale electricity markets, market design, transmission access, balancing, carbon tax

David M. Newbery; David M. Newbery

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

At the NYMEX futures market, the settlement price for November delivery of natural gas moved up most days before dropping by almost 0.19 per MMBtu on Friday to end the week...

305

International market integration for natural gas? : a cointegration analysis of priced in Europe, North America and Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the degree of natural gas market integration in Europe, North America and Japan, between the mid 1990?s and 2002. Our hypothesis is that there was a certain split of prices between Europe and North America. The ...

L'Hegaret, Guillaume

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The role of interruptible natural gas customers in New England heating oil markets: A preliminary examination of events in January-February 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an analysis of data collected from gas service providers and end-use customers in the six New England States and offers a preliminary assessment of the impact of interruptible gas customers on the distillate fuel oil market this past winter. Based on information collected and analyzed as of October 2000, the main findings areas follows: (1) For interruptible gas customers with distillate fuel oil as a backup fuel, their volume of interruptions was equivalent to about 1 to 2 percent of the total sales of distillate fuel oil in New England during January-February 2000. For the two peak weeks of gas supply interruptions, however, the equivalent volume of distillate fuel oil amounted to an estimated 3 to 6 percent of total sales in New England. There were no interruptions of the natural gas service during the 2-month period. (2) Purchases of distillate fuel oil by interruptible gas customers may have contributed somewhat to the spike in the price of distillate fuel oil in January-February 2000, especially during the peak weeks of gas interruptions. Nevertheless, other factors--a sudden drop in temperatures, low regional stocks of distillate fuels, and weather-related supply problems during a period of high customer demand--appear to have played a significant role in this price spike, as they have in previous spikes. (3) While this preliminary analysis suggests that interruptible natural gas service does not threaten the stability of the home heating oil market, several steps might be taken-without undermining the benefits of interruptible service--to reduce the potential adverse impacts of gas supply interruptions in times of market stress. Regardless of the magnitude of the impact of distillate fuel oil purchases by interruptible gas customers on Northeast heating oil markets, the threat of future heating oil price spikes and supply problems still remains. To help counter the threat, President Clinton in July 2000 directed Secretary Richardson to establish a heating oil component of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in the Northeast, and 2 million barrels of heating oil are now stored in the reserve. Other possible policy options are outlined.

None

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the accuracy of two methods to forecast natural gas prices:forecasting models along with the AEO forecast. Appendix ATable 1. Forecast Year AEO Predicted Price from 1996-2003

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Shale Gas and the Outlook for U.S. Natural Gas Markets and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Shale gas offsets declines in other U.S. supply to meet consumption growth and lower import needs Richard Newell, Paris June 2011 14 0 5 10 15 20 25 ...

309

Review of the Structure of Bulk Power Markets Grid of the Future White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is intended to provide an understanding of the needs of a restructured electricity market and some of the market methods and systems that have developed to address those needs. Chapter 2 discusses the historic market framework of vertically integrated utilities. Chapter 3 introduces the changes to the vertically integrated utility brought about by restructuring. It discusses generation and transmission planning, control and the regulatory process. It also summarizes reliability, security and adequacy. Chapter 4 discusses the basic structures of generation and transmission markets along with transmission-congestion contracts (TCCs) and transmission pricing principles. A discussion is given of the 12 ancillary services needed to reliably operate the power system. Chapter 4 also deals with the role of transmission in opening up markets to competition. In California increments (incs) and decrements (decs) are bid to overcome price differences in different zones caused by congestion. In PJM, any member can purchase Fixed Transmission Rights (FTRs) which allows the member to ''collect rent'' on congested lines and essentially obtain a hedge against congestion. There has been a worrisome slowdown in the growth of the transmission system in the United States since about the mid 70's. However, there are methods for providing incentives for construction of new transmission using tariffs. The California and PJM transmission planning processes are outlined. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has recently issued a proposed rulemaking on Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) which stated that the traditional methods of grid management are showing signs of strain and may be inadequate to support efficient and reliable transmission operations. Chapter 5 provides examples of market implementations and a discussion of the price spikes seen in the Midwest in the summers of 1998 and 1999. An examination of six restructured market systems is performed in some detail. The systems are California, PJM (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland), New England, United Kingdom (UK), Alberta, and Australia. Finally, there is a discussion of the price spikes that occurred in the Midwest this summer from the viewpoint of market performance. Chapter 6 deals with the concept of load as a resource. This is a novel idea that holds tremendous promise as technological advances permit real time control of loads based on the user's economic criteria. The user may be willing to curtail operations for some period of time when the spot price reaches a certain level, or the user may be willing to sell ancillary services to the system. Chapter 7 outlines the research needs presented by a restructured industry and the vital federal role in meeting these needs. Without federal participation, research to advance the public good will not be performed by an industry now focused on profit. Chapter 8 provides a summary and concluding remarks.

Kirby, B.J.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

310

Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Does large scale penetration of renewable generation such as wind and solar power pose economic and operational burdens on the electricity system? A number of studies have pointed to the potential benefits of renewable generation as a hedge against the volatility and potential escalation of fossil fuel prices. Research also suggests that the lack of correlation of renewable energy costs with fossil fuel prices means that adding large amounts of wind or solar generation may also reduce the volatility of system-wide electricity costs. Such variance reduction of system costs may be of significant value to consumers due to risk aversion. The analysis in this report recognizes that the potential value of risk mitigation associated with wind generation and natural gas generation may depend on whether one considers the consumer's perspective or the investor's perspective and whether the market is regulated or deregulated. We analyze the risk and return trade-offs for wind and natural gas generation for deregulated markets based on hourly prices and load over a 10-year period using historical data in the PJM Interconnection (PJM) from 1999 to 2008. Similar analysis is then simulated and evaluated for regulated markets under certain assumptions.

Bush, B.; Jenkin, T.; Lipowicz, D.; Arent, D. J.; Cooke, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Black Gold & Fool’s Gold: Speculation in the Oil Futures Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the question of whether the oil price spike of 2003-2008 was a bubble. We document and discuss what is known about the level of speculation in the paper oil market. We then analyze the dynamics of the ...

Parsons, John E.

312

An assessment of the future of closed-cycle gas turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The closed-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) has not reached the worldwide level of success that was expected inspite of the strongly desirable features of this concept and the success of several large closed-cycle power plants operating in Western Europe today. However, an assessment of the CCGT's future has recently been made at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), and IGT has shown that due to innovative developments in technologies relevant to the development of CCGT's, coupled with worldwide changes in some economic factors, the CCGT could become a successful competitor of other externally fired power plants and also of internal combustion engines, especially in sizes ranging from 200 to 5000 kW. Documentation of data recently published in the technical literature and some recent relevant developments at IGT in the area of combustion, show a promising future for the cost. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Fejer, A.A.; Khinkis, M.J.; Wurm, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Preliminary Economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the potential market for process heat produced by a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the environmental benefits reduced CO2 emissions will have on these markets, and the typical economics of projects using these applications. It gives examples of HTGR technological applications to industrial processes in the typical co-generation supply of process heat and electricity, the conversion of coal to transportation fuels and chemical process feedstock, and the production of ammonia as a feedstock for the production of ammonia derivatives, including fertilizer. It also demonstrates how uncertainties in capital costs and financial factors affect the economics of HTGR technology by analyzing the use of HTGR technology in the application of HTGR and high temperature steam electrolysis processes to produce hydrogen.

Larry Demick

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hydrogen production and delivery analysis in US markets : cost, energy and greenhouse gas emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen production cost conclusions are: (1) Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) is the least-cost production option at current natural gas prices and for initial hydrogen vehicle penetration rates, at high production rates, SMR may not be the least-cost option; (2) Unlike coal and nuclear technologies, the cost of natural gas feedstock is the largest contributor to SMR production cost; (3) Coal- and nuclear-based hydrogen production have significant penalties at small production rates (and benefits at large rates); (4) Nuclear production of hydrogen is likely to have large economies of scale, but because fixed O&M costs are uncertain, the magnitude of these effects may be understated; and (5) Given H2A default assumptions for fuel prices, process efficiencies and labor costs, nuclear-based hydrogen is likely to be more expensive to produce than coal-based hydrogen. Carbon taxes and caps can narrow the gap. Hydrogen delivery cost conclusions are: (1) For smaller urban markets, compressed gas delivery appears most economic, although cost inputs for high-pressure gas trucks are uncertain; (2) For larger urban markets, pipeline delivery is least costly; (3) Distance from hydrogen production plant to city gate may change relative costs (all results shown assume 100 km); (4) Pipeline costs may be reduced with system 'rationalization', primarily reductions in service pipeline mileage; and (5) Liquefier and pipeline capital costs are a hurdle, particularly at small market sizes. Some energy and greenhouse gas Observations: (1) Energy use (per kg of H2) declines slightly with increasing production or delivery rate for most components (unless energy efficiency varies appreciably with scale, e.g., liquefaction); (2) Energy use is a strong function of production technology and delivery mode; (3) GHG emissions reflect the energy efficiency and carbon content of each component in a production-delivery pathway; (4) Coal and natural gas production pathways have high energy consumption and significant GHG emissions (in the absence of carbon caps, taxes or sequestration); (5) Nuclear pathway is most favorable from energy use and GHG emissions perspective; (6) GH2 Truck and Pipeline delivery have much lower energy use and GHG emissions than LH2 Truck delivery; and (7) For LH2 Truck delivery, the liquefier accounts for most of the energy and GHG emissions.

Mintz, M.; Gillette, J.; Elgowainy, A. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( ES)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Natural Gas as a Future Fuel for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In addition to their significant environmental impacts, medium-duty and heavy-duty (HD) vehicles are high volume fuel users. Development of such vehicles, which include transit buses, refuse trucks, and HD Class 6-8 trucks, that are fueled with natural gas is strategic to market introduction of natural gas vehicles (NGV). Over the past five years the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) has funded technological developments in NGV systems to support the growth of this sector in the highly competitive transportation market. The goals are to minimize emissions associated with NGV use, to improve on the economies of scale, and to continue supporting the testing and safety assessments of all new systems. This paper provides an overview of the status of major projects under a program supported by DOE/OHVT and managed by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The discussion focuses on the program's technical strategy in meeting specific goals proposed by the N GV industry and the government. Relevant projects include the development of low-cost fuel storage, fueling infrastructure, and HD vehicle applications.

Wai-Lin Litzke; James Wegrzyn

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

316

Future Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-duty Vehicle Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diesel and hybrid technologies each have the potential to increase light-duty vehicle fuel economy by a third or more without loss of performance, yet these technologies have typically been excluded from technical assessments of fuel economy potential on the grounds that hybrids are too expensive and diesels cannot meet Tier 2 emissions standards. Recently, hybrid costs have come down and the few hybrid makes available are selling well. Diesels have made great strides in reducing particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions, and are likely though not certain to meet future standards. In light of these developments, this study takes a detailed look at the market potential of these two powertrain technologies and their possible impacts on light-duty vehicle fuel economy. A nested multinomial logit model of vehicle choice was calibrated to 2002 model year sales of 930 makes, models and engine-transmission configurations. Based on an assessment of the status and outlook for the two technologies, market shares were predicted for 2008, 2012 and beyond, assuming no additional increase in fuel economy standards or other new policy initiatives. Current tax incentives for hybrids are assumed to be phased out by 2008. Given announced and likely introductions by 2008, hybrids could capture 4-7% and diesels 2-4% of the light-duty market. Based on our best guesses for further introductions, these shares could increase to 10-15% for hybrids and 4-7% for diesels by 2012. The resulting impacts on fleet average fuel economy would be about +2% in 2008 and +4% in 2012. If diesels and hybrids were widely available across vehicle classes, makes, and models, they could capture 40% or more of the light-duty vehicle market.

Greene, D.L.

2004-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

317

Modelling Volatilities and Conditional Correlations in Futures Markets with a Multivariate t Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

number of assets. However, in most applications in ?nance the Gaussian as- sumption that underlies the two step procedure is likely to be violated. To capture the fat-tailed nature of the distribution of asset returns, it is more appropriate if the DCC... observations, but is nev- ertheless capable of rendering the devolatized returns approximately Gaussian. One of the main reasons for the non-Gaussian behavior daily returns is pres- ence of jumps in the return process as documented for a number of markets...

Pesaran, Bahram; Pesaran, M Hashem

318

WORKING PAPER SERIESFEDERAL RESERVE BANK of ATLANTA WORKING PAPER SERIES Trading Institutions and Price Discovery: The Cash and Futures Markets for Crude Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: We provide substantial evidence that the futures market for West Texas Intermediate crude oil increased the short-term volatility of the cash price of crude oil. We show that the variability of prices increased using both published posted prices and transaction prices for producers. This increased volatility in the price of crude oil may reflect information aggregated into the price, an increase the variance of shocks to the price of crude oil, or noise in the futures price that affects the cash price. We present evidence from experiments consistent with the interpretation that information aggregation not feasible in a posted-price market can explain at least part of the increase in variance. This evidence supports the proposition that information not previously aggregated into the cash price for crude oil is at least part of the reason for the greater variability of the cash price after the opening of the futures market and provides at least one example in which a futures market increased the volatility of the cash market, and prices became more efficient. JEL classification: G130, G140 Key words: crude oil, futures, posted price, experiments, experimental finance, price discovery, information aggregation

Albert Ballinger; Gerald P. Dwyer; Ann B. Gillette; Albert Ballinger; Gerald P. Dwyer; Ann B. Gillette

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 2, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 7 and 68 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $2.25 per MMBtu, decreasing by 51 cents or 18 percent. As of yesterday, the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub was the lowest since February 15, 2002, when natural gas at this location traded at $2.18 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

320

EIA Report 9/26/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts. Prices. NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/26/2008: Pre-Gustav 8/29/2008: change ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Response of the HadGEM2 Earth System Model to Future Greenhouse Gas Emissions Pathways to the Year 2300  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ensemble of simulations from the Earth System configuration of the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model, version 2 (HadGEM2-ES), is used to evaluate the response to historical and projected future greenhouse gas forcings that follow ...

John Caesar; Erika Palin; Spencer Liddicoat; Jason Lowe; Eleanor Burke; Anne Pardaens; Michael Sanderson; Ron Kahana

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of H.R. 3221  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of H.R. 3221 1 Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of H.R. 3221 November 2007 This paper responds to an October 31, 2007, request from Representatives Barton, McCrery, and Young. Their letter, a copy of which is provided as Appendix A, asks the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to assess selected provisions of H.R. 3221, the energy bill adopted by the House of Representatives in early August 2007. EIA was asked to focus on Title VII, dealing with energy on Federal lands; Section 9611, which would establish a Federal renewable portfolio standard (RPS) for certain electricity sellers; and Section 13001, which would eliminate the

323

Environmental concerns and future oil and gas developments in Coastal Wetlands of Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies have confirmed that much oil and natural gas have been overlooked and increases in future recoverable reserves will come from drilling in these areas. Increased production will result from identifying unexploited compartmentalized reservoirs, new infield reservoirs, and bypassed reservoirs, and by using enhanced recovery technologies for hydrocarbon recovery in incompletely drained reservoirs previously left unproduced for economic reasons. Most of southern Louisiana's hydrocarbon reserves underlie coastal wetland areas of the state. Major environmental concerns associated with the future development of existing reserves are canal dredging and destruction of wildlife habitat, use and disposal of oil-based muds, mitigation for wetland damage, and the recent emerging issue of surface contamination by naturally occurring radioactive materials with potential liabilities and future remedial regulation. To reduce wetland environmental damage caused by access canals to drilling sites, the Coastal Management Division of the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources instituted a geologic reviews program to review drilling permit application in the coastal wetlands. This process provides a mechanism for state and federal agencies to comment on the requested drilling permit. As a result of this process, the total average wetland disturbed area has been reduced from 767 ac per year in 1982 to approximately 76 ac per year in 1991. Average lengths of access canals also have been reduced by approximately 78% during the period. Oil and gas companies are becoming increasingly aware of the environmental consequences of drilling in wetlands and are considering them in planning for development activities. In the current climate of increasing public consciousness about the environment, addressing environmental concerns in the planning state will go a long way in helping alleviate future environmental problems.

John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Groat, C.G. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A Nuclear Future? UK Government Policy and the Role of the Market?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as is solar photovoltaic, leaving onshore wind which is almost competitive at present prices but faces challenges in visual acceptability and transmission connection. Offshore wind is costly, and so the concentrated power in North Africa appears a long way... , as Roques et al (2006, 2008) show. SKM (2008) gives rather optimistic levellised costs in 2020 at £38/MWh assuming a CO2 price of €30/EUA, gas at 55p/therm and coal at $110/tonne, when on-shore wind would be £60/MWh, offshore wind £85/MWh and both coal...

Newbery, David

325

Pipeline Access and Market Integration in the Natural Gas Industry: Evidence from Cointegration Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NattmdGas Pipeline of America(NGPL) Northern Natural GasNatural Gas Pipeline of America (NGPL) Teanease~Gas PipelineGas Pipeline of America(NGPL) Northern Natural Gas (NOR’H-I)

De Vany, Arthur; Walls, W. David

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Human resource needs and development for the gas industry of the future  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas industry will confront many challenges in the 1990s and beyond, one of which is the development of human resources to meet future needs. An efficient, trained work force in this era of environmental concern, high technology, and alternative fuels is essential for the industry to continue to meet the competition and to safely deliver our product and service to all customers. Unfortunately, during this period there will be an increasing shortfall of technical personnel to replace those lost to attrition and a steady decline in the availability of new employees who are able to read, write, and perform simple math. Technological and government developments that will impact the industry and the skill levels needed by the industry employees are reviewed. In-house and external training of professional and nonprofessional personnel and the benefits and disadvantages of selected advanced training methods are discussed. Recommendations are presented that can help improve the training of gas industry employees to meet future needs. 22 refs.

Klass, D.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: August 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 5, 2009) Natural gas prices posted increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday, with price increases at the spot market ranging between 12 and 43 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.61 per MMBtu, increasing by 20 cents or 5.9 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for September delivery increased by 49 cents to $4.042 per MMBtu. The September futures contract closed above $4.00 per MMBtu for the first time since June 19 on Monday, reaching $4.031 per MMBtu. The near-month

328

The Northeast Natural Gas Market in 2030 - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: Energy Information Administration, GasTran Gas Transportation System. = Underground Natural Gas Storage Facilities = LNG Facilities

329

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Office Electricity Modeling System POEMS U.S. Department of Energy NANGAS/IPM NANGAS North American

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

China: Future Customer or Competitor in Livestock Markets? Thomas Hertel, Professor; Alejandro Nin, Graduate Research Assistant; Allan Rae, Professor at Massey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China: Future Customer or Competitor in Livestock Markets? Thomas Hertel, Professor; Alejandro Nin livestock trade, which has been relatively neglected. China is a net exporter of livestock products of total trade reflects a steady deterioration of China's com- parative advantage in pork and poul- try

331

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXcase long-term natural gas price forecasts from theto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXcase long-term natural gas price forecasts from theto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXcase long-term natural gas price forecasts from theto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXcase long-term natural gas price forecasts from theto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

typical of an advanced combined cycle gas turbine), the $comparison between a combined cycle gas turbine and a fixed-

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparison between a combined cycle gas turbine and a fixed-typical of an advanced combined cycle gas turbine), the $

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

typical of an advanced combined cycle gas turbine), the $comparison between a combined cycle gas turbine and a fixed-

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Data mining investigation of co-movements on the Taiwan and China stock markets for future investment portfolio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On June 29, 2010, Taiwan signed an Economic Cooperation Framework Agreement (ECFA) with China as a major step to open markets between Taiwan and China. Thus, the ECFA will contribute by creating a closer relationship between China and Taiwan through ... Keywords: Association rules, Cluster analysis, Co-movements, Cross-national stock market, Data mining, Stock market investment portfolio

Shu-Hsien Liao; Shan-Yuan Chou

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Pipeline Access and Market Integration in the Natural Gas Industry: Evidence from Cointegration Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contract with the Natural Gas Supply Association. Strateconsupply fields form a common pool. Our empirical examination of natural gas

De Vany, Arthur; Walls, W. David

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Northeast Natural Gas Market in 2030 - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... “mature,” so North American production potential is limited LNG terminals in the Northeast offer regional supply diversity, proximity to markets, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gas Supply Outlook - Gauging Wellhead Deliverability Now and in the Future: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While developers are postponing or cutting back plans for new natural gas-fired plants, the next few years will record additions of gas-fired capacity. Over the long term, this growth is expected to continue, causing a 30 percent increase in U.S. natural gas demand by 2015. Are there any limits to the U.S. "dash to gas"? Extraordinarily high gas prices during the winter of 2000-01 offered a warning. The current study investigates the availability of natural gas, asking what is reasonable to expect.

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

342

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas prices), reversed this long-term trend in 2009gas market. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report 4. Price, Cost, and Performance Trends

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: July 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 8, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Price decreases at the spot market ranged between 1 and 44 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a few points in the lower 48 States posted small increases. During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $3.22 per MMBtu, decreasing by 11 percent since last Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for August delivery lost 44.2 cents and ended the report week at $3.353 per MMBtu. The price for the August 2009 contract has posted a

344

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 1, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 23, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices rose at almost all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 2 and 23 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.43 per MMBtu, increasing by 15 cents or about 5 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for October delivery increased by 10 cents to $3.860 per MMBtu. The November contract also posted gains this week, albeit much smaller at 4

345

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: November 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 28, 2009) Natural gas prices posted decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at virtually all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 6 and 46 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, a couple trading locations did post gains this week. The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell 21 cents or about 4 percent, ending trading yesterday at $4.59 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for November delivery expired yesterday at $4.289 per MMBtu, falling 81 cents or about 16 percent since last Wednesday. The December

346

Turmoil in U.S. Coal Markets: Integrating Pressures from Environmental Regulations, Renewables, Natural Gas and Globalization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. coal markets are changing due to intensifying domestic and international forces. This report reviews the extent of these changes, examines recent trends in supply and demand for coals from each major U.S. coal-producing region, and delineates the principal forces of change and their impacts now and in the future. The report quantifies changes due to environmental regulations, coal plant retirements, and power plant installation environmental controls that reduce the need for the lowest sulfur coals....

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daily price history of 1st-nearby NYMEX natural gas futuresthe daily history of the average 5-year natural gas futuresnatural gas prices. Figure 1 shows the daily price history

Bolinger, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daily price history of 1st-nearby NYMEX natural gas futuresthe daily history of the average 5-year natural gas futuresnatural gas prices. Figure 1 shows the daily price history

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts fromAEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts fromAEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

revisions to the EIA’s natural gas price forecasts in AEOsolely on the AEO 2005 natural gas price forecasts willComparison of AEO 2005 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to estimate the base-case natural gas price forecast, but toComparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from

Bolinger, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts fromAEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

revisions to the EIA’s natural gas price forecasts in AEOon the AEO 2005 natural gas price forecasts will likely onceComparison of AEO 2005 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to estimate the base-case natural gas price forecast, but toComparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXcase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO

Bolinger, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futurescase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEOto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futurescase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEOto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futurescase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEOto contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the base-case natural gas price forecast, but to alsoof AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futurescase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO

Bolinger, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 5, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 21-28), with price decreases generally occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and price increases dominant in trading locations in the eastern parts of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.20 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased for the report week, continuing a trend of rising prices that has occurred in futures markets for many commodities this spring, including futures prices for crude oil. The futures contract for June delivery, for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

How Competitive Market Dynamics Affect Coal, Nuclear and Gas Generation and Fuel Use -- A 10-Year Look Ahead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, the fourth in a series by EPRI and GRI addressing power industry deregulation, examines how restructuring is unleashing a new wave of merchant gas-fired plants. This phenomenon can lead to substantial regional changes in generation and fuel use, energy prices, and profitability-changes that have eluded analysts to date. Focusing on several regions in depth, this report breaks new ground in understanding the effects of turbulent, competitive market dynamics.

1999-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

362

Combustion Turbine Combined Cycle Technology Developments, Reliability Issues, and Related Market Conditions: EPRI Gas Turbine Exper ience and Intelligence Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulating power generation markets worldwide present both business opportunities and challenges for combustion turbine (CT) plant owners, operators, and project developers. The "EPRI Gas Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report" (GTE&IR) provides concise, well-organized, up-to-date technical, strategic, and business information for combustion turbine (CT) power producers. This technical report assembles all of the content from the most recent three years of GTE&IR (seven editions) into a single docu...

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

363

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between a combined cycle gas turbine and a fixed-priceadvanced combined cycle gas turbine), the $2.3/MMBtu NYMEX

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this “hybrid” NYMEX-EIA gas price projection still does notcomparison with fixed- price renewable generation (becauseonly a portion of the gas price forecast – through 2010 –

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Capacity Markets and Market Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The good news is that market stability can be achieved through a combination of longer-term contracts, auctions for far enough in the future to permit new entry, a capacity management system, and a demand curve. The bad news is that if and when stable capacity markets are designed, the markets may seem to be relatively close to where we started - with integrated resource planning. Market ideologues will find this anathema. (author)

Stauffer, Hoff

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 shows the monthly natural gas price forecast for 2010 forthe winter when the natural gas prices are lower compared toSep Oct Nov Dec Fig 11 Natural gas price forecast for 2010

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 shows the monthly natural gas price forecast for 2010 forwinter when the natural gas prices are lower compared to theannual prices. Nat. Gas Price (2007$ / MMBtu) New England

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Impacts of a gas cartel on the European gas market – selected results from the supply model EUGAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

b, * This article introduces the simulation model EUGAS which allows a quantitative analysis of the long-term natural gas supply of Europe. Based on chosen parameter specifications, the simulation shows that no discernible physical gas scarcity at least for the next 20-30 years will occur in Europe. Significant investments in new production and transport facilities will be necessary during the next decades. Diversification of supplies and political considerations will have a significant impact on the development of new natural gas resources. Possibly, a new built gas cartel similar to the OPEC may modify the gas supply pattern of Europe.

J. Perner A; A. Seeliger

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Pipeline Access and Market Integration in the Natural Gas Industry: Evidence from Cointegration Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System for Natural Gas Pipelines." Study prepared underin the Natural Gas Pipeline Industry. Ph.D. dissertation,the remaining barfers to pipeline integration. REFERENCES

De Vany, Arthur; Walls, W. David

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market research on solar water heaters. National Renew- ablecom- bined space/water heaters, solar water heaters,combined solar space/water heater, electric water heaters

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market research on solar water heaters. National Renewabletankless combined space/water heaterds, solar water heaters,combined solar space/water heater, electric water heaters

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Northeast Natural Gas Market in 2030 - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Analysis Team Leader Energy Information Administration (EIA) william.trapmann@eia.doe.gov

373

The effect of LNG on the relationship between UK and Continental Europena natural gas markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the price of crude oil will stimulate oil drilling and hence increase the production costs of natural gas, which pushes up its price. Third, as many of the firms drilling for crude oil also drill for natural gas, increasing oil prices result in an increased... in 1995, Barton and Vermeire (1999) claim that gas-on-gas competition in the UK has weakened the oil and gas price link. They argue that gas prices can now move over the range determined by, on the lower end, the marginal cost of gas production and...

Koenig, Philipp

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

374

Market model finds tight gas sands R and D offers most promise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unconventional natural gas (UNG) - primarily tight gas sands - offers by far the largest opportunity for reducing gas costs between now and 2000, a team of researchers reported at the Sept. 1984 International Gas Research conference in Washington, DC. The promises of UNG R and D far outweigh those of synthetic natural gas (SNG), the researchers concluded, but stressed that SNG R and D should nonetheless continue - but with a different focus and changed performance goals.

Not Available

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H[sub 2] and CO, usually containing CO[sub 2]) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H{sub 2} and CO, usually containing CO{sub 2}) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and other gas shale basins in the U.S., this paper discusses the impact of shale gas exploration and production on the potential for CCS in the Marcellus and other units in...

378

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the EIA’s natural gas price forecasts in AEO 2004 and AEOcost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generationwith variable price gas-fired generation that are based

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Public transportation is not going to work : non-work travel markets for the future of mass transit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For public transportation agencies to attract new riders in an automobile-dominated environment, niche markets must be targeted. The downtown journey to work is already recognized as a successful niche for transit. This ...

Cohen, Alexander Nobler, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Orphan drugs : future viability of current forecasting models, in light of impending changes to influential market factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interviews were conducted to establish a baseline for how orphan drug forecasting is currently undertaken by financial market and industry analysts with the intention of understanding the variables typically accounted for ...

Gottlieb, Joshua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report. HTR Multiplex market assessment  

SciTech Connect

The HTR Multiplex utilizes the HTR as an energy source to produce multiple forms of energy. A specific type of multiplex utilizing a high temperature chemical heat pipe (CHP) is examined. Forecasts of the US electric energy markets and industrial heat markets are developed for the 1995-2010 time period. Costs of multiplexes in these markets are compared to costs of the conventional forecast mix of electric generation systems and to costs of fluidized bed combustors in the industrial heat market. The comparisons are by National Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region. The major finding of the study is that a large potential US market exists for the HTR Multiplex in two segments of the electric and industrial heat markets. It is concluded that the HTR Multiplex can provide peaking and mid-range electricity plus industrial heat for one and two-shift operations at costs approximately 50 percent lower than available alternatives. This market is estimated to be at least 300 GW/sub t/ (about 7 quads per year) in the 1995 to 2010 time period.

Leeth, G.G.; Meyer, C.F.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Join Shell and Purdue for a series of discussions that will explore preventative measures to minimize risk of oil spills, the future of natural gas infrastructure, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to minimize risk of oil spills, the future of natural gas infrastructure, and the challenges we face in our-deepwater Exploration" 10:30am ­ 11:30am Panel Discussion: "Natural Gas and the Logistics of Changing Infrastructures ENERGY DAY A Symposium on the New Frontiers in Oil and Natural Gas Exploration #12;

383

U.S. Natural Gas Storage and The Global LNG Market  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. natural gas storage operators are in a good position to take advantage of growing liquefied natural gas (LNG) trade. With the largest storage capacity in the ...

384

Conference on natural gas use state regulation and market dynamics in the Post 636/Energy Policy Act Era: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Reports in this Record of Proceedings explore a wide variety of issues related to the regulation of natural gas and its future role as one of the critical fuels that powers the economy of the United States. The focus is mainly on problems, obstacles, barriers, and the incredibly complex system created to bring a fuel from wellhead to burner tip. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Alaska railroad's future freight market. Volume III. Final report 1 Jul 74-30 Apr 76  

SciTech Connect

The study forecasts the freight market of the Alaska Railroad (ARR) due to natural resource development and pipeline construction in Alaska. This has been done through: (a) evaluation of those resources with commercial development potential which could generate rail service demand; and (b) development and analysis of petroleum development schedules and pipeline construction scenarios. Detailed price and market analysis of Alaskan coal and copper resources were performed. Forecasts of ARR traffic were based upon econometric relationships between the Alaskan economy and petroleum royalties and construction expenditures. Volume three provides a detailed review of ARR's recent freight market, pipeline construction scenarios and other activities which could significantly affect the ARR, and provides forecasts of the Alaska Railroad's freight traffic through 1990.

Hillegas, B.D.; Pernela, L.M.; Lewis, D.C.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach to evaluating price risk would be to use suchthe base-case natural gas price forecast, but to alsorange of different plausible price projections, using either

Bolinger, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Natural Gas - Pub - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Natural Gas Markets Workshop International Natural Gas Markets Workshop EIA's Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Biofuels Analysis has scheduled an International Natural Gas Markets Workshop on Thursday, August 23, 2012, in our EIA offices. The workshop will focus on the international natural gas market as it exists today (with an emphasis on the European and Asian markets), and the outlook for the international natural gas market in the future. Confirmed expert speakers include: Jim Jensen, Jensen Associates; Ben Schlesinger, Benjamin Schlesinger and Associates; Thierry Bros, Societe Generale; Rob Smith, Facts Global Energy; Howard Rogers, Oxford Institute of Energy Studies, Edward Chow, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS); Ken Medlock, Rice University; and Frank Graves or Phil Hanser, The Brattle Group.

388

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 2, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 25, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 18, natural gas spot prices fell at most markets across the lower 48 States. Although a majority of markets posted declines of as much as $1.36 per million Btu (MMBtu), selected western market locations posted relatively narrow gains on the week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.36 per MMBtu, or about 8 percent, averaging $3.99 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, August 25, falling below $4 per MMBtu for the first time since May 7. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.871 per

389

Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regional differences in energy markets and climates, as welldiverse climates and energy markets. These differences areanalyze the effect of other energy market policies in future

Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Impact of Natural Gas Market Conditions on Fuel Flexibility Needs for Existing and New Power Generation: Report Series on Natural Ga s and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ongoing surge in new gas-fired capacity is changing the landscape of how natural gas will be used for power generation, leading to some surprising effects. While the new machines bring greater efficiency, the exit of dual-fuel units leads to a loss in fuel flexibility, greater natural gas price volatility, and less reliability of natural gas-fired generation. This report explores these effects systematically, bringing fresh insight on gas use in the electric sector, its market effects, and the ever-c...

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

U.S. Natural Gas Storage and The Global LNG Market  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

U.S. natural gas storage operators are in a good position to take advantage of growing liquefied natural gas (LNG) trade. With the largest storage capacity in the world, the United States has the capability to import LNG in the summer for winter peak use. The normal falloff in global natural gas demand during the summer frees up some LNG supplies, but storage operators in many countries compete for this gas. The ability of U.S. operators to attract LNG supplies depends on the relative prices in the United States and other countries. At the same time, LNG imports compete with domestic supplies.

Information Center

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Non-utility marketers provide over 20% of residential natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... customers–averaging over 85% of total deliveries since 2000. Starting October 1, 1999, all residential natural gas customers ...

393

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiences of residential consumers and utilities. OakStar (2008). Energy Star Residential Water Heaters: Finalefficiency improvements for residential gas furnaces in the

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appliance_standards/residential/water_ pool_heaters_prelim_Star (2008). Energy star residential water heaters: Finalefficiency improvements for residential gas furnaces in the

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AEO 2005 reference case oil price forecast and NYMEX oi lthan the reference case oil price forecast for that year. Inoil futures case” where oil prices are based on the NYMEX

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Price risk management: Electric power vs. natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As deregulation continues, will electricity resemble gas as a commodity, when it comes to futures markets and forward deals? Overall, yes; the signs are there. But differences will remain-in volatility, the prominence of regional factors, and the importance of shortrun engineering fundamentals. This article examines these differences and concludes that engineering and economic analyses will prove more important in the future in assessing risk in the electric power commodity market than in the gas industry.

Rose, J.; Mann, C. [ICF Kaiser International, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Understanding Sectoral Labor Market Dynamics: An Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examines the response of employment and wages in the US oil and gas ...eld services industry to changes the dynamic response of wages and employment in the U.S. Oil and Gas Field Services (OGFS) industry to changes in the price of crude petroleum using quarterly data from 1972 to 2002. The oil industry provides an important

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

398

Energy Conservation Potential in Natural Gas Fueled Reciprocating Engines - A Preliminary Market Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was undertaken of the usage rates of both fuel and lubricants in reciprocating engines fueled with natural gas. The study was conducted to determine the potential for energy conservation, if use is made of more fuel efficient natural gas engine oils. Governmental and non-governmental published reports and personal interviews with users, suppliers, and manufacturers were utilized in estimating fuel and lubricant consumption figures for the year 1976. Certain important facts emerged: 1) The installed horsepower of reciprocating engines fueled by natural gas was estimated at 38,800,000 hp. 2) Reciprocating engines fueled by natural gas operated an estimated 115.2 billion brake horsepower - hours. 3) Total natural gas consumed to operate these reciprocating engines in 1976 was estimated at 962 billion cubic feet. 4) The estimated crankcase and cylinder lubricants consumed in natural gas reciprocating engines in 1976 was 33.6 million gallons. This figure represents 2% of the total United States lubricant usage. 5) Widespread use of more fuel efficient crankcase and cylinder lubricants (containing stable colloidal additives) could result in a savings of 28,850,000,000 cubic feet of natural gas each year. The natural gas thus saved would be sufficient to serve all residential customers in the metropolitan Houston area for nine (9) months of each year.

Johnson, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

U. S. gas market adapting to commoditization; electricity likely to follow similar course  

SciTech Connect

With the final implementation of Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Order 636 in 1994, the US natural gas industry fully entered the third phase of an evolution from regulation to deregulation and, finally, commoditization. Now, the only major segment of the natural gas industry left to fully deregulate is that of local distribution companies behind the city gate with smaller customers. A model for that type of deregulation exists in Canada, where in the Province of Ontario homeowners can choose from whom to buy gas. Other industries, such as long-distance telephone service and airlines, have recently gone through his evolution. The effect of commoditization is similar to that of Order 636, which unbundled the transportation and sales services of US interstate gas transmission pipelines. Commoditization has unbundled the risks inherent to the gas industry. The paper discusses deregulation, increased risks, risk management steps, financial instruments, and electricity deregulation.

Pruner, D. (KCS Energy Risk Management Inc., Edison, NJ (United States))

1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

400

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Alaska railroad's future freight market. Volume II. Final report 1 Jul 74--30 Apr 76  

SciTech Connect

The study forecasts the freight market of the Alaska Railroad (ARR) due to natural resource development and pipeline construction in Alaska. This has been done through: (a) evaluation of these resources with commercial development potential which could generate rail service demand; and (b) development and analysis of petroleum development schedules and pipeline construction scenarios. Detailed price and market analysis of Alaskan coal and copper resources were performed. Forecasts of ARR traffic were based upon econometric relationships between the Alaskan economy and petroleum royalties and construction expenditures. Volume Two inventories Alaskan natural resources. It includes detailed coal and copper evaluations, describes petroleum related growth and development in Alaska, and contains schedules of petroleum production, employment, state revenues, and pipeline construction employment by scenario.

Hillegas, B.D.; Pernela, L.M.; Lewis, D.C.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Alaska railroad's future freight market. Volume I. Final report, 1 Jul 1974--30 Apr 1976  

SciTech Connect

The study forecasts the freight market of The Alaska Railroad (ARR) due to natural resource development and pipeline construction in Alaska. This has been done through: (a) evaluation of those resources with commercial development potential which could generate rail service demand; and (b) development and analysis of petroleum development schedules and pipeline construction scenarios. Detailed price and market analyses of Alaskan coal and copper resources were performed. Forecasts of ARR traffic were based upon econometric relationship between the Alaska economy and petroleum royalties and construction expenditures. Volume One contains the Executive Summary; it describes the study scope and methodology, and highlights ARR's recent experiences, the Alaskan economy, and resource development status.

Hillegas, B.D.; Pernela, L.M.; Lewis, D.C.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 1, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the lower 48 States, although prices generally rose in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain areas. The Henry Hub spot price fell on the week from $3.99 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.73 per MMBtu, its lowest value since April 1, 2010. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2010 natural gas futures contract fell about 3 percent from $3.896 per MMBtu to $3.762 per MMBtu. During the report week, the September 2010 natural gas futures contract expired at $3.651, having lost about $1.176 per MMBtu during its

404

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2012; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Barbose, G.; Darghouth, N.; Hoen, B.; Mills, A.; Weaver, S.; Porter, K.; Buckley, M.; Fink, S.; Oteri, F.; Tegen, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2011; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2010; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Meeting future exhaust emissions standards using natural gas as a vehicle fuel: Lessons learned from the natural gas vehicle challenge '92  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge '92, organized by Argonne National Laboratory and sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Energy, Mines, and Resources - Canada, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and many others, resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck, donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers strived to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine-out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student-modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors in achieving good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Meeting future exhaust emissions standards using natural gas as a vehicle fuel: Lessons learned from the natural gas vehicle challenge `92  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge `92, organized by Argonne National Laboratory and sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Energy, Mines, and Resources - Canada, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and many others, resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck, donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers strived to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine-out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student-modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors in achieving good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Scoping Economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NGNP Project has the objective of developing the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology to supply high temperature process heat to industrial processes as a substitute for burning of fossil fuels, such as natural gas. Applications of the HTGR technology that have been evaluated by the NGNP Project for supply of process heat include supply of electricity, steam and high-temperature gas to a wide range of industrial processes, and production of hydrogen and oxygen for use in petrochemical, refining, coal to liquid fuels, chemical, and fertilizer plants.

Larry Demick

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Rise of Shale Gas: Implications of the shale gas boom for natural gas markets, environmental protection and U.S. energy policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Through the processes of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, once overlooked deposits of natural gas in shale formations have become economically viable to extract. In… (more)

Lovejoy, Cassandra L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Small Gas Turbines for Distributed Generation Markets: Technology, Products, and Business Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small gas turbines (300 kW to 5 MW) offer an attractive way for utilities and energy service companies to generate electric power within distribution grids and for consumers to generate their own power. Distributed generation also benefits utilities by deferring or avoiding costly expansion of the power transmission and distribution system, which could allow them to offer customers lower cost power. Gas turbines process more power-generation cycle air per unit size and weight of machine than do reciproca...

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

412

Muslim oil and gas periphery; the future of hydrocarbons in Africa, southeast Asia and the Caspian. Master`s thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis is a study of the contemporary political, economic, and technical developments and future prospects of the Muslim hydrocarbon exporters of Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Caspian. The established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia has four members in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and is systemically increasing its production of natural gas. I analyze US government and corporate policies regarding the countries and the major dilemmas of the Muslim hydrocarbon periphery. The first chapter provides a selective overview of global energy source statistics; the policies, disposition and composition of the major hydrocarbon production and consumption players and communities; a selective background of OPEC and its impact on the globe; and a general portrait of how the Muslim periphery piece fits into the overall Muslim oil and gas puzzle. Chapter two analyzes the established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia asking the following questions: What are the major political, economic, and technical trends and dilemmas affecting these producer nations. And what are the United States` policies and relationships with these producers. Chapter three asks the same questions as chapter two, but with regard to the newly independent states of the Caspian Sea. I probe the regional petroleum exploration and transportation dilemmas in some detail.

Crockett, B.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Development of Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines for the DR Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, reciprocating engines are a key facet of the distributed resources (DR) market, ranging from residential, commercial, and industrial standby generators to peaking, peakshaving, prime power, and cogeneration units used in commercial, institutional, and industrial applications. Reciprocating engines have over 100 years of development and application experience for mobile and stationary uses, with several million engines produced annually. In more recent time, forecasts have been made about decre...

2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

414

Pressure on the well servicing market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the well servicing and workover (ws/wo) market is extremely strong and is expected to grow even stronger in the foreseeable future, several pressures are affecting the overall market. These pressures include (1) uncertainty about crude oil prices that is forcing operators to reconsider some marginal ws/wo prospects; (2) demand for oil and gas in future periods; (3) effect of current rate of rig building; and (4) changing requirements of producers. This discussion evaluates the probable effects of possible changes in each of these areas.

Haynes, J.P.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Livermore energy policy model and projections of energy futures for the Gas Research Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy and Resource Planning Group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was asked by the Gas Research Institute to evaluate ten of their research projects relative to proposed funding levels for 1982. These energy technology projects included gas from unconventional and synthetic sources as well as utilization technologies. The primary tool used in the evaluation was the LLNL Energy Policy Model (EPM). The report gives background information about the study, the basic assumptions used in the study, and some conclusions, and presents selected supporting results from the EPM runs.

Castleton, R.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Injection/withdrawal scheduling for natural gas storage facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control decisions for gas storage facilities are made in the face of extreme uncertainty over future natural gas prices on world markets. We examine the problem faced by owners of storage contracts of how to manage the injection/withdrawal schedule of ... Keywords: natural gas storage, optimization, scheduling

Alan Holland

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Assessing the fuel Use and greenhouse gas emissions of future light-duty vehicles in Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is of great concern in Japan, as well as elsewhere, such as in the U.S. and EU. More than 20% of GHG emissions in Japan come from the transportation sector, and a more than 70% ...

Nishimura, Eriko

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

STATE OF THE ART AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS IN NATURAL GAS ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current, state of the art natural gas engines provide the lowest emission commercial technology for use in medium heavy duty vehicles. NOx emission levels are 25 to 50% lower than state of the art diesel engines and PM levels are 90% lower than non-filter equipped diesels. Yet, in common with diesel engines, natural gas engines are challenged to become even cleaner and more efficient to meet environmental and end-user demands. Cummins Westport is developing two streams of technologies to achieve these goals for medium-heavy and heavy-heavy duty applications. For medium-heavy duty applications, lowest possible emissions are sought on SI engines without significant increase in complexity and with improvements in efficiency and BMEP. The selected path builds on the capabilities of the CWI Plus technology and recent diesel engine advances in NOx controls, providing potential to reduce emissions to 2010 values in an accelerated manner and without the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction or NOx Storage and Reduction technology. For heavy-heavy duty applications where high torque and fuel economy are of prime concern, the Westport-Cycle{trademark} technology is in field trial. This technology incorporates High Pressure Direct Injection (HPDI{trademark}) of natural gas with a diesel pilot ignition source. Both fuels are delivered through a single, dual common rail injector. The operating cycle is entirely unthrottled and maintains the high compression ratio of a diesel engine. As a result of burning 95% natural gas rather than diesel fuel, NOx emissions are halved and PM is reduced by around 70%. High levels of EGR can be applied while maintaining high combustion efficiency, resulting in extremely low NOx potential. Some recent studies have indicated that DPF-equipped diesels emit less nanoparticles than some natural gas vehicles [1]. It must be understood that the ultrafine particles emitted from SI natural gas engines are generally accepted to consist predominantly of VOCs [2], and that lubricating oil is a major contributor. Fitting an oxidation catalyst to the natural gas engine leads to a reduction in nanoparticles emissions in comparison to engines without aftertreatment [2,3,4]. In 2001, the Cummins Westport Plus technology was introduced with the C Gas Plus engine, a popular choice for transit bus applications. This incorporates drive by wire, fully integrated, closed loop electronic controls and a standard oxidation catalyst for all applications. The B Gas Plus and the B Propane Plus engines, with application in shuttle and school buses were launched in 2002 and 2003. The gas-specific oxidation catalyst operates in concert with an optimized ring-pack and liner combination to reduce total particulate mass below 0.01g/bhphr, combat ultrafine particles and control VOC emissions.

Dunn, M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

419

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 1, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 23, 2010) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, June 16, completely reversing the previous weekÂ’s gains. However, spot prices remain significantly higher than they were 3 weeks ago. Prices at most market locations fell between 10 and 25 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) this week, with most locations ending the week below $5 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.804 per MMBtu, decreasing by 17 cents or about 4 percent during the report week. In

420

LNG links remote supplies and markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has established a niche for itself by matching remote gas supplies to markets that both lacked indigenous gas reserves and felt threatened in the aftermath of the energy crises of the 1970s and 1980s. It has provided a cost-effective energy source for these markets, while also offering an environmentally friendly fuel long before that was fashionable. The introduction of natural-gas use via LNG in the early years (mostly into France and Japan) has also allowed LNG to play a major role in developing gas infrastructure. Today, natural gas, often supplied as LNG, is particularly well-suited for use in the combined cycle technology used in independent power generation projects (IPPs). Today, LNG players cannot simply focus on monetizing gas resources. Instead, they must adapt their projects to meet the needs of changing markets. The impact of these changes on the LNG industry has been felt throughout the value chain from finding and producing gas, gas treatment, liquefaction, transport as a liquid, receiving terminals and regasification, and finally, to consumption by power producers, industrial users, and households. These factors have influenced the evolution of the LNG industry and have implications for the future of LNG, particularly in the context of worldwide natural gas.

Avidan, A.A.; Gardner, R.E.; Nelson, D.; Borrelli, E.N. [Mobil LNG Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Rethore, T.J. [Arthur D. Little Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition: Present Status and Future Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than two decades ago, the van der Waals behavior of the nucleon - nucleon force inspired the idea of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter. Heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies offer the unique possibility for studying this phase transition in a finite, hadronic system. A general overview of this subject is given emphasizing the most recent results on nuclear calorimetry.

J. Pochodzalla; ALADIN collaboration

1996-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

422

International LNG trade : the emergence of a short-term market; International liquefied natural gas trade : the emergence of a short-term market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Natural gas is estimated to be the fastest growing component of world primary energy consumption. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply chain is a way of… (more)

Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 30, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 22, 2011) Natural gas prices fell slightly at most market locations from Wednesday, June 15 to Wednesday, June 22. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents from $4.52 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $4.42 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the July 2011 near-month futures contract fell by 26 cents, or about 6 percent, from $4.58 last Wednesday to $4.32 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,354 this week, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

424

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 20, 2011) Natural gas prices rose at most market locations during the week, as consumption increased. The Henry Hub spot price increased 19 cents from $4.14 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, April 13 to $4.33 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 20. Futures prices behaved similar to spot prices; at the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (May 2011) rose from $4.141 per MMBtu to $4.310 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

425

WesternGovernors’Asociation Transportation Fuels for the Future Natural Gas and Propane WGA Hydrogen Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The following report is based on the contributions of the individuals and organizations listed below. The Team members were chosen for their breadth of knowledge and industry or policy experience. The group was assembled with the goal of having a wide scope of interests including industry, academia and environmental analysis. The group also worked towards consensus viewpoints on the critical issues impacting the development of natural gas and propane as commercially available alternative fuels. This consensus model helped to achieve a balanced perspective on the challenges and potential solutions to further commercial development of this alternative transportation fuel.

Tom Brotherton Weststart/calstart; Curtis Donaldson; Cleanfuel Usa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2008 2, 2008 Next Release: May 29, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, May 14, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States. However, a price rally yesterday (May 21) contributed to price increases at some market locations since last Wednesday, May 14. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 11 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 1 percent, to $11.40 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $11.64 per MMBtu, rising 4 cents or less than 1 percent since Wednesday, May 14. Natural gas in storage was 1,614 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 16, which is slightly below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an

427

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2009 16, 2009 Next Release: April 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 15, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with some exceptions including those in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent. Despite this weekÂ’s upticks at most locations, natural gas spot prices remain at relatively low levels and have continued to trade within a limited range for the past 4 weeks. The Henry Hub spot market prices gained about 10 cents or 2.9 percent per million Btu (MMBtu), ending trading yesterday at $3.60 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 15) at $3.693

428

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: December 11, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, December 3, 2008) Since Wednesday, November 26, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, although selected markets posted relatively modest gains on the week. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 5 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or less than 0.5 percent, to $6.48 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (December 3) at $6.347 per MMBtu, falling 53 cents per MMBtu or about 8 percent since last Wednesday, November 26. Natural gas in storage was 3,358 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

429

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 30, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 22, 2010) Since Wednesday, September 15, natural gas spot prices fell at most markets across the lower 48 States, with declines of less than 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, selected markets in the Rocky Mountains and at the Florida citygate posted considerably larger declines, falling by as much as $0.51 per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.04 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $4.02 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, September 22. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.966 per

430

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 24, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 16, 2011) With imports (particularly from outside North America) becoming less significant to U.S. natural gas markets, spot natural gas prices this report week appeared largely unaffected by international events that have had large impacts on other energy commodities. As weather turned spring-like in many parts of the country and storage withdrawals continued to slow dramatically, the Henry Hub spot price increased just $0.04 to $3.85 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased slightly for delivery in the near-term. The futures contract for

431

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 2, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 7 and 68 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $2.25 per MMBtu, decreasing by 51 cents or 18 percent. As of yesterday, the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub was the lowest since February 15, 2002, when natural gas at this location traded at $2.18 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

432

Venezuela. [LPG marketing and production  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied petroleum gas marketing and production from Venezuela are not very complicated or big in the business. There is moderate LPG production since the main production comes from oil. There is about 2.3 million bpd of oil production compared with less than 70,000 bpd of gas liquids. Of more than 95% of the associated gas produced with the oil, 50% is injected as a condensate recovery process. Up to now, the LPG plants have been producing only a trickle, most of it from gas before it was injected. In the future program for gas utilization, it is estimated that by 1980 about twice the liquid that is now being produced would be available for exportation to natural markets of the Gulf of Mexico and the east coast. The production of about 7 million tons until the year 2000 can be continued with good conservation and with the future potential area that has been discovered in the south part of the lake and offshore Venezuela.

Reyes, A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Emerging energy security issues: Natural gas in the Gulf Nations, An overview of Middle East resources, export potentials, and markets. Report Series No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This paper proceeds with a presentation of the natural gas resource base of the Gulf nations of the Middle East. The resource base is put in the context of the world natural gas resource and trade flows. This is followed by a discussion of the existing and planned project to move Gulf natural gas to consuming regions. Then a discussion of the source of demand in the likely target markets for the Gulf resource follows. Next, the nature of LNG pricing is discussed. A brief summary concludes the paper.

Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas spot prices generally declined this report week (June 17-24), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.19 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.80. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for natural gas decreased as prices for most energy products fell amid concerns over the economy. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery decreased by 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.761. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday, June 19, is

436

Natural Gas Conveyance and Rates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Natural gas transportation market; Competition vs. market power; Rate structures Cost-of-service Performance based rates

Information Center

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

H. R. 4604: a bill to promote competition in the natural gas market, to ensure open access to transportation service, to encourage production of natural gas, to provide natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices, to eliminate demand restraints, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 16, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Policy Act Amendments of 1986 promotes competition in the natural gas market. Title I ensures open access to transportation service by requiring that interstate pipelines not discriminate in providing transportation services. Title II encourages production of natural gas by removing wellhead price controls and repealing jurisdiction over first sales. Title III provides natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices and eliminates demand restraints. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural gas monthly, August 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis presents the most recent data on natural gas prices, supply, and consumption from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The presentation of the latest monthly data is followed by an update on natural gas markets. The markets section examines the behavior of daily spot and futures prices based on information from trade press, as well as regional, weekly data on natural gas storage from the American Gas Association (AGA). This {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} closes with a special section comparing and contrasting EIA and AGA storage data on a monthly and regional basis. The regions used are those defined by the AGA for their weekly data collection effort: the Producing Region, the Consuming Region East, and the Consuming Region West. While data on working gas levels have tracked fairly closely between the two data sources, differences have developed recently. The largest difference is in estimates of working gas levels in the East consuming region during the heating season.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Residential Price - Marketers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential and Commercial Consumers by Local Distribution and Marketers in Selected States (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet ...

443

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 7, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 31, natural gas spot prices climbed at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with increases of as much as 8 percent. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.15, or about 4 percent, to $4.08 per million Btu (MMBtu), in a week of trading shortened by the Good Friday holiday on April 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 7, at $4.02 per MMBtu, rising by $0.15 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,669 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 29, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 21, 2011) Natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations across the United States, as moderate temperatures led to declines in demand. Prices at the Henry Hub fell from $4.01 per MMBtu last Wednesday, September 14, to $3.78 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (October 2011) dropped from $4.039 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.73 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,201 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 20, 2011) Responding to extremely hot weather this week, natural gas prices moved up at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents from $4.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 13, to $4.64 per MMBtu yesterday, July 20. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) increased from $4.403 per MMBtu to $4.500 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,671 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

446

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 10, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 2, 2010) Since Wednesday, May 26, natural gas spot prices increased across the lower 48 States, with gains of up to $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu), at most market locations. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.13 per MMBtu, or about 3 percent, averaging $4.32 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, June 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.42 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.25 or about 6 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,357 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May

447

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: June 25, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 17, 2009) Natural gas prices increased across the board at both the spot and futures markets. Price jumps at spot market locations in the Lower 48 States ranged up to $1 per million Btu (MMBtu) with an overall average of 53 cents per MMBtu. During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.99 per MMBtu, increasing by 12 percent since last Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices of futures contracts rose this week. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery gained 54.5 cents and ended the report week at $4.253 per MMBtu. Meanwhile, the price for the August 2009 contract rose by 53 cents,

448

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: August 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 5, 2009) Natural gas prices posted increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday, with price increases at the spot market ranging between 12 and 43 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.61 per MMBtu, increasing by 20 cents or 5.9 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for September delivery increased by 49 cents to $4.042 per MMBtu. The September futures contract closed above $4.00 per MMBtu for the first time since June 19 on Monday, reaching $4.031 per MMBtu. The near-month

449

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas prices, slow growth in electricity demand, and uncertainty surrounding future environmental regulations

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Key Federal Decisions/Regulation of the Gas Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Led to market dislocations, gas “bubble” Orders 436, 500, 636 (1985 - 1993) restructured interstate market Natural Gas Decontrol Act ...

451

Modeling of Future-Year Emissions Control Scenarios for the Lower Fraser Valley: Impacts of Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MC2–CALGRID photochemical modeling system is used to simulate the impact of two fuel substitution scenarios on ozone levels for a future year in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada. The relative impacts of selected natural gas ...

M. Hedley; W. Jiang; R. McLaren; D. L. Singleton

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The driving forces on the Swedish compressed natural gas market and the impact on OKQ8's strategy; The driving forces on the Swedish compressed natural gas market and the impact on OKQ8's strategy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This paper aims to examine how the driving forces of the Swedish CNG market have impacted OKQ8’s strategies. This has been conducted through the… (more)

Malmström, Martin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: December 18, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, December 3, to Wednesday, December 10, 2008) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, with all trading regions registering losses with the exception of the Rocky Mountains. On the week, the spot prices at each market location outside the Rockies fell between 2 and 93 cents per MMBtu, with the Henry Hub registering a decrease of 80 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract declined each day for the first 3 days of the report and increased on Tuesday and Wednesday (December 9-10), resulting in a

454

A Regional Approach to Market Monitoring in the West  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Markets 2002. “Southwest Not So Hot;3. July California Energy Markets 2002. “Heat Storm Bringsp. 5. California Energy Markets 2003. “Gas Blitz Electrifies

Barmack, Matthew; Kahn, Edward; Tierney, Susan; Goldman, Charles

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2008 30, 2008 Next Release: November 6, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 29) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States decreased from Wednesday to Wednesday, October 22-29, with relatively large declines of more than 10 percent occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and more modest price movements in the eastern half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.36 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.58. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week. The futures contract for November delivery, for which the final day of trading was yesterday (October 29), decreased by

456

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: February 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 11, 2009) Natural gas prices decreased this week as space-heating demand slackened with a break from the bitter cold of prior weeks. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.33 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week as the economic downturn is expected to be accompanied with a large-scale reduction in demand for all energy products, thus affecting prices for energy in forward markets. The futures contract for February 2009 delivery decreased by 6.5 cents per MMBtu on the week to

457

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 20, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 12, 2011) Wholesale natural gas prices at most market locations east of the Mississippi River moved higher this week as a bitter cold moved into the eastern half of the country. West of the Mississippi River, a gradual warming trend resulted in lower prices. During the report week (January 5-12), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.03 to $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased during the report week, likely in part due to forecasts of continuing cold weather and improving economic conditions. The futures

458

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 11, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 3, 2010) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, limiting demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices declined, with the biggest decreases occurring at markets in the Rocky Mountains and the Midcontinent. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.15 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by $0.10 on the week to $4.76 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 26, working gas in underground storage was

459

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 1, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 24, 2010) The natural gas market is transitioning to spring, a “shoulder” season of lower demand between the relatively high-demand periods of winter and summer. As space-heating demand ebbed during the report week, prices declined across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price ended trading yesterday, March 24, at $4.02 per million Btu (MMBtu), a decrease of $0.25 compared with the previous Wednesday, March 17. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices continued to decline as storage inventories appeared more than adequate and domestic production remained strong. The futures contract for April

460

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Market Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Market Trends Economic Activity Renewables International Oil Markets Oil & Natural Gas Energy Demand Coal Electricity Emissions The projections in AEO2001 are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend forecasts, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose, advocate, or speculate on future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes, when defined, are reflected.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas futures market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Market Research Berkeley FIRST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Research Berkeley FIRST i dDevi Prasad Dt: 03/25/2008 #12;2 Customer Survey Goalsy 1 has > 50% natural gas component ( l di l t i h ) 38 9% 82 d t(excluding electric charges) 38.9% 82 Determine market barriers and purchase factors1.Determine market barriers and purchase factors 2.Relation

Kammen, Daniel M.

462

An economical and market analysis of Canadian wood pellets.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study systematically examined the current and future wood pellet market, estimated the cost of Canadian torrefied pellets, and compared the torrefied pellets with the conventional pellets based on literature and industrial data. The results showed that the wood pellet industry has been gaining significant momentum due to the European bioenergy incentives and the rising oil and natural gas prices. With the new bioenergy incentives in USA, the future pellets market may shift to North America, and Canada can potentially become the largest pellet production centre, supported by the abundant wood residues and mountain pine beetle (MPB) infested trees.

Peng, J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: January 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 7, 2009) Since Wednesday, December 31, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States except in the Northeast region. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 26 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or about 5 percent, to $5.89 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 7) at $5.872 per MMBtu, climbing 22 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since last Wednesday, December 31. Natural gas in storage was 2,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 2, which is about 3 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

464

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: April 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 8, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 1, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 40 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell by 6 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $3.50. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 8, at $3.63 per MMBtu, declining by 7 cents or about 2 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 3, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

465

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 14, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 6, 2010) Since Wednesday, December 30, natural gas spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases of more than 10 percent on the week. Prices at the Henry Hub climbed $0.68 per MMBtu, or about 12 percent, to $6.47 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, January 6, at $6.01 per MMBtu. The price of the near-month contract increased by 30 cents or about 5 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,123 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

466

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 2, 2009) Natural gas spot prices soared this week, following significant, albeit smaller decreases in trading the prior week. Spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States by more than a dollar per million Btu (MMBtu). The only exception occurred at the Leidy location in the Northeast, which rose by 84 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week at $4.67 per MMBtu, $1.35 per MMBtu higher than last Wednesday. Trading at the Henry Hub ended yesterdayÂ’s session 14 cents higher than the January 2010 contract. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

467

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 29, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 21, 2009) Since Wednesday, October 14, natural gas spot prices increased at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes generally ranging between $0.31 and $1.14 per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed 98 cents per MMBtu, or about 26 percent, to $4.80 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, October 21, at $5.10 per MMBtu, increasing by 66 cents or about 15 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was a record-setting 3,734 billion cubic feet

468

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 3, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 18, 2009) Since Wednesday, November 11, natural gas spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases of up to 55 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed $0.15 per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, to $3.74 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, November 18, at $4.254 per MMBtu. The price of the near-month contract decreased by 25 cents or about 6 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was a record-setting 3,833 billion cubic feet

469

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 21, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 13, 2010) Natural gas spot prices posted gains at most markets across the lower 48 States since Wednesday, October 6, accompanied by double-digit increases in trading since the holiday weekend. Price increases on the week ranged up to 25 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the Henry Hub natural gas spot price increasing $0.02 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $3.58 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, October 13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.696 per MMBtu, falling by $0.169, or about 4 percent, since the previous Wednesday.

470

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 20, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 19, 2011) Natural gas prices posted modest net gains at most market locations across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price increased from $3.54 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, October 12, to $3.58 per MMBtu yesterday, October 19. Intra-week trading showed strong rallies followed by quick retreats. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (November 2011) gained about 10 cents on the week from $3.489 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.586 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,624 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, October 14, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

471

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: October 2, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 17, to Wednesday, September 24) Since Wednesday, September 17, natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices rising as much as $2.02 per MMBtu but climbing less than $1 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 33 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent, to $8.15 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (September 24) at $7.679 per MMBtu, declining 23 cents per MMBtu or about 3 percent since last Wednesday, September 17. Natural gas in storage was 3,023 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

472

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 14, 2010) Natural gas prices moved significantly lower at market locations across the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub spot price averaged $4.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) in trading yesterday, July 14, decreasing $0.37 compared with the previous Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub decreased in 4 out the 5 trading sessions during the report week. The near-month contract settled yesterday at $4.31 per MMBtu, about $0.26 lower than the previous Wednesday. As of Friday, July 9, working gas in underground storage was 2,840

473

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 4, 2009 Next Release: May 21, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 13, 2009) Since Wednesday, May 6, natural gas spot prices rose at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 49 and 95 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed by 75 cents per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $4.42 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, May 13, at $4.333 per MMBtu, increasing by 45 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 2,013 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 8, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

474

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: August 21, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 6, to Wednesday, August 13) Since Wednesday, August 6, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling between $0.20 and 0.77 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $0.59 per MMBtu or about 7 percent, to $8.11 per MMBtu—its lowest level since February 8, 2008. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (August 12) at $8.456 per MMBtu, declining $0.31 or about 4 percent since Wednesday, August 6. Natural gas in storage was 2,567 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

475

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 20, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 12, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes ranging between 6 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, May 12, at $4.18 per MMBtu, 18 cents higher than the preceding week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.284 per MMBtu, increasing by 29 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,089 billion cubic feet (Bcf)

476

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 18, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 10, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 3, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with decreases of as much as 11 percent. Prices at the Henry Hub declined $0.32, or about 7 percent, to $4.44 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, March 10, at $4.56 per MMBtu, falling by $0.20 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,626 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 5, about 1 percent above the 5-year average (2005-2009). The implied

477

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: June 12, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Spot gas at most market locations (outside the Rocky Mountain Region) traded above $10 per million Btu (MMBtu) this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday), with many points registering prices in excess of $12 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub moved higher by 38 cents per MMBtu compared with its settlement price a week ago, ending yesterday (June 4) at $12.379 MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 1,806 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 30, which is 0.1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased

478

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: October 23, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For week ending Wednesday, October 15) Since Wednesday, October 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the California, West Texas, and Arizona/Nevada regions, with prices rising as much as 76 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub rose 6 cents per MMBtu or about 1 percent, to $6.64 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (October 15) at $6.592 per MMBtu, declining 15 cents per MMBtu or about 2 percent since last Wednesday, October 8. Natural gas in storage was 3,277 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

479

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: February 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 18, 2009) Since Wednesday, February 11, natural gas spot prices declined at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 3 and 78 cents per MMBtu. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 33 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 7 percent, to $4.35 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 18) at $4.214 per MMBtu, declining 32 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,996 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 13, which is about 8.4 percent above the 5-year average

480

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: November 14, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, November 5) Since Wednesday, October 29, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Midwest, Northeast, and Alabama/Mississippi regions, with gains of up to $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) in a week of highly variable prices. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 36 cents per MMBtu or about 5 percent, to $6.94 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (November 5) at $7.249 per MMBtu, climbing 47 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent since last Wednesday, October 29. Natural gas in storage was 3,405 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

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481

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 6, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 29, 2009) Since Wednesday, July 22, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations, with decreases of as much as 19 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 8 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $3.41 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday, July 29, at $3.379 per MMBtu, decreasing by 41 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,023 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of July 24, which is about 19 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

482

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: July 31, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, July 16, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling more than $1 per MMBtu at most locations during the period. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 11 percent, to $9.89 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $9.788 per MMBtu, declining $1.61 or about 14 percent since Wednesday, July 16. Natural gas in storage was 2,396 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of July 18, which is about 1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net injection of 84 Bcf.

483

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: July 10, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 25, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices rising up to 5 percent during the period. Prices at the Henry Hub increased 55 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 4 percent, to $13.31 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterdayat $13.389 per MMBtu, rising 52 cents or about 4 percent since Wednesday, June 25. Natural gas in storage was 2,118 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of June 27, which is about 3 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net injection of 85 Bcf.

484

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 27, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 19, 2010) Since last Wednesday, May 12, natural gas spot prices generally rose at market locations across the lower 48 States, with only a few exceptions. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price increased about 2 percent since last Wednesday, from $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.28 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the June 2010 futures contract fell about 3 percent, from $4.284 per MMBtu to $4.158 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price dropped about 8 percent, from $75.65 per barrel ($13.05 per MMBtu) to $69.91 per barrel

485

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2009 7, 2009 Next Release: September 3, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 26, 2009) Since Wednesday, August 19, natural gas spot prices fell at all market locations, with decreases ranging between 10 and 39 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 26 cents per MMBtu, or about 9 percent, to $2.76 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, August 26, at $2.91 per MMBtu, decreasing by 21 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,258 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of August 21, which is about 18 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

486

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: September 11, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 27, to Wednesday, September 3) Since Wednesday, August 27, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling more than $1 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $1.29 per MMBtu or about 15 percent, to $7.26 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (September 3) at $7.264 per MMBtu, declining $1.344 or about 16 percent in its first week as the near-month contract. Natural gas in storage was 2,847 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of August 29, which is about 4 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007),

487

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: March 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 11, 2009) Since Wednesday, March 4, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 59 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell 31 cents per MMBtu, or about 7 percent, to $3.92 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, March 11, at $3.80 per MMBtu, declining 54 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,681 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 6, which is about 13 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

488

Natural Gas Marketed Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 20,196,346 21,112,053 21,647,936 22,381,873 24,036,352 25,307,949 1900-2012 Alaska 433,485 398,442 397,077 374,226 356,225 351,259 1967-2012 Alaska Onshore 368,344 337,359 349,457 316,546 294,728 315,682 1992-2012 Alaska State Offshore 65,141 61,084 47,620 57,680 61,496 35,577 1992-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 2,798,718 2,314,342 2,428,916 2,245,062 1,812,328 1,507,564 1997-2012 Federal Offshore Alabama 1992-1998 Federal Offshore Louisiana 1992-1998 Federal Offshore Texas 1992-1998 Louisiana 1,365,333 1,377,969 1,548,607 2,210,099 3,029,206 2,955,437 1967-2012 Louisiana Onshore 1,293,590 1,292,366 1,472,722 2,140,525 2,958,249 2,882,193 1992-2012 Louisiana State Offshore

489

Natural Gas Marketed Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011...

490

OIL &GAS MARKETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Please note that this PDF is subject to specific restrictions that limit its use and distribution. The terms and conditions are available at www.iea.org/about/ copyright.asp MEDIUM-TERM

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Natural Gas Market Information  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presentation by Barbara Mariner-Volpe, February 2001, to the Bangladesh Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources

Information Center

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: July 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 8, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Price decreases at the spot market ranged between 1 and 44 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a few points in the lower 48 States posted small increases. During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $3.22 per MMBtu, decreasing by 11 percent since last Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for August delivery lost 44.2 cents and ended the report week at $3.353 per MMBtu. The price for the August 2009 contract has posted a

493

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: November 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 28, 2009) Natural gas prices posted decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at virtually all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 6 and 46 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, a couple trading locations did post gains this week. The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell 21 cents or about 4 percent, ending trading yesterday at $4.59 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for November delivery expired yesterday at $4.289 per MMBtu, falling 81 cents or about 16 percent since last Wednesday. The December

494

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 1, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 23, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices rose at almost all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 2 and 23 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.43 per MMBtu, increasing by 15 cents or about 5 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for October delivery increased by 10 cents to $3.860 per MMBtu. The November contract also posted gains this week, albeit much smaller at 4

495

Technical Status, Operating Experience, Risk and Market Assessment of Clean Coal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas fired combustion turbines and combined cycle plants have dominated the recent power generation markets in the United States and in much of Europe. However, concerns over natural gas price spikes have led many power companies to initiate studies and projects on clean coal technologies as a strategic hedge against over-reliance on natural gas alone to provide future power needs. Regulatory policy, site and project related issues, coal type, and risk assessment by the financiers and owners will ...

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

496

Market potential of IGCC for domestic power production  

SciTech Connect

Mitretek Systems and CONSOL Inc. have completed the first phase of a market potential study for Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) domestic power production. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this study. The objective of this study is to provide DOE with data to estimate the future domestic market potential of IGCC for electricity generation. Major drivers in this study are the state of technology development, feedstock costs, environmental control costs, demand growth, and dispatchability. This study examines IGCC potential for baseload power production in the Northeast U. S., an important market area by virtue of existing coal infrastructure and proximity to coal producing regions. IGCC market potential was examined for two levels of technology development as a function of natural gas price and carbon tax. This paper discusses the results of this study, including the levels of performance and cost necessary to insure competitiveness with natural gas combined cycle plants.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.; Hawk, E.; Maskew, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

498

2008 Solar Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Looking back—sizing the 2008 solar market. ” pp. 88–93.Iberdrola launches its first solar thermal power plant. ”Analysis of a future solar market, management summary. Bonn,

Price, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

500

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. , 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 8, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 30, 2010) Since Wednesday, June 23, natural gas spot prices decreased across the lower 48 States, with declines of as much as $0.68 per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.37, or about 7 percent, averaging $4.53 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, June 30. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.616 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.24 or about 5 percent since the previous Wednesday. The futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired in trading on Monday, June 28, at $4.717 per MMBtu, climbing $0.39 per MMBtu during its