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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Summary" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

2

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

3

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

4

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

5

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

6

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

7

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,451,1,35,17,,,10,3,0,48...

8

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,13889,36,837,1016,,,1129,181,...

9

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,151,-1,1,6,,,0,0,0,36...

10

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,6305,-3,226,165,,,884,391,10,...

11

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,495,-3,48,11,,,113,0,31,60...

12

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,11457,-3,122,171,,,219,21,7,7...

13

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,877,0,37,79,,,93,32,2,62...

14

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"...

15

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"...

16

,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"...

17

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

18

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"6...

19

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

20

,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 5","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

22

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

23

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"6...

24

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

25

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

26

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,...

27

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

28

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

29

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

30

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

31

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

32

,"Illinois Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

33

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

34

,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

301967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

35

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

36

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

37

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

38

,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

39

Mississippi Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

40

Montana Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Kansas Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

42

Kentucky Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

43

Maryland Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

44

Colorado Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

45

California Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

46

Michigan Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

47

Nebraska Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

48

Illinois Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

49

Arizona Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

655 523 712 183 168 117 1971-2012 From Gas Wells 654 523 711 183 168 117 1971-2012 From Oil Wells * * * 0 0 0 1971-2012 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 From Coalbed...

50

Arkansas Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

51

Alabama Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

52

Arizona Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

53

Indiana Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

54

Missouri Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

55

Florida Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

56

,"Arizona Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"N3050AZ3","N3010AZ3","N3020AZ3","N3035AZ3","NA1570SAZ3","N3045AZ3" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Arizona Natural Gas...

57

,"Vermont Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

80SVT3","N3050VT3","N3010VT3","N3020VT3","N3035VT3","N3045VT3" "Date","Vermont Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Vermont Natural Gas Pipeline and...

58

Natural Gas Imports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Netscape Navigator 3+ Make sure that JavaScript is enabled in your browser U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports by State (Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: Import Volume Import...

59

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050WI3","N3010WI3","N3020WI3","N3035WI3","N3045WI3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Wisconsin (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Wisconsin...

60

,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2012,"6301982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MN3","N3010MN3","N3020MN3","N3035MN3","N3045MN3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Minnesota (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Minnesota...

62

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050CA3","N3010CA3","N3020CA3","N3035CA3","N3045CA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in California (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","California Price...

63

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050TN3","N3010TN3","N3020TN3","N3035TN3","N3045TN3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Tennessee (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Tennessee Price...

64

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050PA3","N3010PA3","N3020PA3","N3035PA3","N3045PA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Pennsylvania (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Pennsylvania...

65

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050LA3","N3010LA3","N3020LA3","N3035LA3","N3045LA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Louisiana (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Louisiana Price...

66

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050ID3","N3010ID3","N3020ID3","N3035ID3","N3045ID3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Idaho (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Idaho Price of...

67

Maine Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

131,035 149,736 76,540 1982-2012 Exports 0 0 2,131 452 1,028 6,952 2007-2012 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 20 32 0 0 0 36 1981-2012 Withdrawals 40 32...

68

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050KY3","N3010KY3","N3020KY3","N3035KY3","N3045KY3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Kentucky (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Price of...

69

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050OH3","N3010OH3","N3020OH3","N3035OH3","N3045OH3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Ohio (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Ohio Price of Natural...

70

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050CO3","N3010CO3","N3020CO3","N3035CO3","N3045CO3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Colorado (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Colorado Price of...

71

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MO3","N3010MO3","N3020MO3","N3035MO3","N3045MO3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Missouri (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Price of...

72

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050UT3","N3010UT3","N3020UT3","N3035UT3","N3045UT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Utah (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Utah Price of Natural...

73

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050NE3","N3010NE3","N3020NE3","N3035NE3","N3045NE3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Nebraska (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Nebraska Price of...

74

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050OK3","N3010OK3","N3020OK3","N3035OK3","N3045OK3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Oklahoma (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Price of...

75

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050TX3","N3010TX3","N3020TX3","N3035TX3","N3045TX3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Texas (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Price of...

76

,"Illinois Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050IL3","N3010IL3","N3020IL3","N3035IL3","N3045IL3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Illinois (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Illinois Price of...

77

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MD3","N3010MD3","N3020MD3","N3035MD3","N3045MD3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Maryland (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Maryland Price of...

78

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050AR3","N3010AR3","N3020AR3","N3035AR3","N3045AR3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Arkansas (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Arkansas Price of...

79

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MI3","N3010MI3","N3020MI3","N3035MI3","N3045MI3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Michigan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Price of...

80

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050VA3","N3010VA3","N3020VA3","N3035VA3","N3045VA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Virginia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Virginia Price of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nevada Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NA NA NA NA 2006-2010 NA NA NA NA 2006-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.72 9.44 7.93 7.19 6.77 5.13 1984-2012 Residential 14.17 13.33 13.18 12.25 10.66 10.14 1967-2012 Commercial 12.03 11.21 10.92 9.77 8.07 7.43 1967-2012 Industrial 11.77 11.10 11.22 10.53 8.99 7.34 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 9.99 9.24 8.97 8.13 4.76 8.97 1991-2012 Electric Power 6.31 8.26 5.50 5.75 5.00 3.49 1997-2012 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 4 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2012 Gross Withdrawals 5 4 4 4 3 4 1991-2012 From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2012 From Oil Wells 5 4 4 4 3 4 1991-2012 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2012 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2012

82

Missouri Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1967-1997 1967-1997 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.53 8.03 7.06 6.17 5.85 5.27 1984-2012 Residential 13.42 13.36 12.61 11.66 12.02 12.25 1967-2012 Commercial 11.82 12.02 10.81 10.28 9.99 9.54 1967-2012 Industrial 10.84 11.32 9.55 8.70 8.54 7.93 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 8.44 8.66 7.86 6.34 6.11 5.64 1994-2012 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2012 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 53 100 1989-2012 Gross Withdrawals 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2012 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

83

Nebraska Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.86 6.22 2.97 3.98 1967-2010 4.86 6.22 2.97 3.98 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.67 8.12 5.87 5.62 5.11 4.31 1984-2012 Residential 11.15 11.11 9.34 8.95 8.84 8.68 1967-2012 Commercial 9.16 9.62 7.44 7.08 6.69 6.19 1967-2012 Industrial 7.97 9.12 6.02 5.85 5.61 4.34 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 15.10 15.29 1994-2012 Electric Power 8.97 W W W 5.74 3.93 1997-2012 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 186 322 285 276 322 270 1989-2012 Gross Withdrawals 1,560 3,083 2,916 2,255 1,980 1,328 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 1,317 1967-2012 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 11 1967-2012 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2012

84

Maryland Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wellhead Wellhead NA NA NA NA 1967-2010 Imports 7.25 9.09 4.05 5.37 5.30 13.82 1999-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 9.24 10.23 8.02 6.49 6.26 5.67 1984-2012 Residential 15.17 16.07 13.73 12.44 12.10 12.17 1967-2012 Commercial 12.30 13.12 10.87 9.87 10.29 10.00 1967-2012 Industrial 11.59 13.46 10.70 9.05 8.61 8.01 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 11.40 14.66 11.20 5.99 5.09 -- 1993-2012 Electric Power 7.89 11.16 5.42 5.77 5.44 W 1997-2012 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 7 7 7 7 8 9 1989-2012 Gross Withdrawals 35 28 43 43 34 44 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 44 1967-2012 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2012 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 From Coalbed Wells

85

Oregon Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5.27 5.33 4.00 4.92 1979-2010 5.27 5.33 4.00 4.92 1979-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.14 8.82 7.79 6.78 5.84 5.21 1984-2012 Residential 14.65 13.89 14.52 12.49 11.76 11.22 1967-2012 Commercial 12.36 11.57 11.86 10.10 9.60 8.91 1967-2012 Industrial 9.30 9.07 9.70 7.05 6.84 5.87 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 6.59 8.03 7.11 5.61 4.23 4.57 1992-2012 Electric Power 6.10 7.08 4.25 4.57 W W 1997-2012 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 18 21 24 26 24 27 1989-2012 Gross Withdrawals 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 1979-2012 From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 1979-2012 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2012 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2012

86

Iowa Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.79 5.12 5.57 4.93 4.84 4.93 1989-2013 4.79 5.12 5.57 4.93 4.84 4.93 1989-2013 Residential 8.74 10.17 13.06 14.85 16.00 NA 1989-2013 Commercial 6.66 7.31 8.29 7.93 8.02 NA 1989-2013 Industrial 5.00 5.14 5.17 4.65 4.64 4.79 2001-2013 Electric Power 6.10 4.82 4.44 4.12 3.99 4.38 2002-2013 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Total Capacity 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 2002-2013 Gas in Storage 209,512 215,593 221,664 230,749 245,317 261,998 1990-2013 Base Gas 197,897 197,897 197,897 197,897 197,897 197,897 1990-2013 Working Gas 11,615 17,696 23,768 32,853 47,421 64,102 1990-2013 Injections 228 6,604 6,409 9,737 15,463 16,682 1990-2013 Withdrawals 1,655 523 337 651 895 1 1990-2013 Net Withdrawals 1,427 -6,081 -6,072 -9,085 -14,568 -16,681 1990-2013

87

Indiana Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

78 7.58 4.05 4.13 1967-2010 78 7.58 4.05 4.13 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.83 8.94 5.59 5.52 4.97 4.23 1984-2012 Residential 11.29 12.65 10.81 8.63 9.46 8.94 1967-2012 Commercial 10.20 11.14 9.18 7.55 8.04 7.68 1967-2012 Industrial 8.45 10.48 6.91 5.65 6.53 6.19 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 6.09 7.94 4.08 5.19 13.24 12.29 1990-2012 Electric Power 7.48 9.61 4.69 4.91 W W 1997-2012 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Gross Withdrawals 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 1967-2012 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2012 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 From Coalbed Wells

88

Delaware Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

78-2005 78-2005 Citygate 7.58 8.32 6.54 5.67 9.03 7.19 1984-2012 Residential 16.21 16.07 17.79 15.12 15.38 15.24 1967-2012 Commercial 14.48 14.24 15.87 13.26 13.58 13.31 1967-2012 Industrial 8.93 12.54 13.99 10.18 11.69 11.61 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 21.90 26.48 14.12 24.55 28.76 30.97 1995-2012 Electric Power W W W W W -- 1997-2012 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1967-1975 Withdrawals 1967-1975 Net Withdrawals 1967-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 215 122 121 73 64 117 1980-2012 Withdrawals 220 104 118 76 96 66 1980-2012 Net Withdrawals -6 17 3 -2 -31 51 1980-2012 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption 48,155 48,162 50,148 54,825 79,715 101,676 1997-2012 Lease and Plant Fuel

89

Georgia Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports Imports 6.79 9.71 3.73 4.39 4.20 2.78 1999-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.15 9.35 6.56 5.93 5.19 4.35 1984-2012 Residential 17.53 18.26 16.30 15.17 15.72 16.23 1967-2012 Commercial 13.21 14.30 11.70 10.95 10.51 9.74 1967-2012 Industrial 8.86 11.02 6.21 6.25 5.90 4.60 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 12.93 12.91 12.11 5.17 5.57 14.51 1993-2012 Electric Power 7.54 10.40 4.70 5.21 4.72 3.40 1997-2012 Imports and Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Imports 170,243 135,711 142,244 106,454 75,641 59,266 1999-2012 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1974-1975 Withdrawals 1974-1975 Net Withdrawals 1974-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 2,817 4,372 3,182 2,693 3,306 2,097 1980-2012

90

Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.04 8.71 6.70 6.14 5.65 4.88 1984-2012 Residential 12.02 12.81 10.76 10.34 9.77 9.27 1967-2012 Commercial 10.36 11.18 8.95 8.53 8.03 7.34 1967-2012 Industrial 9.62 10.57 7.82 7.56 7.05 5.81 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 9.21 11.01 7.19 7.84 6.10 5.71 1989-2012 Electric Power 7.56 9.24 4.83 5.43 4.91 3.27 1997-2012 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1973 Withdrawals 1974-1975 Net Withdrawals 1973-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 148 130 80 63 107 33 1980-2012 Withdrawals 70 79 98 92 87 100 1980-2012 Net Withdrawals 78 51 -18 -29 20 -67 1980-2012 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption 398,370 409,377 387,066 372,898 393,734 402,657 1997-2012

91

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Exports...

92

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Sales (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3+ or Netscape Navigator 3+ Make sure that JavaScript is enabled in your browser Natural Gas Summary (Billion Cubic Feet) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports...

93

,"New York Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

94

,"New York Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,...

95

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

96

North Dakota Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013...

97

,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2012,"6301982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

98

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,1567,1,76,63,,,97,5,17,124...

99

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050WV3","N3010WV3","N3020WV3","N3035WV3","N3045WV3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in West Virginia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","West Virginia...

100

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050NM3","N3010NM3","N3020NM3","N3035NM3","N3045NM3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in New Mexico (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","New Mexico Price...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

,"New York Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050NY3","N3010NY3","N3020NY3","N3035NY3","N3045NY3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in New York (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","New York Price of...

102

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050ND3","N3010ND3","N3020ND3","N3035ND3","N3045ND3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in North Dakota (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota...

103

South Dakota Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wellhead 7.22 7.94 NA NA 1979-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.35 8.06 5.21 5.54 5.21 4.67 1984-2012 Residential 10.49 11.32 9.14 8.77 8.59 8.39 1967-2012 Commercial 8.81 9.76 7.42 7.13 6.98 6.45 1967-2012 Industrial 8.32 9.00 6.07 5.92 6.25 5.37 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- -- -- -- 1991-2012 Electric Power -- 7.32 5.15 5.50 5.04 3.54 1998-2012 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 71 71 89 102 100 95 1989-2012 Gross Withdrawals 11,880 12,007 12,927 12,540 12,449 15,085 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 422 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 1967-2012 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 1967-2012

104

South Dakota Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Citygate 4.65 5.22 5.92 5.49 5.15 5.26 1989-2013 Residential 8.00 9.08 11.46 13.17 13.86 13.81 1989-2013 Commercial 6.38 6.76 7.55 8.06 7.62 7.69 1989-2013 Industrial 5.71 5.84 6.12 6.46 6.27 6.11 2001-2013 Electric Power 4.62 5.61 5.49 4.06 4.06 4.15 2002-2013 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2006-2013 Repressuring NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

105

New Hampshire Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports Imports 7.52 9.72 5.04 5.48 5.45 4.08 1999-2012 Exports -- 7.61 -- -- 7.54 2.62 2007-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1980-2005 Citygate 9.71 10.94 9.53 8.83 8.07 7.15 1984-2012 Residential 16.71 16.45 15.33 14.46 14.67 13.74 1980-2012 Commercial 15.42 15.21 14.37 12.72 11.46 11.95 1977-2012 Industrial 13.45 14.37 12.86 11.59 11.57 10.48 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 1994-1995 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2012 Imports and Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Imports 56,879 39,438 26,767 18,297 19,826 47,451 1982-2012 Exports 0 64 0 0 336 199 2007-2012 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 101 45 82 33 112 65 1980-2012 Withdrawals 103 44 73 35 108 71 1980-2012 Net Withdrawals -2 1 9 -3 4 -6 1973-2012

106

Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10.62 10.07 6.70 10.05 8.22 4.11 1984-2012 10.62 10.07 6.70 10.05 8.22 4.11 1984-2012 Residential 16.66 16.89 17.06 16.48 15.33 14.29 1967-2012 Commercial 14.91 15.53 15.14 14.46 13.33 12.31 1967-2012 Industrial 12.58 13.26 12.58 12.13 10.98 9.78 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 10.96 12.62 10.72 11.71 8.61 16.32 1990-2012 Electric Power 8.06 10.50 4.98 5.45 5.10 3.98 1997-2012 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1996 Withdrawals 1973-1996 Net Withdrawals 1973-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 1,093 656 698 468 430 517 1980-2012 Withdrawals 1,089 730 954 698 436 457 1980-2012 Net Withdrawals 4 -74 -256 -230 -7 60 1980-2012 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption 87,972 89,256 92,743 94,110 100,455 95,477 1997-2012

107

North Carolina Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.55 10.32 6.44 6.02 5.45 4.00 1984-2012 Residential 15.70 16.58 14.25 12.50 12.55 12.19 1967-2012 Commercial 12.77 14.19 11.63 10.18 9.64 8.62 1967-2012 Industrial 9.98 12.10 8.66 8.24 7.70 6.37 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 10.64 12.79 11.21 9.77 12.13 6.48 1990-2012 Electric Power W 11.13 W W W W 1997-2012 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1996 Withdrawals 1974-1996 Net Withdrawals 1973-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 5,744 4,493 6,838 4,410 5,500 3,504 1980-2012 Withdrawals 5,522 4,490 6,027 7,052 3,305 3,762 1980-2012 Net Withdrawals 222 3 811 -2,643 2,194 -258 1980-2012 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption

108

South Carolina Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 9.10 10.27 6.70 6.17 5.67 4.57 1984-2012 Residential 17.15 16.84 14.91 13.01 12.93 13.25 1967-2012 Commercial 13.54 14.26 11.16 10.34 9.68 8.67 1967-2012 Industrial 8.84 11.03 6.06 6.12 5.60 4.30 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 10.84 13.30 12.50 11.16 8.85 9.77 1994-2012 Electric Power 8.16 10.48 W W W W 1997-2012 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1975 Withdrawals 1973-1975 Net Withdrawals 1973-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 1,089 1,872 1,283 1,360 1,386 391 1980-2012 Withdrawals 987 1,847 1,268 1,574 1,183 491 1980-2012 Net Withdrawals 102 26 15 -214 204 -100 1980-2012

109

New Jersey Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 10.21 11.42 9.15 8.41 7.53 6.74 1984-2012 Residential 14.48 15.21 14.54 12.84 11.78 11.09 1967-2012 Commercial 12.10 13.38 10.20 10.11 9.51 8.50 1967-2012 Industrial 9.63 12.76 8.96 9.63 9.23 7.87 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- -- -- -- 1994-2012 Electric Power 8.17 10.78 5.31 5.66 5.24 3.63 1997-2012 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1967-1996 Withdrawals 1967-1996 Net Withdrawals 1967-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 7,290 5,792 4,919 3,304 5,018 3,483 1980-2012 Withdrawals 5,513 5,971 4,425 3,693 4,404 3,278 1980-2012 Net Withdrawals 1,776 -178 494 -390 613 205 1980-2012 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption

110

Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends - Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Monthly April 1999 vii The following article is the Executive Summary from the report Natural Gas ...

111

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 ... produce unconventional gas economically. Production.

112

Montana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31 (Billion Cubic Feet, unless otherwise noted) Area: Period: Annual : Download Series History: Definitions, Sources ...

113

Summary Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Summary Short-Term Petroleum. and Natural Gas Outlook. WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval. Real and Nominal Crude Oil Prices

114

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook: EIA projects that natural gas prices will remain relatively high through the rest of 2003, with...

115

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

116

,"U.S. Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports Price...

117

,"Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Summary" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Dry...

118

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

119

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

120

Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

122

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

123

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

124

Commercial Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

125

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

126

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

127

Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

128

Natural Gas Used for Repressuring (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

129

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

130

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

131

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

132

Working Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

133

Natural Gas Imports (Summary) - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

134

Natural Gas Exports (Summary) - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

135

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil...

136

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

137

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

138

Alabama Natural Gas Summary - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

History; Prices (Dollars per Thousand ... Prices are in nominal ... Gas volumes delivered for use as vehicle fuel are included in the State annual ...

139

Industrial Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

140

Natural Gas A Preliminary Summary 1999  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This Special Report provides preliminary natural gas data for 1999 which were reported on monthly surveys of the industry through December.

Information Center

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Natural Gas A Preliminary Summary 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This Special Report provides preliminary natural gas data for 1998 which were reported on monthly surveys of the industry through December.

Information Center

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

,"U.S. Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301935" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

143

Vehicle Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated ... Gas volumes delivered for use as vehicle fuel are included in the State annual totals through 2010 but not in ...

144

Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated ... Gas volumes delivered for use as vehicle fuel are included in the State annual totals through 2010 but not in ...

145

Residential Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

146

Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

147

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook This summary is based on the most recent Short-Term Energy Outlook released May 6, 2002. EIA projects that natural gas wellhead prices will average $2.73 per MMBtu in 2002 compared with about $4.00 per MMBtu last year (Short-Term Energy Outlook, May 2002). This projection reflects the sharp increases in spot and near-term futures prices in recent weeks. Average wellhead prices have risen 38 percent from $2.14 per MMBtu in February to an estimated $2.96 in April. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have increased to an even greater extent, rising more than $1.50 per MMBtu since early February. The upward price trend reflects a number of influences, such as unusual weather patterns that have led to increased gas consumption, and tensions in the Middle East and rising crude oil prices. Other factors contributing to the recent price surge include the strengthening economy, the increased capacity and planned new capacity of gas-burning power plants, and concerns about the decline in gas-directed drilling.

148

Anisotropic collective flow of a Lorentz gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical results for the anisotropic collective flow of a Lorentz gas of massless particles scattering on fixed centres are presented.

Nicolas Borghini; Clement Gombeaud

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

150

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

151

Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Summary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Summary Report Workshop Summary Report Prepared for: U. S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Dr. Adam Z. Weber Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Organizing Committee: Michael Perry, UTRC Tom Zawodzinski, UTK and ORNL Ned Stetson, DOE EERE Mark Johnson, DOE ARPA-E Imre Gyuk, DOE OEDER i Executive Summary An essentially identical technology to a reversible fuel cell is that of a redox flow cell (RFC) or redox flow battery (RFB), where a RFC can be seen as merging the concepts of RFBs with recent improvements in fuel cells. To investigate how a RFC can be a grid-scale electrical- energy-storage (EES) system and the associated technological needs, this workshop was held. The specific objectives of the workshop were to understand the needs for applied research in RFCs; identify the grand challenges and prioritize R&D needs; and gather input for future

152

NIST Pipeline-Scale Flow Measurement Standards for Natural ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pipeline-Scale Flow Measurement Standards for Natural Gas. Summary: NIST natural gas flow calibrations are performed ...

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

Summary World Natural Gas Data (from World on the Edge) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data GDR Community Login | Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon Summary World Natural Gas Data (from World on the Edge) Dataset Summary Description This dataset...

154

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

155

Sage, solar assisted gas energy. Summary report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes Phase III of Project SAGE (Solar Assisted Gas Energy) which includes the following: (1) field installations and tests to evaluate new vs. retrofit installations; (2) market assessment of the potential for a SAGE water heating system in apartment buildings; and (3) policy analysis of strategies that would contribute to widespread utilization of SAGE water heating. Technical results of field installations and tests are described for two installations using the system configuration chosen from pilot plant analysis.

Cunningham, S.J.; Rice, J.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 9,072,508 9,104,181 9,111,242 9,117,296 9,132,250 9,171,017 1989-2013 Alaska 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 2013-2013 Lower 48 States 8,988,916 9,020,589 9,027,650 9,033,704 9,048,658 9,087,425 2012-2013 Alabama 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 2002-2013 Arkansas 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 2002-2013 California 592,711 592,711 592,711 599,711 599,711 599,711 2002-2013 Colorado 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 2002-2013

157

Summary Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook 1/12/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Summary Short-Term Petroleum. and Natural Gas Outlook WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Real and Nominal Crude Oil Prices OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001 Total OECD Oil Stocks* U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices Consumer Winter Heating Costs U.S. Total Gasoline Inventory Outlook Retail Motor Gasoline Prices* U.S. Propane Total Stocks Average Weekly Propane Spot Prices Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range Natural Gas Spot Prices: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Working Gas in Storage (Percentage Difference fron Previous 5-Year Average)

158

U.S. Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wellhead NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2013 Imports 3.95 3.90 3.41 3.17 3.48 3.44 1989-2013 By Pipeline 3.93 3.73 3.37 3.01 3.01 3.38 1997-2013 As Liquefied Natural Gas 4.51 8.65 4.59 7.42 9.96 5.79 1997-2013 Exports 4.38 4.22 3.94 3.75 3.88 3.88 1989-2013 By Pipeline 4.37 4.22 3.93 3.75 3.88 3.88 1997-2013 As Liquefied Natural Gas 12.84 13.38 12.89 13.25 13.53 13.09 1997-2013 Citygate 5.54 5.74 5.53 5.23 5.20 4.88 1973-2013 Residential 12.61 14.97 16.30 16.44 15.69 12.48 1973-2013 Commercial 8.75 9.09 8.99 9.07 8.80 8.34 1973-2013 Industrial 5.03 4.91 4.50 4.34 4.38 4.39 2001-2013 Electric Power 4.79 4.56 4.34 4.03 4.19 4.26 2002-2013

159

U.S. Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wellhead 6.25 7.97 3.67 4.48 3.95 2.66 1922-2012 Imports 6.87 8.70 4.19 4.52 4.24 2.88 1985-2012 By Pipeline 6.83 8.57 4.13 4.46 4.09 2.79 1985-2012 As Liquefied Natural Gas 7.07 10.03 4.59 4.94 5.63 4.27 1985-2012 Exports 6.92 8.58 4.47 5.02 4.64 3.25 1985-2012 By Pipeline 6.96 8.62 4.34 4.75 4.35 3.08 1985-2012 As Liquefied Natural Gas 6.23 7.69 8.40 9.53 10.54 12.82 1985-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.16 9.18 6.48 6.18 5.63 4.73 1973-2012 Residential 13.08 13.89 12.14 11.39 11.03 10.71 1967-2012 Commercial 11.34 12.23 10.06 9.47 8.91 8.10 1967-2012 Industrial 7.68 9.65 5.33 5.49 5.13 3.89 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 8.50 11.75 8.13 6.25 7.48 8.04 1989-2012

160

VALIDATING UNCERTAINTY ANALYSES FOR GAS FLOW ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... tank volume to obtain the initial and final mass of gas in the tank ... during a crossover test, but laminar flow elements (LFE) and turbine flowmeters are ...

2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Spark gap switch with spiral gas flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spark gap switch having a contaminate removal system using an injected gas. An annular plate concentric with an electrode of the switch defines flow paths for the injected gas which form a strong spiral flow of the gas in the housing which is effective to remove contaminates from the switch surfaces. The gas along with the contaminates is exhausted from the housing through one of the ends of the switch.

Brucker, J.P.

1988-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

162

Advances in gas-liquid flows 1990  

SciTech Connect

Gas-liquid two-phase flows commonly occur in nature and industrial applications. Rain, clouds, geysers, and waterfalls are examples of natural gas-liquid flow phenomena, whereas industrial applications can be found in nuclear reactors, steam generators, boilers, condensers, evaporators, fuel atomization, heat pipes, electronic equipment cooling, petroleum engineering, chemical process engineering, and many others. The household-variety phenomena such as garden sprinklers, shower, whirlpool bath, dripping faucet, boiling tea pot, and bubbling beer provide daily experience of gas-liquid flows. The papers presented in this volume reflect the variety and richness of gas-liquid two-phase flow and the increasing role it plays in modern technology. This volume contains papers dealing with some recent development in gas-liquid flow science and technology, covering basic gas-liquid flows, measurements and instrumentation, cavitation and flashing flows, countercurrent flow and flooding, flow in various components and geometries liquid metals and thermocapillary effects, heat transfer, nonlinear phenomena, instability, and other special and general topics related to gas-liquid flows.

Kim, J.M. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.); Rohatgi, U.S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Hashemi, A. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Natural gas and electricity optimal power flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — In this paper, the combined natural gas and electric optimal power flow (GEOPF) is presented. It shows fundamental modeling of the natural gas network to be used for the GEOPF, and describes the equality constraints which describe the energy transformation between gas and electric networks at combined nodes (i.e., generators). We also present the formulation of the natural gas loadflow problem, which includes the amount of gas consumed in compressor stations. Case studies are presented to show the sensitivity of the real power generation to wellhead gas prices. Results from the simulation demonstrate that the GEOPF can provide social welfare maximizing solutions considering both gas and electric networks. I.

Seungwon An

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006 Jeffrey L. Beck Independent Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81505 Please cite as: Beck, J. L. 2006. Summary of oil and natural gas and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse 2 disturbances such as oil and gas development

Beck, Jeffrey L.

165

In Summary: Risk of Infrastructure Failure in the Natural Gas Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In Summary: Risk of Infrastructure Failure in the Natural Gas Industry. Increasing demand could put additional stress on capacity-constrained areas

166

Microfluidic gas flow profiling using remote detection NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of axial dispersion as the gas flows within thetimes; A, three dispersion curves for gas originating atdispersion measurements. Pressurized hyperpolarized xenon gas

Hilty, Christian; McDonnell, Erin; Granwehr, Josef; Pierce, Kimberly; Han, Song-I Han; Pines, Alexander

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Real gas effects for compressible nozzle flows  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation of compressible nozzle flows of real gas with or without the addition of heat is presented. A generalized real gas method, using an upwind scheme and curvilinear coordinates, is applied to solve the unsteady compressible Euler equations in axisymmetric form. The present method is an extension of a previous 2D method, which was developed to solve the problem for a gas having the general equation of state in the form p=p ([rho], i). In the present work the method is generalized for an arbitrary P-V-T equation of state introducing an iterative procedure for the determination of the temperature from the specific internal energy and the flow variables. The solution procedure is applied for the study of real gas effects in an axisymmetric nozzle flow.

Drikakis, D.; Tsangaris, S. (National Technical Univ. of Athens, (Greece). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary HELP Index Summary Scenario Internet Links Student Pages SubjectContent Area: Language Arts and Social Studies Target Audience: This project is designed for third...

169

Controlling annular gas flow in deep wells  

SciTech Connect

This article reports on the phenomenon of annular gas channeling. It can occur during primary cementing in wells with formations containing gas. Such channeling may lead to interzonal communication down hole, or even gas migration to the surface. Formation gas is normally contained by the cement slurry's hydrostatic pressure. Annular gas channeling usually results from volumetric changes associated with: cement hydration and fluid loss, poor cement placement techniques, high cement free water, cementing gelling properties, and excessive thickening times. Initially, the cement slurry acts as a true fluid, transmitting hydrostatic pressure to the formation gas and preventing its flow into the cement matrix. However, as the cement begins to set, changing from a fluid state to a rigid state, it gradually begins to lose its ability to transmit hydrostatic pressure. This period of change is usually referred to as the ''transition period.'' Shrinkage of the cement volume compounds the problem and eventually can lead to poor binding between the cement and formation, thereby allowing gas to flow through gaps at the formation-cement interface.

Matthews, S.M.; Copeland, J.C.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

171

Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage (Summary...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

172

Independent to start gas flow in Moldova  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A small independent operator hopes to start gas production this year in the eastern European republic of Moldova, which imports all oil and gas, mainly from Russia. Redeco Ltd. LLC, Oklahoma City, is seeking commercial customers in the town of Baimaclia for gas from a planned 5 km sales pipeline from nearby Victorovca field. The company is affiliated with Redexco ltd., Calgary, and Costilla Energy Inc., Midland, Tex. Redeco`s Victorovca 302 workover well in Cantemir County flowed 500 Mcfd of gas in December from 1,976--86 ft in the Miocene Sarmat formation. The well is in the eastern Carpathian basin. Most wells in Victorovca field are 30--45 years old, but Redeco believes it could economically redrill the field. Victorovca field extends about 12 km east-west and 4 km north-south.

NONE

1997-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

710 high-temperature gas reactor program summary report. Volume I. Summary  

SciTech Connect

Declassified 6 Sep 1973. A description of the 710 Reactor concept and its significant design features is presented. A summary of the history of the 710 Program and a summary of the major technical achievements of the program are included. (13 references) (auth)

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Summary of Environmental Performance at Harvard Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Harvard University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Environmental Performance at Harvard Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Harvard University of emissions reductions associated with central utilities. Harvard University Greenhouse Gas Emissions: FY2006 AND SAFETY The 2010 Harvard University Greenhouse Gas Inventory represents the full breadth of the University

175

Summary of Environmental Performance at Harvard Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Harvard University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Environmental Performance at Harvard Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Harvard University of emissions reductions associated with central utilities. Harvard University Greenhouse Gas Emissions: FY2006 AND SAFETY The 2011 Harvard University Greenhouse Gas Inventory represents the full breadth of the University

176

Investigation of flow characteristics of gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Measurements carried out in the process of assimilation of gas turbine (GT) plants of 16 different types in starting and working conditions to estimate the operational conditions and characteristics of the main elements (in particular of the turbines) have created a basis for generaliztion of flow characteristics of different turbines and for extending them to a wider range of operational conditions. The studies showed that: flow characteristics of the investigated turbines, independently of the number of stages and the degree of reaction, are described by the elliptic flowrate equation; throughput of similar turbines, i.e., of turbines formed of stages with high reaction, which have low design degrees of expansion, can be determined with satisfactory accuracy by the unique function of the degree of expansion; and in operating the gas turbine plants considerable changes in throughput of the turbines are possible.

Ol' khovskii, G.G.; Ol' khovskaya, N.I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Summary World Natural Gas Data (from World on the Edge)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary World Natural Gas Data (from World on the Edge) This dataset...

178

Pipeline and Distribution Use of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

179

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

180

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

182

Pipeline and Distribution Use of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

183

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of May, as strong demand for natural gas coupled with high petroleum prices has led to higher gas prices despite nearly normal storage inventory levels. Storage stocks at...

184

Withdrawals of Liquefied Natural Gas from Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil...

185

NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS) NIST Special Publication of Standards and Technology #12;i Table of Contents for the Natural Gas Flowmeter Calibration Service (NGFCS;1 Abstract This document describes NIST's high pressure natural gas flow calibration service (NGFCS). Flow

Magee, Joseph W.

186

Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RAINFOREST REALITIES Project Summary Scenario Student Pages Internet Links Index SubjectContent Area: Science, Language Arts, Math, and Social Science Target Audience: This...

187

summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary Scenario Student Page Internet Links Index SubjectContent Area: Math - data collection; Language Arts - expressive and narrative writing and reference skills;...

188

Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Natural Gas Reserves Summary...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

811 805 704 739 724 710 1977-2011 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 811 805 705 740 725 711 1979-2011 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 55 53 3 9 3 0...

189

Ohio Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

975 1,027 985 896 832 758 1977-2011 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 975 1,027 985 896 832 758 1979-2011 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 801 926 886...

190

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6.27 in June, as strong demand for natural gas coupled with high petroleum prices has led to higher gas prices despite nearly normal storage inventory levels. Storage stocks at...

191

Miscellaneous Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

138 239 270 349 350 379 1977-2011 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 139 241 272 349 363 393 1979-2011 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 120 226 263 271...

192

AEO2011: Primary Natural Gas Flows Entering NGTDM Region from Neighboring  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Primary Natural Gas Flows Entering NGTDM Region from Neighboring Primary Natural Gas Flows Entering NGTDM Region from Neighboring Regions Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 138, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in billion cubic feet per year. The data is broken down into New England, Middle Atlantic, East North Central, West Central, South Atlantic, East South Central, West South Central, Mountain, Pacific, Florida, Arizona/New Mexico, California. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIS Natural Gas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Primary Natural Gas Flows Entering NGTDM Region from Neighboring Regions- Reference Case (xls, 60 KiB)

193

,"Iowa Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summary" Summary" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Prices",5,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1990" ,"Data 3","Consumption",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sia_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sia_m.htm"

194

,"Illinois Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summary" Summary" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Prices",5,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Data 2","Production",10,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1991" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1990" ,"Data 4","Consumption",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sil_m.xls"

195

[Fuel substitution of vehicles by natural gas: Summaries of four final technical reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains summary information on three meetings and highlights of a fourth meeting held by the Society of Automotive Engineers on natural gas fueled vehicles. The meetings covered the following: Natural gas engine and vehicle technology; Safety aspects of alternately fueled vehicles; Catalysts and emission control--Meeting the legislative standards; and LNG--Strengthening the links.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summary. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z. 1, STEP File, STEP-File-Analyzer.stp, 2, STEP Directory, C ...

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

197

Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summary. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z. 1, STEP File, STEP-File-Analyzer-Semantic-PMI.stp, 2, STEP ...

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

198

Summary of Gas Turbine Operation on Liquid Biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel, an alternative liquid biofuel option for stationary gas turbines, has gained much interest in the past decade. This report documents recent biodiesel field tests on aeroderivative and frame class gas turbines. Pollutant emissions and engine performance for these gas turbineswhich include models from General Electric, Siemens, Pratt Whitney, and Alstomwere plotted, compared, and analyzed to determine trends, similarities, and noticeable differences. In addition, the report documents engine oper...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

199

Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs - U.S. Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Residential Programs by State. ... such as changes to market structure and operation and to regulatory and legislative guidelines (incentives).

200

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

than average, which means that price volatility can be expected to continue in these tight market conditions. Natural gas demand in 2004 is expected to rise as industrial...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

202

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed Extraction Loss Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports...

203

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

204

Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity  

SciTech Connect

In November 2012, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) released a new report, 'Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity.' The study provides a new methodological approach to estimate natural gas related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tracks trends in regulatory and voluntary industry practices, and explores various electricity futures. The Executive Summary provides key findings, insights, data, and figures from this major study.

Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Perturbations in high-velocity gas flow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High velocity explosive products or other low-density gases are often used to accelerate metal plates to high velocities. Perturbations in otherwise uniform flow configurations are sometimes sufficient to cause interactions that can rapidly destroy the integrity of the plates. In this study perturbations were introduced in uniform gas flows of detonated HE products and strongly shocked polyethylene, CH{sub 2}. The primary diagnostics were smear-camera records obtained when these gases impinged on layers of plexiglas separated by small argon-filled gaps. These records show shock-arrival times at various levels and thus determine not only the size of the perturbation but also its strength. Perturbations in HE gases running into H{sub 2} and in CH{sub 2} into H{sub 2} have been studied. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations are in excellent agreement with the experiments, and enable one to study details of the flow not possible from experimental results. 1 ref., 5 figs.

Harvey, W.B.; McQueen, R.G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Utah Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5,146 6,391 6,643 7,257 6,981 7,857 1977-2011 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 5,211 6,463 6,714 7,411 7,146 8,108 1979-2011 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease...

207

California Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

794 2,740 2,406 2,773 2,647 2,934 1977-2011 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 2,935 2,879 2,538 2,926 2,785 3,042 1979-2011 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease...

208

Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Reserves Summary...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 View History Dry Natural Gas 24,689 22,059 18,812 17,007 14,549 13,634 1992-2007 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 25,347 22,522 19,288 17,427...

209

California Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2,794 2,740 2,406 2,773 2,647 2,934 1977-2011 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 2,935 2,879 2,538 2,926 2,785 3,042 1979-2011 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease...

210

Colorado Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

17,149 21,851 23,302 23,058 24,119 24,821 1977-2011 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 17,682 22,480 24,169 24,081 25,372 26,151 1979-2011 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After...

211

Michigan Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3,065 3,630 3,174 2,763 2,919 2,505 1977-2011 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 3,117 3,691 3,253 2,805 2,975 2,549 1979-2011 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease...

212

Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary Project Summary HELP Index Summary Scenario References Student Pages Subject/Content Area: Ecology and Data Collection Target Audience: This project is designed for upper intermediate grade students. Access to a river or stream is critical to the success of this project. Students need access to the Internet and data collection software. Project Goals: When presented with an environmental problem on a local river, students will use their knowledge of river ecology to develop an action plan. Learner Outcomes: The students will be able to Use river monitoring equipment to collect river monitoring data, including biological, physical,and chemical data. Design a project that aids the class in accompolishing one of four goals: Raising smallmouth bass Creating a stream habitat in an aquarium

213

SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integral method for calculating the turbulent wall boundary layers in axial flow turbomachines is described. The method is applied to flow through annular cascades and sjngle and multistage machines. Agreement between prediction and experiment is good provided lift coefficients ad flow deflections of the blade rows sre small.

Research Council; Curren J Papers; J. H. Horlock; J. H. Horlock

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

215

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2.3 percent in 2002 compared with the 2001 growth rate of 2.4 percent. Lower natural gas prices have reduced production and resource development incentives from their highs of...

216

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2002, compared with the 2001 growth rate of 2.4 percent. Lower demand and lower natural gas prices have reduced production and resource development incentives from their highs of...

217

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.7 percent in 2002 compared with the 2001 growth rate of 2.4 percent. Lower natural gas prices have reduced production and resource development incentives from their highs of...

218

A summary description of the flammable gas tank safety program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive liquid waste may produce hydrogen as result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. If the waste contains organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia may be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site in Washington State, are on a Flammable Gas Watch List. Some contain waste that produces and retains gases until large quantities of gas are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks nearly-filled to capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture could result. The most notable example of a Hanford waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Upon occasion waste stored in this tank has released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several, other Hanford waste tanks exhibit similar behavior although to a lesser magnitude. Because this behavior was hot adequately-addressed in safety analysis reports for the Hanford Tank Farms, an unreviewed safety question was declared, and in 1990 the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Program was established to address this problem. The purposes of the program are a follows: (1) Provide safety documents to fill gaps in the safety analysis reports, and (2) Resolve the safety issue by acquiring knowledge about gas retention and release from radioactive liquid waste and developing mitigation technology. This document provides the general logic and work activities required to resolve the unreviewed safety question and the safety issue of flammable gas mixtures in radioactive liquid waste storage tanks.

Johnson, G.D.; Sherwood, D.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summary. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z. 1, CIS/2 File, AISC_Sculpture_J.stp, 2, CIS/2 Directory, C:\\Users ...

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

Gas flow behavior in extremely low permeability rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical model and modeling study of gas flow through extremely low permeability unconventional reservoirs. In contrast to conventional reservoirs

Yu-Shu Wu; Cong Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Gas flow means for improving efficiency of exhaust hoods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is described for inhibiting the flow of contaminants in an exhaust enclosure toward an individual located adjacent an opening into the exhaust enclosure by providing a gas flow toward a source of contaminants from a position in front of an individual to urge said contaminants away from the individual toward a gas exit port. The apparatus comprises a gas manifold which may be worn by a person as a vest. The manifold has a series of gas outlets on a front face thereof facing away from the individual and toward the contaminants to thereby provide a flow of gas from the front of the individual toward the contaminants. 15 figures.

Gadgil, A.J.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

222

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Now that the heating season has ended, natural gas wellhead prices have fallen from the exceptionally high levels seen in February and early March. Nevertheless, they still remain historically and unseasonably high, hovering around $5.00 per MMBtu. EIA projects that natural gas wellhead prices will remain above $5.00 per MMBtu in April and then decrease to $4.36 in May and $4.26 in June (Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2003). Wellhead prices for the 2002-2003 heating season (November through March) averaged $4.44 per MMBtu, or $2.08 more than last winter's price. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are projected to increase about $1.53 per MMBtu over the 2002 level to $4.40 per MMBtu. This projection is based on the expectation of lower volumes of natural gas in underground storage compared with last year and continued increases in demand over 2002 levels. Cold temperatures this past winter led to a record drawdown of storage stocks. By the end of March, estimated working gas stocks were 676 Bcf (prior estimates were 696 Bcf), which is the lowest end-of-March level in EIA records and 44 percent below the previous 5-year average. In 2004, continued tightness of domestic natural gas supply and high demand levels are expected to keep the average wellhead price near the 2003 level.

223

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

average $2.83 per MMBtu in 2002 compared with about $4.00 last year (Short-Term Energy Outlook, June 2002). Average wellhead prices have increased by nearly 50 percent from $2.09 per MMBtu in February to an estimated $3.11 per MMBtu in May. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have also increased, rising more than $1.00 per MMBtu since early February. It is atypical to see higher spot gas prices in the cooling season than during the heating season, particularly when working gas in underground storage is at high levels, as it has been for the past several months. As of the end of May, working gas levels were more than 20 percent above the previous 5-year average for that month. Moreover, gas-directed drilling, while down sharply from summer 2001 levels, is still quite strong from a historical perspective. The gas rig count as of May 31 was up 22 percent from the recent low of 591 for the week ending April 5.

224

Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Oil & Gas Field Equipment & Production Operations, 1995 through 1998 2 of 10 wells producing by primary means (natural depletion)

225

Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Golden Field Office Golden Field Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE/EIS-0407D September 2009 Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas Summary Cover photos courtesy of (left to right): Southeast Renewable Fuels, LLC DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory Public domain U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE/EIS-0407D September 2009 Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas Summary COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) COOPERATING AGENCY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture-Rural Development is a cooperating agency in the preparation of the Abengoa Biorefinery Project EIS.

226

Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPACE SPACE Project Summary HELP Index Summary Scenario Internet Links Student Pages Subject/Content Area: Interdisciplinary: Science - astronomy; Math - problem-solving and measurement; Art; Social Studies - current events; and Language Arts - reference. skills Target Audience: Middle school students, 7th grade, all levels Project Goals: A collaborative, seven-to-ten weeks investigation of the space program, specifically space stations, its impact on our lives and the world Learner Outcomes: Students will be able to: Gather information and use decision-making skills to evaluate this information. Establish connections and to develop decision-making skills about science and technology. Identify and state a problem; design, implement, and evaluate the solution. Gather and use information for research purposes.

227

Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Russia is a major player in world energy markets. It has more proven natural gas reserves than any other country, is among the top ten in proven oil reserves, is the largest exporter of natural gas, the second largest oil exporter, and the third largest energy consumer. Energy exports have been a major driver of Russia’s economic growth over the last five years, as Russian oil production has risen strongly and world oil prices have been very high. This type of growth has made the Russian economy dependent on oil and natural gas exports and vulnerable to fluctuations in oil prices. The Russian government has moved to take control of the country’s energy supplies. It broke up the previously large energy company Yukos and acquired its main oil production subsidiary. The Duma voted to give Gazprom, the statecontrolled natural gas monopoly the exclusive right to export natural gas; Russia moved to limit participation by foreign companies in oil and gas production and Gazprom gained majority control of the Sakhalin energy projects. Russia has agreed with Germany to supply Germany and, eventually, the UK by building a natural gas pipeline under the Baltic Sea, bypassing Ukraine and Poland. In late 2006 and early 2007, Russia cut off and/or threatened to cut off gas or oil supplies going to and/or

Robert Pirog

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Transportation Process & Flow  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Process and Flow Process and Flow About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Transportation Process and Flow Overview | Gathering System | Processing Plant | Transmission Grid | Market Centers/Hubs | Underground Storage | Peak Shaving Overview Transporting natural gas from the wellhead to the final customer involves several physical transfers of custody and multiple processing steps. A natural gas pipeline system begins at the natural gas producing well or field. Once the gas leaves the producing well, a pipeline gathering system directs the flow either to a natural gas processing plant or directly to the mainline transmission grid, depending upon the initial quality of the wellhead product.

229

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

this summer and continue at elevated levels through the rest of 2003 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, June 2003). Natural gas wellhead prices are expected to average $5.40 per MMBtu in June and remain above $5.13 through December 2003. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have stayed well above $5.00 per MMBtu on a monthly basis since the beginning of the year and have been above $6.00 for the first 10 days of June. The low level of underground storage is the principal reason for these unusually high prices. As of June 6, 2003, working gas stocks were 1,324 Bcf, which is about 35 percent below year-earlier levels and 25 percent below the 5-year average. Natural gas prices are likely to stay high as long as above-normal storage injection demand competes with industrial and power sector demand for gas. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are projected to increase about $2.33 per MMBtu (the largest U.S. annual wellhead price increase on record) over the 2002 level to a record annual high of about $5.20 per MMBtu. For 2004, prices are projected to ease only moderately, as supplies are expected to remain tight.

230

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about $3.49 per MMBtu through December 2002 and then increase to $3.76 in January 2003, the peak demand month of the heating season (Short-Term Energy Outlook, released November 7, 2002). Natural gas prices were higher than expected in October as storms in the Gulf of Mexico in late September temporarily shut in some gas production, causing spot prices at the Henry Hub and elsewhere to rise above $4.00 per million Btu for most of October. In addition, early winter-like temperatures, particularly in the Midwest and Northeast, increased demand for natural gas, placing upward pressure on gas prices. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.84 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average $3.56 per MMBtu, which is about $1.20 higher than last winter's price. Prices to residential customers during the heating season are expected to average $7.81 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter. In 2003, wellhead prices are projected to average $3.28 per MMBtu, or about $0.44 per MMBtu more than in 2002, owing to expectations of increasing economic growth, little or no change in the annual average crude oil price for 2003, and lower storage levels for most of 2003 compared with 2002 levels.

231

Summary of gas release events detected by hydrogen monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of monitoring tank headspace for flammable gas release events. In over 40 tank years of monitoring the largest detected release in a single-shell tank is 2.4 cubic meters of Hydrogen. In the double-shell tanks the largest release is 19.3 cubic meters except in SY-101 pre mixer pump installation condition.

MCCAIN, D.J.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

232

An approach to generating summaries of time series data in the gas turbine domain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose an approach to generating summaries of time series data in the gas turbine domain using AI techniques. Through the think-aloud method with the aid of visualization of temporal data using time series workbench (TSW), both domain knowledge from experts about how to solve problems in the gas turbine and information about how domain experts analyze the archived temporal data are gotten. An algorithm to select interesting events is proposed and a prototype knowledge-based system is designed to generate summary of temporal data for interesting events in the gas turbine domain. Some further research works also are pointed. Key words: knowledge acquisition, knowledge-based system, gas turbine. 1

Jin Yu; Jim Hunter; Ehud Reiter; Somayajulu Sripada

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5.57 per MMBtu in January 2004 and $5.40 in February, and then decrease to $4.77 in March as the heating season winds down (Short-Term Energy Outlook, January 2004). Spot prices were quite variable in December, with prices at the Henry Hub starting the month at around $5.00 per MMBtu, spiking to roughly $7.00 in the middle of the month, then falling to $5.50 toward the end of the month as warmer-than-normal weather eased demand. Spot prices will likely remain well above $5.00 over the next few months if normal or colder weather prevails, especially with oil prices remaining at relatively high levels. (Oil prices this winter are expected to average $31.35 per barrel (19 cents higher than last winter's average), or 5.41 per MMBtu.) Natural gas storage levels were 8 percent above average as of January 2, which could place downward pressure on prices if warm temperatures and weak heating demand occur later this winter, just as rising prices are possible if the weather becomes colder. Overall in 2004, natural gas wellhead prices are expected to average $4.73 per MMBtu, while spot prices will average nearly $5.00. In 2005, natural gas spot prices are projected to fall to an average of $4.83 per MMBtu under the assumption that domestic and imported supply can continue to grow by about 1-1.5 percent per year.

234

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.41 per MMBtu in December 2003, although spot prices are expected to average $5.38 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2003). The average wellhead price is expected to increase moderately to $4.56 during the first three months of 2004. Natural gas prices were lower in November than previously expected but forward price expectations remain sensitive to weather conditions. Prices increased rapidly in futures trading in early December as some cold weather moved into the Eastern United States and reported withdrawals from gas storage were slightly larger than expected. Spot prices above $5 per MMBtu remain likely over the next few months if normal (or colder) weather prevails, especially with oil prices remaining at relatively high levels. Natural gas storage levels are still above average and hold the potential to push prices back down if warm temperatures and weak heating demand materialize later in the winter, just as upward spikes remain a strong possibility if the weather turns cold.

235

Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Proved Reserves Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 13,634 1992-2007 Estimated Production NA 1992-2007 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Gross Withdrawals 2,813,197 2,329,955 2,444,102 2,259,144 1,830,913 1,527,875 1997-2012 From Gas Wells 2,202,242 1,848,290 1,877,722 1,699,908 1,353,929 1,013,914 1997-2012 From Oil Wells 610,955 481,665 566,380 559,235 476,984 513,961 1997-2012 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2012 Repressuring 1,969 1,105 432 110 3,084 4,014 1997-2012 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2012 Vented and Flared 12,509 14,507 14,754 13,971 15,502 16,296 1997-2012

236

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the rest of the winter and the first part of spring, with prices averaging $5.19 per MMBtu through March and $4.58 in April (Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2004). Wellhead prices for the current heating season (November 2003 through March 2004) are expected to average $4.99 per MMBtu, or about 7 percent higher than last winter's level. Spot prices at the Henry Hub averaged $5.90 per MMBtu in January as cold temperatures (6 percent colder than normal nationally and 19 percent colder than normal in the Northeast) kept natural gas prices and heating demand high. Despite the severe weather, natural gas storage stocks were 3 percent above average as of January 30 and spot prices in early February have moved down somewhat. Overall in 2004, spot prices are expected to average about $4.90 per MMBtu and wellhead prices are expected to average $4.63 per MMBtu, declining moderately from the 2003 levels. In 2005, natural gas spot prices are projected to average about $5.00 per MMBtu, under the assumption that domestic and imported supply can continue to grow by about 1 percent per year.

237

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_smo_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_smo_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

238

,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",12,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sak_a.xls"

239

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sla_a.xls"

240

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sne_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sne_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sin_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sin_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

242

,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1999" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sga_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sga_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

243

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1979" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sor_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sor_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

244

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sca_a.xls"

245

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sid_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sid_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

246

,"U.S. Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1922" 4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1922" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6/30/1925" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1900" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",6,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1935" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1930" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_nus_a.xls"

247

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sma_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sma_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

248

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_smn_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_smn_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

249

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_swa_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_swa_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

250

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_stn_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_stn_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

251

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in September and range between $4.37 and $4.58 per MMBtu in the last 3 months of 2003 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, September 2003). Spot prices at the Henry Hub have fallen somewhat from the unusually high levels that prevailed in the first half of the year and most of July, as mild summer weather in many areas of the country has reduced cooling demand and allowed record storage refill rates. As of September 5, working gas levels were only 5.5 percent below the 5-year average and, barring any disruptions, are on target to reach 3 Tcf by the end of October. However, gas prices remain high-wellhead prices this summer are estimated to be 60 to 70 percent higher than levels last summer. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.84 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, assuming normal weather, wellhead prices are projected to drop by about $1 per MMBtu, or almost 20 percent, to $3.89 per MMBtu, as the overall supply situation improves.

252

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.20 per MMBtu through January 2003 and then increase to $4.61 in February and $4.23 in March (Short-Term Energy Outlook, released January 8, 2003). Wellhead prices for the overall heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average about $4.10 per MMBtu, or $1.74 more than last winter's levels, while prices to residential customers are expected to average $8.51 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter. Natural gas prices were higher than expected in November and December as below-normal temperatures throughout much of the nation increased heating demand, placing upward pressure on gas prices. Spot prices at the Henry Hub climbed above $5.00 per MMBtu in the second week of December and stayed near or above this threshold through the end of the month. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average $2.90 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. In 2003, average wellhead prices are projected to increase about $1.00 per MMBtu over the 2002 level to $3.90 per MMBtu, owing to expectations of higher demand levels than in 2002 and lower storage levels for most of the year compared with 2002 levels.

253

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 per MMBtu during the last 2 months of 2003 and increase to $4.36 in January 2004 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, November 2003). Prices have fallen in the past few months as mild weather and reduced industrial demand have allowed record storage refill rates. As of October 31, 2003, working gas levels had reached 3,155 Bcf, which is about 3 percent higher than the 5-year average and the first time since October 2002 that stocks exceeded the year-earlier levels. With the improved storage situation, wellhead prices during the current heating season (November through March) are expected to be about 12 percent less than last winter ($4.12 vs. $4.68 per MMBtu). However, prices in the residential sector will likely be about 8 percent higher than last winter, as accumulated natural gas utility costs through 2003 are recovered in higher household delivery charges. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.76 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, wellhead prices are projected to drop by nearly $0.90 per MMBtu, or about 18 percent, to $3.88 per MMBtu as the overall supply situation improves.

254

Microfluidic gas-flow profiling using remote-detection NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and dispersion measurements. A pres- surized hyperpolarized xenon gas mixture containing 0.3% NMR-active 129Xe [1. The amount of axial dispersion as the gas flows within the enlarged section of the chip is immediately shown in A over all travel times. (C) Three dispersion curves for gas originating at different z

Pines, Alexander

255

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_snm_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_snm_a.htm"

256

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sct_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sct_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:43:03 AM"

257

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_swi_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_swi_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:44:50 AM"

258

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

63 and $2.72 per MMBtu during the months through October without the wide variations that occurred over the spring and early summer months (Short-Term Energy Outlook, August 2002). Prices are expected to be less variable unless unusually hot weather in late summer results in gas being diverted from storage to meet the added cooling demand, or colder-than-normal weather for October results in an unexpected drawdown of storage stocks. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.73 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average close to $3.12 per MMBtu, which is about $0.75 higher than last winter's price but only about 10-15 percent higher than current prices.

259

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_ssd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_ssd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:44:30 AM"

260

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_spa_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_spa_a.htm"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_snv_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_snv_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:44:08 AM"

262

,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sde_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sde_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:43:06 AM"

263

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_ssc_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_ssc_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:44:28 AM"

264

,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sri_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sri_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:44:27 AM"

265

,"North Carolina Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_snc_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_snc_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:43:55 AM"

266

,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1977" 9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_snh_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_snh_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:44:02 AM"

267

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sco_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sco_a.htm"

268

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sar_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sar_a.htm"

269

,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sme_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sme_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:43:37 AM"

270

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1999" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_smd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_smd_a.htm"

271

,"New Jersey Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_snj_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_snj_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:44:04 AM"

272

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sva_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sva_a.htm"

273

Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Imperial-Mexicali DEIS Imperial-Mexicali DEIS S-1 May 2004 SUMMARY S.1 BACKGROUND S.1.1 Previous NEPA Review and Litigation Baja California Power, Inc. (hereafter referred to as Intergen), applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on February 27, 2001, to construct a double-circuit, 230,000-volt (230-kV) transmission line across the U.S.-Mexico border. In a separate but similar proceeding, Sempra Energy Resources (hereafter referred to as Sempra) applied to DOE for a Presidential permit on March 7, 2001, also proposing to construct a double-circuit, 230-kV transmission line across the U.S.-Mexico border. Executive Order (E.O.) 10485 (September 9, 1953), as amended by E.O. 12038 (February 7, 1978), requires that a Presidential permit be issued by DOE before electric transmission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained,

274

Ceramic stationary gas turbine development program -- Fifth annual summary  

SciTech Connect

A program is being performed under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through the selective replacement of metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. The program focuses on design, fabrication, and testing of ceramic components, generating a materials properties data base, and applying life prediction and nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The development program is being performed by a team led by Solar Turbines Incorporated, and which includes suppliers of ceramic components, US research laboratories, and an industrial cogeneration end user. The Solar Centaur 50S engine was selected for the development program. The program goals included an increase in the turbine rotor inlet temperature (TRIT) from 1,010 C (1,850 F) to 1,121 C (2,050 F), accompanied by increases in thermal efficiency and output power. The performance improvements are attributable to the increase in TRIT and the reduction in cooling air requirements for the ceramic parts. The ceramic liners are also expected to lower the emissions of NOx and CO. Under the program uncooled ceramic blades and nozzles have been inserted for currently cooled metal components in the first stage of the gas producer turbine. The louvre-cooled metal combustor liners have been replaced with uncooled continuous-fiber reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) liners. Modifications have been made to the engine hot section to accommodate the ceramic parts. To date, all first generation designs have been completed. Ceramic components have been fabricated, and are being tested in rigs and in the Centaur 50S engine. Field testing at an industrial co-generation site was started in May, 1997. This paper will provide an update of the development work and details of engine testing of ceramic components under the program.

Price, J.R.; Jimenez, O.; Faulder, L.; Edwards, B.; Parthasarathy, V.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Non-isothermal, compressible gas flow for the simulation of an enhanced gas recovery application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we present a framework for numerical modeling of CO"2 injection into porous media for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) from depleted reservoirs. Physically, we have to deal with non-isothermal, compressible gas flows resulting in a system of ... Keywords: Carbon dioxide sequestration, Enhanced gas recovery, Equation of state, Finite element method, Numerical simulation, Real gas behavior

N. BöTtcher; A. -K. Singh; O. Kolditz; R. Liedl

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

range from $2.91 to $3.19 per MMBtu through December 2002 and then increase to $3.53 in January 2003, the peak demand month of the heating season (Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2002). Natural gas prices climbed sharply in late September as hurricanes Isidore and Lili caused production shut downs in the Gulf of Mexico. However, this price surge is expected to be short-lived, unless the weather in October is unusually cold or if additional storm activity in the Gulf curbs production further. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.76 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average $3.32 per MMBtu, which is about $0.96 higher than last winter's price. Prices to residential customers during the heating season are expected to average $7.55 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter.

277

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

prices will remain relatively high during the storage refill season (April through October) and the rest of 2004. Wellhead prices are expected to average $4.87 per MMBtu in April and May, $4.71 from June through October, and $5.12 for November and December (Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2004). Spot prices during the storage refill months will likely average $5.23 per MMBtu, virtually the same as the average price ($5.22) this past heating season. Overall in 2004, spot prices are expected to average $5.31 per MMBtu, slightly less than the 2003 price ($5.35), while wellhead prices will average about $4.90. In 2005, natural gas spot prices will likely average about $5.25 per MMBtu, under the assumption that domestic supply can continue to grow by about 1 percent per year. Total available supply (including imports and storage inventories) is expected to increase to 22.31 Tcf in 2004 compared with 21.78 Tcf in 2003. Storage stocks at the end of the traditional heating season (March 31) were about 6 percent less than the 5-year average but nearly 50 percent more than year-earlier levels.

278

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that natural gas prices will remain relatively high for the rest of 2004. Wellhead prices are expected to average $5.41 per MMBtu through the end of the storage refill season (October 31) and $5.59 in November and December. Spot prices (composites for producing-area hubs) averaged about $5.30 per MMBtu in the first quarter of this year but are currently near $6.00. Barring cooler-than-normal weather this summer, the likelihood appears small that spot prices will fall significantly below $5.65 per MMBtu for the rest of 2004. Overall in 2004, spot prices will likely average $5.62 per MMBtu and wellhead prices will average $5.33. In 2005, spot prices are expected to increase to $5.90 per MMBtu. As in other recent projections, this outcome depends on modest growth in domestic production and total available supply (including imports and storage inventories) in both 2004 and 2005. Underground storage facilities reported net injections of 199 Bcf for April, well above the previous 5-year average of 139 Bcf. At the end of April, storage stocks were only about 2 percent below the 5-year average level and 37 percent higher than last year at this time based on monthly survey data.

279

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 per MMBtu during the last 3 months of 2003 and increase to $4.32 in January 2004 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2003). Prices have fallen somewhat from the unusually high levels that prevailed in the first half of the year and most of July, as mild summer weather and reduced industrial demand allowed record storage refill rates. As of October 3, 2003, working gas levels were only 1 percent below the 5-year average and, barring any disruptions, are on target to reach 3 Tcf by the end of October. With the improved storage situation, wellhead prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to be about 13 percent less than last winter ($4.17 vs. $4.68 per MMBtu). But prices in the residential sector are projected to be about 9 percent higher than last winter, as the recent decline in wellhead prices is too recent and insufficient to offset the impact of the substantial spring-summer increase in wellhead prices on residential prices. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.75 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, wellhead prices are projected to drop by nearly $0.90 per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $3.86 per MMBtu as the overall supply situation improves.

280

Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal creep flow (TCF) is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary. Here, TCF is demonstrated experimentally in a dusty plasma. Stripes on a glass box are heated by laser beam absorption, leading to both TCF and a thermophoretic force. The design of the experiment allows isolating the effect of TCF. A stirring motion of the dust particle suspension is observed. By eliminating all other explanations for this motion, we conclude that TCF at the boundary couples by drag to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result provides an experimental verification, for the field of fluid mechanics, that TCF in the slip-flow regime causes steady-state gas flow in a confined volume.

Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Numerical simulation of transient gas flow during underbalanced drilling into a gas sand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shallow gas drilling has long been recognized as a serious problem in offshore operations. Low fracture gradients and shallow casing do not permit shutting- in the well. Computer simulations of gas kicks during drilling require accurate description of the gas flow rate from the formation into the wellbore. The problem is complicated by the fact that during drilling into a gas sand the effective wellbore area exposed to flow is continually changing until the formation has been completely drilled. This paper describes a numerical model developed to calculate gas flow into the wellbore while drilling underbalanced into a gas sand. A two-dimensional finite difference model of transient flow from the reservoir has been coupled with a one-dimensional finite element model of two-phase flow in the wellbore.

Berg, K.A.; Skalle, P. (Dept. of Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Trondheim (NO)); Podio, A.L. (Dept. of Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Relationship of observed flow patterns to gas core reactor criticality  

SciTech Connect

The gas core reactor requires the establishment of stable and unique flow patterns. A recent series of room temperature flow tests have studied the hydrodynamics, particularly involving gases of differing densities. In an actual operating gas core reactor, the central gas of vaporized uranium will have a much higher density than the surrounding coolant. Testing was done in two different sized chambers (18 inch and 36 inch diameter) to study hydrodynamic scaling. Air was employed as the ''coolant'' gas. Air, argon, and freon, smoked for identification, was used to simulate the fuel. A variety of injectors at various locations in the cavity were employed. (auth)

Macbeth, P.J.; Kunze, J.F.; Rogers, V.C.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

GAS-LIQUID FLOW IN STIRRED REACTORS: Trailing Vortices and Gas Accumulation behind Impeller Blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a gas-liquid stirred reactor, gas tends to accumulate in low-pressure regions behind the impeller blades. Such gas accumulation forming so-called gas cavities, significantly alters impeller performance characteristics. We have computationally investigated gas-liquid flow generated by a Rushton turbine. Rotating Rushton turbine generates trailing vortices behind the blades, which enhance the gas accumulation. Characteristics of these trailing vortices were first investigated by considering a model problem of flow over a single impeller blade. Predicted results were compared with the published experimental data. Circulation velocity and turbulent kinetic energy of the trailing vortices were found to scale with blade tip velocity. Several numerical experiments were carried out to understand interaction of gas bubbles and trailing vortices. Gas-liquid flow in stirred vessel was then simulated by extending the computational snapshot approach of Ranade and Dometti (Chem. Eng. Res. Des. 74...

Vivek V. Ranade; Vaibhav R. Deshpande; Via Cantonale

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane emissions resulting from the release of methane trapped in coal beds can have a significant impact on the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with coal production. These emissions vary dramatically by coal rank, specific seam, and seam depth and thickness. This is particularly true of underground mines, where 50 of the nation’s 600 active underground mines are responsible for 98 % of all methane emissions. Various methods can be utilized to mitigate methane emissions, although at present these technologies have only seen limited deployment domestically due to lack of clear incentives or other barriers such as unclear ownership of rights to the gas, proximity of methane to market or a lack of desire to invest in new processes. Despite these factors, coal mine methane (CMM) recovery and use continues to grow, with over 46 billion cubic feet (Bcf) recovered domestically in 2006 – a 10 % increase from 2003.[1] The U.S. Department of Environmental Protection (EPA) reports that of the 50 mines identified as potential candidates for CMM recovery (CMMR), 14 mines have implemented recovery strategies.[1] It is expected that deployment will increase dramatically for gassy mines in the event that carbon regulation is passed, due to the potential cost associated with emissions: methane emissions would incur a cost 25 times higher than carbon emissions based on their increased global warming potential (GWP). This paper explores methane content and emissions associated with mining Illinois Basin coals such as Illinois No. 6. Illinois Basin bituminous coals tend to have a higher gas content than other bituminous coals, but the range of values is quite large, with methane contents as low as 10 standard cubic feet per ton of coal (scf CH4/ton) and as high as 250 scf CH4/ton being reported. As the methane content of the coal does not account for methane which has desorbed into the surrounding rock strata, specific methane emissions resulting from mining this coal will be even higher, with a 50 % increase in emissions expected.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10)/1 10)/1 Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for March 2010 through June 2010 March 2010 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Energy Information Administration Market Assessment of Planned Refinery Outages / March 2010 - June 2010

286

Microfluidic gas flow profiling using remote detection NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. (1954) Molecular theory of gases and liquids (Wiley, NewK. (1977) The properties of gases and liquids (McGraw-Hill,Microfluidic gas flow profiling using remote detection NMR

Hilty, Christian; McDonnell, Erin; Granwehr, Josef; Pierce, Kimberly; Han, Song-I Han; Pines, Alexander

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

AEO2011: Primary Natural Gas Flows Entering NGTDM Region from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Primary Natural Gas Flows Entering NGTDM Region from Neighboring Regions

288

Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Executive Summary - Natural Gas Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity Jeffrey Logan, Garvin Heath, and Jordan Macknick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Elizabeth Paranhos and William Boyd University of Colorado Law School Ken Carlson Colorado State University Technical Report NREL/TP-6A50-57702 January 2013 The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of Colorado-Boulder, the Colorado School of Mines, the Colorado State University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Stanford University. JISEA ® and all JISEA-based marks are trademarks or registered trademarks of the Alliance for

289

Flow through shares for Natural Gas exploration (Quebec, Canada) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flow through shares for Natural Gas exploration (Quebec, Canada) Flow through shares for Natural Gas exploration (Quebec, Canada) Flow through shares for Natural Gas exploration (Quebec, Canada) < Back Eligibility Utility Industrial Program Info Funding Source Government of Quebec State Quebec Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Revenu Quebec, Resources Naturalles Quebec A flow-through share is a security issued by an exploration company that waives its exploration deduction in favor of the investor. The Québec Taxation Act enables a private individual to benefit from a significant tax deduction when calculating his or her taxable income. In fact, the Québec system provides for a basic deduction equal to 100 percent of the cost of the flow-through shares. For shares acquired after March 30, 2004 the individual may deduct an additional 25% when exploration costs are incurred

290

F-Class Gas Turbine Technology Summary: Design Features, Reliability Statistics, and Durability Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the design features and capabilities of current F-class gas turbine models, and includes reliability/availability statistics and a summary of durability issues. The design matrix table includes models GT24/GT26 by Alstom, 7FA/9FA and 7FB/9FB by General Electric, M501F/M701F by Mitsubishi, and W501F by Siemens, presented in a format that facilitates a comparison of their design characteristics.BackgroundGas turbine technology continues ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodiesel has captured the interest of Washington State citizens. For policy makers, biodiesel provides air quality benefits, including reductions in greenhouse gas and particulate emissions. Biodiesel also offers the promise of in-state production, which can improve energy security and create local jobs. For consumers, biodiesel offers an “environmentally friendly ” alternative to petroleum diesel and opens up new market opportunities for fuel suppliers and farmers for services, commodities and products. Since 2001, biodiesel consumption in Washington State has grown from a few thousand gallons to nearly 1.5 million gallons in 2004. While small in comparison to annual diesel sales of nearly 1 billion gallons, demand for biodiesel is continuing to increase and opportunities for market expansion are large. Currently, biodiesel sales are dominated by large public fleets, such as the City of Seattle and the Washington State Ferries. These fleets have been able to balance the higher cost of the fuel with its public benefits. However, as the cost of diesel increases, general interest in biodiesel is growing statewide. Currently, there are approximately 20 retail stations in the state selling biodiesel to both public and private customers.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Prediction of flow pattern of gas-liquid flow through circular microchannel using probabilistic neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study attempts to develop a flow pattern indicator for gas-liquid flow in microchannel with the help of artificial neural network (ANN). Out of many neural networks present in literature, probabilistic neural network (PNN) has been chosen ... Keywords: Hydrodynamics, Microchannel, Microstructure, Multiphase flow, Probabilistic neural network, Transition boundary, Turbulence

Seim Timung; Tapas K. Mandal

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test plan and procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this test plan and procedure is to test the Whittaker electrochemical cell and the Sierra Monitor Corp. flammable gas monitors in a simulated field flow configuration. The sensors are used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Flammable Gas Interlock (FGI), to detect flammable gases, including hydrogen and teminate the core sampling activity at a predetermined concentration level.

Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

294

DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in which flow regime transition occurs.

X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Intercooler flow path for gas turbines: CFD design and experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program was created by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for generating electricity. Intercooling or cooling of air between compressor stages is a feature under consideration in advanced cycles for the ATS. Intercooling entails cooling of air between the low pressure (LP) and high pressure (HP) compressor sections of the gas turbine. Lower air temperature entering the HP compressor decreases the air volume flow rate and hence, the compression work. Intercooling also lowers temperature at the HP discharge, thus allowing for more effective use of cooling air in the hot gas flow path.

Agrawal, A.K.; Gollahalli, S.R.; Carter, F.L. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7. Total U.S. Proved Reserves of Crude Oil, Dry Natural Gas, and Lease Condensate, 2001-2009 Revisionsa Net of Salesb New Reservoir Provedd Change

297

The Energy Transformation Limit Theorem for Gas Flow Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The limit energy theorem which determines the possibility of transformation the energy flow in power systems in the absence of technical work is investigated and proved for such systems as gas lasers and plasmatrons, chemical gas reactors, vortex tubes, gas-acoustic and other systems, as well as a system of close stars. In the case of the same name ideal gas in the system the maximum ratio of energy conversion effectiveness is linked to the Carnot theorem, which in its turn is connected with the Nernst theorem. However, numerical analyses show that the class of flow energy systems is non-carnot one. The ratio of energy conversion effectiveness depends on the properties of the working medium; a conventional cycle in open-circuit is essentially irreversible. The proved theorem gives a more strongly worded II law of thermodynamics for the selected class of flow energy systems. Implications for astrophysical thermodynamic systems and the theory of a strong shock wave are discussed.

Volov, V T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Summary report on the design of the retained gas sampler system (retained gas sampler, extruder and extractor)  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes work performs in Fiscal Year 1994 to develop the three main components of Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS). These primary components are the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), the Retained Gas Extruder (RGE), and the Retained Gas Extractor (RGEx). The RGS is based on the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Universal Sampler design, and includes modifications to reduce gas leakage. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. Significant progress has been made in developing the RGSS. The RGSS is being developed by WHC to extract a representative waste sample from a Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks and to measure both the amount and composition of free and {open_quotes}bound{close_quotes} gases. Sudden releases of flammable gas mixtures are a safety concern for normal waste storage operations and eventual waste retrieval. Flow visualization testing was used to identify important fluid dynamic issues related to the sampling process. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. The safety analysis for the RGSS is being performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and is more than sixty percent (60%) complete.

Wootan, D.W.; Bolden, R.C.; Bridges, A.E.; Cannon, N.S.; Chastain, S.A.; Hey, B.E.; Knight, R.C.; Linschooten, C.G.; Pitner, A.L.; Webb, B.J.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

299

Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 4. Total U.S. Proved Reserves of Wet Natural Gas, and Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate, 2001-2009 Revisionsa Net of Salesb New Reservoir Provedd Change

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gas mass transfer for stratified flows  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Gas mass transfer for stratified flows  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume I. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first of which is this Executive Summary. Subsequent volumes include Volume II which contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III which includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. As part of this study, a scale model of the proposed gasification facility was constructed. This model was sent to Minnegasco, and photographs of the model are included at the end of this summary.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Multiphase imaging of gas flow in a nanoporous material using remote detection NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore structure on gas flow and dispersion with 129 Xe as thedominates the free gas flow, and dispersion is mainly due toinlet data. B. Dispersion of occluded gas in the center of

Harel, Elad; Granwehr, Josef; Seeley, Juliette A.; Pines, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Prediction of strongly-heated internal gas flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purposes of the present article are to remind practitioners why the usual textbook approaches may not be appropriate for treating gas flows heated from the surface with large heat fluxes and to review the successes of some recent applications of turbulence models to this case. Simulations from various turbulence models have been assessed by comparison to the measurements of internal mean velocity and temperature distributions by Shehata for turbulent, laminarizing and intermediate flows with significant gas property variation. Of about fifteen models considered, five were judged to provide adequate predictions.

McEligot, D.M. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)]|[Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Shehata, A.M. [Xerox Corp., Webster, NY (United States); Kunugi, Tomoaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)]|[Tokai Univ., Hiratsuka, Kanagawa (Japan)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Experimental Study of Main Gas Ingestion and Purge Gas Egress Flow in Model Gas Turbine Stages.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Efficient performance of gas turbines depends, among several parameters, on the mainstream gas entry temperature. At the same time, transport of this high temperature gas… (more)

Balasubramanian, Jagdish Harihara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Characterization of hydrotreating catalysts by reversed-flow gas chromatography  

SciTech Connect

A flow perturbation gas chromatographic method, called reversed-flow technique, was introduced in 1980 and has been used to study the kinetics of various surface-catalyzed reactions, as well as for other physicochemical measurements. A review on the method has already been published. The new technique is based on reversing the direction of flow of the carrier gas from time to time. It uses a conventional gas chromatograph with any kind of detector, accommodating in its oven a so-called sampling cell. This consists of a sampling column and a diffusion column and is connected to the carrier gas inlet and the detector via a four-port or six-port valve. By switching the valve from one position to the other, the carrier gas is made to flow through the sampling column either from D{sub 2} to D{sub 1} or in the reversed direction. The sampling column can be filled with a catalyst whereby it plays the role of a catalytic reactor, or it filled with a usual chromatographic material acting as a conventional separation column, or it can contain both kinds of solids. Moreover, this column can be completely empty of any solid material, when it simply acts as a sampling volume to produce chromatographic signals without any separation process. The diffusion column, which was not used in the early papers, is employed either as a device for feeding catalytic or chromatographic beds with a gas diffusion stream, or as a means to study slow rate processes, normally occurring within a gas chromatographic column and usually being described as broadening factors.

Katsanos, N.A. (Univ. of Patras (Greece))

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondoteam and carried out oil and gas flow simulations using theoil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated using

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Multiphase imaging of gas flow in a nanoporous material using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and transport, filtering or as reactors. We report a model study on silica aerogel using a time of the aerogel. The asymmetrical nature of the dispersion pattern alludes to the existence of a stationary and a flow regime in the aerogel. An exchange time constant is determined to characterize the gas transfer

Pines, Alexander

310

An Approach to Generating Summaries of Time Series Data in the Gas Turbine Domain Jin Yu and Jim Hunter and Ehud Reiter and Somayajulu Sripada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Approach to Generating Summaries of Time Series Data in the Gas Turbine Domain Jin Yu and Jim an approach to generating summaries of time series data in the gas turbine domain using AI techniques. Through), both domain knowledge from experts about how to solve problems in the gas turbine and information about

Sripada, Yaji

311

High btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. The proposed product, high Btu SNG would be a suitable substitute for natural gas which is widely used throughout the Upper Midwest by residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The study team consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors, Ertec Atlantic, Inc., The Institute of Gas Technology, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Minnegasco. Preliminary engineering and operating and financial plans for the harvesting, dewatering and gasification operations were developed. A site in Koochiching County near Margie was chosen for detailed design purposes only; it was not selected as a site for development. Environmental data and socioeconomic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential economic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential impacts - both positive and negative - were identified and assessed. The peat resource itself was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Markets for plant by-products were also assessed. In summary, the technical, economic, and environmental assessment indicates that a facility producing 80 billion Btu's per day SNG from peat is not commercially viable at this time. Minnegasco will continue its efforts into the development of peat and continue to examine other options.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flow: Effects of alternating channel curvature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flow: Effects of alternating channel curvature Metin of channel curvature on the axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flows are studied computationally.1063/1.3531742 I. INTRODUCTION Segmented gas-liquid flow also known as Taylor flow has been studied extensively

Muradoglu, Metin

313

Predicting enhanced mass flow rates in gas microchannels using nonkinetic models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Different nonkinetic approaches are adopted in this paper towards theoretically predicting the experimentally observed phenomenon of enhanced mass flow rates accompanying pressure-driven rarefied gas flows through ...

Dadzie, S. Kokou

314

Table 1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, 2007-2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, 2007-2011 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 14,991,891 R 15,134,644 R 14,414,287 R 13,247,498 12,291,070 From Oil Wells R 5,681,871 R 5,609,425 R 5,674,120 R 5,834,703 5,907,919 From Coalbed Wells R 1,999,748 R 2,022,228 R 2,010,171 1,916,762 1,779,055 From Shale Gas Wells 1,990,145 R 2,869,960 R 3,958,315 5,817,122 8,500,983 Total 24,663,656 25,636,257 26,056,893 R 26,816,085 28,479,026 Repressuring 3,662,685 3,638,622 3,522,090 3,431,587 3,365,313 Vented and Flared 143,457 166,909 165,360

315

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume II. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first is the Executive Summary. This Volume II contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. Contents of Volume II are: introduction; project scope and objectives; commercial plant description; engineering specifications; design and construction schedules; capital cost estimates; operating cost estimates; financial analysis; and future areas for investigation. 15 figures, 17 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Capacitance-based prover for gas flow meters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to examine a novel method for calibrating natural gas flow meters. This new method can accommodate very large flow rates and it avoids common problems associated with current meter proving techniques. In this method, the amount of gas accumulated in a vessel of fixed. volume is determined by measuring the change in capacitance of the vessel with respect to time. Because the accumulator has a fixed volume, the problems inherent with the mechanical motions involved in volumetric provers such as bell provers and piston provers are eliminated. Accurate measurements can also be made in larger vessels than would be feasible for gravimetric provers, especially for in situ calibrations.

Pipkins, Sean Patrick

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Numerical Simulation of Gas/Solid Flow in a Novel Annular Spouted Bed with Multiple Gas Nozzles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel annular spouted bed with multiple gas nozzles, has been proposed for dryness, pyrolysis, and gasification of coal particulates. It consists of two homocentric upright cylinders with some annularly located spouting gas nozzles between inner and ... Keywords: gas/solid flow, CFD, Eulerian multiphase model, kinetic theory of granular flow, annular spouted bed

Gong Xi-wu; Hu Guo-xin; Zhou Hai-jiang; Shi Qian

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Transition to Three-dimensional Waves in Cocurrent Gas-liquid Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 Transition to Three-dimensional Waves in Cocurrent Gas-liquid Flows W. C. Kuru, M on the interface of a gas-liquid flow in a horizontal channel is studied experimentally. It is found of gas-liquid and liquid-liquid mixtures. For a general case, these flows will have at least 6

McCready, Mark J.

320

Computer modeling of gas flow and gas loading of rock in a bench blasting environment  

SciTech Connect

Numerical modeling can contribute greatly to an understanding of the physics involved in the blasting process. This paper will describe the latest enhancements to the blast modeling code DMC (Distinct Motion Code) (Taylor and Preece, 1989) and will demonstrate the ability of DMC to model gas flow and rock motion in a bench blasting environment. DMC has been used previously to model rock motion associated with blasting in a cratering environment (Preece and Taylor, 1990) and in confined volume blasting associated with in-situ oil shale retorting (Preece, 1990 a b). These applications of DMC treated the explosive loading as force versus time functions on specific spheres which were adjusted to obtain correct face velocities. It was recognized that a great need in explosives modeling was the coupling of an ability to simulate gas flow with the rock motion simulation capability of DMC. This was accomplished by executing a finite difference code that computes gas flow through a porous media (Baer and Gross, 1989) in conjunction with DMC. The marriage of these two capabilities has been documented by Preece and Knudsen, 1991. The capabilities that have been added recently to DMC and which will be documented in this paper include: (1) addition of a new equation of state for the explosive gases; (2) modeling of gas flow and sphere loading in a bench environment. 8 refs., 5 figs.

Preece, D.S.; Baer, M.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Knudsen, S.D. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

An Enskog based Monte Carlo method for high Knudsen number non-ideal gas flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high Knudsen number non-ideal gas flows References [1] Gad-121: [2] Bird GA. Molecular gas dynamics. Oxford: Clarendon1976. [3] Bird GA. Molecular Gas Dynamics and the Direct

Wang, Moran; Li, Zhixin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Coupled rock motion and gas flow modeling in blasting  

SciTech Connect

The spherical element computer code DMC (Distinct Motion Code) used to model rock motion resulting from blasting has been enhanced to allow routine computer simulations of bench blasting. The enhancements required for bench blast simulation include: (1) modifying the gas flow portion of DMC, (2) adding a new explosive gas equation of state capability, (3) modifying the porosity calculation, and (4) accounting for blastwell spacing parallel to the face. A parametric study performed with DMC shows logical variation of the face velocity as burden, spacing, blastwell diameter and explosive type are varied. These additions represent a significant advance in the capability of DMC which will not only aid in understanding the physics involved in blasting but will also become a blast design tool. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Preece, D.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Knudsen, S.D. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiation tests performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cavitation damage results from the irradiated test plates in contact with the mercury are available for correlation with the bubble populations. The most effective mitigating population can now be designed into prototypical geometries for implementation into an actual SNS target.

Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

1984-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey"; Form EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report"; Form EIA-64A,...

328

Verification of software codes for simulation of unsteady flows in a gas centrifuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple semi-analytical solution is proposed for the problem of an unsteady gas flow in a gas centrifuge. The circulation in the centrifuge is driven by a source/sink of energy and by an external force (deceleration/acceleration of the gas rotation) ... Keywords: mathematical simulation of unsteady flows in a gas centrifuge, numerical solution of gas dynamics equations, semi-analytical solution, verification of software codes

V. A. Abramov; S. V. Bogovalov; V. D. Borisevich; V. D. Borman; V. A. Kislov; I. V. Tronin; V. N. Tronin; S. V. Yupatov

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

FORCE2: A multidimensional flow program for gas solids flow theory guide  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the theory and structure of the FORCE2 flow program. The manual describes the governing model equations, solution procedure and their implementation in the computer program. FORCE2 is an extension of an existing B&V multidimensional, two-phase flow program. FORCE2 was developed for application to fluid beds by flow implementing a gas-solids modeling technology derived, in part, during a joint government -- industry research program, ``Erosion of FBC Heat Transfer Tubes,`` coordinated by Argonne National Laboratory. The development of FORCE2 was sponsored by ASEA-Babcock, an industry participant in this program. This manual is the principal documentation for the program theory and organization. Program usage and post-processing of code predictions with the FORCE2 post-processor are described in a companion report, FORCE2 -- A Multidimensional Flow Program for Fluid Beds, User`s Guide. This manual is segmented into sections to facilitate its usage. In section 2.0, the mass and momentum conservation principles, the basis for the code, are presented. In section 3.0, the constitutive relations used in modeling gas-solids hydrodynamics are given. The finite-difference model equations are derived in section 4.0 and the solution procedures described in sections 5.0 and 6.0. Finally, the implementation of the model equations and solution procedure in FORCE2 is described in section 7.0.

Burge, S.W.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fluid and heat flow in gas-rich geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical-simulation techniques are used to study the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on geothermal reservoir behavior in the natural state and during exploitation. It is shown that the presence of CO/sub 2/ has large effects on the thermodynamic conditions of a reservoir in the natural state, especially on temperature distributions and phase compositions. The gas will expand two-phase zones and increase gas saturations to enable flow of CO/sub 2/ through the system. During exploitation, the early pressure drop is primarily due to degassing of the system. This process can cause a very rapid initial pressure drop, on the order of tens of bars, depending upon the initial partial pressure of CO/sub 2/. The following gas content from wells can provide information on in-place gas saturations and relative permeability curves that apply at a given geothermal resource. Site-specific studies are made for the gas-rich two-phase reservoir at the Ohaki geothermal field in New Zealand. A simple lumped-parameter model and a vertical column model are applied to the field data. The results obtained agree well with the natural thermodynamic state of the Ohaki field (pressure and temperature profiles) and a partial pressure of 15 to 25 bars is calculated in the primary reservoirs. The models also agree reasonably well with field data obtained during exploitation of the field. The treatment of thermophysical properties of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures for different phase compositions is summarized.

O'Sullivan, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Blakeley, M.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Using multi-layer models to forecast gas flow rates in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The petroleum industry commonly uses single-layer models to characterize and forecast long-term production in tight gas reservoir systems. However, most tight gas reservoirs are layered systems where the permeability and porosity of each layer can vary significantly, often over several orders of magnitude. In addition, the drainage areas of each of the layers can be substantially different. Due to the complexity of such reservoirs, the analysis of pressure and production history using single-layer analyses techniques provide incorrect estimates of permeability, fracture conductivity, drainage area, and fracture half-length. These erroneous values of reservoir properties also provide the reservoir engineer with misleading values of forecasted gas recovery. The main objectives of this research project are: (1) to demonstrate the typical errors that can occur in reservoir properties when single-layer modeling methods are used to history match production data from typical layered tight gas reservoirs, and (2) to use the single-layer match to demonstrate the error that can occur when forecasting long-term gas production for such complex gas reservoirs. A finite-difference reservoir simulator was used to simulate gas production from various layered tight gas reservoirs. These synthetic production data were analyzed using single-layer models to determine reservoir properties. The estimated reservoir properties obtained from the history matches were then used to forecast ten years of cumulative gas production and to find the accuracy of gas reserves estimated for tight gas reservoirs when a single-layer model is used for the analysis. Based on the results obtained in this work, I conclude that the accuracy in reservoir properties and future gas flow rates in layered tight gas reservoirs when analyzed using a single-layer model is a function of the degree of variability in permeability within the layers and the availability of production data to be analyzed. In cases where there is an idea that the reservoir presents a large variability in ��k�, using a multi-layer model to analyze the production data will provide the reservoir engineer with more accurate estimates of long-term production recovery and reservoir properties.

Jerez Vera, Sergio Armando

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A model for stratified gas-liquid turbulent flow in ducts of arbitrary cross-section  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

93 A model for stratified gas-liquid turbulent flow in ducts of arbitrary cross-section J. M the pressure gradient and the liquid fraction in two-phase gas- liquid fully developed stratified flow.60 Nomenclature. - TWO-PHASE VARIABLES. Definition densities statistical average (gas, liquid) mass average phase

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

333

Steam generators two phase flows numerical simulation with liquid and gas momentum equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam generators two phase flows numerical simulation with liquid and gas momentum equations M dimensional two-phase (liquid and gas) flows. The main goal is to improve the mod- eling of kinetic imbalance between the phases. We present a method that solves the mix- ture (liquid-gas) mass and enthalpy equations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

334

A computational study of axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flow Metin Muradoglua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A computational study of axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flow Metin Muradoglua Department-dimensional gas-liquid flow is studied computationally using a finite-volume/front-tracking method. The effects models. © 2007 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2750295 I. INTRODUCTION Segmented gas-liquid

Muradoglu, Metin

335

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2002-2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2002-2006 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year .................................. 387,772 393,327 406,147 R 425,887 448,641 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 503,894 506,356 506,454 R 494,748 508,075 From Oil Wells ................................................ 174,047 176,617 172,292 R 169,476 157,583 Total ................................................................. 677,942 682,973 678,746 R 664,223 665,657 Repressuring .................................................... 97,839 100,462 104,819 R 104,759 92,453 Vented and Flared

336

Understanding the Impacts of Incremental Gas Supply on the Flow ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

High natural gas prices and sharply higher oil and natural gas field revenues are expected to drive a resurgence in natural gas-directed drilling activity this year ...

337

Executive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 19902009 1 n emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stone, flue gas desulfurization, and glass manufacturing), soda ash production and consumption, titaniumExecutive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990­2009 1 n, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention, stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations

Little, John B.

338

Study of gas flow dynamics in porous and granular media with laser-polarized ą˛?Xe NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of gas flow dynamics in porous and granular media by using laser-polarized ą˛?Xe . Two different physical processes, the gas transport in porous rock cores and ...

Wang, Ruopeng, 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Numerical Simulation of Flow Field in Diesel Centrifugal Gas-Oil Separator Basing on CFD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aiming at the low efficiency problem of the traditional gas-oil separator, this paper put forward a centrifugal gas-oil separator. In order to identify out the interior fluid field character of centrifugal gas-oil separator, RANS equation, RNG k-e model ... Keywords: Diesel, Centrifugal Gas-oil Separator, Flow Field, Separation Efficiency

Zhiguo Zhao

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Numerical Early Warning Model Research of Landfill Gas Permeation and Diffusion Considering Flow-Temperature Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on seepage mechanics in porous medium gas and heat transfer theory, numerical early warning model is established, which is on quantitative description of migration and release of landfill gas and penetration and diffusion of energy, and dynamic ... Keywords: component, landfill gas, flow-temperature coupling, gas pressure and temperature distribution, numerical early warning model

Xue Qiang; Feng Xia-ting; Ma Shi-jin; Zhou Xiao-jun

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Oil and Gas Flow Data from the Top Hat and from the Choke Line...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flow Data from the Top Hat and from the Choke Line - XLS Oil and Gas Flow Data from the Top Hat and from the Choke Line - XLS Updated through 12:00 AM on July 10, 2010...

342

A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Periodic Flow Gas Turbine for Distributed Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

The proposed effort served as a feasibility study for an innovative, low-cost periodic flow gas turbine capable of realizing efficiencies in the 39-48% range.

Dr. Adam London

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report, summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns.

Information Center

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Table 10. Summary of U.S. natural gas imports by point of entry...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

as tailgate. Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports....

345

Program Summaries  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Program Summaries Program Summaries Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Seeing Matter Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Program Summaries Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Bes Summaries 2012 thumbnail JPG .jpg file (469KB) Basic Energy Sciences FY 2012 Research Summaries This report provides a collection of research abstracts and highlights for

346

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2005-2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2005-2009 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year .... 425,887 440,516 452,945 R 476,652 493,100 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 494,748 509,577 483,238 R 442,265 420,197 From Oil Wells ................................................ 169,476 156,860 164,759 R 162,742 164,611 From Coalbed Wells ....................................... NA NA 50,400 R 56,249 55,990 From Shale Gas Wells .................................... NA NA NA 64,682 95,811 Total ................................................................. 664,223 666,438 698,397 R 725,938 736,609

347

A CFD study of gas-solid jet in a CFB riser flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a gas–solid jet in a high-density riser flow were conducted. The impact of gas–solid injection on the riser flow hydrodynamics was investigated with respect to voidage, tracer mass fractions, and solids velocity distribution. The behaviors of a gas–solid jet in the riser crossflow were studied through the unsteady numerical simulations. Substantial separation of the jetting gas and solids in the riser crossflow was observed. Mixing of the injected gas and solids with the riser flow was investigated and backmixing of gas and solids was evaluated. In the current numerical study, both the overall hydrodynamics of riser flow and the characteristics of gas–solid jet were reasonably predicted compared with the experimental measurements made at NETL.

Li, Tingwen; Guenther, Chris

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Localization of shallow gas deposits and uncontrolled gas flows in young and unconsolidated sediments by geophysical methods  

SciTech Connect

The great mass of Neogene sediments in the Hungarian basin, where several hydrocarbon accumulations are known, is affected by Pliocene strike-slip movements, resulting in many [open quotes]flower structures.[close quotes] The gas may migrate from the reservoirs upward to the surface along the faults. Thus, shallow gas deposits can be located in the young, unconsolidated sands. There are also several shallow gas deposits derived from uncontrolled gas flows. In Hungary, the shallow gas reservoirs, which are small but increasingly important, have not yet been explored properly. However, the depleting gas may pollute the water in the soil as well as cause explosions. Our purpose is to develop inexpensive, complete, and highly sophisticated field- and data-processing techniques and an integrated complex of geophysical methods in order to define the limits of shallow gas deposits. To avoid anomalous behavior on seismic sections of the depleting gas, we started from uncontrolled gas flows which require special velocity and amplitude vs. offset analyses. In addition, natural and controlled source electromagnetic/electric surveys with various parameters were applied. An industrial-scale seismic section over an uncontrolled gas flow, special sections over flower structures and geoelectric sections, and a magnetic map are presented. The integrated complex of geophysical methods outlined above is being developed in order to establish the conditions for the exploration of gas reservoirs which have been used close to their locality and which could be recovered inexpensively.

Csoergei, J.; Kummer, I.; Papa, A.; Sipos, J.; Solyom, I.; Takacs, E.; Timar, Z. (Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary, Budapest (Hungary)); Keresztes, T. (MOL RT, Budapest (Hungary))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various analytical, semi-analytical, and empirical models have been proposed to characterize rate and pressure behavior as a function of time in tight/shale gas systems featuring a horizontal well with multiple hydraulic fractures. Despite a small number of analytical models and published numerical studies there is currently little consensus regarding the large-scale flow behavior over time in such systems. The purpose of this work is to construct a fit-for-purpose numerical simulator which will account for a variety of production features pertinent to these systems, and to use this model to study the effects of various parameters on flow behavior. Specific features examined in this work include hydraulically fractured horizontal wells, multiple porosity and permeability fields, desorption, and micro-scale flow effects. The theoretical basis of the model is described in Chapter I, along with a validation of the model. We employ the numerical simulator to examine various tight gas and shale gas systems and to illustrate and define the various flow regimes which progressively occur over time. We visualize the flow regimes using both specialized plots of rate and pressure functions, as well as high-resolution maps of pressure distributions. The results of this study are described in Chapter II. We use pressure maps to illustrate the initial linear flow into the hydraulic fractures in a tight gas system, transitioning to compound formation linear flow, and then into elliptical flow. We show that flow behavior is dominated by the fracture configuration due to the extremely low permeability of shale. We also explore the possible effect of microscale flow effects on gas effective permeability and subsequent gas species fractionation. We examine the interaction of sorptive diffusion and Knudsen diffusion. We show that microscale porous media can result in a compositional shift in produced gas concentration without the presence of adsorbed gas. The development and implementation of the micro-flow model is documented in Chapter III. This work expands our understanding of flow behavior in tight gas and shale gas systems, where such an understanding may ultimately be used to estimate reservoir properties and reserves in these types of reservoirs.

Freeman, Craig M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Expansion Process Flow Diagram  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Development and Expansion Process For Natural Gas Pipeline Projects Figure showing the expansion process...

351

Liquid-Gas Relative Permeabilities in Fractures: Effects of Flow Structures, Phase Transformation and Surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SGP-TR-177 Liquid-Gas Relative Permeabilities in Fractures: Effects of Flow Structures, Phase) the liquid-gas relative permeabilities in fractures can be modeled by characterizing the flow structures permeabilities in both smooth and rough fractures. For the theoretical analysis of liquid-vapor relative

Stanford University

352

A quadrature-based third-order moment method for dilute gas-particle flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dilute gas-particle flows can be described by a kinetic equation containing terms for spatial transport, gravity, fluid drag, and particle-particle collisions. However, the direct numerical solution of the kinetic equation is intractable for most applications ... Keywords: Boltzmann equation, Gas-particle flows, Kinetic equation, Quadrature method of moments, Velocity distribution function

R. O. Fox

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow  

SciTech Connect

Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

Steward, W. Gene

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

354

Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

Steward, W. Gene

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

355

Next Generation * Natural Gas (NG)2 Information Requirements--Executive Summary  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has initiated the Next Generation * Natural Gas (NG)2 project to design and implement a new and comprehensive information program for natural gas to meet customer requirements in the post-2000 time frame.

Information Center

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Visualization of Atomization Gas Flow and Melt Break-up Effects in Response to Nozzle Design  

SciTech Connect

Both powder particle size control and efficient use of gas flow energy are highly prized goals for gas atomization of metal and alloy powder to minimize off-size powder inventory (or 'reverb') and excessive gas consumption. Recent progress in the design of close-coupled gas atomization nozzles and the water model simulation of melt feed tubes were coupled with previous results from several types of gas flow characterization methods, e.g., aspiration measurements and gas flow visualization, to make progress toward these goals. Size distribution analysis and high speed video recordings of gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) experiments on special ferritic stainless steel alloy powders with an Ar+O{sub 2} gas mixture were performed to investigate the operating mechanisms and possible advantages of several melt flow tube modifications with one specific gas atomization nozzle. In this study, close-coupled gas atomization under closed wake gas flow conditions was demonstrated to produce large yields of ultrafine (dia.<20 {mu}m) powders (up to 32%) with moderate standard deviations (1.62 to 1.99). The increased yield of fine powders is consistent with the dual atomization mechanisms of closed wake gas flow patterns in the near-field of the melt orifice. Enhanced size control by stabilized pre-filming of the melt with a slotted trumpet bell pour tube was not clearly demonstrated in the current experiments, perhaps confounded by the influence of the melt oxidation reaction that occurred simultaneously with the atomization process. For this GARS variation of close-coupled gas atomization, it may be best to utilize the straight cylindrical pour tube and closed wake operation of an atomization nozzle with higher gas mass flow to promote the maximum yields of ultrafine powders that are preferred for the oxide dispersion strengthened alloys made from these powders.

Anderson, Iver; Rieken, Joel; Meyer, John; Byrd, David; Heidloff, Andy

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Observations of gas flows inside a protoplanetary gap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gaseous giant planet formation is thought to occur in the first few million years following stellar birth. Models predict that giant planet formation carves a deep gap in the dust component (shallower in the gas). Infrared observations of the disk around the young star HD142527, at ~140pc, found an inner disk ~10AU in radius, surrounded by a particularly large gap, with a disrupted outer disk beyond 140AU, indicative of a perturbing planetary-mass body at ~90 AU. From radio observations, the bulk mass is molecular and lies in the outer disk, whose continuum emission has a horseshoe morphology. The vigorous stellar accretion rate would deplete the inner disk in less than a year, so in order to sustain the observed accretion, matter must flow from the outer-disk into the cavity and cross the gap. In dynamical models, the putative protoplanets channel outer-disk material into gap-crossing bridges that feed stellar accretion through the inner disk. Here we report observations with the Atacama Large Millimetre Arr...

Casassus, Simon; M., Sebastian Perez; Dent, William R F; Fomalont, Ed; Hagelberg, Janis; Hales, Antonio; Jordán, Andrés; Mawet, Dimitri; Ménard, Francois; Wootten, Al; Wilner, David; Hughes, A Meredith; Schreiber, Matthias R; Girard, Julien H; Ercolano, Barbara; Canovas, Hector; Román, Pablo E; Salinas, Vachail

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Fuel Nozzle Flow Testing Guideline for Gas Turbine Low-NOx Combustion Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of dry low-NOx (DLN) gas turbine combustion systems capable of achieving single-digit emission levels requires precise control of the fuel/air ratio within each combustor. The primary means of maintaining the required fuel/air ratio control is through flow testing designed to ensure even distribution of fuel to both individual fuel nozzles and combustion chambers around the gas turbine. This report provides fuel nozzle flow testing guidelines for advanced gas turbine ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Understanding the Impacts of Incremental Gas Supply on the Flow Dynamics Across the North American Grid  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The presentation "Understanding the Impacts of Incremental Gas Supply on the Flow Dynamics Across the North American Grid" was given at the Canadian Institute's BC LNG Forum on November 20, 2006. The presentation provides an overview of EIA's long-term natural gas projections under reference case and sensitivity cases from the Annual Energy Outlook 2006, with special emphasis on natural gas flows in the West Coast.

Information Center

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

A FLOW VISUALIZATION STUDY OF THE GAS DYNAMICS OF LIQUID METAL ATOMIZATION NOZZLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A FLOW VISUALIZATION STUDY OF THE GAS DYNAMICS OF LIQUID METAL ATOMIZATION NOZZLES S.P. Mates and G-velocity gas to bear on the liquid metal, may point the way towards enhancing powder production capability Gas atomization of liquid metal via close-coupled nozzle technology is used to produce metal powders

Settles, Gary S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A unified moving grid gas-kinetic method in Eulerian space for viscous flow computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under a generalized coordinate transformation with arbitrary grid velocity, the gas-kinetic BGK equation is reformulated in a moving frame of reference. Then, a unified conservative gas-kinetic scheme is developed for the viscous flow computation in ... Keywords: 65M06, 76P05, 76T05, Gas-kinetic scheme, Moving grid, Navier-Stokes equations, Unified coordinate system

Changqiu Jin; Kun Xu

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2004-2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2004-2008 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year .... 406,147 425,887 440,516 R 452,945 478,562 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 506,454 494,748 509,577 R 483,238 510,019 From Oil Wells ................................................ 172,292 169,476 156,860 R 164,759 165,506 From Coalbed Wells ....................................... NA NA NA 50,400 53,757 Total ................................................................. 678,746 664,223 666,438 R 698,397 729,282 Repressuring .................................................... 104,819 104,759

363

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2003-2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2003-2007 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year .... 393,327 406,147 425,887 R 440,516 452,768 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 506,356 506,454 494,748 R 509,577 530,629 From Oil Wells ................................................ 176,617 172,292 169,476 R 156,860 165,699 Total ................................................................. 682,973 678,746 664,223 R 666,438 696,328 Repressuring .................................................... 100,462 104,819 104,759 92,453 107,274 Vented and Flared ............................................

364

Microsoft Word - Flue Gas Moisture.Final Report.Abstract.Summary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The...

365

Little Goose Dam Full Flow PIT-Tag Detection System Project Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2006, the design phase of this project was kicked off and was for the most part modeled after the Full Flow PIT installation installed at Lower Monumental Dam during winter and spring of 2006 and 2007. As the Goose Full Flow design progressed and the project started to move towards construction, issues within contracting occurred and the project was put on delay for 1 year. Starting in mid December of 2008, Harcon Inc. was awarded the contract and construction of the new Goose Full Flow PIT-tag detection system began. The purpose of this document is to summarize the installation of the Little Goose Full Flow project from start to finish and to highlight the notable successes and challenges that the installation presented along with the final results and current status.

Warf, Don; Livingston, Scott [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

366

FLOW BEHAVIOR OF GAS-CONDENSATE WELLS A DISSERTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation Input File 149 xi #12;xii #12;List of Tables 2.1 Four gas-condensate systems with different. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 5.1 Fluid characterization for a multicomponent gas-condensate system. . 113 xiii #12;xiv #12;List

367

NIST Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Natural Gas Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... control, meaning the turbine meters as well as all other auxiliary measurements (eg, temperature, pressure, frequency, gas composition) are ...

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

368

TX, RRC District 1 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6,127 1979-2011 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1,048 1,029 987 1,456 2,332 5,227 1979-2011 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 61...

369

U.S. Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

History; Dry Natural Gas: 211,085: 237,726: 244,656: 272,509: 304,625: 334,067: 1925-2011: Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation: 220,416: 247,789: 255,035: 283,879 ...

370

Federal Offshore U.S. Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5,360 14,439 13,546 12,552 11,765 10,420 1990-2011 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 15,750 14,813 13,892 12,856 12,120 10,820 1990-2011 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After...

371

High temperature ultrasonic gas flow sensor based on lead free piezoelectric material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are satisfied by flow meters with multiple ultrasonic measurement paths, typically supplied as a spool piece and used in custody transfer applications such as natural gas pipelines. With respect to flow metering in general, a substantial and key body of work... and ?T is the differential temperature. The disadvantages of thermal mass flow meters are discussed at length by Baker [11] and Miller [10]. The response of the instrument to changes in flow velocity is typically slow due to the thermal inertia...

Krsmanovic, Dalibor

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

372

Influence of gas flow rate on liquid distribution in trickle-beds using perforated plates as liquid distributors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of gas flow rate on liquid distribution in trickle- beds using perforated plates devices and a liquid collector were used to study the influence of the gas flow rate on liquid in liquid distribution were evidenced. Indeed, the obtained results show that the influence of gas flow rate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

373

Received through the CRS Web Summary Caspian Oil and Gas: Production and Prospects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a likelihood of relatively large reserves of crude oil and natural gas in the Caspian Sea region, and a consequent large increase in oil and natural gas production from that area. Because diversity of energy sources and energy security are considerations in Congressional deliberations on energy policy, this prospect could play a role in such discussions. However, there are obstacles to increases in Caspian Sea region production of oil and gas that may slow development. This report will be updated as events warrant. The Caspian Sea is a 700-mile-long body of water in central Asia bordered by

Bernard A. Gelb

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

Holmes, Michael Jerome (Thompson, ND); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh (Allentown, PA)

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

375

Existence and flow behavior of gas at low saturation in geopressured formations. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first geopressured brine well tested for the Department of Energy produced gas and brine at a ratio far above the solution ratio for the gas in that brine. One explanation advanced was that the geopressured formation contained gas at a low saturation, and that this gas flowed into the well during the test. This hypothesis is examined and found to be untenable based on evidence from well logs, flow tests and thermodynamics, and on currently accepted concepts for migration and accumulation of petroleum. The probable explanation for the observed high gas/water ratios is shown to be a thin, tight gas-bearing layer in the case of one sand and an updip gas cap in the case of the second and tested.

Matthews, C.S.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Key New England natural gas pipeline reflects seasonal flow ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Northeast natural gas prices frequently increase in winter, as high demand and supply constraints separate local prices from the U.S. Gulf region ...

377

GMAW Shielding Gas Flow Optimisation by Refinement of Nozzle ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, sufficient shielding gas coverage of the weld region is essential for the generation of high quality welds, and drafts can be detrimental to its efficiency.

378

Gas-liquid hydrodynamics in Taylor Flows with complex liquids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Universitá di Pisa Facoltá di Ingegneria Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Chimica Industriale e Scienza dei Materiali Relazione di tirocinio in Ingegneria Chimica Gas-liquid hydrodynamics in… (more)

ALBERINI, FEDERICO

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

NIST Calibration Services for Gas Flow Meters Piston Prover ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... [8] Tables of Thermal Properties of Gases, Natl. Bur. ... Standards, presented at Appalachian Gas Meas. ... [14] Smith, AJW, The Effect of Oil Films on the ...

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Key New England natural gas pipeline reflects seasonal flow ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) deliveries into New England have been declining in recent years, as low domestic prices provide an unattractive market to LNG shippers.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

In Natural Gas Pipelines, NIST Goes with the Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... flows from producers to consumers through a complex pipeline network totaling ... pressures an order of magnitude smaller than pipelines used in ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Analysis of Chemically Reacting Gas Flow and Heat Transfer in Methane Reforming Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents simulation and analysis of gas flow and heat transfer affected by chemical reactions relating to steam reforming of methane in a compact reformer. The reformer conditions such as the combined thermal boundary conditions on solid walls, ...

Guogang Yang; Danting Yue; Xinrong Lv; Jinliang Yuan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Biomass gasification using a horizontal entrained-flow gasifier and catalytic processing of the product gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A novel study on biomass-air gasification using a horizontal entrained-flow gasifier and catalytic processing of the product gas has been conducted. The study was designed… (more)

Legonda, Isack Amos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2008-2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2008-2012 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 428,565 408,167 375,127 348,044 360,663 From Oil Wells 158,841 160,673 165,220 167,294 140,725 From Coalbed Wells 57,263 56,922 54,277 50,377 43,591 From Shale Gas Wells 81,268 112,087 164,723 240,721 291,566 Total 725,938 737,849 759,347 806,436 836,545 Repressuring 103,034 99,734 97,172 95,295 92,304 Vented and Flared 4,726 4,682 4,699 5,931 6,027 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 20,351 20,431 23,693 24,577 21,573

385

Flow and heat transfer in gas turbine disk cavities subject to nonuniform external pressure field  

SciTech Connect

Ingestion of hot gas from the main-stream gas path into turbine disk cavities, particularly the first-stage disk cavity, has become a serious concern for the next-generation industrial gas turbines features high rotor inlet temperature. Fluid temperature in the cavities increases further due to windage generated by fluid drag at the rotating and stationary surfaces. The resulting problem of rotor disk heat-up is exacerbated by the high disk rim temperature due to adverse (relatively flat) temperature profile of the mainstream gas in the annular flow passage of the turbine. This describes an investigation into local convective heat transfer coefficient and cooling effectiveness of the rotor disk, flow field in the disk cavity, computation of the flow field and heat transfer in the disk cavity, and mainstream gas injection and rotor disk cooling effectiveness by mass transfer analogy.

Roy, R.P.; Kim, Y.W.; Tong, T.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Miscellaneous: Uruguay energy supply options study assessing the market for natural gas - executive summary.  

SciTech Connect

Uruguay is in the midst of making critical decisions affecting the design of its future energy supply system. Momentum for change is expected to come from several directions, including recent and foreseeable upgrades and modifications to energy conversion facilities, the importation of natural gas from Argentina, the possibility for a stronger interconnection of regional electricity systems, the country's membership in MERCOSUR, and the potential for energy sector reforms by the Government of Uruguay. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of several fuel diversification strategies on Uruguay's energy supply system. The analysis pays special attention to fuel substitution trends due to potential imports of natural gas via a gas pipeline from Argentina and increasing electricity ties with neighboring countries. The Government of Uruguay has contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to study several energy development scenarios with the support of several Uruguayan institutions. Specifically, ANL was asked to conduct a detailed energy supply and demand analysis, develop energy demand projections based on an analysis of past energy demand patterns with support from local institutions, evaluate the effects of potential natural gas imports and electricity exchanges, and determine the market penetration of natural gas under various scenarios.

Conzelmann, G.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

387

Gas flow stabilized megavolt spark gap for repetitive pulses  

SciTech Connect

A high voltage spark gap switch including a housing having first and second end walls being spaced apart by a predetermined distance. A first electrode is positioned on the first end wall and a second electrode is positioned on the second end wall. The first and second electrodes are operatively disposed relative to each other and are spaced apart by a predetermined gap. An inlet conduit is provided for supplying gas to the first electrode. The conduit includes a nozzle for dispersing the gas in the shape of an annular jet. The gas is supplied into the housing at a predetermined velocity. A venturi housing is disposed within the second electrode. An exhaust conduit is provided for discharging gas and residue from the housing. The gas supplied at the predetermined velocity to the housing through the inlet conduit and the nozzle in an annular shape traverses the gap between the first and second electrodes and entrains low velocity gas within the housing decreasing the velocity of the gas supplied to the housing and increasing the diameter of the annular shape. The venturi disposed within the second electrode recirculates a large volume of gas to clean and cool the surface of the electrodes.

Lawson, Robert N. (Albuquerque, NM); O' Malley, Martin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohwein, Gerald J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Investigation of flow modifying tools for the continuous unloading of wet-gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid loading in low production gas wells is a common problem faced in many producing regions around the world. Once gas rates fall below the minimum lift velocity, it is essential that some action be taken to maintain continuous operation of the well. Commonly applied solutions include: 1) reduction in wellhead pressure (compression); 2) reduction of tubing diameter (velocity strings); and 3) installation of artificial lift (plunger lift or sucker rod pumping). This thesis examines the use of a patented vortex flow modifier to lift liquids from low rate (stripper) gas wells. Vortex Flow LLC has developed a flow modifying tool using the patented EcoVeyor technology developed by EcoTech. This technology has been used successfully for almost a decade to transport solids in the coal and potash industries and is now being adapted to the oil and gas industries. Recent field tests in horizontal production pipelines have shown the ability to alter basic flow characteristics, significantly decreasing backpressure on wells and increasing production. This thesis evaluates this technology for use in the wellbore, where a tool is introduced at the bottom of the tubing string. Laboratory experiments were conducted using a 125-ft vertical flow loop of 2-in diameter clear PVC. In these experiments, the effects of the vortex device on gas and water flow was examined and compared with the behavior in normal pipe flow. An optimized tool was developed that alters the flow patterns in the pipe resulting in improved liquid unloading accompanied by a decrease in the tubing pressure loss by more than 15 percent. The optimized tool also lowered the minimum lift velocity required for liquid unloading. Visual observations at four locations along the test loop confirmed that the liquid phase is transported in an upward helical manner along the pipe wall, providing an improved flow path for the gas phase. Apart from assisting liquid unloading, the flow modifying tool enhances the operational envelope at low gas rates as well as forming smaller slugs during liquid unloading. Therefore the flow modifier can also reduce gas requirements during artificial gas lift and can also serve as a flow stabilizing device.

Ali, Ahsan Jawaid

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Non-uniform isentropic gas flow analysis of explosion in fractured solid media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new formulation of non-uniform isentropic gas flow during an explosion in solid media. The present form takes into account additional effects of variations in geometries of voids and crack openings. Variations of mass, density, ... Keywords: Blast, Combined finite/discrete element method, Explosion, Gas-solid interaction

S. Mohammadi; A. Pooladi

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that for increasingly rarefied flowfields, the predictions from continuum formulation, such as the Navier-Stokes equations lose accuracy. For the high speed diatomic molecular flow in the transitional regime, the inaccuracies are partially ... Keywords: Gas-kinetic method, Hypersonic and rarefied flows, Multiple temperature kinetic model

Kun Xu; Xin He; Chunpei Cai

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Gas Turbine Autotuning Technologies: Evaluation of State of the Art and Summary of Commercial Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines commercially available autotuning systems specifically for use on 7FA gas turbine engines. Each autotuning company is outlined giving details of operation and available features for each particular unit. This discussion is based upon three aspects: literature review, original equipment manufacturer (OEM) interviews, and user interviews. For each of the commercially available products, General Electric’s OpFlexTM, Power System Manufacturing's (PSM’s) ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

Summary of tank information relating salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Active use of these SSTs was phased out completely by November 1980, and the first step toward final disposal of the waste in the SSTs is interim stabilization, which involves removing essentially all of the drainable liquid from the tank. Stabilization can be achieved administratively, by jet pumping to remove drainable interstitial liquid, or by supernatant pumping. To date, 116 tanks have been declared interim stabilized; 44 SSTs have had drainable liquid removed by salt well jet pumping. Of the 149 SSTs, 19 are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because the waste in these tanks is known or suspected, in all but one case, to generate and retain mixtures of flammable gases, including; hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Salt well pumping to remove the drainable interstitial liquid from these SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. The scope of this work is to collect and summarize information, primarily tank data and observations, that relate salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues. While the waste within FGWL SSTs is suspected offering flammable gases, the effect of salt well pumping on the waste behavior is not well understood. This study is being conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the Flammable Gas Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Understanding the historical tank behavior during and following salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

Caley, S.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Canadian natural gas: Review of 1996 and outlook to 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review provides summaries of North American gas industry trends, including supply, demand, storage, gas flows, prices, transportation capacities, and Canadian gas export volumes, export prices, and revenues. Forecasts of North American demand, supply, gas flows, pipeline capacity, prices, and sales are provided to 2002. The appendix reviews regional natural gas markets, with detail on the drivers of gas consumption by sector for each region in Canada and the United States.

Not Available

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Multiphase imaging of gas flow in a nanoporous material usingremote detection NMR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pore structure and connectivity determine how microstructured materials perform in applications such as catalysis, fluid storage and transport, filtering, or as reactors. We report a model study on silica aerogel using a recently introduced time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance imaging technique to characterize the flow field and elucidate the effects of heterogeneities in the pore structure on gas flow and dispersion with Xe-129 as the gas-phase sensor. The observed chemical shift allows the separate visualization of unrestricted xenon and xenon confined in the pores of the aerogel. The asymmetrical nature of the dispersion pattern alludes to the existence of a stationary and a flow regime in the aerogel. An exchange time constant is determined to characterize the gas transfer between them. As a general methodology, this technique provides new insights into the dynamics of flow in porous media where multiple phases or chemical species may be present.

Harel, Elad; Granwehr, Josef; Seeley, Juliette A.; Pines, Alex

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

395

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects 2 Projects to Help Boost Gas Flow from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 15, 2001 August 15, 2001 DOE Selects 2 Projects to Help Boost Gas Flow from Low-Permeability Formations New Technologies Targeted at Future Gas Production From "Tight" Formations in Western U.S. MORGANTOWN, WV - America has vast resources of natural gas, but President Bush's National Energy Policy cautions that domestic production of the easier "conventional" gas could peak as early as 2015. To help prepare for the day when the Nation's increasing demand for clean-burning natural gas will have to be met by gas trapped in denser, more difficult-to-produce "unconventional" formations, the U.S. Department of Energy has selected two firms to develop advanced methods for locating and producing these low permeability gas reservoirs.

396

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of 12/31 (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feet) Feet) Data Series: Dry Natural Gas Wet NG Wet Nonassociated NG Wet Associated-Dissolved NG Natural Gas Liquids Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History U.S. 211,085 237,726 244,656 272,509 304,625 334,067 1925-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 15,360 14,439 13,546 12,552 11,765 10,420 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 811 805 704 739 724 710 1977-2011 Gulf of Mexico 14,549 13,634 1992-2007 Louisiana & Alabama 11,824 11,090 10,450 9,362 8,896 8,156 1981-2011 Texas 2,725 2,544 2,392 2,451 2,145 1,554 1981-2011 Alaska 10,245 11,917 7,699 9,101 8,838 9,424 1977-2011

397

NUMERICAL STUDY OF CO-CURRENT WATER-DRY GAS FLOW IN GAS GATHERING SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The optimum operation of the surface production system is one of the key elements needed for the successful operation of natural gas well facilities, particularly… (more)

Fernandez Luengo, Juan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A MULTIFIELD MODEL OF CHURN-TURBULENT GAS/LIQUID FLOWS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accuracy of numerical predictions for gas/liquid two-phase flows using Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) methods strongly depends on the formulation of models governing the interaction between the continuous liquid field and bubbles of different sizes. The purpose of this paper is to develop, test and validate a multifield model of adiabatic gas/liquid flows at intermediate gas concentrations (e.g., churn-turbulent flow regime), in which multiple-size bubbles are divided into a specified number of groups, each representing a prescribed range of sizes. The proposed modeling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for each bubble field. The overall model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code. The results of NPHASE-CMFD simulations have been validated against the experimental data from the TOPFLOW test facility. Also, a parametric analysis on the effect of various modeling assumptions has been performed.

Elena A. Tselishcheva; Steven P. Antal; Michael Z. Podowski; Donna Post Guillen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Table 10. Summary of U.S. natural gas imports by point of entry, 2007-2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table 10. Summary of U.S. natural gas imports by point of entry, 2007-2011 (volumes in million cubic feet, prices in dollars per thousand cubic feet) See footnotes at end of table. Pipeline (Canada) Eastport, ID 704,429 6.31 688,782 7.88 693,892 3.86 708,806 4.19 606,099 3.90 Calais, ME 106,643 7.57 121,295 9.77 114,081 4.48 131,035 4.94 149,736 4.40 Detroit, MI 81 8.28 753 6.58 21 4.53 79 8.37 19 5.17 Marysville, MI 876 7.59 2,252 8.59 5,651 3.80 5,694 4.44 9,946 4.42 St. Clair, MI 9,633 6.97 9,104 10.03 6,544 5.10 5,591 4.97 5,228 4.29 Noyes, MN 499,863 6.72 476,948 8.48 478,368 4.21 447,079 4.49 544,135 4.15 Warroad, MN 4,813 6.75 4,800 8.50 4,380 4.24 4,325 4.69 4,551 4.17

400

Table 9. Summary of U.S. natural gas imports by point of entry, 2008-2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Table 9. Summary of U.S. natural gas imports by point of entry, 2008-2012 (volumes in million cubic feet, prices in dollars per thousand cubic feet) See footnotes at end of table. Pipeline (Canada) Eastport, ID 688,782 7.88 693,892 3.86 708,806 4.19 606,099 3.90 634,194 2.59 Calais, ME 121,295 9.77 114,081 4.48 131,035 4.94 149,736 4.40 76,540 3.44 Detroit, MI 753 6.58 21 4.53 79 8.37 19 5.17 0 -- Marysville, MI 2,252 8.59 5,651 3.80 5,694 4.44 9,946 4.42 8,099 2.99 St. Clair, MI 9,104 10.03 6,544 5.10 5,591 4.97 5,228 4.29 3,531 2.64 Noyes, MN 476,948 8.48 478,368 4.21 447,079 4.49 544,135 4.15 401,717 2.86 Warroad, MN 4,800 8.50 4,380 4.24 4,325 4.69 4,551 4.17 4,610 3.06

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Table 11. Summary of U.S. natural gas exports by point of exit, 2008-2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 11. Summary of U.S. natural gas exports by point of exit, 2008-2012 (volumes in million cubic feet, prices in dollars per thousand cubic feet) See footnotes at end of table. Pipeline (Canada) Eastport, ID 252 7.43 113 4.49 12 5.85 10 4.74 0 -- Calais, ME 0 -- 2,131 5.62 452 4.53 1,028 4.46 6,952 4.30 Detroit, MI 27,220 8.37 43,980 4.01 44,275 4.69 43,690 4.26 50,347 3.10 Marysville, MI 8,756 7.48 14,925 4.85 22,198 4.87 41,964 4.48 42,866 3.18 Sault Ste. Marie, MI 3,122 8.75 2,044 5.04 4,011 5.27 9,555 4.23 24,913 3.20 St. Clair, MI 492,235 8.96 612,369 4.62 650,590 4.86 781,058 4.45 754,494 3.11 Noyes, MN 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- 3,975 3.90 11,768 3.46 Babb, MT 0 -- 0

402

Rock matrix and fracture analysis of flow in western tight gas sands: 1986 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents progress for the second year of a five-year project concerned with the pore structure and flow properties of low permeability gas sands. The main objective of work during the first year was to carry out advanced core analysis on cores recovered from the Multi-Well Field Experiment. In Phase 2, the properties of both fractured and non-fractured samples (hereafter referred to as matrix) have been studied. Special attention was given to the combined effect of overburden pressure and water saturation on gas flow. 11 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Morrow, N.R.; Buckley, J.S.; Cather, S.M.; Brower, K.R.; Dandge, V.; Graham, M.; Gonzales, B.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Radial flow has little effect on clusterization at intermediate energies in the framework of the Lattice Gas Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lattice Gas Model was extended to incorporate the effect of radial flow. Contrary to popular belief, radial flow has little effect on the clusterization process in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions except adding an ordered motion to the particles in the fragmentation source. We compared the results from the lattice gas model with and without radial flow to experimental data. We found that charge yields from central collisions are not significantly affected by inclusion of any reasonable radial flow.

C. B. Das; L. Shi; S. Das Gupta

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Creating Small Gas Bubbles in Flowing Mercury Using Turbulence at an Orifice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to create cavitation damage to the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, creating such a population in mercury is difficult due to the high surface tension and particularly the non-wetting behavior of mercury on gas-injection hardware. If the larger injected gas bubbles can be broken down into small bubbles after they are introduced to the flow, then the material interface problem is avoided. Research at the Oak Ridge National Labarotory is underway to develop a technique that has shown potential to provide an adequate population of small-enough bubbles to a flowing spallation target. This technique involves gas injection at an orifice of a geometry that is optimized to the turbulence intensity and pressure distribution of the flow, while avoiding coalescence of gas at injection sites. The most successful geometry thus far can be described as a square-toothed orifice having a 2.5 bar pressure drop in the nominal flow of 12 L/s for one of the target inlet legs. High-speed video and high-resolution photography have been used to quantify the bubble population on the surface of the mercury downstream of the gas injection sight. Also, computational fluid dynamics has been used to optimize the dimensions of the toothed orifice based on a RANS computed mean flow including turbulent energies such that the turbulent dissipation and pressure field are best suited for turbulent break-up of the gas bubbles.

Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; Paquit, Vincent C [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Closures for Course-Grid Simulation of Fluidized Gas-Particle Flows  

SciTech Connect

Gas-particle flows in fluidized beds and riser reactors are inherently unstable, and they manifest fluctuations over a wide range of length and time scales. Two-fluid models for such flows reveal unstable modes whose length scale is as small as ten particle diameters. Yet, because of limited computational resources, gas-particle flows in large fluidized beds are invariably simulated by solving discretized versions of the two-fluid model equations over a coarse spatial grid. Such coarse-grid simulations do not resolve the small-scale spatial structures which are known to affect the macroscale flow structures both qualitatively and quantitatively. Thus there is a need to develop filtered two-fluid models which are suitable for coarse-grid simulations and capturing the effect of the small-scale structures through closures in terms of the filtered variables. The overall objective of the project is to develop validated closures for filtered two-fluid models for gas-particle flows, with the transport gasifier as a primary, motivating example. In this project, highly resolved three-dimensional simulations of a kinetic theory based two-fluid model for gas-particle flows have been performed and the statistical information on structures in the 100-1000 particle diameters length scale has been extracted. Based on these results, closures for filtered two-fluid models have been constructed. The filtered model equations and closures have been validated against experimental data and the results obtained in highly resolved simulations of gas-particle flows. The proposed project enables more accurate simulations of not only the transport gasifier, but also many other non-reacting and reacting gas-particle flows in a variety of chemical reactors. The results of this study are in the form of closures which can readily be incorporated into existing multi-phase flow codes such as MFIX (www.mfix.org). Therefore, the benefits of this study can be realized quickly. The training provided by this project has prepared a PhD student to enter research and development careers in DOE laboratories or chemicals/energy-related industries.

Sankaran Sundaresan

2010-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

ENERGY EFFICIENT THERMAL MANAGEMENT FOR NATURAL GAS ENGINE AFTERTREATMENT VIA ACTIVE FLOW CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control  

SciTech Connect

The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control  

SciTech Connect

The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

Maria Cecilia Bravo

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Galactic scale gas flows in colliding galaxies: 3-Dimensional, N-body/hydrodynamics experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Galactic Scale Gas Flows in Colliding Galaxies: Galactic Scale Gas Flows in Colliding Galaxies: a-Dimensional, N-bodyjHydrodynamics Experiments Susan A. Lamb* NORDITA and Neils Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100, Kpbenhaven 0, Danmark. Richard A. Gerber University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Departments of Physics and Astronomy, 1110 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801, U.S.A. and Dinshaw S. Balsara t Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Homewood Campu.s, Baltimore, MD 21218, U.S.A. Abstract. We present some result.s from three dimensional computer simulations of collisions between models of equal mass gaJaxies, one of which is a rotating, disk galaxy containing both gas and stars and the other is an elliptical contaiuing stars only. We use fully self consistent models in which the

411

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the matrix-fracture interface. The distinctive two-phase flow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of gas condensate can seriously affect the recovery rate by blocking gas flow. Dry gas injection, pressure maintenance, or heating can help to preserve the mobility of gas phase. A small amount of water can increase the mobility of gas condensate.

Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

413

Louisiana Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

02 8.73 3.82 4.23 1967-2010 02 8.73 3.82 4.23 1967-2010 Imports 6.98 9.76 3.89 4.84 7.57 7.98 1989-2012 Exports -- -- -- 7.07 9.63 11.80 2007-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.22 9.58 5.96 5.43 5.67 3.48 1984-2012 Residential 14.20 15.49 13.15 11.73 11.37 11.54 1967-2012 Commercial 11.83 13.52 10.46 9.88 9.36 8.44 1967-2012 Industrial 7.08 9.32 4.31 4.68 4.25 2.96 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 12.00 13.02 8.58 11.14 10.58 10.53 1990-2012 Electric Power 7.53 10.01 4.35 4.79 W 2.99 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 10,045 11,573 20,688 29,277 30,358 1981-2011 Adjustments 192 -71 319 -612 178 1981-2011 Revision Increases 1,011 1,387 1,863 3,149 3,755 1981-2011

414

Hawaii Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Citygate 17.37 27.15 17.82 22.94 31.58 32.39 1984-2012 Residential 34.05 44.57 36.37 44.50 55.28 52.86 1980-2012 Commercial 28.31 39.01 30.00 36.55 45.58 47.03 1980-2012 Industrial 18.66 26.74 19.05 24.10 29.80 30.89 1997-2012 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2012 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption 2,850 2,702 2,607 2,627 2,619 2,689 1997-2012 Pipeline & Distribution Use 3 2 2 2 2 3 2004-2012 Delivered to Consumers 2,848 2,700 2,605 2,625 2,616 2,687 1997-2012 Residential 509 499 510 509 486 481 1980-2012 Commercial 1,836 1,769 1,752 1,777 1,768 1,850 1980-2012 Industrial 502 431 344 339 362 355 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2012 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- --

415

Arkansas Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6.61 8.72 3.43 3.84 1967-2010 6.61 8.72 3.43 3.84 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.55 8.88 7.86 6.76 6.27 5.36 1984-2012 Residential 13.08 14.09 13.39 11.53 11.46 11.82 1967-2012 Commercial 10.07 11.32 10.72 8.89 8.90 7.99 1967-2012 Industrial 9.51 10.56 8.44 7.28 7.44 6.38 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 8.39 -- -- -- -- 9.04 1994-2012 Electric Power 7.04 9.23 4.14 5.11 W 3.19 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 3,305 5,626 10,869 14,178 16,370 1977-2011 Adjustments -27 -64 5 -34 728 1977-2011 Revision Increases 321 1,249 1,912 1,072 631 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 146 189 621 301 324 1977-2011 Sales 298 19 54 393 6,760 2000-2011 Acquisitions 280 5 36 807 6,880 2000-2011

416

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

822,454 963,263 1,072,357 1,136,789 1,505,650 1,618,828 1973-2012 822,454 963,263 1,072,357 1,136,789 1,505,650 1,618,828 1973-2012 Alaska 48,396 39,164 30,536 30,100 16,398 9,342 1982-2012 Arizona 16,207 46,581 44,152 44,693 45,086 46,385 1982-2012 California 96,757 109,127 101,422 43,278 94,433 110,656 1982-2012 Idaho 0 252 113 12 10 0 1999-2012 Louisiana 0 0 0 22,814 38,552 7,655 2007-2012 Maine 0 0 2,131 452 1,028 6,952 2007-2012 Michigan 455,216 531,333 673,318 721,075 876,267 872,620 1982-2012 Minnesota 0 0 0 0 3,975 11,768 1999-2012 Montana 20,420 16,399 12,504 9,437 6,826 4,332 1982-2012 New Hampshire 0 64 0 0 336 199 2007-2012 New York 2 0 0 0 38,783 68,843 1982-2012 North Dakota 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999-2012 Texas 178,897 209,741 195,651 257,158 374,188 474,060 1982-2012

417

Montana Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5.72 7.50 3.16 3.64 1967-2010 5.72 7.50 3.16 3.64 1967-2010 Imports 6.66 8.22 3.88 4.13 3.75 2.45 1989-2012 Exports 6.16 8.14 3.63 4.05 3.82 2.40 1989-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.42 7.71 5.63 5.17 5.11 4.23 1984-2012 Residential 9.91 11.45 9.50 8.64 8.80 8.06 1967-2012 Commercial 9.76 11.32 9.41 8.54 8.66 7.98 1967-2012 Industrial 9.75 11.04 9.06 8.07 8.13 7.54 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 7.64 11.50 9.08 9.60 8.20 6.48 1990-2012 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 1,052 1,000 976 944 778 1977-2011 Adjustments 9 -3 135 -19 -59 1977-2011 Revision Increases 92 41 132 103 43 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 74 56 210 100 97 1977-2011

418

Florida Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wellhead Wellhead NA NA NA NA 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.97 9.73 5.76 5.49 5.07 3.93 1984-2012 Residential 20.61 21.07 20.18 17.89 18.16 18.31 1967-2012 Commercial 13.07 14.45 11.09 10.60 11.14 10.41 1967-2012 Industrial 10.56 11.72 9.41 8.33 8.07 6.96 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 12.82 15.56 13.16 17.98 5.56 9.83 1989-2012 Electric Power 9.35 10.41 7.90 6.54 5.86 4.80 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 108 1 7 56 6 1977-2011 Adjustments 4 79 6 64 -54 1977-2011 Revision Increases 110 0 0 0 13 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 0 183 0 0 9 1977-2011 Sales 47 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 Extensions 0 0 0 0 0 1977-2011

419

Ohio Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.59 7.88 4.36 4.63 1967-2010 7.59 7.88 4.36 4.63 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.64 10.41 6.60 6.87 5.51 4.47 1984-2012 Residential 13.47 14.53 12.68 11.13 10.78 9.91 1967-2012 Commercial 11.74 12.77 10.42 9.25 8.55 7.11 1967-2012 Industrial 10.63 12.71 8.71 7.40 6.77 5.48 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- -- -- -- 1990-2012 Electric Power 7.88 10.79 4.40 5.01 W 3.05 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 1,027 985 896 832 758 1977-2011 Adjustments 138 210 70 127 -99 1977-2011 Revision Increases 144 135 70 68 17 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 198 333 43 59 38 1977-2011 Sales 0 31 196 374 0 2000-2011 Acquisitions 0 32 79 239 4 2000-2011 Extensions

420

Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6.24 7.56 3.53 4.71 1967-2010 6.24 7.56 3.53 4.71 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.14 8.40 7.15 6.18 5.67 5.00 1984-2012 Residential 12.06 12.32 11.39 11.12 10.32 11.10 1967-2012 Commercial 10.94 11.54 10.59 9.77 8.94 8.95 1967-2012 Industrial 9.18 13.03 12.53 8.23 7.37 7.65 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 12.83 11.01 9.69 8.18 10.98 9.13 1991-2012 Electric Power 6.69 8.18 3.92 4.84 W 3.04 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 19,031 20,845 22,769 26,345 27,830 1977-2011 Adjustments 13 99 984 -394 -368 1977-2011 Revision Increases 2,115 2,786 2,894 3,224 5,142 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 1,366 2,580 3,592 3,474 6,856 1977-2011 Sales 1,545 395 600 219 2,995 2000-2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Kentucky Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

35 8.42 NA 4.47 1967-2010 35 8.42 NA 4.47 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.22 10.14 5.98 5.69 5.18 4.17 1984-2012 Residential 12.05 13.84 11.97 10.02 10.44 10.19 1967-2012 Commercial 11.29 13.25 10.89 8.61 8.79 8.28 1967-2012 Industrial 8.37 10.41 6.04 5.57 5.16 3.96 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- -- -- -- 1992-2012 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 2,469 2,714 2,782 2,613 2,006 1977-2011 Adjustments 37 81 97 -58 -34 1977-2011 Revision Increases 62 187 126 103 178 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 152 133 760 540 639 1977-2011 Sales 4 10 0 0 100 2000-2011 Acquisitions 6 13 0 39 84 2000-2011 Extensions 373 200 713 383 4 1977-2011

422

Colorado Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.57 6.94 3.21 3.96 1967-2010 4.57 6.94 3.21 3.96 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.23 6.98 5.09 5.26 4.94 4.26 1984-2012 Residential 8.84 9.77 8.80 8.13 8.25 8.31 1967-2012 Commercial 8.10 9.01 7.56 7.58 7.84 7.58 1967-2012 Industrial 7.21 8.76 6.57 5.84 6.42 5.79 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 8.72 13.57 9.12 10.79 9.56 11.65 1990-2012 Electric Power 4.35 7.02 4.27 5.16 4.98 W 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 21,851 23,302 23,058 24,119 24,821 1977-2011 Adjustments 136 -250 306 449 801 1977-2011 Revision Increases 3,924 3,244 1,601 2,973 2,509 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 582 3,029 4,044 3,645 2,921 1977-2011 Sales 750 747 374 242 1,244 2000-2011

423

Natural Gas Imports (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,607,582 3,984,101 3,751,360 3,740,757 3,468,693 3,137,789 4,607,582 3,984,101 3,751,360 3,740,757 3,468,693 3,137,789 1973-2012 California 0 1,345 1,953 22,503 2,171 0 2007-2012 Georgia 170,243 135,711 142,244 106,454 75,641 59,266 1999-2012 Idaho 704,429 688,782 693,892 708,806 606,099 634,194 1982-2012 Louisiana 268,714 18,110 70,099 90,867 60,554 20,132 1982-2012 Maine 106,643 121,295 114,081 131,035 149,736 76,540 1982-2012 Maryland 148,231 25,894 72,339 43,431 13,981 2,790 1999-2012 Massachusetts 183,624 166,247 161,486 164,984 135,278 86,609 1982-2012 Michigan 10,590 12,109 12,216 11,365 15,193 11,630 1982-2012 Minnesota 504,676 481,748 482,749 451,405 548,686 406,327 1982-2012 Mississippi 0 0 0 0 5,774 0 2007-2012 Montana 779,129 666,251 502,435 706,201 679,848 754,058 1982-2012

424

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NA NA NA NA 1967-2010 NA NA NA NA 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 9.35 10.39 7.81 7.04 6.28 5.52 1984-2012 Residential 14.66 16.22 14.74 12.90 12.46 11.99 1967-2012 Commercial 12.77 14.29 11.83 10.47 10.42 10.24 1967-2012 Industrial 10.64 12.09 9.19 8.23 9.86 9.58 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 10.83 8.30 5.15 3.76 3.40 7.96 1990-2012 Electric Power 8.01 10.46 4.60 5.27 4.85 3.15 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 3,361 3,577 6,985 13,960 26,529 1977-2011 Adjustments 181 -201 65 -373 -224 1977-2011 Revision Increases 326 655 668 2,892 7,077 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 418 502 502 1,938 4,872 1977-2011 Sales 4 275 52 678 799 2000-2011 Acquisitions

425

California Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6.62 8.38 3.96 4.87 1967-2010 6.62 8.38 3.96 4.87 1967-2010 Imports -- 9.15 2.83 4.76 3.57 -- 2007-2012 Exports 6.53 8.06 3.76 4.51 4.18 2.90 1997-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.82 8.11 4.17 4.86 4.47 3.46 1984-2012 Residential 11.57 12.75 9.43 9.92 9.93 9.14 1967-2012 Commercial 10.20 11.75 7.75 8.30 8.29 7.05 1967-2012 Industrial 9.07 10.80 6.56 7.02 7.04 5.77 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 7.72 11.32 7.61 5.55 7.32 7.01 1990-2012 Electric Power 6.72 8.23 4.44 4.99 4.71 3.68 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 2,740 2,406 2,773 2,647 2,934 1977-2011 Adjustments 33 -6 11 10 923 1977-2011 Revision Increases 355 263 259 548 1,486 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 273 491 189 451 1,889 1977-2011

426

Kansas Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

69 6.85 3.16 4.23 1967-2010 69 6.85 3.16 4.23 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.27 8.85 6.12 6.08 5.53 4.74 1984-2012 Residential 12.97 13.00 11.10 10.61 9.93 10.13 1967-2012 Commercial 12.04 12.24 10.01 9.65 8.89 8.82 1967-2012 Industrial 7.17 9.42 4.59 5.49 5.28 3.95 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- -- 9.87 9.00 1994-2012 Electric Power 6.31 8.11 4.13 5.05 4.79 3.28 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 3,982 3,557 3,279 3,673 3,486 1977-2011 Adjustments 79 -6 224 140 125 1977-2011 Revision Increases 407 334 212 687 152 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 221 498 403 166 240 1977-2011 Sales 65 17 2 17 124 2000-2011 Acquisitions 63 30 1 23 122 2000-2011

427

Alaska Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5.63 7.39 2.93 3.17 1967-2010 5.63 7.39 2.93 3.17 1967-2010 Exports 6.21 7.69 8.59 12.19 12.88 15.71 1989-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1970-2005 Citygate 6.75 6.74 8.22 6.67 6.53 6.14 1988-2012 Residential 8.68 8.72 10.23 8.89 8.77 8.47 1967-2012 Commercial 7.57 8.66 9.51 8.78 8.09 8.09 1967-2012 Industrial 4.67 5.49 4.02 4.23 3.84 5.11 1997-2012 Electric Power 3.58 W W W 5.04 4.32 1997-2012 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 11,917 7,699 9,101 8,838 9,424 1977-2011 Adjustments 1 -3 3 1 -1 1977-2011 Revision Increases 2,147 184 1,868 622 928 1977-2011 Revision Decreases 112 4,068 108 452 206 1977-2011 Sales 10 0 5 131 36 2000-2011 Acquisitions 6 0 0 0 221 2000-2011 Extensions

428

Utah Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

51 5.54 5.81 5.89 5.16 5.38 1989-2013 Residential NA 8.11 8.07 8.33 8.47 8.12 1989-2013 Commercial NA 6.95 6.90 7.07 7.08 6.60 1989-2013 Industrial 5.40 5.59 5.48 5.51 5.41 5.26...

429

Nevada Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60 4.94 NA 5.08 5.80 5.60 1989-2013 Residential 7.63 7.87 8.48 10.03 11.09 12.16 1989-2013 Commercial 5.96 5.95 6.04 6.38 6.56 6.78 1989-2013 Industrial 6.09 6.04 6.10 6.23 6.33...

430

Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43 4.60 5.04 5.95 6.91 6.25 1989-2013 Residential 7.96 8.14 9.00 9.85 NA 12.66 1989-2013 Commercial 6.99 7.05 7.38 7.19 7.58 7.26 1989-2013 Industrial 6.05 6.21 6.59 6.11 6.01 5.39...

431

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Prices are in ...

432

Maine Natural Gas Summary  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan...

433

Ohio Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

63 4.76 4.18 NA 3.91 4.03 1989-2013 Residential 7.49 7.86 9.07 13.17 17.82 22.69 1989-2013 Commercial 7.25 NA 7.03 7.59 7.04 7.40 1989-2013 Industrial 5.09 5.28 5.55 6.17 7.18 6.33...

434

Vermont Natural Gas Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8.51 9.74 6.34 6.54 5.81 1989-2011 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1982-2005 Citygate 10.03 10.66 9.33 8.29 7.98 6.63 1984-2012 Residential 15.99 18.31 17.29 16.14 16.17 16.73...

435

Natural Gas Imports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,607,582 3,984,101 3,751,360 3,740,757 3,468,693 3,137,789 1973-2012 California 0 1,345 1,953 22,503 2,171 0 2007-2012 Georgia 170,243 135,711 142,244 106,454 75,641 59,266...

436

Illinois Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wellhead NA NA NA NA 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.87 8.48 5.71 5.52 5.09 4.11 1984-2012 Residential 10.76...

437

Idaho Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10 4.56 4.46 4.18 4.09 3.68 1989-2013 Residential 8.73 8.93 9.31 9.70 8.81 8.62 1989-2013 Commercial 7.58 7.41 7.32 7.32 7.24 NA 1989-2013 Industrial 5.24 5.10 5.27 4.96 5.05 NA...

438

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

46,385 1982-2012 California 96,757 109,127 101,422 43,278 94,433 110,656 1982-2012 Idaho 0 252 113 12 10 0 1999-2012 Louisiana 0 0 0 22,814 38,552 7,655 2007-2012 Maine 0 0...

439

Mississippi Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

12.48 9.48 8.75 7.99 7.35 1967-2012 Industrial 8.28 10.37 6.65 6.19 5.83 4.61 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- -- -- 1994-2011 Electric Power 7.43 9.62 W W 4.32 2.91 1997-2012 Dry...

440

Vermont Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

478 274 137 93 85 1989-2013 Commercial 404 347 201 108 85 83 1989-2013 Industrial 302 286 247 206 204 233 2001-2013 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Electric Power 4 4 1 4 4 3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Texas Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9.77 11.25 8.15 7.90 7.07 NA 1967-2012 Industrial 6.76 8.96 4.05 4.61 4.20 3.02 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 9.76 11.53 4.88 5.38 7.03 1990-2011 Electric Power 6.77 8.91 3.96 4.66 4.36...

442

Alabama Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.94 13.34 12.37 12.71 1967-2012 Industrial 8.70 10.57 6.48 6.64 5.56 4.32 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel -- 17.32 19.17 16.24 11.45 1990-2011 Electric Power 7.19 10.03 4.30 4.85 4.36...

443

Washington Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

12.26 10.49 10.40 9.84 1967-2012 Industrial 9.79 10.55 11.68 9.37 9.47 8.70 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 6.66 15.43 11.98 12.89 9.88 1990-2011 Electric Power 6.15 8.56 5.29 5.52 W W...

444

Virginia Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

12.81 10.31 9.55 9.69 NA 1967-2012 Industrial 9.33 11.49 7.14 6.68 6.44 4.92 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 7.45 10.66 6.77 4.31 4.55 1993-2011 Electric Power 8.42 10.87 4.70 5.72 5.08...

445

Utah Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8.03 7.74 7.57 6.83 7.05 NA 1967-2012 Industrial 6.35 7.21 5.62 5.57 5.50 4.70 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 8.33 8.08 10.01 11.61 13.01 1990-2011 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2012...

446

Hawaii Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 48 49 50 50 47 1989-2013 Commercial 151 143 151 164 159 160 1989-2013 Industrial 28 26 42 37 33 30 2001-2013 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- --...

447

Tennessee Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

13.01 10.67 9.39 9.04 8.32 1967-2012 Industrial 9.32 10.81 7.09 6.64 6.15 4.84 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 13.91 11.79 8.74 8.16 12.32 1990-2011 Electric Power W W 4.70 5.04 4.64 2.90...

448

Minnesota Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10.52 7.96 7.60 7.46 6.34 1967-2012 Industrial 7.65 9.05 5.66 5.58 5.55 4.29 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 12.78 19.51 18.72 16.49 10.55 1993-2011 Electric Power W 9.23 W W W W...

449

Connecticut Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

13.81 9.92 9.55 8.48 NA 1967-2012 Industrial 10.54 12.63 8.44 9.60 9.16 NA 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 20.57 24.04 15.26 16.31 18.59 1992-2011 Electric Power 7.81 10.48 4.89 5.70...

450

Idaho Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10.28 9.77 8.21 8.09 7.45 1967-2012 Industrial 9.39 9.18 8.53 6.39 6.36 5.74 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 11.42 12.45 9.33 7.51 3.33 1994-2011 Electric Power W W W W W W 2001-2012...

451

Michigan Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10.66 9.38 8.95 9.14 8.34 1967-2012 Industrial 9.47 10.26 9.63 9.25 8.27 7.42 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- -- -- 1990-2011 Electric Power 6.63 8.75 4.55 4.97 4.76 3.23...

452

Wyoming Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8.87 8.01 7.13 7.29 6.92 1967-2012 Industrial 6.61 7.55 5.79 4.91 5.57 4.07 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 5.79 6.51 5.79 10.08 11.96 1991-2011 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2012 Dry...

453

Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

12.85 12.00 11.68 NA 1967-2012 Industrial 14.83 15.23 12.07 10.41 10.14 NA 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel 12.84 13.80 12.99 12.48 4.21 1990-2011 Electric Power 8.11 10.43 4.93 5.44...

454

A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AND FEASIBILITY EVALUATION OF NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW MEASUREMENT ALTERNATIVES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulation and open access in the natural gas pipeline industry has changed the gas business environment towards greater reliance on local energy flow rate measurement. What was once a large, stable, and well-defined source of natural gas is now a composite from many small suppliers with greatly varying gas compositions. Unfortunately, the traditional approach to energy flow measurement [using a gas chromatograph (GC) for composition assay in conjunction with a flow meter] is only cost effective for large capacity supplies (typically greater than 1 to 30 million scfd). A less costly approach will encourage more widespread use of energy measurement technology. In turn, the US will benefit from tighter gas inventory control, more efficient pipeline and industrial plant operations, and ultimately lower costs to the consumer. An assessment of the state and direction of technology for natural gas energy flow rate measurement is presented. The alternative technologies were ranked according to their potential to dramatically reduce capital and operating and maintenance (O and M) costs, while improving reliability and accuracy. The top-ranked technologies take an unconventional inference approach to the energy measurement problem. Because of that approach, they will not satisfy the fundamental need for composition assay, but have great potential to reduce industry reliance on the GC. Technological feasibility of the inference approach was demonstrated through the successful development of data correlations that relate energy measurement properties (molecular weight, mass-based heating value, standard density, molar ideal gross heating value, standard volumetric heating value, density, and volume-based heating value) to three inferential properties: standard sound speed, carbon dioxide concentration, and nitrogen concentration (temperature and pressure are also required for the last two). The key advantage of this approach is that inexpensive on-line sensors may be used to measure the inferential variables, which can then be applied (through the data correlations) to convert existing flow meters (ultrasonic, orifice, turbine, rotary, Coriolis, diaphragm, etc.) for on-line energy measurement. The practical issues for field development were evaluated using two transducers extracted from a $100 ultrasonic domestic gas meter, and a $400 infrared sensor.

Kendricks A. Behring II; Eric Kelner; Ali Minachi; Cecil R. Sparks; Thomas B. Morrow; Steven J. Svedeman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The Implications and Flow Behavior of the Hydraulically Fractured Wells in Shale Gas Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas formations are known to have low permeability. This low permeability can be as low as 100 nano darcies. Without stimulating wells drilled in the shale gas formations, it is hard to produce them at an economic rate. One of the stimulating approaches is by drilling horizontal wells and hydraulically fracturing the formation. Once the formation is fractured, different flow patterns will occur. The dominant flow regime observed in the shale gas formation is the linear flow or the transient drainage from the formation matrix toward the hydraulic fracture. This flow could extend up to years of production and it can be identified by half slop on the log-log plot of the gas rate against time. It could be utilized to evaluate the hydraulic fracture surface area and eventually evaluate the effectiveness of the completion job. Different models from the literature can be used to evaluate the completion job. One of the models used in this work assumes a rectangular reservoir with a slab shaped matrix between each two hydraulic fractures. From this model, there are at least five flow regions and the two regions discussed are the Region 2 in which bilinear flow occurs as a result of simultaneous drainage form the matrix and hydraulic fracture. The other is Region 4 which results from transient matrix drainage which could extend up to many years. The Barnett shale production data will be utilized throughout this work to show sample of the calculations. This first part of this work will evaluate the field data used in this study following a systematic procedure explained in Chapter III. This part reviews the historical production, reservoir and fluid data and well completion records available for the wells being analyzed. It will also check for data correlations from the data available and explain abnormal flow behaviors that might occur utilizing the field production data. It will explain why some wells might not fit into each model. This will be followed by a preliminary diagnosis, in which flow regimes will be identified, unclear data will be filtered, and interference and liquid loading data will be pointed. After completing the data evaluation, this work will evaluate and compare the different methods available in the literature in order to decide which method will best fit to analyze the production data from the Barnett shale. Formation properties and the original gas in place will be evaluated and compared for different methods.

Almarzooq, Anas Mohammadali S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Estimation of Critical Flow Velocity for Collapse of Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents calculations performed to determine the critical flow velocity for plate collapse due to static instability for the Gas Test Loop booster fuel assembly. Long, slender plates arranged in a parallel configuration can experience static divergence and collapse at sufficiently high coolant flow rates. Such collapse was exhibited by the Oak Ridge High Flux Reactor in the 1940s and the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 1950s. Theoretical formulas outlined by Miller, based upon wide-beam theory and Bernoulli’s equation, were used for the analysis. Calculations based upon Miller’s theory show that the actual coolant flow velocity is only 6% of the predicted critical flow velocity. Since there is a considerable margin between the theoretically predicted plate collapse velocity and the design velocity, the phenomena of plate collapse due to static instability is unlikely.

Guillen; Mark J. Russell

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Lagrangian Prediction Of Disperse Gas-Particle Flow In Cyclone Separators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disperse multiphase flows are very common for processes in mechanical and thermal process technology (e.g. gas--particle or gas--droplet flows, coal combustion, pneumatical conveying, erosion phenomena). Processes for the separation of solid particles from gases or fluids and for the classification and particle size analysis are an important field of interest in process technology. The paper deals with a 3--dimensional Lagrangian approach for the prediction of disperse multiphase flows. The underlying numerical algorithm is based on the PSI--cell approach, where trajectories of a large number of particles are calculated from the equations of motion of the disperse phase. The time--averaged equations of fluid motion are solved by the program package FAN--3D developed by Peri'c and Lilek and modified for gas-particle flow calculations by the authors. The most fundamental features of FAN--3D are : ffl use of non--orthogonal, boundary fitted, numerical grids with arbitrary hexahedral cont...

Thomas Frank; Th. Frank; Qiang Yu; Erik Wassen; Q. Yu

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

The spatial distributions of cooling gas and intrinsic X-ray absorbing material in cooling flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results from a study of the spatial distributions of cooling gas and intrinsic X-ray absorbing material in a sample of nearby, X-ray bright cooling flow clusters observed with the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) on ROSAT. Our method of analysis employs X-ray colour profiles, formed from ratios of the surface brightness profiles of the clusters in selected energy bands, and an adapted version of the deprojection code of Fabian et al. (1981). We show that all of the cooling flow clusters in our sample exhibit significant central concentrations of cooling gas. At larger radii the clusters appear approximately isothermal. In detail, the spatial distributions and emissivity of the cooling material are shown to be in excellent agreement with the predictions from the deprojection code, and can be used to constrain the ages of the cooling flows. The X-ray colour profiles also indicate substantial levels of intrinsic X-ray absorption in the clusters. The intrinsic absorption increases with decreasing radius, and is confined to the regions occupied by the cooling flows. We explore a range of likely spatial distributions for the absorbing gas and discuss the complexities

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A Novel Approach For the Simulation of Multiple Flow Mechanisms and Porosities in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The state of the art of modeling fluid flow in shale gas reservoirs is dominated by dual porosity models that divide the reservoirs into matrix blocks that significantly contribute to fluid storage and fracture networks which principally control flow capacity. However, recent extensive microscopic studies reveal that there exist massive micro- and nano- pore systems in shale matrices. Because of this, the actual flow mechanisms in shale reservoirs are considerably more complex than can be simulated by the conventional dual porosity models and Darcy’s Law. Therefore, a model capturing multiple pore scales and flow can provide a better understanding of complex flow mechanisms occurring in these reservoirs. Through the use of a unique simulator, this research work establishes a micro-scale multiple-porosity model for fluid flow in shale reservoirs by capturing the dynamics occurring in three separate porosity systems: organic matter (mainly kerogen); inorganic matter; and natural fractures. Inorganic and organic portions of shale matrix are treated as sub-blocks with different attributes, such as wettability and pore structures. In the organic matter or kerogen, gas desorption and diffusion are the dominant physics. Since the flow regimes are sensitive to pore size, the effects of smaller pores (mainly nanopores and picopores) and larger pores (mainly micropores and nanopores) in kerogen are incorporated in the simulator. The separate inorganic sub-blocks mainly contribute to the ability to better model dynamic water behavior. The multiple porosity model is built upon a unique tool for simulating general multiple porosity systems in which several porosity systems may be tied to each other through arbitrary transfer functions and connectivities. This new model will allow us to better understand complex flow mechanisms and in turn to extend simulation to the reservoir scale including hydraulic fractures through upscaling techniques

Yan, Bicheng

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository for spent fuel and high-level nuclear wastes, leads to the generation and accumulation of hydrogen gas in the backfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-term repository safety. Previous studies used H{sub 2} generation rates based on the volume of the waste or canister material and the stoichiometry of the corrosion reaction. However, iron corrosion and H{sub 2} generation rates vary with time, depending on factors such as amount of iron, water availability, water contact area, and aqueous and solid chemistry. To account for these factors and feedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to iron corrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena that are driven by gas-pressure buildup associated with H{sub 2} generation and water consumption. Results indicate that by dynamically calculating H{sub 2} generation rates based on a simple model of corrosion chemistry, and by coupling this corrosion reaction with two-phase flow processes, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup could be much smaller compared to a model that neglects the coupling between flow and reactive transport mechanisms. By considering the feedback of corrosion chemistry, the gas pressure increases initially at the canister, but later decreases and eventually returns to a stabilized pressure that is slightly higher than the background pressure. The current study focuses on corrosion under anaerobic conditions for which the coupled hydrogeochemical model was used to examine the role of selected physical parameters on the H{sub 2} gas generation and corresponding pressure buildup in a nuclear waste repository. The developed model can be applied to evaluate the effect of water and mineral chemistry of the buffer and host rock on the corrosion reaction for future site-specific studies.

Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas flow summary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A Gas-Kinetic Scheme For The Simulation Of Compressible Turbulent Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A gas-kinetic scheme for the continuum regime is applied to the simulation of turbu- lent compressible flow, by replacing the molecular relaxation time with a turbulent relaxation time in the BGK model. The turbulence dynamics is modelled on the basis of a standard, linear two-equation turbulence model. The hydrodynamic limit of the resulting turbulence model is linear in smooth flow and non-linear in the presence of stronger flow gradients. The non-linear correction terms in the numerical flux are weighed as a function of "rarefaction" - referred to turbulence dynamics and not to molecular dynamics, i.e. measured by the ratio of turbulence to mean flow scales of motion. Even though no assumptions on the nature of the turbulence have been made and a linear two-equation turbulence model is used, the turbulence gas-kinetic scheme seems able to correct the turbulent stress tensor in an effective way; on the basis of a number of turbulence modelling benchmark flow cases, characterized by strong shock - boundary l...

Righi, Marcello

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Liquid-gas-solid flows with lattice Boltzmann: Simulation of floating bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a model for the simulation of liquid-gas-solid flows by means of the lattice Boltzmann method. The approach is built upon previous works for the simulation of liquid-solid particle suspensions on the one hand, and on a liquid-gas free surface model on the other. We show how the two approaches can be unified by a novel set of dynamic cell conversion rules. For evaluation, we concentrate on the rotational stability of non-spherical rigid bodies floating on a plane water surface - a classical hydrostatic problem known from naval architecture. We show the consistency of our method in this kind of flows and obtain convergence towards the ideal solution for the measured heeling stability of a floating box.

Bogner, Simon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Computational Flow Predictions for the Lower Plenum of a High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced gas-cooled reactors offer the potential advantage of higher efficiency and enhanced safety over present day nuclear reactors. Accurate simulation models of these Generation IV reactors are necessary for design and licensing. One design under consideration by the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) program is a modular, prismatic gas-cooled reactor. In this reactor, the lower plenum region may experience locally high temperatures that can adversely impact the plant’s structural integrity. Since existing system analysis codes cannot capture the complex flow effects occurring in the lower plenum, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are being employed to model these flows [1]. The goal of the present study is to validate the CFD calculations using experimental data.

Donna Post Guillen

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Constant-pressure production in solution-gas-drive reservoirs; Transient flow  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents procedures to obtain reservoir parameters from constant-pressure drawdown data in solution-gas-drive reservoirs. A novel procedure to determine the mechanical skin factor is introduced. Examples, including a field case, illustrate the use of this procedure. An estimate of the drainage area can be obtained with the derivative of rate data. A theoretical basis for analyzing data by the pressure-squared, p{sup 2}, approach is presented; this procedure permits the approximate determination of sandface effective permeabilities in the transient flow period. For damaged wells, it is possible to obtain rough estimates of the size of the skin zone and the ratio of reservoir/skin-zone permeability when early transient data are available. The expression of the appropriate dimensionless rate in terms of physical properties for solution-gas-drive systems is presented. Finally, this paper presents a procedure to obtain an estimate of the change in sandface saturation during the transient flow period.

Camacho, R.G. (National Univ. of Mexico/PEMEX (MX))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Investigation of Swirl Flows Applied to the Oil and Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding how swirl flows can be applied to processes in the oil and gas industry and how problems might hinder them, are the focus of this thesis. Three application areas were identified: wet gas metering, liquid loading in gas wells and erosion at pipe bends due to sand transport. For all three areas, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed. Where available, experimental data were used to validate the CFD results. As a part of this project, a new test loop was conceived for the investigation of sand erosion in pipes. The results obtained from CFD simulations of two-phase (air-water) flow through a pipe with a swirl-inducing device show that generating swirl flow leads to separation of the phases and creates distinct flow patterns within the pipe. This effect can be used in each of the three application areas of interest. For the wet gas metering application, a chart was generated, which suggests the location of maximum liquid deposition downstream of the swirling device used in the ANUMET meter. This will allow taking pressure and phase fraction measurements (from which the liquid flow rate can be determined) where they are most representative of the flow pattern assumed for the ANUMET calculation algorithms. For the liquid loading application, which was taken as an upscaling of the dimensions investigated for the wet gas metering application, the main focus was on the liquid hold-up. This parameter is defined as the ratio of the flowing area occupied by liquid to the total area. Results obtained with CFD simulations showed that as the water rate increases, the liquid hold-up increases, implying a more effective liquid removal. Thus, it was concluded that the introduction of a swirler can help unload liquid from a gas well, although no investigation was carried out on the persistance of the swirl motion downstream of the device. For the third and final application, the erosion at pipe bends due to sand transport, the main focus was to check the erosion rate on the pipe wall with and without the introduction of a swirler. The erosion rate was predicted by CFD simulations. The flow that was investigated consisted of a liquid phase with solid particles suspended in it. The CFD results showed a significant reduction in erosion rate at the pipe walls when the swirler was introduced, which could translate into an extended working life for the pipe. An extensive literature review performed on this topic, complemented by the CFD simulations, showed the need for a dedicated multiphase test loop for the investigation of sand erosion in horizontal pipes and at bends. The design of a facility of this type is included in this thesis. The results obtained with this work are very encouraging and provide a broad perspective of applications of swirl flows and CFD for the oil and gas industry.

Ravuri Venkata Krish, Meher Surendra

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Impact of relative permeability models on fluid flow behavior for gas condensate reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate assessments of reserves and evaluation of productivity trends for gas condensate systems depend on a basic understanding of phase and fluid flow behavior. In gas condensate reservoirs, the gas flow depends on liquid drop out at pressures below the dewpoint pressure. The liquid initially accumulates as a continuous film along the porous media because of the low interfacial tension. Then, as the volume of condensate increases, the interfacial tension increases and capillary forces become more important. Modeling fluid flow in these systems must consider the dependence of relative permeability on both viscous and capillary forces. This research focuses on the evaluation of several recently proposed relative permeability models and on the quantification of their impact on reservoir fluid flow and well performance. We selected three relative permeability models to compare the results obtained in the modeling of relative permeabilities for a published North Sea gas condensate reservoir. The models employ weighting factors to account for the interpolation between miscible and immiscible flow behavior. The Pusch model evaluated using Fevang's weighting factor gave the best estimation of relative permeability when compared to the published data. Using a sector model, we evaluated the effects at the field scale of the selected gas condensate relative permeability models on well performance under different geological heterogeneity and permeability anisotropy scenarios. The Bette and Pusch models as well as the Danesh model, as implemented in a commercial reservoir simulator, were used to quantify the impact of the relative permeability models on fluid-flow and well performance. The results showed that, if the transition between miscible and immiscible behavior is not considered, the condensate saturation could be overestimated and the condensate production could be underestimated. After twenty years of production, the heterogeneous model using the selected relative permeability models predicted between 7.5 - 13% more condensate recovery than was estimated using an immiscible relative permeability model. Using the same relative permeability models, the anisotropic model forecast between 3 - 10% more condensate recovery than predicted using an immiscible relative permeability model. Results using the anisotropic model showed that vertical communication could affect the liquid distribution in the reservoir.

Zapata Arango, Jose? Francisco

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Canadian natural gas: Review of 1997 and outlook to 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review provides summaries of North American gas industry trends, including supply, demand, storage, gas flows, prices, transportation capacities, and Canadian gas export volumes, export prices, and revenues. Forecasts of North American demand, supply, gas flows, pipeline capacity, prices, and sales are provided to 2005. The focus of the review is on regional natural gas markets, with detail on the drivers of gas consumption by sector for each region in Canada and the United States. A regulatory analysis section updates developments in Canadian and US pipeline regulation, electric power deregulation and its effect on gas as a power source, and gas distribution.

Not Available

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Moving Character Observation of Bubble Rising in Vertical Gas?Liquid Two?Phase Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of bubble motion in water is a basic subject in gas?liquid two?phase flow research. A suit of visualized experimental device was designed and set up. Bubble rising in stagnant liquid in a vertical translucent rectangular tank was studied using the high?speed video system combined with digital image process methods. Several bubble parameters were calculated base on the processed images. Bubble track

H. Y. Wang; F. Dong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Flow interaction in the combustor-diffusor system of industrial gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an experimental/computational study of cold flow in the combustor-diffuser system of industrial gas turbines to address issues relating to flow interactions and pressure losses in the pre- and dump diffusers. The present configuration with can annular combustors differs substantially from the aircraft engines which typically use a 360 degree annular combustor. Experiments were conducted in a one-third scale, annular 360-degree model using several can combustors equispaced around the turbine axis. A 3-D computational fluid dynamics analysis employing the multidomain procedure was performed to supplement the flow measurements. The measured data correlated well with the computations. The airflow in the dump diffuser adversely affected the prediffuser flow by causing it to accelerate in the outer region at the prediffuser exit. This phenomenon referred to as the sink-effect also caused a large fraction of the flow to bypass much of the dump diffuser and go directly from the prediffuser exit to the bypass air holes on the combustor casing, thereby, rendering the dump diffuser ineffective in diffusing the flow. The dump diffuser was occupied by a large recirculation region which dissipated the flow kinetic energy. Approximately 1.2 dynamic head at the prediffuser inlet was lost in the combustor-diffuser system; much of it in the dump diffuser where the fluid passed through the narrow gaps and pathways. Strong flow interactions in the combustor-diffuser system indicate the need for design modifications which could not be addressed by empirical correlations based on simple flow configurations.

Agrawal, A.K. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Kapat, J.S.; Yang, T. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

471

Measurement of Turbulent Flow Phenomena for the Lower Plenum of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean velocity field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics design (Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor). The datawere obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered as a benchmark for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The primary objective of this paper is to document the experiment and present a sample of the data set that has been established for this standard problem. Present results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flowin the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined crossflow—with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. Posts, side walls and end walls are fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive index of the mineral oil working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet-jet Reynolds numbers (based on the hydraulic diameter of the jet and the timemean average flow rate) are approximately 4300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analysis and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal complicated flow patterns that include several large recirculation zones, reverse flow near the simulated reflector wall, recirculation zones in the upper portion of the plenum and complex flow patterns around the support posts. Data include three-dimensional PIV images of flow planes, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model.

Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a Lower Plenum Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean-velocity-field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. The data were obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. This paper reviews the experimental apparatus and procedures, presents a sample of the data set, and reviews the INL Standard Problem. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages in and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3-D) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analysis and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal undeveloped, non-uniform, turbulent flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet conditions are also presented.

Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Fracture Modeling and Flow Behavior in Shale Gas Reservoirs Using Discrete Fracture Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid flow process in fractured reservoirs is controlled primarily by the connectivity of fractures. The presence of fractures in these reservoirs significantly affects the mechanism of fluid flow. They have led to problems in the reservoir which results in early water breakthroughs, reduced tertiary recovery efficiency due to channeling of injected gas or fluids, dynamic calculations of recoverable hydrocarbons that are much less than static mass balance ones due to reservoir compartmentalization, and dramatic production changes due to changes in reservoir pressure as fractures close down as conduits. These often lead to reduced ultimate recoveries or higher production costs. Generally, modeling flow behavior and mass transport in fractured porous media is done using the dual-continuum concept in which fracture and matrix are modeled as two separate kinds of continua occupying the same control volume (element) in space. This type of numerical model cannot reproduce many commonly observed types of fractured reservoir behavior since they do not explicitly model the geometry of discrete fractures, solution features, and bedding that control flow pathway geometry. This inaccurate model of discrete feature connectivity results in inaccurate flow predictions in areas of the reservoir where there is not good well control. Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) model has been developed to aid is solving some of these problems experienced by using the dual continuum models. The Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) approach involves analysis and modeling which explicitly incorporates the geometry and properties of discrete features as a central component controlling flow and transport. DFN are stochastic models of fracture architecture that incorporate statistical scaling rules derived from analysis of fracture length, height, spacing, orientation, and aperture. This study is focused on developing a methodology for application of DFN to a shale gas reservoir and the practical application of DFN simulator (FracGen and NFflow) for fracture modeling of a shale gas reservoir and also studies the interaction of the different fracture properties on reservoir response. The most important results of the study are that a uniform fracture network distribution and fracture aperture produces the highest cumulative gas production for the different fracture networks and fracture/well properties considered.

Ogbechie, Joachim Nwabunwanne

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This summary presents the significant results of a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. The report summarizes the air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phases of the proposed development, their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas, and mitigating measures and strategies available to minimize perceived impacts. The air quality modeling analysis includes both and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

High-Resolution Simulations of Gas-Solids Jet Penetration Into a High Density Riser Flow  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution simulations of a gas-solids jet in a 0.3 m diameter and 15.9 m tall circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser were conducted with the open source software-MFIX. In the numerical simulations, both gas and solids injected through a 1.6 cm diameter radial-directed tube 4.3 m above the bottom distributor were tracked as tracers, which enable the analysis of the characteristics of a two-phase jet. Two jetting gas velocities of 16.6 and 37.2 m/s were studied with the other operating conditions fixed. Reasonable flow hydrodynamics with respect to overall pressure drop, voidage, and solids velocity distributions were predicted. Due to the different dynamic responses of gas and particles to the crossflow, a significant separation of gas and solids within the jet region was predicted for both cases. In addition, the jet characteristics based on tracer concentration and tracer mass fraction profiles at different downstream levels are discussed. Overall, the numerical predictions compare favorably to the experimental measurements made at NETL.

Li, Tingwen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

released from the BP oil well blowout, Nature Geoscience, 4:for the Deepwater Horizon /Macondo Well oil spill. Flow Ratecolumn of oil and gas in the well, it would imply the

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Gas-liquid two phase flow through a vertical 90 elbow bend  

SciTech Connect

Pressure drop data are reported for two phase air-water flow through a vertical to horizontal 90 elbow bend set in 0.026 m i.d. pipe. The pressure drop in the vertical inlet tangent showed some significant differences to that found for straight vertical pipe. This was caused by the elbow bend partially choking the inflow resulting in a build-up of pressure and liquid in the vertical inlet riser and differences in the structure of the flow regimes when compared to the straight vertical pipe. The horizontal outlet tangent by contrast gave data in general agreement with literature even to exhibiting a drag reduction region at low liquid rates and gas velocities between 1 and 2 m s{sup -1}. The elbow bend pressure drop was best correlated in terms of l{sub e}/d determined using the actual pressure loss in the inlet vertical riser. The data showed a general increase with fluid rates that tapered off at high fluid rates and exhibited a negative pressure region at low rates. The latter was attributed to the flow being smoothly accommodated by the bend when it passed from slug flow in the riser to smooth stratified flow in the outlet tangent. A general correlation was presented for the elbow bend pressure drop in terms of total Reynolds numbers. A modified Lockhart-Martinelli model gave prediction of the data. (author)

Spedding, P.L.; Benard, E. [School of Aeronautical Engineering, Queen's University Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Design and Initial Development of Monolithic Cross-Flow Ceramic Hot-Gas Filters  

SciTech Connect

Advanced, coal-fueled, power generation systems utilizing pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies are currently being developed for high-efficiency, low emissions, and low-cost power generation. In spite of the advantages of these promising technologies, the severe operating environment often leads to material degradation and loss of performance in the barrier filters used for particle entrapment. To address this problem, LoTEC Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are jointly designing and developing a monolithic cross-flow ceramic hot-gas filter. The filter concept involves a truly monolithic cross-flow design that is resistant to delamination, can be easily fabricated, and offers flexibility of geometry and material make-up. During Phase I of the program, a thermo-mechanical analysis was performed to determine how a cross-flow filter would respond both thermally and mechanically to a series of thermal and mechanical loads. The cross-flow filter mold was designed accordingly, and the materials selection was narrowed down to Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} (CS-50) and 2Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-3SiO{sub 2} (mullite). A fabrication process was developed using gelcasting technology and monolithic cross-flow filters were fabricated. The program focuses on obtaining optimum filter permeability and testing the corrosion resistance of the candidate materials.

Barra, C.; Limaye, S.; Stinton, D.P.; Vaubert, V.M.

1999-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

479

COARSE-GRID SIMULATION OF REACTING AND NON-REACTING GAS-PARTICLE FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

Many processes involved in coal utilization involve handling of fine particles, their pneumatic transport, and their reactions in fluidized beds, spouted beds and circulating fluidized beds. One of the factors limiting our ability to simulate these processes is the hydrodynamics encountered in them. Two major issues that contribute to this limitation are lack of good and computationally expedient models for frictional interaction between particles, and models to capture the consequences of mesoscale structures that are ubiquitous in gas-solid flows. This project has focused on the development of these models through a combination of computer simulations and experiments. The principal goal of this project, funded under the ''DOE Vision 21 Virtual Demonstration Initiative'' is better simulation of circulating fluidized bed performance. The principal challenge funded through this cooperative agreement is to devise sound physical models for the rheological characteristics of the gas-particle mixtures and implement them in the open-domain CFD code MFIX. During the course of this project, we have made the following specific advances. (a) We have demonstrated unequivocally that sub-grid models are essential to capture, even qualitatively correctly, the macroscale flow structures in gas-particle flows in vertical risers. To this end, we developed sub-grid models of different levels of detail and exposed the sensitivity of the results obtained in coarse-grid simulations of gas-particle flow in a riser to the level of sophistication of the sub-grid models. (b) We have demonstrated that sub-grid model for the fluid-particle drag force is the most important additional feature and that the corrections for the granular phase viscosity and pressure are of secondary importance. We have also established that sub-grid models for dispersion of heat and mass are of secondary importance only. (c) We have brought forth the general character of the sub-grid model for the drag force. (d) We have performed for the first time in the literature a detailed analysis of the impact of unipolar electrostatic charges on gas-particle flow characteristics in a riser. (e) We have examined in detail the effect of wall friction and particle-particle contact (frictional) stresses on fluidization and defluidization behavior of particle assemblies, and brought forth their importance for stable operation of standpipes in a circulating fluidized bed circuit. (f) We have demonstrated that the general characteristics of contact stresses in particle assemblies and wall friction are similar for many different particles, establishing that a simple model framework can be widely applicable. (g) We have developed constitutive models for frictional regime, implemented them in MFIX and demonstrated the capability of simulating dense gas-solid flows in the frictional regime. (h) We have also performed detailed experiments to expose the nature of the stick-slip flows in silos, as a simple model system for under-aerated standpipes. All theoretical advances made in the study are implemented in MFIX and are available for public use.

Sankaran Sundaresan

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Preliminary Study of Turbulent Flow in the Lower Plenum of a Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the turbulent flow in a scaled model of a portion of the lower plenum of a gas-cooled advanced reactor concept has been conducted. The reactor is configured such that hot gases at various temperatures exit the coolant channels in the reactor core, where they empty into a lower plenum and mix together with a crossflow past vertical cylindrical support columns, then exit through an outlet duct. An accurate assessment of the flow behavior will be necessary prior to final design to ensure that material structural limits are not exceeded. In this work, an idealized model was created to mimic a region of the lower plenum for a simplified set of conditions that enabled the flow to be treated as an isothermal, incompressible fluid with constant properties. This is a first step towards assessing complex thermal fluid phenomena in advanced reactor designs. Once such flows can be computed with confidence, heated flows will be examined. Experimental data was obtained using three-dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to obtain non-intrusive flow measurements for an unheated geometry. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) predictions of the flow were made using a commercial CFD code and compared to the experimental data. The work presented here is intended to be scoping in nature, since the purpose of this work is to identify improvements that can be made to subsequent computations and experiments. Rigorous validation of computational predictions will eventually be necessary for design and analysis of new reactor concepts, as well as for safety analysis and licensing calculations.

T. Gallaway; D.P. Guillen; H.M. McIlroy, Jr.; S.P. Antal

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a Lower Plenum Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean-velocity-field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. The data were obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate geometry scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages in and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3-D) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean bulk velocity) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analyses and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal developing, non-uniform, turbulent flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet conditions is also presented.

Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Doanld M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Report to Congress: management of wastes from the exploration, development, and production of crude oil, natural gas, and geothermal energy. Volume 3. Appendices. A. Summary of state oil and gas regulations. B. Glossary of terms for Volume 1. C. Damage case summaries  

SciTech Connect

Section 3001(b)(2)(A) of the 1980 Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) temporarily exempted several types of solid waste from regulation under the Federal hazardous-waste control program. These exempted wastes included drilling fluids, produced waters, and other wastes associated with the exploration, development, or production of crude oil or natural gas or geothermal energy. Section 8002(m) of the RCRA Amendments requires EPA to study these wastes and submit a final report to Congress. The report responds to those requirements. This is volume 3 of 3 reports to Congress. The volume contains the Appendices which include a summary of: (1) State oil and gas regulatory programs; and (2) the damage cases compiled for the oil and gas industry. A glossary of oil and gas industry terms is also included in the volume.

Not Available

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the second half year (April 1, 2001-September 30, 2001) of the fourth project year budget period (October 1, 2000-September 30, 2001). An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the current budget period. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with some discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section followed by relevant references. The fourth project year activities are divided into three main parts, which are carried out in parallel. The first part is continuation of the experimental program that includes a study of the oil/water two-phase behavior at high pressures and control system development for the three-phase GLCC{copyright}. This investigation will be eventually extended for three-phase flow. The second part consists of the development of a simplified mechanistic model incorporating the experimental results and behavior of dispersion of oil in water and water in oil. This will provide an insight into the hydrodynamic flow behavior and serve as the design tool for the industry. Although useful for sizing GLCC{copyright} for proven applications, the mechanistic model will not provide detailed hydrodynamic flow behavior information needed to screen new geometric variations or to study the effect of fluid property variations. Therefore, in the third part, the more rigorous approach of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will be utilized. Multidimensional multiphase flow simulation at high pressures and for real crude conditions will provide much greater depth into the understanding of the physical phenomena and the mathematical analysis of three-phase GLCC{copyright} design and performance.

Dr. Ram S. Mohan; Dr. Ovadia Shoham

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

484

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the first half year (October 1, 2000-March 31, 2001) of the fourth project year budget period (October 1, 2000-September 30, 2001). An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the current budget period. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with some discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section followed by relevant references. The fourth project year activities are divided into three main parts, which are carried out in parallel. The first part is continuation of the experimental program that includes a study of the oil/water two-phase behavior at high pressures and control system development for the three-phase GLCC{copyright}. This investigation will be eventually extended for three-phase flow. The second part consists of the development of a simplified mechanistic model incorporating the experimental results and behavior of dispersion of oil in water and water in oil. This will provide an insight into the hydrodynamic flow behavior and serve as the design tool for the industry. Although useful for sizing GLCC{copyright} for proven applications, the mechanistic model will not provide detailed hydrodynamic flow behavior information needed to screen new geometric variations or to study the effect of fluid property variations. Therefore, in the third part, the more rigorous approach of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will be utilized. Multidimensional multiphase flow simulation at high pressures and for real crude conditions will provide much greater depth into the understanding of the physical phenomena and the mathematical analysis of three-phase GLCC{copyright} design and performance.

Dr. Ram S. Mohan; Dr. Ovadia Shoham

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

485

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying possible relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. Based on a critical review of the available literature, a better understanding of the main weaknesses of the current state of the art of modeling and simulation for tight sand reservoirs has been reached. Progress has been made in the development and implementation of a simple reservoir simulator that is still able to overcome some of the deficiencies detected. The simulator will be used to quantify the impact of microscopic phenomena in the macroscopic behavior of tight sand gas reservoirs. Phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization are being considered as part of this study. To date, the adequate modeling of gas slippage in porous media has been determined to be of great relevance in order to explain unexpected fluid flow behavior in tight sand reservoirs.

Maria Cecilia Bravo; Mariano Gurfinkel

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

486

CFD Simulation of 3D Flow field in a Gas Centrifuge  

SciTech Connect

A CFD method was used to study the whole flow field in a gas centrifuge. In this paper, the VSM (Vector Splitting Method) of the FVM (Finite Volume Method) was used to solve the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit second-order upwind scheme was adopted. The numerical simulation was successfully performed on a parallel cluster computer and a convergence result was obtained. The simulation shows that: in the withdrawal chamber, a strong detached shock wave is formed in front of the scoop; as the radial position increases, the shock becomes stronger and the distance to scoop front surface is smaller. An oblique shock forms in the clearance between the scoop and the centrifuge wall; behind the shock-wave, the radially-inward motion of gas is induced because of the imbalance of the pressure gradient and the centrifugal force. In the separation chamber, a countercurrent is introduced. This indicates that CFD method can be used to study the complex three-dimensional flow field of gas centrifuges. (authors)

Dongjun Jiang; Shi Zeng [Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines Summary of Overall Operating History and Experience from GE 7F in Peaking Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline report describes the operating history, performance, and maintenance protocol for advanced gas turbine units. It details the effects of peaking service on the integrity and life of hot-gas-path parts such as buckets and combustors and the frequency of hot gas path inspections. The results have serious implications for the reliability, availability, and maintainability of these units when subjected to peaking operation.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

488

www.crs.gov R42814 Natural Gas in the U.S. Economy: Opportunities for Growth Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the growth in natural gas production, primarily from shale gas, the United States is benefitting from some of the lowest prices for natural gas in the world and faces the question of how to best use this resource. Different segments of the U.S. economy have different perspectives on the role natural gas can play. Suppliers, which have become the victims of their own production success, are facing low prices that are forecast to remain low. Some companies that have traditionally produced only natural gas have even turned their attention to oil in order to improve their financial situation. Smaller companies are having a difficult time continuing operations and larger companies, including international companies, have bought into many shale gas assets. Prices have remained low even as consumption has increased, in part, because producers have raised production to meet the demand and because companies have improved efficiency and extraction techniques. Some companies, many with large production operations, have applied for permits to export natural gas. This has raised concerns from consumers of natural gas that domestic prices will rise. The debate regarding exports is ongoing. Industries that consume natural gas have seen input costs drop, and some have heralded low

Robert Pirog; Michael Ratner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

A two-mesh coupled gas flow-solid interaction model for 2D blast analysis in fractured media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2D coupled two-mesh interaction model for blast gas flow through fractured and fragmented solid media is presented. It is mainly designed to solve blast problems where a complicated set of wide difficult phenomena are involved: shock waves, progressive ... Keywords: Blast, Combined finite/discrete element method, Cracking, Explosion, Fragmentation, Gas-solid interaction

S. Mohammadi; A. Pooladi

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Controlling fuel and diluent gas flow for a diesel engine operating in the fuel rich low-temperature-combustion mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flow of a diluent gas supplied to a motoring engine was controlled at a diluent to air mass flow ratios of 10%, 30%, 50%, and 70%. This arrangement was a significant set up for running the engine in the Low-Temperature ...

Lopez, David M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Gas-liquid two-phase flow across a bank of micropillars Santosh Krishnamurthy and Yoav Peles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

densitometry8­10 have been successfully used to measure the void fraction, while in previous micro- channel studies14,15,17 image processing was used. These studies compared the measured void fraction to the homoge the homogeneous void fraction overpredicts the measured value even at low gas flow rates. C. Flow pattern Several

Peles, Yoav

492

US LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor): flow induced vibration program (1977-1986): A summary and overview  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the activities and accomplishments under the US LMFBR Flow Induced Vibration Program for the period 1977-1986. Since 1977 represents the date of the last IAEA IWGFR Specialists Meeting on LMFBR Flow Induced Vibration, this paper thus provides an update to the results presented at that meeting. This period also represents a period of substantial change for the US LMFBR program. A major reactor project, the FFTF, was completed and a second major project, the CRBR plant, was terminated. This change adversely impacted the US flow induced vibration program. Nevertheless, base technology activities have continued. In this paper, research in the following areas is summarized: Vibration characteristics and scaling, Turbulent buffeting and vortex shedding, Fluidelastic instabilities of tube bundles in crossflow, and Instabilities induced by leakage flows.

Wambsganss, M.W.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Characterization of the reactive flow field dynamics in a gas turbine injector using high frequency PIV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present work details the analysis of the aerodynamics of an experimental swirl stabilized burner representative of gas turbine combustors. This analysis is carried out using High Frequency PIV (HFPIV) measurements in a reactive situation. While this information is usually available at a rather low rate, temporally resolved PIV measurements are necessary to better understand highly turbulent swirled flows, which are unsteady by nature. Thanks to recent technical improvements, a PIV system working at 12 kHz has been developed to study this experimental combustor flow field. Statistical quantities of the burner are first obtained and analyzed, and the measurement quality is checked, then a temporal analysis of the velocity field is carried out, indicating that large coherent structures periodically appear in the combustion chamber. The frequency of these structures is very close to the quarter wave mode of the chamber, giving a possible explanation for combustion instability coupling.

Barbosa, Séverine; Ducruix, Sébastien

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 2, Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Data from sidestream testing are presented. 18 refs.

Underkoffler, V.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

A nozzle array and ballast resistance for producing a glow discharge in a gas flow  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a design for a nozzle-anode array equipped with a system of cathodes fitted at the axis of each nozzle together with liquid ballast resistors. The system is designed to produce a glow discharge in a supersonic gas flow. The circuit resistance is adjusted via the contact area between the electrode and the liquid. The nominal values of the resistances can be varied over the range 10/sup 1/-10/sup 4/..cap omega.., or set values can be produced with an accuracy of + or - 2%.

Alferov, V.I.; Bushmin, A.S.; Dmitriev, L.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Source modulation-correlation measurement for fissile mass flow in gas or liquid fissile streams  

SciTech Connect

The method of monitoring fissile mass flow on all three legs of a blending point, where the input is high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) and the product is PEU, can yield the fissile stream velocity and, with calibration, the [sup235]U content. The product of velocity and content integrated over the pipe gives the fissile mass flow in each leg. Also, the ratio of fissile contents in each pipe: HEU/LEU, HEU/PEU, and PEU/LEU, are obtained. By modulating the source on the input HEU pipe differently from that on the output pipe, the HEU gas can be tracked through the blend point. This method can be useful for monitoring flow velocity, fissile content, and fissile mass flow in HEU blenddown of UF[sub 6] if the pressures are high enough to contain some of the induced fission products. This method can also be used to monitor transfer of fissile liquids and other gases and liquids that emit radiation delayed from particle capture. These preliminary experiments with the Oak Ridge apparatus show that the method will work and the modeling is adequate.

Mihalczo, J.T.; March-Leuba, J.A.; Valentine, T.E.; Abston, R.A.; Mattingly, J.K.; Mullens, J.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

A phenomenological model for rarefied gas flows in thin film slider bearings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze rarefied gas flows in lubricating films that form between the read/write head and rotating recording medium in computer hard drives. A modified slip-corrected Reynolds lubrication equation is derived for arbitrary Knudsen numbers using the Navier-Stokes equation with consistent slip boundary conditions and modified physical coefficients. In particular, we present results of velocity profiles, pressure distribution and load capacity for various slider bearing configurations. An empirical model for the velocity distribution is developed by studying the Poiseuille and Couette flow components of the lubricating film. Important lubrication characteristics such as the pressure distribution and load capacity are obtained directly from numerical solutions of the modified Reynolds equation. In addition, we outline a method to accurately predict the shear drag forces induced by air resistance to the track-access-motion of the sliders. The new model is validated by comparisons with numerical solutions of the generalized lubrication equation based on the two-dimensional linearized Boltzmann equation and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) results available in the literature. The model predicts the velocity profiles, pressure distribution, load capacity and skin friction with good accuracy for a wide range of Knudsen numbers for low subsonic compressible flows. However it exhibits some physical limitations in the free molecular flow regime, due to its use of a Poiseuille flowrate database obtained via the solution of a two- dimensional Boltzmann equation.

Bahukudumbi, Pradipkumar

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This document contains an assessment of the first project to be completed under the U.S. Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program. The project was selected under Round I and is known officially as "The Demonstration of an Advanced Cyclone Coal Combustor, with Internal Sulfur, Nitrogen, and Ash Control for the Conversion of a 23 MMBtu/hour Oil-Fired Boiler to Pulverized Coal." The project was carried out by the Coal Tech Corporation over the period March 1987 February 1991 at the site of the Keeler/Dorr-Oliver Boiler Company in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. The project was a three-year demonstration scale test of a 30 MMBtu/hr air-cooled ceramic slagging cyclone combustor retrofitted to a horizontal 23-MMBtu/hr oil or natural gas-fired Keeler/Dorr-Oliver DS-9

499

Conference Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summary of the conference, summarizing both theoretical and experimental presentations and discussions.

Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Rijssenbeek, Michael; /SUNY, Stony Brook

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

500

State policies affecting natural gas consumption (Notice of inquiry issued on August 14, 1992). Summary of comments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On August 14, 1992, the United States Department of Energy issued a Request for Comments Concerning State Policies Affecting Natural Gas Consumption. This Notice of (NOI) noted the increasing significance of the role played by states and sought to gain better understanding of how state policies impact the gas industry. The general trend toward a. more competitive marketplace for natural gas, as well as recent regulatory and legislative changes at the Federal level, are driving State regulatory agencies to reevaluate how they regulate natural gas. State action is having a significant impact on the use of natural gas for generating electricity, as well as affecting the cost-effective trade-off between conservation expenditures and gas use. Additionally, fuel choice has an impact upon the environment and national energy security. In light of these dimensions, the Department of Energy initiated this study of State regulation. The goals of this NOI are: (1) help DOE better understand the impact of State policies on the efficient use of gas; (2) increase the awareness of the natural gas industry and Federal and State officials to the important role of State policies and regulations; (3) create an improved forum for dialogue on State and Federal natural gas issues; and, (4) develop a consensus on an analytical agenda that would be most helpful in addressing the regulatory challenges faced by the States. Ninety-seven parties filed comments, and of these ninety-seven, fifteen parties filed reply comments. Appendix One lists these parties. This report briefly syntheses the comments received. The goal is to assist parties to judging the extent of consensus on the problems posed and the remedies suggested, aid in identifying future analytical analyses, and assist parties in assessing differences in strategies and regulatory philosophies which shape these issues and their resolution.

Lemon, R.; Kamphuis-Zatopa, W.

1993-03-25T23:59:59.000Z