National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gas flow summary

  1. Alabama Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  2. Texas Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gross Withdrawals 752,341 754,086 731,049 739,603 714,788 720,593 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  3. Wyoming Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gross Withdrawals 168,548 167,539 162,880 167,555 163,345 165,658 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  4. Tennessee Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  5. Alaska Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gross Withdrawals 221,340 204,073 261,150 279,434 289,770 304,048 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Coalbed Wells ...

  6. Utah Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 35,984 33,029 30,933 31,404 30,891 34,204 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA ...

  7. Missouri Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1967-1997 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.17 5.85 5.27 4.99 5.76 4.65 1984-2015 Residential 11.66 12.02 12.25 10.88 10.83 11.59 1967-2015 Commercial 10.28 9.99 9.54 9.00 8.96 9.10 1967-2015 Industrial 8.70 8.54 7.85 8.19 8.00 7.75 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 6.34 6.11 5.64 1994-2012 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 0 53 100 26 28 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA 9 9 1967-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA 8 8

  8. Indiana Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    13 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.52 4.97 4.23 4.38 5.63 NA 1984-2015 Residential 8.63 9.46 8.94 8.43 9.02 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 7.55 8.04 7.69 7.59 8.19 7.58 1967-2015 Industrial 5.65 6.53 6.19 6.54 7.45 6.29 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 5.19 13.24 12.29 1990-2012 Electric Power 4.91 W W W W W 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 620 914 819 921 895 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 6,802 9,075 8,814 7,938 6,616 1967-2014 From Gas Wells

  9. Arizona Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    64 4.60 4.85 3.03 2.77 3.31 1989-2016 Residential 11.99 13.82 18.05 16.53 17.44 19.47 1989-2016 Commercial 8.93 9.32 9.73 9.07 8.77 8.69 1989-2016 Industrial 6.57 6.25 5.92 5.76 5.63 4.92 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2016

  10. Florida Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 3.95 3.83 3.37 3.50 3.46 1989-2016 Residential 16.78 16.00 17.06 17.83 20.52 22.40 1989-2016 Commercial 10.70 10.62 10.50 10.29 10.16 10.38 1989-2016 Industrial 6.36 6.11 6.28 5.72 5.20 5.30 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W 3.43 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA

  11. Illinois Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    12 2.79 3.33 3.39 3.10 NA 1989-2016 Residential 5.82 6.29 7.07 7.52 10.46 12.59 1989-2016 Commercial 5.52 5.86 6.49 6.96 9.45 10.90 1989-2016 Industrial 4.13 4.37 4.57 4.77 NA 5.30 2001-2016 Electric Power W W 2.15 2.24 2.26 W 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2006-2016

  12. Indiana Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    26 3.25 3.45 2.91 3.25 4.35 1989-2016 Residential 5.95 6.33 7.97 NA 9.95 16.29 1989-2016 Commercial 5.26 5.58 6.92 NA 7.08 9.35 1989-2016 Industrial 4.31 4.81 4.44 4.35 4.06 4.92 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2006-2016 Repressuring

  13. Kentucky Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    24 3.26 3.26 2.97 2.93 2.85 1989-2016 Residential 7.88 7.65 8.79 10.37 14.91 20.24 1989-2016 Commercial 6.72 6.37 7.09 7.98 9.17 10.75 1989-2016 Industrial 3.79 3.64 3.32 2.82 3.21 2.98 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2006-2016

  14. Maryland Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NA 3.52 4.34 3.93 4.57 7.14 1989-2016 Residential 9.95 9.46 11.04 NA 12.66 16.06 1989-2016 Commercial NA 8.18 8.87 NA NA 9.85 1989-2016 Industrial 8.37 8.53 8.62 7.63 7.42 NA 2001-2016 Electric Power 3.59 5.64 2.69 2.40 2.50 3.01 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2006-2016

  15. Mississippi Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 3.85 NA 3.36 3.19 3.46 1989-2016 Residential 8.65 8.17 9.26 11.05 13.30 14.29 1989-2016 Commercial 7.96 7.58 7.86 8.07 7.54 7.06 1989-2016 Industrial 4.45 4.39 4.16 3.88 3.61 3.74 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2016

  16. Missouri Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 3.36 3.79 4.09 4.79 5.18 1989-2016 Residential 7.98 8.12 9.31 11.31 15.59 19.71 1989-2016 Commercial 7.06 6.92 7.19 7.89 8.51 9.35 1989-2016 Industrial 5.93 6.15 5.97 5.90 5.41 5.91 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016

  17. Montana Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 3.43 3.03 2.42 2.28 2.50 1989-2016 Residential 6.80 6.89 7.01 6.76 7.18 8.34 1989-2016 Commercial 6.77 6.88 6.93 6.66 6.94 7.76 1989-2016 Industrial 5.71 6.27 5.51 5.50 4.82 5.90 2001-2016 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- -- 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 4,521 4,233 4,426 4,275 4,454 4,280 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA

  18. Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    48 3.68 3.58 3.73 3.83 4.77 1989-2016 Residential 6.54 6.82 8.93 10.97 16.74 19.82 1989-2016 Commercial 5.45 5.48 6.86 8.18 11.01 12.45 1989-2016 Industrial 9.63 5.25 5.43 7.81 8.85 NA 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 214,000 201,258 214,561 203,524 211,217 201,673 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA

  19. Oregon Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    64 3.79 3.48 3.97 4.47 4.97 1989-2016 Residential 10.43 12.03 12.03 13.70 15.03 15.63 1989-2016 Commercial 8.84 9.25 9.32 9.73 10.74 11.57 1989-2016 Industrial 5.50 5.59 5.60 5.24 5.14 6.49 2001-2016 Electric Power W W 1.77 W W W 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2016

  20. Oregon Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    92 1979-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.78 5.84 5.21 4.82 5.40 4.65 1984-2015 Residential 12.49 11.76 11.22 10.84 11.72 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 10.10 9.60 8.91 8.60 9.44 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 7.05 6.84 5.87 5.79 6.20 6.38 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 5.61 4.23 4.57 1992-2012 Electric Power 4.57 W W W W W 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 26 24 27 26 28 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 1,407 1,344 770 770 950 1979-2014 From Gas Wells 1,407

  1. Minnesota Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    43 3.65 3.77 2.94 2.98 3.49 1989-2016 Residential 7.05 6.93 7.96 7.59 10.52 12.21 1989-2016 Commercial 6.53 6.08 6.49 6.10 NA 7.37 1989-2016 Industrial 4.43 4.28 3.68 3.36 4.27 3.76 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2016 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Total Capacity 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 2002-2016 Gas in Storage 6,658 6,531 6,016 6,009 6,085 6,259 1990-2016 Base Gas 4,848 4,848 4,848 4,848 4,848 4,848 1990-2016 Working Gas 1,810 1,683 1,168 1,161 1,237 1,411

  2. Nebraska Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.62 5.11 4.31 4.61 5.58 NA 1984-2015 Residential 8.95 8.84 8.68 8.39 8.77 8.94 1967-2015 Commercial 7.08 6.69 6.19 6.49 7.27 6.54 1967-2015 Industrial 5.85 5.61 4.34 4.72 5.69 4.61 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 15.10 15.29 1994-2012 Electric Power W 5.74 3.93 4.96 5.84 3.97 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 276 322 270 357 310 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 2,255 1,980 1,328 1,032 402 1967-2014 From Gas

  3. Nevada Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NA 2006-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 7.19 6.77 5.13 5.16 5.90 4.06 1984-2015 Residential 12.25 10.66 10.14 9.42 11.44 11.82 1967-2015 Commercial 9.77 8.07 7.43 6.61 8.21 8.66 1967-2015 Industrial 10.53 8.99 7.34 6.66 7.83 8.12 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 8.13 4.76 8.97 1991-2012 Electric Power 5.75 5.00 3.49 W W 3.34 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 0 0 0 4 4 1996-2014 Gross Withdrawals 4 3 4 3 3 1991-2014 From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 3

  4. Arkansas Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    43 3.76 4.53 4.60 4.79 6.16 1989-2016 Residential 9.54 9.06 10.33 10.89 13.73 15.40 1989-2016 Commercial 7.16 6.74 7.11 6.85 7.11 7.22 1989-2016 Industrial 6.01 5.92 5.90 5.40 5.34 5.51 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 77,842 71,967 74,543 70,831 71,769 67,293 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA

  5. California Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.72 2.65 2.30 2.25 2.49 2.52 1989-2016 Residential 11.45 11.52 10.60 10.50 11.51 11.37 1989-2016 Commercial 7.98 8.43 8.12 7.14 7.29 7.38 1989-2016 Industrial 6.60 6.94 6.71 5.73 5.87 5.83 2001-2016 Electric Power 3.08 2.85 2.59 W 2.59 2.98 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 18,737 17,100 18,166 17,618 18,096 17,265 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From

  6. Colorado Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    09 3.23 3.43 2.78 3.25 4.22 1989-2016 Residential 6.06 6.44 6.67 6.82 7.07 12.43 1989-2016 Commercial 5.79 5.94 5.91 5.95 6.04 7.88 1989-2016 Industrial 4.19 4.47 4.92 4.33 4.22 5.43 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 143,629 134,325 143,636 139,949 144,615 136,544 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA

  7. Iowa Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    65 3.62 3.83 3.41 3.43 4.16 1989-2016 Residential 6.51 6.50 7.41 NA 8.88 NA 1989-2016 Commercial 5.35 5.39 5.80 5.48 5.69 7.30 1989-2016 Industrial 5.18 NA 4.58 4.18 3.83 4.13 2001-2016 Electric Power 2.96 2.57 2.20 2.60 2.10 2.63 2002-2016 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Total Capacity 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 2002-2016 Gas in Storage 236,541 225,867 221,105 218,955 221,304 224,160 1990-2016 Base Gas 197,897 197,897 197,897 197,897 197,897 197,897 1990-2016

  8. Kansas Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    38 3.41 3.56 4.41 4.57 5.64 1989-2016 Residential 7.27 7.90 9.53 11.41 13.85 19.42 1989-2016 Commercial 6.63 7.11 8.83 NA NA 12.67 1989-2016 Industrial 6.88 6.37 4.34 NA 3.38 3.34 2001-2016 Electric Power 4.26 4.22 2.84 3.16 3.45 3.07 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 22,543 20,866 22,110 21,173 21,644 20,545 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells

  9. Louisiana Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11 2.97 2.53 2.43 2.46 3.16 1989-2016 Residential 9.42 8.69 10.51 11.32 13.39 14.15 1989-2016 Commercial 8.04 7.71 7.71 7.13 7.27 7.20 1989-2016 Industrial 3.22 3.07 2.51 2.61 2.68 2.60 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W 2.63 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 158,907 153,090 152,390 154,885 157,114 151,252 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA

  10. Michigan Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    80 3.84 3.90 2.91 2.87 2.76 1989-2016 Residential 7.25 7.58 7.80 7.71 9.56 12.33 1989-2016 Commercial 6.50 6.64 6.63 6.48 7.23 8.19 1989-2016 Industrial 5.79 5.98 5.65 5.51 5.83 6.01 2001-2016 Electric Power 2.66 2.37 2.14 2.31 2.28 2.75 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA

  11. Nebraska Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    62 3.87 4.04 3.26 3.08 3.17 1989-2016 Residential 6.49 6.56 7.05 7.91 9.71 13.08 1989-2016 Commercial 5.46 5.51 5.35 4.89 4.67 4.69 1989-2016 Industrial 4.45 4.35 4.35 3.79 3.29 3.37 2001-2016 Electric Power 3.52 2.81 2.32 2.44 2.77 3.32 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA

  12. Nevada Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.38 3.56 3.18 3.16 3.19 3.74 1989-2016 Residential 9.12 9.75 10.84 11.25 11.92 12.99 1989-2016 Commercial 7.34 7.48 7.59 7.25 7.04 7.08 1989-2016 Industrial 6.52 6.67 6.76 6.23 6.01 6.12 2001-2016 Electric Power 2.98 2.78 2.30 2.40 2.54 2.57 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA

  13. Ohio Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    60 3.55 3.09 2.41 2.61 2.46 1989-2016 Residential 6.48 6.44 7.16 8.01 11.73 19.29 1989-2016 Commercial 5.32 5.30 5.31 5.38 6.17 7.03 1989-2016 Industrial 5.31 5.11 5.01 NA 6.59 NA 2001-2016 Electric Power 2.20 2.00 1.63 2.01 2.03 2.32 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 112,423 116,401 120,760 118,944 121,569 115,202 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed

  14. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    04 3.19 4.02 3.23 4.14 6.10 1989-2016 Residential 8.75 8.64 9.51 9.91 11.30 15.62 1989-2016 Commercial 7.19 7.44 8.21 8.12 8.74 10.69 1989-2016 Industrial 7.58 7.31 7.73 7.21 NA NA 2001-2016 Electric Power 2.70 2.33 1.43 1.61 1.65 1.90 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 447,447 430,800 452,601 429,503 441,514 434,346 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From

  15. Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.14 5.65 4.88 4.88 6.96 4.71 1984-2015 Residential 10.34 9.77 9.27 8.65 10.52 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 8.53 8.03 7.34 6.94 8.74 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 7.56 7.05 5.81 6.02 8.08 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 7.84 6.10 5.71 1989-2012 Electric Power 5.43 4.91 3.27 4.47 5.47 W 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1973 Withdrawals 1974-1975 Net Withdrawals 1973-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions

  16. Connecticut Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    67-2005 Citygate 6.58 5.92 5.12 5.42 5.61 4.07 1984-2015 Residential 14.93 13.83 14.17 13.32 14.13 12.47 1967-2015 Commercial 9.55 8.48 8.40 9.20 10.24 8.56 1967-2015 Industrial 9.60 9.16 8.83 6.85 8.07 6.37 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 16.31 18.59 13.70 1992-2012 Electric Power 5.70 5.09 3.99 6.23 6.82 4.73 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1996 Withdrawals 1973-1996 Net Withdrawals 1973-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 651 655 743 558

  17. Delaware Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    78-2005 Citygate 5.67 9.03 7.19 5.67 5.54 NA 1984-2015 Residential 15.12 15.38 15.24 13.65 13.21 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 13.26 13.58 13.31 11.78 11.42 10.70 1967-2015 Industrial 10.18 11.69 11.61 11.24 10.95 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 24.55 28.76 30.97 1995-2012 Electric Power W W -- -- W -- 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1967-1975 Withdrawals 1967-1975 Net Withdrawals 1967-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 73 64 117 63 157 1980-2014

  18. Maryland Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wellhead NA 1967-2010 Imports 5.37 5.30 13.82 15.29 8.34 1999-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.49 6.26 5.67 5.37 6.36 4.99 1984-2015 Residential 12.44 12.10 12.17 11.67 12.21 12.05 1967-2015 Commercial 9.87 10.29 10.00 10.06 10.52 10.00 1967-2015 Industrial 9.05 8.61 8.01 8.47 9.94 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 5.99 5.09 -- 1993-2012 Electric Power 5.77 5.44 W W 5.35 4.06 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 7 8 9 7 7 1989-2014 Gross

  19. Arizona Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11 1967-2010 Exports 4.57 4.28 3.07 4.17 5.15 1989-2014 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.59 5.91 4.68 4.73 5.20 NA 1984-2015 Residential 15.87 15.04 15.75 13.92 17.20 17.04 1967-2015 Commercial 10.72 9.99 9.35 8.76 10.34 10.53 1967-2015 Industrial 7.54 6.86 5.78 6.29 7.52 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 12.35 7.73 13.19 1991-2012 Electric Power 4.84 W 3.51 4.60 5.30 3.43 1997-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 5 5 5 5 5 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 183

  20. Tennessee Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.35 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.78 5.23 4.35 4.73 5.37 4.06 1984-2015 Residential 10.46 10.21 9.95 9.44 10.13 9.69 1967-2015 Commercial 9.39 9.04 8.36 8.41 9.30 8.46 1967-2015 Industrial 6.64 6.15 4.98 5.62 6.31 4.89 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 8.16 12.32 8.18 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.04 4.62 2.90 3.83 4.64 2.74 2001-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 230 210 212 1,089 1,024 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 5,144 4,851 5,825 5,400 5,294

  1. SUMMARY GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS DATA WORKSHEET JANUARY 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SUMMARY GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS DATA WORKSHEET JANUARY 2015 SUMMARY GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS DATA WORKSHEET JANUARY 2015 SUMMARYGREENHOUSEGASEMISSIONSDATAWORKSHEETJANUARY20...

  2. ,"New Jersey Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Date","New Jersey Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Natural Gas Citygate Price in New Jersey (Dollars per ...

  3. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","N3010NH3","N3020NH3","N3035NH3","N3045NH3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in New Hampshire (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","New Hampshire Price of Natural Gas Delivered ...

  4. ,"New Jersey Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...J3","N3035NJ3","N3045NJ3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in New Jersey (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","New Jersey Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers ...

  5. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...0NM3","N3035NM3","NA1570SNM3","N3045NM3" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","New Mexico Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use ...

  6. ,"New York Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...NY3","N3035NY3","N3045NY3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in New York (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","New York Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers ...

  7. ,"New York Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...20NY3","N3035NY3","NA1570SNY3","N3045NY3" "Date","New York Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","New York Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand ...

  8. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...M3","N3035NM3","N3045NM3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in New Mexico (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","New Mexico Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers ...

  9. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,"N3035NC3","N3045NC3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in North Carolina (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Carolina Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential ...

  10. South Dakota Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Shale Gas ...

  11. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...NH3","N3050NH3","N3010NH3","N3020NH3","N3035NH3","NA1570SNH3","N3045NH3" "Date","New Hampshire Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of New ...

  12. West Virginia Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 115,055 114,871 111,932 108,711 96,802 105,945 1991-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA ...

  13. New Mexico Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.72 2.80 2.75 2.23 2.43 2.89 1989-2016 Residential 6.32 6.41 7.03 7.44 8.69 11.32 1989-2016 Commercial 5.10 5.04 5.20 5.20 5.36 5.85 1989-2016 Industrial 5.69 NA NA NA NA NA 2001-2016 Electric Power 2.91 2.57 2.56 2.69 2.47 2.86 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 100,031 99,889 109,105 106,844 108,761 106,440 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells

  14. New York Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.64 2.88 2.91 3.06 4.06 5.52 1989-2016 Residential 10.31 9.45 9.65 9.90 10.91 14.77 1989-2016 Commercial 6.59 6.58 6.40 6.23 5.99 5.76 1989-2016 Industrial 6.49 6.51 6.46 6.13 6.03 5.82 2001-2016 Electric Power 3.76 3.41 2.22 2.36 2.12 2.38 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA

  15. North Dakota Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    76 3.84 3.65 2.97 2.71 2.83 1989-2016 Residential 5.51 5.62 6.33 6.92 9.55 19.26 1989-2016 Commercial 5.26 5.22 5.27 4.68 5.43 6.77 1989-2016 Industrial 2.43 2.83 2.10 2.09 1.91 2.09 2001-2016 Electric Power 2.45 2.22 1.90 2.09 2.04 2.63 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals 50,146 47,912 51,852 47,507 49,979 48,555 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed

  16. New Jersey Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 8.41 7.53 6.74 6.21 6.21 4.87 1984-2015 Residential 12.84 11.78 11.09 10.89 9.69 8.37 1967-2015 Commercial 10.11 9.51 8.50 9.55 10.08 8.52 1967-2015 Industrial 9.63 9.23 7.87 8.19 10.45 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- 1994-2012 Electric Power 5.66 5.24 3.63 4.34 4.83 2.96 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1967-1996 Withdrawals 1967-1996 Net Withdrawals 1967-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet)

  17. North Carolina Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.02 5.45 4.00 4.63 5.41 3.81 1984-2015 Residential 12.50 12.55 12.19 11.83 11.88 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 10.18 9.64 8.62 8.81 9.12 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 8.24 7.70 6.37 6.87 7.55 6.03 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 9.77 12.13 6.48 1990-2012 Electric Power W W W W 6.05 W 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1996 Withdrawals 1974-1996 Net Withdrawals 1973-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 4,410

  18. Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10.05 8.22 4.11 4.01 4.03 3.14 1984-2015 Residential 16.48 15.33 14.29 14.55 15.14 14.23 1967-2015 Commercial 14.46 13.33 12.31 12.37 12.89 11.97 1967-2015 Industrial 12.13 10.98 9.78 9.04 10.27 9.26 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 11.71 8.61 16.32 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.45 5.10 3.98 5.84 W W 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1996 Withdrawals 1973-1996 Net Withdrawals 1973-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 468 430 517 624 0 1980-2014

  19. South Carolina Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6.17 5.67 4.57 5.11 5.22 3.90 1984-2015 Residential 13.01 12.93 13.25 12.61 12.65 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 10.34 9.68 8.67 9.10 9.55 8.37 1967-2015 Industrial 6.12 5.60 4.30 5.27 6.13 4.39 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 11.16 8.85 9.77 1994-2012 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1975 Withdrawals 1973-1975 Net Withdrawals 1973-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 1,360 1,386 391 879 1,371 1980-2014 Withdrawals 1,574

  20. Gas flow meter and method for measuring gas flow rate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, Eric P.

    2006-08-01

    A gas flow rate meter includes an upstream line and two chambers having substantially equal, fixed volumes. An adjustable valve may direct the gas flow through the upstream line to either of the two chambers. A pressure monitoring device may be configured to prompt valve adjustments, directing the gas flow to an alternate chamber each time a pre-set pressure in the upstream line is reached. A method of measuring the gas flow rate measures the time required for the pressure in the upstream line to reach the pre-set pressure. The volume of the chamber and upstream line are known and fixed, thus the time required for the increase in pressure may be used to determine the flow rate of the gas. Another method of measuring the gas flow rate uses two pressure measurements of a fixed volume, taken at different times, to determine the flow rate of the gas.

  1. South Dakota Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NA 1979-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.54 5.21 4.67 4.83 6.14 4.16 1984-2015 Residential 8.77 8.59 8.39 8.23 9.27 8.21 1967-2015 Commercial 7.13 6.98 6.45 6.59 7.65 6.11 1967-2015 Industrial 5.92 6.25 5.37 5.67 6.88 4.98 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- 1991-2012 Electric Power 5.50 5.04 3.54 4.35 4.98 3.31 1998-2015 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 102 100 95 65 68 1989-2014 Gross Withdrawals 12,540 12,449 15,085 16,205 15,307 1967-2014 From

  2. High gas flow alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, R.D.; Bounds, J.A.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.

    1996-05-07

    An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors. 4 figs.

  3. High gas flow alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, Richard D.; Bounds, John A.; Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini W.

    1996-01-01

    An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors.

  4. First AEO2015 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    GAS MARKETS TEAMS SUBJECT: First AEO2015 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary ... The shorter AEO2015 will have 6 cases - Reference case, HighLow Oil Price cases, HighLow ...

  5. EFM units monitor gas flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This paper describes the radio-controlled pipeline monitoring system established by Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corp. which was designed to equip all its natural gas purchasing metering facilities with electronic flow measurement computers. The paper describes the actual radio equipment used and the features and reliability of the equipment.

  6. Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Summary Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Summary Report Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Summary Report Workshop summary report from the Flow Cell Workshop held March 7-8, 2012, in Washington, D.C., to investigate how a redow flow cell (RFC) can be a grid-scale electricalenergy-storage system and the associated technological needs. The specific objectives of the workshop were to understand the needs for applied research in RFCs; identify the grand challenges and prioritize R&D needs; and gather input for future

  7. Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply...

  8. Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt Caverns Number of Existing Aquifers Number of Depleted Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data

  9. Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground

  10. Natural Gas: A Preliminary Summary 1998

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This special report provides preliminary natural gas data for 1998 which were reported on monthly surveys of the industry through December.

  11. Natural Gas: A Preliminary Summary 1999

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This special report provides preliminary natural gas data for 1999 which were reported on monthly surveys of the industry through December.

  12. AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 August 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: ANGELINA LAROSE TEAM LEAD NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAM JOHN STAUB TEAM LEAD EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANALYSIS TEAM EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION and NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAMS SUBJECT: First AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on July 25, 2013) Attendees: Anas Alhajji (NGP)* Samuel Andrus (IHS)* Emil Attanasi (USGS)* Andre Barbe (Rice University) David J. Barden (self) Joseph

  13. Second AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 November 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: ANGELINA LAROSE TEAM LEAD NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAM JOHN STAUB TEAM LEAD EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANALYSIS TEAM EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION and NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAMS SUBJECT: Second AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary (presented September 26, 2013) Attendees: Robert Anderson (DOE) Peter Balash (NETL)* David Bardin (self) Joe Benneche (EIA) Philip Budzik (EIA) Kara Callahan

  14. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...S3","N9133US3","N3050US3","N3010US3","N3020US3","N3035US3","N3045US3" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports ...

  15. Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From

  16. Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From

  17. U.S. Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports 4.52 4.24 2.88 3.83 5.30 2.99 1985-2015 By Pipeline 4.46 4.09 2.79 3.73 5.21 2.84 1985-2015 As Liquefied Natural Gas 4.94 5.63 4.27 6.80 8.85 7.37 1985-2015 Exports 5.02 ...

  18. Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S. 9,225,127 9,235,132 9,228,893 9,232,305 9,232,937 9,232,991 1989-2016 Alaska 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 2013-2016 Lower 48 States 9,141,535 9,151,540 9,145,301 9,148,713 9,149,345 9,149,399

  19. Spark gap switch with spiral gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brucker, John P.

    1989-01-01

    A spark gap switch having a contaminate removal system using an injected gas. An annular plate concentric with an electrode of the switch defines flow paths for the injected gas which form a strong spiral flow of the gas in the housing which is effective to remove contaminates from the switch surfaces. The gas along with the contaminates is exhausted from the housing through one of the ends of the switch.

  20. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic ...

  1. Apparatus for focusing flowing gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nogar, N.S.; Keller, R.A.

    1985-05-20

    Apparatus for focusing gas streams. The principle of hydrodynamic focusing is applied to flowing gas streams in order to provide sample concentration for improved photon and sample utilization in resonance ionization mass spectrometric analysis. In a concentric nozzle system, gas samples introduced from the inner nozzle into the converging section of the outer nozzle are focused to streams 50-250-..mu..m in diameter. In some cases diameters of approximately 100-..mu..m are maintained over distances of several centimeters downstream from the exit orifice of the outer nozzle. The sheath gas employed has been observed to further provide a protective covering around the flowing gas sample, thereby isolating the flowing gas sample from possible unwanted reactions with nearby surfaces. A single nozzle variation of the apparatus for achieving hydrodynamic focusing of gas samples is also described.

  2. Flowing effects in gas lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhi, G.

    1984-05-01

    Currently accepted theory states that saturation intensity and gain (or optical power density) increase without limit with the increase of the flow speed. These conclusions are not true. It is shown instead that they tend to be limiting values with the increase of flow speed. The variations of the parameters mentioned above with flow speed are presented.

  3. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-01-27

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX.« less

  4. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-03

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX. The DEC VAX11 version contains an auxiliary program, POLYREAD, which reads the polyplot file created by FEM3.« less

  5. Flowmeter for gas-entrained solids flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Porges, Karl G.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of solids feedrate in a gas-entrained solids flow conveyance system. The apparatus and method of the present invention include a vertical duct connecting a source of solids to the gas-entrained flow conveyance system, a control valve positioned in the vertical duct, and a capacitive densitometer positioned along the duct at a location a known distance below the control valved so that the solid feedrate, Q, of the gas entrained flow can be determined by Q=S.rho..phi.V.sub.S where S is the cross sectional area of the duct, .rho. is the density of the solid, .phi. is the solid volume fraction determined by the capacitive densitometer, and v.sub.S is the local solid velocity which can be inferred from the konown distance of the capacitive densitometer below the control valve.

  6. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gas is heavily used for power generation. Such conditions could cause a mid-year spike in prices to above 6 per MMBtu. With high natural gas prices, natural gas demand is...

  7. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Transportation Process & Flow

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Process and Flow About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Transportation Process and Flow Overview | Gathering System | Processing Plant | Transmission Grid | Market Centers/Hubs | Underground Storage | Peak Shaving Overview Transporting natural gas from the wellhead to the final customer involves several physical transfers of custody and multiple processing steps. A natural gas pipeline system begins at the natural gas

  8. CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    91 92 102 98 90 84 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 91 92 102 98 ...

  9. Mississippi Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    22 858 868 612 600 563 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 884 822 806 550 557 505 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease ...

  10. Miscellaneous Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    349 363 393 233 188 185 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 271 353 270 219 169 167 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease ...

  11. Montana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    93 959 792 616 590 686 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 681 657 522 327 286 361 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease ...

  12. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2002). Natural gas prices were higher than expected in October as storms in the Gulf of Mexico in late September temporarily shut in some gas production, causing spot prices at...

  13. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    economy. In 2003, natural gas demand growth is expected across all sectors. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, July 2002 History Projections Apr-02 Ma May-02 Jun-02...

  14. New York Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    196 281 253 184 144 143 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 196 271 245 178 138 138 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 0 10 8 6 6 5 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 196 281 253 184 144 14

  15. Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dec. 31 740 725 711 652 264 243 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 9 3 0 0 0 0 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 731 722 711 652 264 243 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 739 724 710 651 261 240

  16. Florida Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 56 6 16 15 0 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 0 26 4 16 14 0 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 7 30 2 0 1 0 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 7 56 6 16 15 0

  17. [Fuel substitution of vehicles by natural gas: Summaries of four final technical reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This report contains summary information on three meetings and highlights of a fourth meeting held by the Society of Automotive Engineers on natural gas fueled vehicles. The meetings covered the following: Natural gas engine and vehicle technology; Safety aspects of alternately fueled vehicles; Catalysts and emission control--Meeting the legislative standards; and LNG--Strengthening the links.

  18. Ohio Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    896 832 758 1,235 3,201 7,193 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 799 742 684 1,012 2,887 6,985 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 97 90 74 223 314 208 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 896 832 758 1,233 3,161 6,72

  19. Oklahoma Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    24,207 28,182 29,937 28,714 28,900 34,319 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 23,115 26,873 27,683 25,018 24,370 27,358 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,092 1,309 2,254 3,696 4,530 6,961 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 22,769 26,345 27,830 26,599 26,873 31,778 1977-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1979-2008

  20. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,018 14,068 26,719 36,543 50,078 60,443 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 6,885 13,924 26,585 36,418 49,809 60,144 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 133 144 134 125 269 299 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 6,985 13,960 26,529 36,348 49,674 59,873 1977-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1979-1981

  1. Texas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    85,034 94,287 104,454 93,475 97,921 105,955 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 76,272 84,157 90,947 74,442 75,754 79,027 1981-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 8,762 10,130 13,507 19,033 22,167 26,928 1981-2014 Dry Natural Gas 80,424 88,997 98,165 86,924 90,349 97,154 1981-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1981

  2. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    change the pattern of annual demand shifts reported in earlier Outlooks. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, December 2002 History Projections Sep-02 Oct-02 Nov-02...

  3. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to increase because of accelerated economic growth and generally lower prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, October 2003 History Projections Jul-03 Aug-03 Sep-03...

  4. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to increase because of accelerated economic growth and generally lower prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, November 2003 History Projections Aug-03 Sep-03 Oct-03...

  5. Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2012, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) released a new report, 'Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity.' The study provides a new methodological approach to estimate natural gas related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tracks trends in regulatory and voluntary industry practices, and explores various electricity futures. The Executive Summary provides key findings, insights, data, and figures from this major study.

  6. Gas flow means for improving efficiency of exhaust hoods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.J.

    1994-01-11

    Apparatus is described for inhibiting the flow of contaminants in an exhaust enclosure toward an individual located adjacent an opening into the exhaust enclosure by providing a gas flow toward a source of contaminants from a position in front of an individual to urge said contaminants away from the individual toward a gas exit port. The apparatus comprises a gas manifold which may be worn by a person as a vest. The manifold has a series of gas outlets on a front face thereof facing away from the individual and toward the contaminants to thereby provide a flow of gas from the front of the individual toward the contaminants. 15 figures.

  7. Gas flow means for improving efficiency of exhaust hoods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok J.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus for inhibiting the flow of contaminants in an exhaust enclosure toward an individual located adjacent an opening into the exhaust enclosure by providing a gas flow toward a source of contaminants from a position in front of an individual to urge said contaminants away from the individual toward a gas exit port. The apparatus comprises a gas mani-fold which may be worn by a person as a vest. The manifold has a series of gas outlets on a front face thereof facing away from the individual and toward the contaminants to thereby provide a flow of gas from the front of the individual toward the contaminants.

  8. Michigan Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,805 2,975 2,549 1,781 1,839 1,873 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,728 2,903 2,472 1,687 1,714 1,765 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, ...

  9. West Virginia Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6,090 7,163 10,532 14,881 23,209 31,153 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 6,066 7,134 10,480 14,860 23,139 31,121 1979-2014 Natural Gas ...

  10. Kentucky Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,919 2,785 2,128 1,515 1,794 1,753 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,887 2,674 2,030 1,422 1,750 1,704 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, ...

  11. Utah Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,411 7,146 8,108 7,775 7,057 6,970 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 6,810 6,515 7,199 6,774 6,162 6,098 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, ...

  12. NM, East Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,558 4,720 4,884 4,833 5,108 6,434 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,658 2,612 2,475 2,156 1,832 1,977 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, ...

  13. Alabama Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,948 2,724 2,570 2,304 1,670 2,121 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,919 2,686 2,522 2,204 1,624 1,980 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, ...

  14. Virginia Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,091 3,215 2,832 2,579 2,373 2,800 1982-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3,091 3,215 2,832 2,579 2,373 2,800 1982-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, ...

  15. Wyoming Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    36,748 36,526 36,930 31,636 34,576 28,787 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 36,386 36,192 36,612 30,930 33,774 27,507 1979-2014 Natural Gas ...

  16. Louisiana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    30,545 22,135 20,389 23,258 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 19,898 28,838 29,906 21,362 19,519 22,350 1981-2014 Natural Gas ...

  17. Kansas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,500 3,937 3,747 3,557 3,772 4,606 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3,417 3,858 3,620 3,231 3,339 3,949 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 83 79 127 326 433 657 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 3,279 3,673 3,486 3,308 3,592 4,359

  18. NM, West Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,086 11,809 11,254 9,720 9,459 9,992 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 12,004 11,704 11,111 9,578 9,322 9,766 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 82 105 143 142 137 226 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 11,457 11,186 10,626 9,200 8,943 9,484

  19. New Mexico Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6,644 16,529 16,138 14,553 14,567 16,426 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 14,662 14,316 13,586 11,734 11,154 11,743 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,982 2,213 2,552 2,819 3,413 4,683 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 15,598 15,412 15,005 13,586 13,576 15,283

  20. North Dakota Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,213 1,869 2,652 3,974 6,081 6,787 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 143 152 141 105 91 45 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,070 1,717 2,511 3,869 5,990 6,742 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 1,079 1,667 2,381 3,569 5,420 6,034

  1. North Louisiana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    17,273 26,136 27,411 18,467 17,112 19,837 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 17,220 26,063 27,313 18,385 16,933 19,645 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 53 73 98 82 179 192 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 17,143 26,030 27,337 18,418 17,044 19,722

  2. Alaska Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,183 8,917 9,511 9,667 7,383 6,805 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1,090 1,021 976 995 955 954 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 8,093 7,896 8,535 8,672 6,428 5,851 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 9,101 8,838 9,424 9,579 7,316 6,745

  3. Arkansas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10,872 14,181 16,374 11,039 13,524 12,795 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 10,852 14,152 16,328 10,957 13,389 12,606 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 20 29 46 82 135 189 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 10,869 14,178 16,370 11,035 13,518 12,789

  4. California Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,926 2,785 3,042 2,119 2,023 2,260 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 612 503 510 272 247 273 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 2,314 2,282 2,532 1,847 1,776 1,987 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,773 2,647 2,934 1,999 1,887 2,107

  5. Colorado Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,081 25,372 26,151 21,674 23,533 21,992 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 22,199 23,001 23,633 18,226 19,253 16,510 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,882 2,371 2,518 3,448 4,280 5,482 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 23,058 24,119 24,821 20,666 22,381 20,851

  6. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    this winter is expected to be almost 9 percent higher than last winter, as estimated gas consumption weighted heating degree days during the fourth quarter of 2002 and first...

  7. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and continued increases in demand over 2002 levels. Cold temperatures this past winter led to a record drawdown of storage stocks. By the end of March, estimated working gas...

  8. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    price trend reflects a number of influences, such as unusual weather patterns that have led to increased gas consumption, and tensions in the Middle East and rising crude oil...

  9. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    levels and 25 percent below the 5-year average. Natural gas prices are likely to stay high as long as above-normal storage injection demand competes with industrial and...

  10. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3.20 per MMBtu, which is about 0.84 higher than last winter's price. Domestic dry natural gas production is projected to fall by about 1.7 percent in 2002 compared with the...

  11. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    commercial sector demand are offset by lower demand in the electric power sector. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, September 2003 History Projections Jun-03 Jul-03 Aug-03...

  12. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    by 1.8 percent as the economy continues to expand and prices ease slightly. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, January 2004 History Projections Oct-03 Nov-03 Dec-03...

  13. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of 2005 relative to the first quarter of 2004 and relatively lower fuel oil prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, April 2004 History Projections Jan-04 Feb-04 Mar-04...

  14. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    should relieve some of the potential upward price pressure on the domestic market Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, January 2003 History Projections Oct-02 Nov-02 Dec-02...

  15. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    because of somewhat weaker prices and higher demand in the electric power sector. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, July 2003 History Projections Apr-03 May-03 Jun-03 Jul-03...

  16. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than those of 2003, when stocks after the winter of 2002-2003 were at record lows. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, December 2003 History Projections Sep-03 Oct-03 Nov-03...

  17. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    power sector eases and relative coal and fuel oil spot prices decline somewhat. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, May 2004 History Projections Feb-04 Mar-04 Apr-04 May-04...

  18. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    demand in the first quarter of 2005 relative to the first quarter of 2004. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, March 2004 History Projections Dec-03 Jan-04 Feb-04...

  19. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Summary" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Prices",5,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1989" ,"Data 2","Production",10,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1991" ,"Data 3","Underground

  20. ,"Iowa Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Summary" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Prices",5,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1989" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",7,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1990" ,"Data

  1. Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 1992-2007 Estimated Production 1992-2007 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 1,852 1,559 1,474 1,146 1,400 1998-2014 Gross Withdrawals 2,259,144 1,830,913 1,527,875 1,326,697 1,275,213 1,351,655 1997-2015 From Gas Wells 1,699,908 1,353,929 1,013,914 817,340 706,413 1997-2014 From Oil Wells 559,235 476,984 513,961 509,357 568,801 1997-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

  2. Summary of gas release events detected by hydrogen monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    1999-05-18

    This paper summarizes the results of monitoring tank headspace for flammable gas release events. In over 40 tank years of monitoring the largest detected release in a single-shell tank is 2.4 cubic meters of Hydrogen. In the double-shell tanks the largest release is 19.3 cubic meters except in SY-101 pre mixer pump installation condition.

  3. FROZEN HEAT A GLOBAL OUTLOOK ON METHANE GAS HYDRATES EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROZEN HEAT A GLOBAL OUTLOOK ON METHANE GAS HYDRATES EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Beaudoin, Y. C., Boswell, R., Dallimore, S. R., and Waite, W. (eds), 2014. Frozen Heat: A UNEP Global Outlook on Methane Gas Hydrates. United Nations Environment Programme, GRID-Arendal. © United Nations Environment Programme, 2014 This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part and in any form for educational or non-profit purposes without special permission from the copyright holder, provided acknowledgement of the

  4. Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    [ 6450-01-P ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy

  5. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  6. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  7. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  8. ,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  9. ,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  10. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1999" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  11. ,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  12. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  13. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",15,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  14. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  15. ,"South Carolina Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  16. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Production",11,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data

  17. ,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  18. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",12,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",6,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas

  19. ,"California Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas

  20. ,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1999" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016"

  1. ,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016"

  2. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016"

  3. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas

  4. ,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",1,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016"

  5. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016"

  6. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016"

  7. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016"

  8. ,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1979" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016"

  9. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Production",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016"

  10. ,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas

  11. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1922" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1925" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1900" ,"Data 4","Imports and Exports",6,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1973" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1935" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas

  12. ,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016"

  13. Canada Mexico Figure 11. Flow of natural gas exports, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Canada Mexico Figure 11. Flow of natural gas exports, 2014 (billion cubic feet) Source: Energy Information Administration, based on data from the Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. ...

  14. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test plan and procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-13

    The purpose of this test plan and procedure is to test the Whittaker electrochemical cell and the Sierra Monitor Corp. flammable gas monitors in a simulated field flow configuration. The sensors are used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Flammable Gas Interlock (FGI), to detect flammable gases, including hydrogen and teminate the core sampling activity at a predetermined concentration level.

  15. System for controlling the flow of gas into and out of a gas laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry; Uhlich, Dennis M.; Benett, William J.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    A modularized system for controlling the gas pressure within a copper vapor or like laser is described herein. This system includes a gas input assembly which serves to direct gas into the laser in a controlled manner in response to the pressure therein for maintaining the laser pressure at a particular value, for example 40 torr. The system also includes a gas output assembly including a vacuum pump and a capillary tube arrangement which operates within both a viscous flow region and a molecular flow region for drawing gas out of the laser in a controlled manner.

  16. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  17. Hot gas cross flow filtering module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lippert, Thomas E.; Ciliberti, David F.

    1988-01-01

    A filter module for use in filtering particulates from a high temperature gas has a central gas duct and at least one horizontally extending support mount affixed to the duct. The support mount supports a filter element thereon and has a chamber therein, which communicates with an inner space of the duct through an opening in the wall of the duct, and which communicates with the clean gas face of the filter element. The filter element is secured to the support mount over an opening in the top wall of the support mount, with releasable securement provided to enable replacement of the filter element when desired. Ceramic springs may be used in connection with the filter module either to secure a filter element to a support mount or to prevent delamination of the filter element during blowback.

  18. Gas-Dynamic Transients Flow Networks

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1987-09-01

    TVENT1P predicts flows and pressures in a ventilation system or other air pathway caused by pressure transients, such as a tornado. For an analytical model to simulate an actual system, it must have (1) the same arrangement of components in a network of flow paths; (2) the same friction characteristics; (3) the same boundary pressures; (4) the same capacitance; and (5) the same forces that drive the air. A specific set of components used formore » constructing the analytical model includes filters, dampers, ducts, blowers, rooms, or volume connected at nodal points to form networks. The effects of a number of similar components can be lumped into a single one. TVENT1P contains a material transport algorithm and features for turning blowers off and on, changing blower speeds, changing the resistance of dampers and filters, and providing a filter model to handle very high flows. These features make it possible to depict a sequence of events during a single run. Component properties are varied using time functions. The filter model is not used by the code unless it is specified by the user. The basic results of a TVENT1P solution are flows in branches and pressures at nodes. A postprocessor program, PLTTEX, is included to produce the plots specified in the TVENT1P input. PLTTEX uses the proprietary CA-DISSPLA graphics software.« less

  19. About the statistical description of gas-liquid flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanz, D.; Guido-Lavalle, G.; Carrica, P.

    1995-09-01

    Elements of the probabilistic geometry are used to derive the bubble coalescence term of the statistical description of gas liquid flows. It is shown that the Boltzmann`s hypothesis, that leads to the kinetic theory of dilute gases, is not appropriate for this kind of flows. The resulting integro-differential transport equation is numerically integrated to study the flow development in slender bubble columns. The solution remarkably predicts the transition from bubbly to slug flow pattern. Moreover, a bubbly bimodal size distribution is predicted, which has already been observed experimentally.

  20. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-06-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

  1. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-07-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

  2. Turbine exhaust diffuser with region of reduced flow area and outer boundary gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orosa, John

    2014-03-11

    An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inwardly toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. At least one gas jet is provided including a jet exit located on the outer boundary. The jet exit may discharge a flow of gas downstream substantially parallel to an inner surface of the outer boundary to direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the outer boundary to effect a radially outward flow of at least a portion of the exhaust gas flow toward the outer boundary to balance an aerodynamic load between the outer and inner boundaries.

  3. Table 1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, 2010-2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, 2010-2014 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year 487,627 514,637 482,822 R 484,994 514,786 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,247,498 12,291,070 12,504,227 R 10,759,545 10,384,119 From Oil Wells 5,834,703 5,907,919 4,965,833 R 5,404,699 5,922,088 From Coalbed Wells 1,916,762 1,779,055 1,539,395 R 1,425,783 1,285,189 From Shale Gas Wells 5,817,122 8,500,983

  4. Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

    2007-09-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

  5. Dynamic Modeling Strategy for Flow Regime Transition in Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia Wang; Xiaodong Sun; Benjamin Doup; Haihua Zhao

    2012-12-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regimes has been widely used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are flow regime dependent. Current nuclear reactor safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5, classify flow regimes using flow regime maps or transition criteria that were developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows. As twophase flows are dynamic in nature, it is important to model the flow regime transitions dynamically to more accurately predict the two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy to determine flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation of the interfacial area, fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation, and the destruction of the interfacial area, fluid particle coalescence and condensation. For flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shapes, namely group-1 and group-2 bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identify the flow regimes is discussed, in which discriminator s are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration. The flow regime predicted with this method shows good agreement with the experimental observations.

  6. Microfluidic gas flow profiling using remote detection NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilty, Christian; McDonnell, Erin; Granwehr, Josef; Pierce,Kimberly; Han, Song-I Han; Pines, Alexander

    2005-05-06

    Miniaturized fluid handling devices have recently attracted considerable interest in many areas of science1. Such microfluidic chips perform a variety of functions, ranging from analysis of biological macromolecules2,3 to catalysis of reactions and sensing in the gas phase4,5. To enable precise fluid handling, accurate knowledge of the flow properties within these devices is important. Due to low Reynolds numbers, laminar flow is usually assumed. However, either by design or unintentionally, the flow characteristic in small channels is often altered, for example by surface interactions, viscous and diffusional effects, or electrical potentials. Therefore, its prediction is not always straight-forward6-8. Currently, most microfluidic flow measurements rely on optical detection of markers9,10, requiring the injection of tracers and transparent devices. Here, we show profiles of microfluidic gas flow in capillaries and chip devices obtained by NMR in the remote detection modality11,12. Through the transient measurement of dispersion13, NMR is well adaptable for non-invasive, yet sensitive determination of the flow field and provides a novel and potentially more powerful tool to profile flow in capillaries and miniaturized flow devices.

  7. A Two-Dimensional Compressible Gas Flow Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-17

    F2D is a general purpose, two dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-correction solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicabilitymore » of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes and flow in heated porous media.« less

  8. Fiber-optic interferometric sensor for gas flow measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminski, W.R. ); Griffin, J.W.; Bates, J.M. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation to determine the feasibility of a novel approach to measuring gas flow in a pipe. An optical fiber is stretched across a pipe and serves as a sensor which is based upon the well-established principle of vortex shedding of a cylinder in cross-flow. The resulting time varying optical signal produces a frequency component proportional to the average velocity in the pipe which is in turn proportional to volumetric flow. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to enhance the accuracy of the vortex shedding frequency signal. The analytical and experimental effort discussed herein shows that the concept is feasible and holds promise for a sensitive and accurate flow measuring technique.

  9. Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

    2006-09-01

    This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  10. Magnetic roller gas gate employing transonic sweep gas flow to isolate regions of differing gaseous composition or pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doehler, Joachim

    1994-12-20

    Disclosed herein is an improved gas gate for interconnecting regions of differing gaseous composition and/or pressure. The gas gate includes a narrow, elongated passageway through which substrate material is adapted to move between said regions and inlet means for introducing a flow of non-contaminating sweep gas into a central portion of said passageway. The gas gate is characterized in that the height of the passageway and the flow rate of the sweep gas therethrough provides for transonic flow of the sweep gas between the inlet means and at least one of the two interconnected regions, thereby effectively isolating one region, characterized by one composition and pressure, from another region, having a differing composition and/or pressure, by decreasing the mean-free-path length between collisions of diffusing species within the transonic flow region. The gas gate preferably includes a manifold at the juncture point where the gas inlet means and the passageway interconnect.

  11. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-24

    The purpose of this test report is to document the testing performed under the guidance of HNF-SD-WM-TC-073, {ital Flammable Gas Interlock Spoolpiece Flow Response Test Plan and Procedure}. This testing was performed for Lockheed Martin Hanford Characterization Projects Operations (CPO) in support of Rotary Mode Core Sampling jointly by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation and Numatec Hanford Company. The testing was conducted in the 305 building Engineering Testing Laboratory (ETL). NHC provides the engineering and technical support for the 305 ETL. The key personnel identified for the performance of this task are as follows: Test responsible engineering manager, C. E. Hanson; Flammable Gas Interlock Design Authority, G. P. Janicek; 305 ETL responsible manager, N. J. Schliebe; Cognizant RMCS exhauster engineer, E. J. Waldo/J. D. Robinson; Cognizant 305 ETL engineer, K. S. Witwer; Test director, T. C. Schneider. Other support personnel were supplied, as necessary, from 305/306 ETL. The testing, on the flammable Gas Interlock (FGI) system spoolpiece required to support Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) of single shell flammable gas watch list tanks, took place between 2-13-97 and 2-25-97.

  12. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-05-14

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  13. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals in response to said first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  14. Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

    1992-05-01

    Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

  15. Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

  16. FORCE2: A multidimensional flow program for gas solids flow theory guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burge, S.W.

    1991-05-01

    This report describes the theory and structure of the FORCE2 flow program. The manual describes the governing model equations, solution procedure and their implementation in the computer program. FORCE2 is an extension of an existing B&V multidimensional, two-phase flow program. FORCE2 was developed for application to fluid beds by flow implementing a gas-solids modeling technology derived, in part, during a joint government -- industry research program, ``Erosion of FBC Heat Transfer Tubes,`` coordinated by Argonne National Laboratory. The development of FORCE2 was sponsored by ASEA-Babcock, an industry participant in this program. This manual is the principal documentation for the program theory and organization. Program usage and post-processing of code predictions with the FORCE2 post-processor are described in a companion report, FORCE2 -- A Multidimensional Flow Program for Fluid Beds, User`s Guide. This manual is segmented into sections to facilitate its usage. In section 2.0, the mass and momentum conservation principles, the basis for the code, are presented. In section 3.0, the constitutive relations used in modeling gas-solids hydrodynamics are given. The finite-difference model equations are derived in section 4.0 and the solution procedures described in sections 5.0 and 6.0. Finally, the implementation of the model equations and solution procedure in FORCE2 is described in section 7.0.

  17. Use of exhaust gas as sweep flow to enhance air separation membrane performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutart, Charles H.; Choi, Cathy Y.

    2003-01-01

    An intake air separation system for an internal combustion engine is provided with purge gas or sweep flow on the permeate side of separation membranes in the air separation device. Exhaust gas from the engine is used as a purge gas flow, to increase oxygen flux in the separation device without increasing the nitrogen flux.

  18. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ? log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

  19. Large Eddy Simulation of two phase flow combustion in gas turbines |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Simulation of two phase flow combustion in gas turbines PI Name: Thierry Poinsot PI Email: poinsot@cerfacs.fr Institution: CERFACS Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 10,000,000 Year: 2011 Research Domain: Chemistry Research in CombustiLETFLOC (Large Eddy Simulation of two phase flow combustion in gas turbines) aims at improving our knowledge of two phase flows and their combustion in gas turbines. This will allow a better assesment of

  20. Executive Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive Summary September 2015 Quadrennial Technology Review ES Executive Summary ES Executive Summary Introduction The United States is in the midst of an energy revolution. Over the last decade, the United States has slashed net petroleum imports, dramatically increased shale gas production, scaled up wind and solar power, and cut the growth in electricity consumption to nearly zero through widespread efficiency measures. Emerging advanced energy technologies provide a rich set of options to

  1. A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Periodic Flow Gas Turbine for Distributed Energy Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Adam London

    2008-06-20

    The proposed effort served as a feasibility study for an innovative, low-cost periodic flow gas turbine capable of realizing efficiencies in the 39-48% range.

  2. Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic converter through use of insulation within the ceramic monolith Emissions performance comparison of conventional ...

  3. Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This report, summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns.

  4. A simple model of gas flow in a porous powder compact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Robinson, David B.

    2014-04-01

    This report describes a simple model for ideal gas flow from a vessel through a bed of porous material into another vessel. It assumes constant temperature and uniform porosity. Transport is treated as a combination of viscous and molecular flow, with no inertial contribution (low Reynolds number). This model can be used to fit data to obtain permeability values, determine flow rates, understand the relative contributions of viscous and molecular flow, and verify volume calibrations. It draws upon the Dusty Gas Model and other detailed studies of gas flow through porous media.

  5. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Expansion Process Flow Diagram

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Development & Expansion > Development and Expansion Process Figure About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates ...

  6. Analytical model for transient gas flow in nuclear fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, D.S.; Oehlberg, R.N.

    1981-08-01

    An analytical model for calculating gas flow and pressure inside a nuclear fuel rod is presented. Such a model is required to calculate the pressure loading of cladding during ballooning that could occur for postulated reactor accidents. The mathematical model uses a porous media (permeability) concept to define the resistance to gas flow along the fuel rod. 7 refs.

  7. Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, W. Gene

    1999-11-14

    Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

  8. Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2010-2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2010-2014 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year 487,627 514,637 482,822 R 484,994 514,786 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 375,127 348,044 354,080 R 304,676 294,045 From Oil Wells 165,220 167,294 140,617 R 153,044 167,695 From Coalbed Wells 54,277 50,377 43,591 R 40,374 36,392 From Shale Gas Wells 164,723 240,721 298,257 R 337,891 389,474

  9. Falling microbead counter-flow process for separating gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hornbostel, Marc D.; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2015-10-27

    A method and reactor for removing a component from a gas stream is provided. In one embodiment, the method includes providing the gas stream containing the component that is to be removed and adsorbing the component out of the gas stream as the gas stream rises via microbeads of a sorbent falling down an adsorber section of a reactor.

  10. Falling microbead counter-flow process for separating gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hornbostel, Marc D.; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2015-07-07

    A method and reactor for removing a component from a gas stream is provided. In one embodiment, the method includes providing the gas stream containing the component that is to be removed and adsorbing the component out of the gas stream as the gas stream rises via microbeads of a sorbent falling down an adsorber section of a reactor.

  11. Next Generation * Natural Gas (NG)2 Information Requirements--Executive Summary

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has initiated the Next Generation * Natural Gas (NG)2 project to design and implement a new and comprehensive information program for natural gas to meet customer requirements in the post-2000 time frame.

  12. TX, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    64 131 118 94 59 42 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 161 128 113 88 56 42 1981-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 3 3 ...

  13. LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    728 386 519 519 420 341 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 215 279 468 391 332 273 1981-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease ...

  14. CA, Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    169 180 173 305 284 277 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1 2 1 2 2 8 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 168 178 172 303 282 269 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 163 173 165 290 266 261

  15. CA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    57 66 82 66 75 76 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 4 3 3 1 0 0 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 53 63 79 65 75 76 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 57 66 82 66 75 76

  16. Summary of Recent Flow Testing of the Fenton Hill HDR Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a viable commercial reality. Of most significance is the demonstrated self-regulating nature of the flow through such a reservoir. Both temperature and tracer data indicate that...

  17. Iran seeking help in regaining prerevolution oil and gas flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tippee, B.

    1996-02-19

    This paper reviews the goals of the Iranian oil and gas industry to rebuild their oil and gas production facilities by using foreign investment. It discusses the historical consequences of war in the region to diminish the production and postpone the recovery of natural gas which is currently flared. It describes the major projects Iran hopes to develop through international partnerships and includes field development, pipeline construction, gas reinjection, gas treatment facilities, and new offshore operation. The paper also reviews the US policy on Iran and its attempt to apply sanctions towards this country.

  18. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-11

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  19. Fuel Summary for Peach Bottom Unit 1 High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karel I. Kingrey

    2003-04-01

    This fuel summary report contains background and summary information for the Peach Bottom Unit 1, High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2. This report contains detailed information about the fuel in the two cores, the Peach Bottom Unit 1 operating history, nuclear parameters, physical and chemical characteristics, and shipping and storage canister related data. The data in this document have been compiled from a large number of sources and are not qualified beyond the qualification of the source documents. This report is intended to provide an overview of the existing data pertaining to spent fuel management and point to pertinent reference source documents. For design applications, the original source documentation must be used. While all referenced sources are available as records or controlled documents at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), some of the sources were marked as informal or draft reports. This is noted where applicable. In some instances, source documents are not consistent. Where they are known, this document identifies those instances and provides clarification where possible. However, as stated above, this document has not been independently qualified and such clarifications are only included for information purposes. Some of the information in this summary is available in multiple source documents. An effort has been made to clearly identify at least one record document as the source for the information included in this report.

  20. Gas-kinetic unified algorithm for hypersonic flows covering various flow regimes solving Boltzmann model equation in nonequilibrium effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhihui; Ma, Qiang; Wu, Junlin; Jiang, Xinyu; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-12-09

    Based on the Gas-Kinetic Unified Algorithm (GKUA) directly solving the Boltzmann model equation, the effect of rotational non-equilibrium is investigated recurring to the kinetic Rykov model with relaxation property of rotational degrees of freedom. The spin movement of diatomic molecule is described by moment of inertia, and the conservation of total angle momentum is taken as a new Boltzmann collision invariant. The molecular velocity distribution function is integrated by the weight factor on the internal energy, and the closed system of two kinetic controlling equations is obtained with inelastic and elastic collisions. The optimization selection technique of discrete velocity ordinate points and numerical quadrature rules for macroscopic flow variables with dynamic updating evolvement are developed to simulate hypersonic flows, and the gas-kinetic numerical scheme is constructed to capture the time evolution of the discretized velocity distribution functions. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions in thermodynamic non-equilibrium and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function, and then the unified algorithm of Boltzmann model equation involving non-equilibrium effect is presented for the whole range of flow regimes. The hypersonic flows involving non-equilibrium effect are numerically simulated including the inner flows of shock wave structures in nitrogen with different Mach numbers of 1.5-Ma-25, the planar ramp flow with the whole range of Knudsen numbers of 0.0009-Kn-10 and the three-dimensional re-entering flows around tine double-cone body.

  1. U.S. Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    283,879 317,647 348,809 322,670 353,994 388,841 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 250,496 281,901 305,986 269,514 295,504 319,724 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 33,383 35,746 42,823 53,156 58,490 69,117 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 272,509 304,625 334,067 308,036 338,264 368,704 1925-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1979

  2. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  3. Gas-lift pumps for flowing and purifying molten silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kellerman, Peter L.; Carlson, Frederick

    2016-02-23

    The embodiments herein relate to a sheet production apparatus. A vessel is configured to hold a melt of a material and a cooling plate is disposed proximate the melt. This cooling plate configured to form a sheet of the material on the melt. A pump is used. In one instance, this pump includes a gas source and a conduit in fluid communication with the gas source. In another instance, this pump injects a gas into a melt. The gas can raise the melt or provide momentum to the melt.

  4. Influence of the gas-flow Reynolds number on a plasma column in a glass tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Dong Jun; Uhm, Han S.; Cho, Guangsup [Department of Electronic and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, 20 Kwangwon-Ro, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Electronic and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, 20 Kwangwon-Ro, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Atmospheric-plasma generation inside a glass tube is influenced by gas stream behavior as described by the Reynolds number (Rn). In experiments with He, Ne, and Ar, the plasma column length increases with an increase in the gas flow rate under laminar flow characterized by Rn < 2000. The length of the plasma column decreases as the flow rate increases in the transition region of 2000 < Rn < 4000. For a turbulent flow beyond Rn > 4000, the length of the plasma column is short in front of the electrode, eventually leading to a shutdown.

  5. LA, South Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,969 2,995 2,615 3,149 2,857 3,080 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,463 2,496 2,125 2,586 2,254 2,432 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, ...

  6. Program Summaries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Summaries Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Seeing Matter Nano for Energy Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington,

  7. Gas flow stabilized megavolt spark gap for repetitive pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawson, R.N.; O'Malley, M.W.; Rohwein, G.J.

    A high voltage spark gap switch is disclosed including a housing having first and second end walls being spaced apart by a predetermined distance. A first electrode is positioned on the first end wall and a second electrode is positioned on the second end wall. The first and second electrodes are operatively disposed relative to each other and are spaced apart by a predetermined gap. An inlet conduit is provided for supplying gas to the first electrode. The conduit includes a nozzle for dispersing the gas in the shape of an annular jet. The gas is supplied into the housing at a predetermined velocity. A venturi housing is disposed within the second electrode. An exhaust conduit is provided for discharging gas and residue from the housing. The gas supplied at the predetermined velocity to the housing through the inlet conduit and the nozzle in an annular shape traverses the gap between the first and second electrodes and entrains low velocity gas within the housing decreasing the velocity of the gas supplied to the housing and increasing the diameter of the annular shape. The venturi disposed within the second electrode recirculates a large volume of gas to clean and cool the surface of the electrodes.

  8. Gas flow stabilized megavolt spark gap for repetitive pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawson, Robert N.; O'Malley, Martin W.; Rohwein, Gerald J.

    1986-01-01

    A high voltage spark gap switch including a housing having first and second end walls being spaced apart by a predetermined distance. A first electrode is positioned on the first end wall and a second electrode is positioned on the second end wall. The first and second electrodes are operatively disposed relative to each other and are spaced apart by a predetermined gap. An inlet conduit is provided for supplying gas to the first electrode. The conduit includes a nozzle for dispersing the gas in the shape of an annular jet. The gas is supplied into the housing at a predetermined velocity. A venturi housing is disposed within the second electrode. An exhaust conduit is provided for discharging gas and residue from the housing. The gas supplied at the predetermined velocity to the housing through the inlet conduit and the nozzle in an annular shape traverses the gap between the first and second electrodes and entrains low velocity gas within the housing decreasing the velocity of the gas supplied to the housing and increasing the diameter of the annular shape. The venturi disposed within the second electrode recirculates a large volume of gas to clean and cool the surface of the electrodes.

  9. CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,609 2,447 2,685 1,650 1,574 1,823 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 607 498 506 269 245 265 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 2,002 1,949 2,179 1,381 1,329 1,558 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,469 2,321 2,590 1,550 1,460 1,69

  10. Federal Offshore U.S. Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,856 12,120 10,820 9,853 8,567 8,968 1990-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 7,633 6,916 5,374 3,989 3,037 3,634 1990-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 5,223 5,204 5,446 5,864 5,530 5,334 1990-2014 Dry Natural Gas 12,552 11,765 10,420 9,392 8,193 8,527 1990

  11. TX, RRC District 1 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    523 2,599 6,127 9,141 8,118 12,431 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1,456 2,332 5,227 6,516 4,442 7,733 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 67 267 900 2,625 3,676 4,698 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 1,398 2,399 5,910 8,868 7,784 11,945

  12. TX, RRC District 10 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,594 8,484 8,373 8,007 7,744 8,354 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 6,984 7,915 7,475 7,073 6,660 7,140 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 610 569 898 934 1,084 1,214 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 6,882 7,663 7,513 7,253 7,034 7,454

  13. TX, RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    909 2,235 3,690 5,985 6,640 7,524 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1,837 2,101 2,766 3,986 4,348 4,802 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 72 134 924 1,999 2,292 2,722 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 1,800 2,090 3,423 5,462 5,910 6,559

  14. TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,802 2,774 2,490 2,429 2,592 2,483 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,326 2,308 2,091 1,965 1,795 1,760 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 476 466 399 464 797 723 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,616 2,588 2,260 2,154 2,307 2,19

  15. TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,057 7,392 10,054 9,566 11,101 12,482 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 6,961 7,301 9,993 9,467 11,038 12,291 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 96 91 61 99 63 191 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 6,728 7,014 9,458 8,743 9,640 11,057

  16. TX, RRC District 5 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    22,623 24,694 28,187 17,640 19,531 18,155 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 22,602 24,686 28,147 17,587 19,354 17,970 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 21 8 40 53 177 185 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 22,343 24,363 27,843 17,331 19,280 17,880

  17. TX, RRC District 6 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    13,257 15,416 15,995 11,726 12,192 12,023 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 12,806 14,958 15,524 11,204 11,553 11,640 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 451 458 471 522 639 383 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 12,795 14,886 15,480 11,340 11,655 11,516

  18. TX, RRC District 7B Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,424 2,625 3,887 3,363 3,267 2,695 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,322 2,504 3,754 3,183 3,040 2,418 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 102 121 133 180 227 277 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 2,077 2,242 3,305 2,943 2,787 2,290

  19. TX, RRC District 7C Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5,430 5,432 5,236 5,599 5,584 7,103 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3,724 3,502 2,857 2,523 2,183 2,444 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,706 1,930 2,379 3,076 3,401 4,659 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 4,827 4,787 4,475 4,890 4,800 6,422

  20. TX, RRC District 8 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,440 8,105 8,088 8,963 9,715 11,575 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3,950 3,777 3,006 2,309 2,315 2,480 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 3,490 4,328 5,082 6,654 7,400 9,095 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 6,672 7,206 7,039 7,738 8,629 9,742

  1. TX, RRC District 8A Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,289 1,228 1,289 1,280 1,338 1,328 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 43 58 31 20 23 24 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1,246 1,170 1,258 1,260 1,315 1,304 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 1,218 1,164 1,226 1,214 1,269 1,257

  2. TX, RRC District 9 Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11,522 13,172 10,920 9,682 10,040 9,760 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 11,100 12,587 9,963 8,521 8,947 8,283 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 422 585 957 1,161 1,093 1,477 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 10,904 12,464 10,115 8,894 9,195 8,791

  3. The Gas Flow from the Gas Attenuator to the Beam Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D.D.

    2010-12-03

    The gas leak from the gas attenuator to the main beam line of the Linac Coherent Light Source has been evaluated, with the effect of the Knudsen molecular beam included. It has been found that the gas leak from the gas attenuator of the present design, with nitrogen as a working gas, does not exceed 10{sup -5} torr x l/s even at the highest pressure in the main attenuation cell (20 torr).

  4. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gas causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design production

  5. A summary of methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in numerical models of multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    Eight alternative methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in a multiphase flow model of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were implemented and evaluated: Three fixed-room geometries three porosity functions and two fluid-phase-salt methods. The pressure-time-porosity line interpolation method is the method used in current WIPP Performance Assessment calculations. The room closure approximation methods were calibrated against a series of room closure simulations performed using a creep closure code, SANCHO. The fixed-room geometries did not incorporate a direct coupling between room void volume and room pressure. The two porosity function methods that utilized moles of gas as an independent parameter for closure coupling. The capillary backstress method was unable to accurately simulate conditions of re-closure of the room. Two methods were found to be accurate enough to approximate the effects of room closure; the boundary backstress method and pressure-time-porosity line interpolation. The boundary backstress method is a more reliable indicator of system behavior due to a theoretical basis for modeling salt deformation as a viscous process. It is a complex method and a detailed calibration process is required. The pressure lines method is thought to be less reliable because the results were skewed towards SANCHO results in simulations where the sequence of gas generation was significantly different from the SANCHO gas-generation rate histories used for closure calibration. This limitation in the pressure lines method is most pronounced at higher gas-generation rates and is relatively insignificant at lower gas-generation rates. Due to its relative simplicity, the pressure lines method is easier to implement in multiphase flow codes and simulations have a shorter execution time.

  6. Rock matrix and fracture analysis of flow in western tight gas sands: Annual report, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dandge, V.; Graham, M.; Gonzales, B.; Coker, D.

    1987-12-01

    Tight gas sands are a vast future source of natural gas. These sands are characterized as having very low porosity and permeability. The main resource development problem is efficiently extracting the gas from the reservoir. Future production depends on a combination of gas price and technological advances. Gas production can be enhanced by fracturing. Studies have shown that many aspects of fracture design and gas production are influenced by properties of the rock matrix. Computer models for stimulation procedures require accurate knowledge of flow properties of both the rock matrix and the fractured regions. In the proposed work, these properties will be measured along with advanced core analysis procedure aimed at understanding the relationship between pore structure and properties. The objective of this project is to develop reliable core analysis techniques for measuring the petrophysical properties of tight gas sands. Recent research has indicated that the flow conditions in the reservoir can be greatly enhanced by the presence of natural fractures, which serve as a transport path for gas from the less permeable matrix. The study is mainly concerned with the dependence of flow in tight gas matrix and healed tectonic fractures on water saturation and confining pressure. This dependency is to be related to the detailed pore structure of tight sands as typified by cores recovered in the Multi-Well experiment. 22 refs., 34 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Miscellaneous: Uruguay energy supply options study assessing the market for natural gas - executive summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-03-04

    Uruguay is in the midst of making critical decisions affecting the design of its future energy supply system. Momentum for change is expected to come from several directions, including recent and foreseeable upgrades and modifications to energy conversion facilities, the importation of natural gas from Argentina, the possibility for a stronger interconnection of regional electricity systems, the country's membership in MERCOSUR, and the potential for energy sector reforms by the Government of Uruguay. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of several fuel diversification strategies on Uruguay's energy supply system. The analysis pays special attention to fuel substitution trends due to potential imports of natural gas via a gas pipeline from Argentina and increasing electricity ties with neighboring countries. The Government of Uruguay has contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to study several energy development scenarios with the support of several Uruguayan institutions. Specifically, ANL was asked to conduct a detailed energy supply and demand analysis, develop energy demand projections based on an analysis of past energy demand patterns with support from local institutions, evaluate the effects of potential natural gas imports and electricity exchanges, and determine the market penetration of natural gas under various scenarios.

  8. Oil and gas resources of the Fergana basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan). Advance summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-07

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA), in cooperation with the US Geological Survey (USGS), has assessed 13 major petroleum producing regions outside of the United States. This series of assessments has been performed under EIA`s Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). The basic approach used in these assessments was to combine historical drilling, discovery, and production data with EIA reserve estimates and USGS undiscovered resource estimates. Field-level data for discovered oil were used for these previous assessments. In FESAP, supply projections through depletion were typically formulated for the country or major producing region. Until now, EIA has not prepared an assessment of oil and gas provinces in the former Soviet Union (FSU). Before breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Fergana basin was selected for a trial assessment of its discovered and undiscovered oil and gas. The object was to see if enough data could be collected and estimated to perform reasonable field-level estimates of oil and gas in this basin. If so, then assessments of other basins in the FSU could be considered. The objective was met and assessments of other basins can be considered. Collected data for this assessment cover discoveries through 1987. Compared to most other oil and gas provinces in the FSU, the Fergana basin is relatively small in geographic size, and in number and size of most of its oil and gas fields. However, with recent emphasis given to the central graben as a result of the relatively large Mingbulak field, the basin`s oil and gas potential has significantly increased. At least 7 additional fields to the 53 fields analyzed are known and are assumed to have been discovered after 1987.

  9. Modification of plasma flows with gas puff in the scrape-off layer of ADITYA tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangwan, Deepak; Jha, Ratneshwar; Brotankova, Jana; Gopalkrishna, M. V. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-06-15

    The parallel Mach numbers are measured at three locations in the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma of ADITYA tokamak by using Mach probes. The flow pattern is constructed from these measurements and the modification of flow pattern is observed by introducing a small puff of working gas. In the normal discharge, there is an indication of shell structure in the SOL plasma flows, which is removed during the gas puff. The plasma parameters, particle flux and Reynolds stress are also measured in the normal discharge and in the discharge with gas puff. It is observed that Reynolds stress and Mach number are coupled in the near SOL region and decoupled in the far SOL region. The coupling in the near SOL region gets washed away during the gas puff.

  10. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gasmore » causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design