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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

SLE($?,?$)and Boundary Coulomb Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the coulomb gas model on the upper half plane with different boundary conditions, namely Drichlet, Neuman and mixed. We related this model to SLE($\\kappa,\\rho$) theories. We derive a set of conditions connecting the total charge of the coulomb gas, the boundary charges, the parameters $\\kappa$ and $\\rho$. Also we study a free fermion theory in presence of a boundary and show with the same methods that it would lead to logarithmic boundary changing operators.

S. Moghimi-Araghi; M. A. Rajabpour; S. Rouhani

2005-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Imperfect Bose Gas with Attractive Boundary Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The free Bose gas with attractive boundary conditions is an interesting toy model for the study of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC), because one has BEC already in one dimension. Here we study for the first time the imperfect Bose gas with these boundary conditions and prove rigorously the occurence of condensation.

Lieselot Vandevenne; Andre Verbeure

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

3

Thermal field theories and shifted boundary conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analytic continuation to an imaginary velocity of the canonical partition function of a thermal system expressed in a moving frame has a natural implementation in the Euclidean path-integral formulation in terms of shifted boundary conditions. The Poincare' invariance underlying a relativistic theory implies a dependence of the free-energy on the compact length L_0 and the shift xi only through the combination beta=L_0(1+xi^2)^(1/2). This in turn implies that the energy and the momentum distributions of the thermal theory are related, a fact which is encoded in a set of Ward identities among the correlators of the energy-momentum tensor. The latter have interesting applications in lattice field theory: they offer novel ways to compute thermodynamic potentials, and a set of identities to renormalize non-perturbatively the energy-momentum tensor. At fixed bare parameters the shifted boundary conditions also provide a simple method to vary the temperature in much smaller steps than with the standard procedure.

Leonardo Giusti; Harvey B. Meyer

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Thermal field theories and shifted boundary conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analytic continuation to an imaginary velocity of the canonical partition function of a thermal system expressed in a moving frame has a natural implementation in the Euclidean path-integral formulation in terms of shifted boundary conditions. The Poincare' invariance underlying a relativistic theory implies a dependence of the free-energy on the compact length L_0 and the shift xi only through the combination beta=L_0(1+xi^2)^(1/2). This in turn implies that the energy and the momentum distributions of the thermal theory are related, a fact which is encoded in a set of Ward identities among the correlators of the energy-momentum tensor. The latter have interesting applications in lattice field theory: they offer novel ways to compute thermodynamic potentials, and a set of identities to renormalize non-perturbatively the energy-momentum tensor. At fixed bare parameters the shifted boundary conditions also provide a simple method to vary the temperature in much smaller steps than with the standard procedur...

Giusti, Leonardo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2003.04.02 - 2003.09.02 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon, water, and energy varies with climate, soil, and land management, in ways 1) that influence the CO2 flux and planetary boundary layer CO2 concentration in ARM CART and 2) that we can model and predict. This activity repeated portable flux system measurements that we performed in spring 2002, by continuing measurements of the spatial heterogeneity of carbon, water, and energy fluxes in fields surrounding the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF).

6

Geometric Boundary Data for the Gravitational Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An outstanding issue in the treatment of boundaries in general relativity is the lack of a local geometric interpretation of the necessary boundary data. For the Cauchy problem, the initial data is supplied by the 3-metric and extrinsic curvature of the initial Cauchy hypersurface.. This Cauchy data determines a solution to Einstein's equations which is unique up to a diffeomorphism. Here, we show how three pieces of boundary data, which are associated locally with the geometry of the boundary, likewise determine a solution of the initial-boundary value problem which is unique up to a diffeomorphism. One piece of this data, constructed from the extrinsic curvature of the boundary, determines the dynamical evolution of the boundary. The other two pieces constitute a conformal class of rank-2, positive definite metrics, which represent the two gravitational degrees of freedom.

H-O. Kreiss; J. Winicour

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

7

Nuclear stimulation of gas fields  

SciTech Connect

From National Technical Canadian Gas Association; Calgary, Alberta, Canada (17 Oct 1973). The technical bases of the emerging technology of nuclear stimulation of natural gas fields, the potential of this method for increasing the gas supply of the US, and public issues related to this technology are discussed. A technical appendix is provided with information on: reservoir producing characteristics; explosive design, availability, and cost; firing and space of explosives; economic parameters; and tabulated statistics on past and current projects on nuclear stimulation. (LCL)

Randolph, P.L.

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP Campaign Links Campaign Images Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer Cloud IOP 2005.07.11 - 2005.08.07 Lead Scientist : William Shaw For data sets, see below. Description Investigators from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from a number of other institutions, carried out a month of intensive measurements at the ARM Climate Research Facility on the North Slope of Alaska in the summer of 2005. The purpose of these measurements was to determine how much the arctic land surface modifies the way low clouds reflect, absorb, and transmit solar and infrared radiation. This is an important problem because arctic clouds play a prominent role in

9

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the ninth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1990 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. There are 54,963 field records in this year's Oil and Gas Field Code Master List (FCML). This amounts to 467 more than in last year's report. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes: Field records for each state and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides;field records for each alias field name; fields crossing state boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective state naming authorities.

Not Available

1991-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

10

Boundary conditions for Einstein's field equations: Analytical and numerical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outer boundary conditions for strongly and symmetric hyperbolic formulations of 3D Einstein's field equations with a live gauge condition are discussed. The boundary conditions have the property that they ensure constraint propagation and control in a sense made precise in this article the physical degrees of freedom at the boundary. We use Fourier-Laplace transformation techniques to find necessary conditions for the well posedness of the resulting initial-boundary value problem and integrate the resulting three-dimensional nonlinear equations using a finite-differencing code. We obtain a set of constraint-preserving boundary conditions which pass a robust numerical stability test. We explicitly compare these new boundary conditions to standard, maximally dissipative ones through Brill wave evolutions. Our numerical results explicitly show that in the latter case the constraint variables, describing the violation of the constraints, do not converge to zero when resolution is increased while for the new boundary conditions, the constraint variables do decrease as resolution is increased. As an application, we inject pulses of ``gravitational radiation'' through the boundaries of an initially flat spacetime domain, with enough amplitude to generate strong fields and induce large curvature scalars, showing that our boundary conditions are robust enough to handle nonlinear dynamics. We expect our boundary conditions to be useful for improving the accuracy and stability of current binary black hole and binary neutron star simulations, for a successful implementation of characteristic or perturbative matching techniques, and other applications. We also discuss limitations of our approach and possible future directions.

Olivier Sarbach; Manuel Tiglio

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

11

Optimization of offshore natural gas field development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis the target is to find the optimal development solution of an offshore natural gas field. Natural gas is increasing in importance… (more)

Johansen, Gaute Rannem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields This appendix presents estimates of the proved reserves and production of the top 100 liquids or gas fields by reserves or by ...

13

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

14

Oil and Gas field code master list 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourteenth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1995 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the US. The Field Code Index, a listing of all field names and the States in which they occur, ordered by field code, has been removed from this year`s publications to reduce printing and postage costs. Complete copies (including the Field Code Index) will be available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA World-Wide Web Site. Future editions of the complete Master List will be available on CD-ROM and other electronic media. There are 57,400 field records in this year`s Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes the following: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (see definition of alias below); and fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. Taking into consideration the double-counting of fields under such circumstances, EIA identifies 46,312 distinct fields in the US as of October 1995. This count includes fields that no longer produce oil or gas, and 383 fields used in whole or in part for oil or gas Storage. 11 figs., 6 tabs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Grain Boundary Percolation Modeling of Fission Gas Release in Oxide Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new approach to fission gas release modeling in oxide fuels based on grain boundary network percolation. The method accounts for variability in the bubble growth and coalescence rates on individual grain boundaries, and the resulting effect on macroscopic fission gas release. Two-dimensional representa- tions of fuel pellet microstructures are considered, and the resulting gas release rates are compared with traditional two-stage Booth models, which do not account for long-range percolation on grain boundary net- works. The results show that the requirement of percolation of saturated grain boundaries can considerably reduce the total gas release rates, particularly when gas resolution is considered.

Paul C. Millett; Michael R. Tonks; S. B. Biner

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Oil and gas field code master list 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997 is the sixteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the US. It is updated with field information collected through October 1997. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry. As a result of their widespread adoption they have in effect become a national standard. The use of field names and codes listed in this publication is required on survey forms and other reports regarding field-specific data collected by EIA. There are 58,366 field records in this year`s FCML, 437 more than last year. The FCML includes: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (definition of alias is listed); fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. This report also contains an Invalid Field Record List of 4 records that have been removed from the FCML since last year`s report. These records were found to be either technically incorrect or to represent field names which were never recognized by State naming authorities.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Where is the boundary for state and federal offshore oil and gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wind › Geothermal › ... Where is the boundary for state and federal offshore oil and gas production? For most coastal states, the state jurisdiction extends about ...

18

,"Shale Natural Gas New Field Discoveries "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Shale Natural Gas New Field Discoveries ",36,"Annual",2011,"6302009" ,"Release...

19

PERCOLATION ON GRAIN BOUNDARY NETWORKS: APPLICATION TO FISSION GAS RELEASE IN NUCLEAR FUELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The percolation behavior of grain boundary networks is characterized in two- and three-dimensional lattices with circular macroscale cross-sections that correspond to nuclear fuel elements. The percolation of gas bubbles on grain boundaries, and the subsequent percolation of grain boundary networks is the primary mechanism of fission gas release from nuclear fuels. Both radial cracks and radial gradients in grain boundary property distributions are correlated with the fraction of grain boundaries vented to the free surfaces. Our results show that cracks surprisingly do not significantly increase the percolation of uniform grain boundary networks. However, for networks with radial gradients in boundary properties, the cracks can considerably raise the vented grain boundary content.

Paul C. Millett

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Model of Trace Gas Flux in Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the nonzero vorticity. Generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for arbitrary number components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers.

I. I. Vasenev; I. S. Nurgaliev

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2008 The Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2008 ranks the United States’ largest oil and gas fields by their estimated

22

Gas geochemistry of the Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increases in gas concentrations in Central and Southeast Geysers steam are related to the decreases in pressure caused by heavy exploitation in the 1980s. When reservoir pressures in the central parts of the field decreased, high-gas steam from undrilled reservoir margins (and possibly from underlying high-temperature zones) flowed into exploited central areas. The Northwest Geysers reservoir probably lacks high-gas marginal steam and a decline in pressure may not cause a significant increase of gas concentrations in produced steam.

Truesdell, A.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

OPTIMIZATION OF NATURAL GAS FIELD DEVELOPMENT USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Field development of natural gas reservoirs is one of the main aspects of exploration and production of natural gas for oil and gas operators. After… (more)

Olatunji, Adewale

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment Campaign Links LABLE Website Related Campaigns 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2013.05.28, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2012.09.17 - 2012.11.13 Lead Scientist : David Turner Description Boundary layer turbulence is an important process that is parameterized in most atmospheric numerical models. Turbulence redistributes energy and mass within the boundary layer. Many different characteristics can impact the character of turbulence in the boundary layer, including different surface types, horizontal wind speed and direction, and the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere. However, there have been few studies that have

25

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009 ... The peak oil discovery decade reflects the 1967 discovery of Alaska’s Prudhoe Bay Field. The gas discoveries ...

26

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic...

27

New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)...

28

Achieving safety: a field study of boundary objects in aircraft technical support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boundary objects are a critical, but understudied, theoretical construct in CSCW. Through a field study of aircraft technical support, we examined the role of boundary objects in the "achievement of safety" by service engineers. The resolution process ... Keywords: boundary objects, collaborative work, high reliability organizations, hotlines, information reuse, organizational memory, safety, service engineering, technical support

Wayne G. Lutters; Mark S. Ackerman

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Glass Transition and Liquid-Gas Spinodal Boundaries of Metastable Liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A liquid can exist under conditions of thermodynamic stability or metastability within boundaries defined by the liquid-gas spinodal and the glass transition line. The relationship between these boundaries has been investigated previously using computer simulations, the energy landscape formalism, and simplified model calculations. We calculate these stability boundaries semi-analytically for a model glass forming liquid, employing accurate liquid state theory and a first-principles approach to the glass transition. These boundaries intersect at a finite temperature, consistent with previous simulation-based studies.

S. S. Ashwin; Gautam I. Menon; Srikanth Sastry

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2006.01.01 - 2006.12.31 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. In an extension of our earlier work on crop systems, we investigated the effects of burning on the cycles of carbon, water, and energy in an example of grazed land of the Southern Great Plains. In collaboration with Dr. Herman Mayeux, of the USDA Grazing

31

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2004.04.15 - 2004.12.15 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. Models predicting fluxes for un-irrigated agriculture were posed with the challenge of characterizing the onset and severity of plant water stress. We conducted a study that quantified the spatial heterogeneity and temporal variations in land

32

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar 2005.05.21 - 2005.05.24 Lead Scientist : Michael Dobbs Description Overflights Underway at ACRF Southern Great Plains Site (M.Dobbs/J.Liljegren) Science collaborators at ITT Industries and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) conducted flights over the Central Facility at ACRF's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site as part of the Climate Sources and Sink (CO2) Intensive Operational Period (IOP), using a CW lidar. The objective of the flights was to validate, by demonstration and comparison with SGP ground observations, the performance of the ITT system when used in conjunction with retrieval

33

DISCUSSIONS ON A TYPE OF RESERVOIR CELL BOUNDARY IN THE GEYSERS STEAM FIELD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The boundaries of reservoir fluid convection cells are discreet and intricate zones, commonly sealed or reduced in permeabilities, which are often quite readily identifiable in many hydrothermal systems. Cell boundaries in the Geysers Steam Field are more vague; however, they are gradually being revealed by cumulative and extensive wellbore data. A profound example of a type of boundary has been revealed by drilling in one area of the steam field. A proposed model utilizes a sericitic alteration scheme to establish cell self-sealing. Mineralogical, permeability, and temperature properties all coincide so as to allow formation of a boundary model. This reinforces previously held views that the reservoir cell rock and hydrothermal system are greatly out of equilibrium. Such similar phenomena are suggested from drilling experiences in other parts of the steam field. Considerably, more work is required to better define and comprehend the nature and location of reservoir cell boundaries within the Geysers Steam Field.

Hebein, J.L.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

34

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields for 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields for 2000 This appendix presents estimates of the proved reserves and production of the top 100 oil and gas

35

Brief paper: Controlling the motion of charged particles in a vacuum electromagnetic field from the boundary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of driving two non-relativistic charged particles in a bounded vacuum electromagnetic field to the same location by applying electromagnetic forces through the boundary of the domain. The dynamics of the particles is modeled by ... Keywords: Boundary feedback, Charged particle, Maxwell-Lorentz system, Nuclear fusion, Perturbed energy

Luis R. Suazo; Weijiu Liu

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009 Introduction This supplement to the Energy Information Administration's summary of U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved...

37

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1998 Updates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List Updates 1998 is an addendum to the 1997 edition of the EIA publication Oil and Gas Field Code Master List, an annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. These updates represent the addition of new fields to the list and changes to the records of previously listed fields, including deletions. The current publication is based on field information collected through October 1998.

Robert F. King

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1999 Updates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List Updates 1999 is an addendum to the 1998 edition of the EIA publication Oil and Gas Field Code Master List, an annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. These updates represent the addition of new fields to the list and changes to the records of previously listed fields, including deletions. The current publication is based on field information collected through November 1999.

Robert F. King

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preface The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2006 is the twenty-fifth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It ...

40

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Front Matter. Cover Page, Preface, Contents, Chapters, Maps and the Glossary: PDF.. Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. Field code information for all ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

42

Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

43

Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

44

Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

45

Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

46

Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

47

Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

48

Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

49

Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

50

A three-phase free boundary problem with melting ice and dissolving gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a mathematical model for a three-phase free boundary problem in one dimension that involves the interactions between gas, water and ice. The dynamics are driven by melting of the ice layer, while the pressurized gas also dissolves within the meltwater. The model incorporates a Stefan condition at the water-ice interface along with Henry's law for dissolution of gas at the gas-water interface. We employ a quasi-steady approximation for the phase temperatures and then derive a series solution for the interface positions. A non-standard feature of the model is an integral free boundary condition that arises from mass conservation owing to changes in gas density at the gas-water interface, which makes the problem non-self-adjoint. We derive a two-scale asymptotic series solution for the dissolved gas concentration, which because of the non-self-adjointness gives rise to a Fourier series expansion in eigenfunctions that do not satisfy the usual orthogonality conditions. Numerical simulations of the original governing equations are used to validate the series approximations.

Maurizio Ceseri; John M. Stockie

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

51

Oil and gas field code master list, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains data collected through October 1993 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. Other Federal and State government agencies, as well as industry, use the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List as the standard for field identification. A machine-readable version of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List is available from the National Technical Information Service.

Not Available

1993-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

52

Recovering associated gas from marginal fields  

SciTech Connect

To enable production from offshore gasfields too small to justify a pipeline, LGA Gastechnik G.m.b.H. has designed for a capacity of 30-90 million cu ft/day a system comprising a floating production unit on a catamaran barge complete with its own powerplant and personnel quarters plus a 15,000 cu m LNG/LPG/NGL tanker in the form of a catamaran holding two long cylindrical tanks. The catamaran barge production unit has a standard breadth of 27.5 m and depth of 6.5 m, with the length varying from 90 m to 120 m according to production and storage needs. There are ten cargo tanks located below decks in the two hulls. The tanker draft is either 7.7 m with LNG or 9.0 m with LPG. Tankers can be designed to match the actual production slate of a field. A possible third component of the system is a floating or a shore-based storage installation with capacity for 27,000 cu m LNG, 15,000 cu m LPG, and 7000 cu m natural gas liquids. At the beginning of 1978, Liquid Gas International G.m.b.H. was given an order for the preconstruction planning of a gas production and transport system such as described above.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Enhanced Generic Phase-field Model of Irradiation Materials: Fission Gas Bubble Growth Kinetics in Polycrystalline UO2  

SciTech Connect

Experiments show that inter-granular and intra-granular gas bubbles have different growth kinetics which results in heterogeneous gas bubble microstructures in irradiated nuclear fuels. A science-based model predicting the heterogeneous microstructure evolution kinetics is desired, which enables one to study the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system on gas bubble microstructure evolution kinetics and morphology, improve the understanding of the formation mechanisms of heterogeneous gas bubble microstructure, and provide the microstructure to macroscale approaches to study their impact on thermo-mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking. In our previous report 'Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration, Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing', we developed a phase-field model to simulate the intra-granular gas bubble evolution in a single crystal during post-irradiation thermal annealing. In this work, we enhanced the model by incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic properties at grain boundaries, which can be obtained from atomistic simulations, to simulate fission gas bubble growth kinetics in polycrystalline UO2 fuels. The model takes into account of gas atom and vacancy diffusion, vacancy trapping and emission at defects, gas atom absorption and resolution at gas bubbles, internal pressure in gas bubbles, elastic interaction between defects and gas bubbles, and the difference of thermodynamic and kinetic properties in matrix and grain boundaries. We applied the model to simulate gas atom segregation at grain boundaries and the effect of interfacial energy and gas mobility on gas bubble morphology and growth kinetics in a bi-crystal UO2 during post-irradiation thermal annealing. The preliminary results demonstrate that the model can produce the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and the morphology of gas bubbles at grain boundaries for given grain boundary properties. More validation of the model capability in polycrystalline is underway.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect

Gases are stored, separated, and/or concentrated. An electric field is applied across a porous dielectric adsorbent material. A gas component from a gas mixture may be selectively separated inside the energized dielectric. Gas is stored in the energized dielectric for as long as the dielectric is energized. The energized dielectric selectively separates, or concentrates, a gas component of the gas mixture. When the potential is removed, gas from inside the dielectric is released.

Currier, Robert P; Obrey, Stephen J; Devlin, David J; Sansinena, Jose Maria

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997 is the seventeenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through October 1997. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1998 is the eighteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through October 1998. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2000 is the nineteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through November 2000. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2003  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2001 is the twenty second annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through November 2002. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2001 is the twentieth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through November 2001. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2001 is the twenty first annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through November 2002. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Boundary S Matrix and the Anti{endash}de Sitter Space to Conformal Field Theory Dictionary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An S matrix analog is defined for anti{endash}de Sitter (Ads) space by constructing {open_quotes}in{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}out{close_quotes} states that asymptote to the timelike boundary. A derivation parallel to that of the Lehmann-Symanzik-Zimmermann formula shows that this {open_quotes}boundary S matrix{close_quotes} is given directly by correlation functions in the boundary conformal theory. This provides a key entry in the AdS to conformal field theory dictionary. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

Giddings, S.B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1996 Updates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List Updates 1996 represents a departure from past Energy Information Administration (EIA) practice. This publication does not provide a list of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States as did the fourteen prior annual volumes of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It provides updates to the Field Code Master File that were made subsequent to the publication of Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1995, based on information collected through October 1996. These updates represent the addition of new fields to the list and changes to the records of previously listed fields, including deletions. This publication is therefore a supplement to theOil and Gas Field Code Master List 1995, which its recipients were requested to retain.

Robert F. King

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Barrow Gas Fields - North Slope Borough, Alaska  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase 2- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04/06/2010 Phase 2- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04/06/2010 DE-FC26-06NT42962 Goal The goal of this project is to evaluate, design, drill, log, core and production test methane hydrate resources in the Barrow Gas Fields near Barrow, Alaska to determine its impact on future free gas production and its viability as an energy source. Photo of Barrow welcome sign Performers North Slope Borough, Barrow, Alaska 99723 Petrotechnical Resources Alaska (PRA), Fairbanks, AK 99775 University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 Background Phase 1 of the Barrow Gas Fields Hydrate Study provided very strong evidence for the existence of hydrates updip of the East Barrow and Walakpa Gas Fields. Full-field history matched reservoir modeling supported the

64

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1995  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1995 is the fourteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gasfields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through October 1995. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1996 is the fifteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gasfields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through October 1996. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

,"Shale Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Shale Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields ",36,"Annual",2011,"6302009"...

67

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Available; W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas New Field Discoveries...

68

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields This appendix presents estimates of the proved reserves and production of the largest or top 100 ...

69

,"California Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011...

70

,"Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

71

Utah Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

72

Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

73

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

74

California Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) California Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

75

California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

76

Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

77

Ohio Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

78

Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

79

Michigan Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

80

Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

82

U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

83

New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

84

New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

85

New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

86

New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

87

Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

88

Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

89

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List Oil and Gas Field Code Master List With Data for 2012 | Release Date: May 8, 2013 | Next Release Date: April 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Comprehensive listing of U.S. oil and gas field names. Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2012 Definition of a Field Afield is defined as "an area consisting of a single reservoir ormultiple reservoirs all grouped on, or related to, the same individual geological structural feature and/or stratigraphic condition. There may be two or more reservoirs in a field which are separated vertically by intervening impervious strata, or laterally by local geologic barriers, or by both." More › About the Field Code Master List Related Links

90

Electromagnetic field of a charge intersecting a cold plasma boundary in a waveguide  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the electromagnetic field of a charge crossing a boundary between a vacuum and cold plasma in a waveguide. We obtain exact expressions for the field components and the spectral density of the transition radiation. With the steepest descent technique, we investigate the field components. We show that the electromagnetic field has a different structure in a vacuum than in cold plasma. We also develop an algorithm for the computation of the field based on a certain transformation of the integration path. The behavior of the field depending on distance and time and the spectral density depending on frequency are explored for different charge velocities. Some important physical effects are noted. A considerable increase and concentration of the field near the wave front in the plasma is observed for the case of ultrarelativistic particles. In the plasma, the mode envelopes and spectral density show zero points when the charge velocity is within certain limits.

Alekhina, Tatiana Yu.; Tyukhtin, Andrey V. [Radiophysics Department of St. Petersburg University, 1 Ulyanovskaya, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Atmospheric boundary layer parameters necessary for calculation of gas and particle deposition velocities were directly measured from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results Atmospheric boundary layer parameters necessary for calculation of gas and particle hourly gas and particle deposition velocities. Acknowledgements · Staffs at the Lost Dutchman State Park, Desert Botanical Garden, and White Tank Mountain Regional Park. · Fred Peña, Department of Chemical

Hall, Sharon J.

92

Gas Lasers for Strong Field Applications  

SciTech Connect

Atomic, molecular and excimer gas lasers employ variety of pumping schemes including electric discharge, optical, or chemical reactions and cover a broad spectral range from UV to far-IR. Several types of gas lasers are capable to produce multi-kilojoule pulses and kilowatts of average power. Among them, excimer and high-pressure molecular lasers have sufficient bandwidth for producing pico- and femtosecond pulses. Projects are under way and prospects are open to bring ultra-fast gas laser technology to the front lines of the advanced accelerator applications.

Pogorelsky, I.V. [Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 820, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

GAS LASERS FOR STRONG-FIELD APPLICATIONS.  

SciTech Connect

Atomic-, molecular- and excimer-gas lasers employ variety of pumping schemes including electric discharge, optical, or chemical reactions and cover a broad spectral range from UV to far-IR. Several types of gas lasers can produce multi-kilojoule pulses and kilowatts of average power. Among them, excimer- and high-pressure molecular lasers have sufficient bandwidth for generating pico- and femtosecond pulses. Projects are underway and prospects are opening up to bring ultrafast gas laser technology to the front lines of advanced accelerator applications.

POGORELSKY,I.V.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Oil and gas field code master list 1994  

SciTech Connect

This is the thirteenth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1994 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. The master field name spellings and codes are to be used by respondents when filing the following Department of Energy (DOE) forms: Form EIA-23, {open_quotes}Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves,{close_quotes} filed by oil and gas well operators (field codes are required from larger operators only); Forms FERC 8 and EIA-191, {open_quotes}Underground Gas Storage Report,{close_quotes} filed by natural gas producers and distributors who operate underground natural gas storage facilities. Other Federal and State government agencies, as well as industry, use the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List as the standard for field identification. A machine-readable version of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List is available from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161, (703) 487-4650. In order for the Master List to be useful, it must be accurate and remain current. To accomplish this, EIA constantly reviews and revises this list. The EIA welcomes all comments, corrections, and additions to the Master List. All such information should be given to the EIA Field Code Coordinator at (214) 953-1858. EIA gratefully acknowledges the assistance provides by numerous State organizations and trade associations in verifying the existence of fields and their official nomenclature.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Existing fields ...

96

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

97

,"Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

98

,"Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural...

99

Kalimantan field development hikes gas supply for LNG export  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of Tambora and Tunu gas fields in Kalimantan that have increased available gas supply for the export of liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Indonesia. The demand for LNG is increasing in the energy thirsty Far East market. And Indonesia, the world's largest exporter, is keeping pace by expanding the Bontang liquefaction plant in East Kalimantan. A fifth train, with a capacity of around 2.5 million tons/year, began operating in January 1990. Start-up of a sixth train, of identical capacity, is planned for January 1994. The Bontang plant is operated by PT Badak on behalf of Pertamina, the Indonesian state oil and gas mining company. The feed to the fifth train comes primarily from the first-phase development of Total Indonesie's two gas fields, Tambora and Tunu. The sixth train will be fed by a second-phase development of the Tunu field.

Suharmoko, G.R. (Total Indonesie, Balikpapan (ID))

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

100

MAGNETIC FIELD GENERATION AND PARTICLE ENERGIZATION AT RELATIVISTIC SHEAR BOUNDARIES IN COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON-POSITRON PLASMAS  

SciTech Connect

Using particle-in-cell simulations, we study the kinetic physics of relativistic shear flow in collisionless electron-positron (e+e-) plasmas. We find efficient magnetic field generation and particle energization at the shear boundary, driven by streaming instabilities across the shear interface and sustained by the shear flow. Nonthermal, anisotropic high-energy particles are accelerated across field lines to produce a power-law tail turning over just below the shear Lorentz factor. These results have important implications for the dissipation and radiation of jets in blazars and gamma-ray bursts.

Liang, Edison; Smith, Ian [Rice University, MS 108, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Boettcher, Markus, E-mail: liang@rice.edu, E-mail: iansmith@rice.edu, E-mail: boettchm@ohio.edu [Physics and Astronomy Department, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Oil and Gas Field Code Index - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

000174 LA Fox Lake 000175 MT Gilford North 000210 NM Springs 000213 NM Dog Town Draw ... Energy Information Administration/Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1998 343

102

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Barrow Gas Fields - North Slope Borough...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04062010 DE-FC26-06NT42962 Goal The goal of this...

103

Trip report for field visit to Fayetteville Shale gas wells.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a visit to several gas well sites in the Fayetteville Shale on August 9, 2007. I met with George Sheffer, Desoto Field Manager for SEECO, Inc. (a large gas producer in Arkansas). We talked in his Conway, Arkansas, office for an hour and a half about the processes and technologies that SEECO uses. We then drove into the field to some of SEECO's properties to see first-hand what the well sites looked like. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) made several funding awards under a program called Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil (LINGO). One of the projects that received an award is 'Probabilistic Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems'. The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has the lead on the project, and Argonne National Laboratory is a partner. The goal of the project is to develop a Web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of gas reserves in sensitive areas. The project focuses on a large new natural gas field called the Fayetteville Shale. Part of the project involves learning how the natural gas operators do business in the area and the technologies they employ. The field trip on August 9 provided an opportunity to do that.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Gas characterization system 241-AN-105 field acceptance test procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AN-105. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

Schneider, T.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Gas characterization system 241-AW-101 field acceptance test procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AW-101. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

Schneider, T.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 74,056 76,732 74,938 79,040 82,376 81,196 1981-2013 PADD 1 1,525 1,439 2,394 2,918 2,821 2,687 1981-2013 East Coast 1993-2008 Appalachian No. 1 1,525 1,439 2,394 2,918 2,821 2,687 1993-2013 PADD 2 12,892 13,208 13,331 13,524 15,204 15,230 1981-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 1,975 1,690 2,171 1,877 2,630 2,746 1993-2013

107

Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas is an important energy source that contributes up to 25% of the total US energy reserves (DOE 2011). An increase in natural gas demand spurs further development of unconventional resources, including methane hydrate (Rajnauth 2012). Natural gas from methane hydrate has the potential to play a major role in ensuring adequate future energy supplies in the US. The worldwide volume of gas in the hydrate state has been estimated to be approximately 1.5 x 10^16 m^3 (Makogon 1984). More than 230 gas-hydrate deposits have been discovered globally. Several production technologies have been tested; however, the development of the Messoyakha field in the west Siberian basin is the only successful commercial gas-hydrate field to date. Although the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field was not a certainty, this current study determined the undeniable presence of gas hydrates in the reservoir. This study uses four models of the Messoyakha field structure and reservoir conditions and examines them based on the available geologic and engineering data. CMG STARS and IMEX software packages were used to calculate gas production from a hydrate-bearing formation on a field scale. Results of this analysis confirm the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field and also determine the volume of hydrates in place. The cumulative production from the field on January 1, 2012 is 12.9 x 10^9 m^3, and it was determined in this study that 5.4 x 10^9 m^3 was obtained from hydrates. The important issue of pressure-support mechanisms in developing a gas hydrate reservoir was also addressed in this study. Pressure-support mechanisms were investigated using different evaluation methods such as the use of gas-injection well patterns and gas/water injection using isothermal and non-isothermal simulators. Several aquifer models were examined. Simulation results showed that pressure support due to aquifer activity was not possible. Furthermore, it was shown that the water obtained from hydrates was not produced and remained in the reservoir. Results obtained from the aquifer models were confirmed by the actual water production from the field. It was shown that water from hydrates is a very strong pressure-support mechanism. Water not only remained in the reservoir, but it formed a thick water-saturated layer between the free-gas and gas-hydrate zone. Finally, thermodynamic behavior of gas hydrate decomposition was studied. Possible areas of hydrate preservation were determined. It was shown that the central top portion of the field preserved most of hydrates due to temperature reduction of hydrate decomposition.

Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Lattice gas models derived from effective field theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We start from a low-energy effective field theory for interacting fermions on the lattice and expand in the hopping parameter to derive the nearest-neighbor interactions for a lattice gas model. In this model the renormalization of couplings for different lattice spacings is inherited from the effective field theory, systematic errors can be estimated a priori, and the breakdown of the lattice gas model description at low temperatures can be understood quantitatively. We apply the lattice gas method to neutron matter and compare with results from a recent quantum simulation.

Matthew Hamilton; Iyam Lynch; Dean Lee

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: Australian field trial  

SciTech Connect

In Australia a significant number of landfill waste disposal sites do not incorporate measures for the collection and treatment of landfill gas. This includes many old/former landfill sites, rural landfill sites, non-putrescible solid waste and inert waste landfill sites, where landfill gas generation is low and it is not commercially viable to extract and beneficially utilize the landfill gas. Previous research has demonstrated that biofiltration has the potential to degrade methane in landfill gas, however, the microbial processes can be affected by many local conditions and factors including moisture content, temperature, nutrient supply, including the availability of oxygen and methane, and the movement of gas (oxygen and methane) to/from the micro-organisms. A field scale trial is being undertaken at a landfill site in Sydney, Australia, to investigate passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas as a means of managing landfill gas emissions at low to moderate gas generation landfill sites. The design and construction of the trial is described and the experimental results will provide in-depth knowledge on the application of passive gas drainage and landfill gas biofiltration under Sydney (Australian) conditions, including the performance of recycled materials for the management of landfill gas emissions.

Dever, S.A. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia) and GHD Pty. Ltd., 10 Bond Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 (Australia)]. E-mail: stuart_dever@ghd.com.au; Swarbrick, G.E. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: g.swarbrick@unsw.edu.au; Stuetz, R.M. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: r.stuetz@unsw.edu.au

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

HOT GAS HALOS IN EARLY-TYPE FIELD GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use Chandra and XMM-Newton to study the hot gas content in a sample of field early-type galaxies. We find that the L {sub X}-L {sub K} relationship is steeper for field galaxies than for comparable galaxies in groups and clusters. The low hot gas content of field galaxies with L {sub K} {approx_lt} L {sub *} suggests that internal processes such as supernovae-driven winds or active galactic nucleus feedback expel hot gas from low-mass galaxies. Such mechanisms may be less effective in groups and clusters where the presence of an intragroup or intracluster medium can confine outflowing material. In addition, galaxies in groups and clusters may be able to accrete gas from the ambient medium. While there is a population of L {sub K} {approx_lt} L {sub *} galaxies in groups and clusters that retain hot gas halos, some galaxies in these rich environments, including brighter galaxies, are largely devoid of hot gas. In these cases, the hot gas halos have likely been removed via ram pressure stripping. This suggests a very complex interplay between the intragroup/intracluster medium and hot gas halos of galaxies in rich environments, with the ambient medium helping to confine or even enhance the halos in some cases and acting to remove gas in others. In contrast, the hot gas content of more isolated galaxies is largely a function of the mass of the galaxy, with more massive galaxies able to maintain their halos, while in lower mass systems the hot gas escapes in outflowing winds.

Mulchaey, John S. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: mulchaey@obs.carnegiescience.ed, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.or [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

111

Field_SWAT: A tool for mapping SWAT output to field boundaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) hydrological/water quality model divides a watershed into hydrological response units (HRUs) based on unique land cover, soil type, and slope. HRUs are a set of discontinuous land masses that are spatially located ... Keywords: Field responses, HRU, Hydrological response units, SWAT

Naresh Pai; Dharmendra Saraswat; Raghavan Srinivasan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

NETL: Methane Hydrates - 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field trial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field trial 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field trial Photo of the Ignik Drilling Pad Download 2011/2012 Field Test Data Ignik Sikumi #1 "Fire in the Ice" Video Project Background Participants Ignik Sikumi Well Review CO2-Ch4 Exchange Overview August 2, 2013 - Project operations are complete. Read the Final Project Technical Report [PDF-44.1MB] February 19, 2013 - Data from the 2011/2012 field test is now available! Click here to access data. Status Report - May 7, 2012 Final abandonment of Ignik Sikumi #1 wellsite has been completed. Tubing, casing-tubing annulus, and flatpack were filled with cement per the abandonment procedure approved by the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. To minimize effects on the landscape and leave as little trace of the operations as possible, a small area around the wellhead was

113

The Vertical Structure of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer over a Sloping Bed: Theory and Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical solutions for the wave bottom boundary layer (WBL) over a sloping bed are compared with field measurements in the nearshore zone. The WBL theory is constructed using both viscoelastic–diffusion and conventional eddy viscosity ...

Qingping Zou; Alex E. Hay

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Variability in the internal wave field induced by the Atlantic Deep Western Boundary Current at 16°N  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five years of continuous mooring data combined with CTD/LADCP measurements from five cruises are used to investigate the influence of the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) on the internal wave field and associated vertical mixing at the ...

Janna Köhler; Christian Mertens; Maren Walter; Uwe Stöber; Monika Rhein; Torsten Kanzow

115

Largest US oil and gas fields, August 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Largest US Oil and Gas Fields is a technical report and part of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) series presenting distributions of US crude oil and natural gas resources, developed using field-level data collected by EIA`s annual survey of oil and gas proved reserves. The series` objective is to provide useful information beyond that routinely presented in the EIA annual report on crude oil and natural gas reserves. These special reports also will provide oil and gas resource analysts with a fuller understanding of the nature of US crude oil and natural gas occurrence, both at the macro level and with respect to the specific subjects addressed. The series` approach is to integrate EIA`s crude oil and natural gas survey data with related data obtained from other authoritative sources, and then to present illustrations and analyses of interest to a broad spectrum of energy information users ranging from the general public to oil and gas industry personnel.

Not Available

1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

116

Oil and gas field code master list, 1983. [Glossary included  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States with field information collected through November 1983. The purpose of the publication is to provide codes for easy identification of domestic fields. A standardization of these field codes will foster consistency in field identification by government and industry. The use of field names and codes listed in this publication is required on the survey forms and reports regarding field-specific data for the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. A glossary of the terms is provided to assist the readers in more fully understanding the information in this Field Code Master List. 8 figures, 4 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Lithium bromide absorption chiller passes gas conditioning field test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lithium bromide absorption chiller has been successfully used to provide refrigeration for field conditioning of natural gas. The intent of the study was to identify a process that could provide a moderate level of refrigeration necessary to meet the quality restrictions required by natural-gas transmission companies, minimize the initial investment risk, and reduce operating expenses. The technology in the test proved comparatively less expensive to operate than a propane refrigeration plant. Volatile product prices and changes in natural-gas transmission requirements have created the need for an alternative to conventional methods of natural-gas processing. The paper describes the problems with the accumulation of condensed liquids in pipelines, gas conditioning, the lithium bromide absorption cycle, economics, performance, and operating and maintenance costs.

Lane, M.J.; Huey, M.A. [Nicol and Associates, Richardson, TX (United States)

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version (from ArcGIS 9.0 to ArcGIS 9.2) of the polygon smoothing algorithm described below. A bug that occurred when multiple wells had the same location was also fixed. SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINE POLYGONS MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS Why smooth buffered field outlines? See the issues in the figure below: [pic] The smoothing application provided as VBA code below does the following: Adds area to the concave portions; doesn't add area to convex portions to maintain buffer spacing Fills in non-field "islands" smaller than buffer size Joins separate polygon rings with a "bridge" if sufficiently close Minimizes increase in total field area Methodology: creates trapezoids between neighboring wells within an oil/gas

119

Development of the Erawan gas field, Gulf of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Erawan gas field is the first major domestic source of hydrocarbons available for industrial development in Thailand. The field has multiple producing facilities that are installed simultaneously and exemplify a tailored design to accommodate current market conditions in vendor and fabrication shops. Equipment modules and their complexity are adjusted to take advantage of workload, labor prices, and steel prices in different countries, which enables both a rapid schedule and significant cost savings.

Clapp, T.W.; Lower, G.D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Yukawa-field approximation of electrostatic free energy and dielectric boundary force This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yukawa-field approximation of electrostatic free energy and dielectric boundary force This article.1088/0951-7715/24/11/011 Yukawa-field approximation of electrostatic free energy and dielectric boundary force Hsiao-Bing Cheng1. The electrostatic free energy determines the dielectric boundary force that in turn influences crucially

Li, Bo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

FIELD OBSERVATIONS OF GAS-CONDENSATE WELL TESTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a commercial simulator was used to perform phase- equilibrium and property calculations based on the PengFIELD OBSERVATIONS OF GAS- CONDENSATE WELL TESTING A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY-point pressure is impacted severely due to condensate banking around the wellbore. Condensate banking also

122

Interaction between phantom field and modified Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter, we have considered a flat FRW universe. Instead of considering only one candidate for dark energy, we have considered interaction between phantom field and modified Chaplygin gas. It has been shown that the potential of the phantom field increases from a lower value with evolution of the Universe. It has been observed that, the field has an increasing tendency and potential has also an increasing tendency with passage of cosmic time. In the evolution of the universe the crossing of $w=-1$ has been realized by this interacting model.

Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

123

Use of Synthetic Data to Test Flight Patterns for a Boundary Layer Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A virtual research aircraft was flown through a synthetic atmospheric boundary layer to help design a real flight plan that would allow robust turbulence statistics to be obtained in a heterogeneous, evolving, convective boundary layer. The ...

Edi Santoso; Roland Stull

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

Haszeldine, Stuart

125

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2008 - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pipeline’s Annual Report of Gas Supply”, began ... length on DOE forms and by the field naming authority, usually the State oil and gas regulatory ...

126

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2007 - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pipeline’s Annual Report of Gas Supply”, began ... length on DOE forms and by the field naming authority, usually the State oil and gas regulatory ...

127

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields for 1999 - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields for 1999 This appendix presents estimates of the proved reserves and production of the top 100 oil and gas

128

Thermodynamics of Modified Chaplygin Gas and Tachyonic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we generalize the results of the work of ref. [10] in modified Chaplygin gas model and tachyonic field model. Here we have studied the thermodynamical behaviour and the equation of state in terms of volume and temperature for both models. We have used the solution and the corresponding equation of state of our previous work [12] for tachyonic field model. We have also studied the thermodynamical stability using thermal equation of state for the tachyonic field model and have shown that there is no critical points during thermodynamical expansion. The determination of $T_{*}$ due to expansion for the tachyonic field have been discussed by assuming some initial conditions. Here, the thermal quantities have been investigated using some reduced parameters.

Samarpita Bhattacharya; Ujjal Debnath

2010-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

129

Gas Turbine Compressor Field Repair Guideline: GE 7FA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline is designed to assist gas turbine owners confronted with limited damage to compressor rotating blade airfoils. The guideline addresses typical damage to the airfoil tip and leading edge where a limited amount of material trimming and blending is allowable. The guideline provides an engineering basis for implementing safe repairs and avoiding possible risk of airfoil failure due to high-cycle fatigue. In-situ field repair criteria are given for each compressor row R-0 through R-17 for ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

130

Gas insulated transmission line with insulators having field controlling recesses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line having a novel insulator for supporting an inner conductor concentrically within an outer sheath. The insulator has a recess contiguous with the periphery of one of the outer and inner conductors. The recess is disposed to a depth equal to an optimum gap for the dielectric insulating fluid used for the high voltage insulation or alternately disposed to a large depth so as to reduce the field at the critical conductor/insulator interface.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Pederson, Bjorn O. (Chelmsford, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Field testing the Raman gas composition sensor for gas turbine operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gas composition sensor based on Raman spectroscopy using reflective metal lined capillary waveguides is tested under field conditions for feed-forward applications in gas turbine control. The capillary waveguide enables effective use of low powered lasers and rapid composition determination, for computation of required parameters to pre-adjust burner control based on incoming fuel. Tests on high pressure fuel streams show sub-second time response and better than one percent accuracy on natural gas fuel mixtures. Fuel composition and Wobbe constant values are provided at one second intervals or faster. The sensor, designed and constructed at NETL, is packaged for Class I Division 2 operations typical of gas turbine environments, and samples gas at up to 800 psig. Simultaneous determination of the hydrocarbons methane, ethane, and propane plus CO, CO2, H2O, H2, N2, and O2 are realized. The capillary waveguide permits use of miniature spectrometers and laser power of less than 100 mW. The capillary dimensions of 1 m length and 300 ?m ID also enable a full sample exchange in 0.4 s or less at 5 psig pressure differential, which allows a fast response to changes in sample composition. Sensor operation under field operation conditions will be reported.

Buric, M.; Chorpening, B.; Mullem, J.; Ranalli, J.; Woodruff, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Numerical Simulation of Flow Field in Diesel Centrifugal Gas-Oil Separator Basing on CFD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aiming at the low efficiency problem of the traditional gas-oil separator, this paper put forward a centrifugal gas-oil separator. In order to identify out the interior fluid field character of centrifugal gas-oil separator, RANS equation, RNG k-e model ... Keywords: Diesel, Centrifugal Gas-oil Separator, Flow Field, Separation Efficiency

Zhiguo Zhao

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Velocity Field of Quasar Broad Emission Line Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Letter, the broad emission line (BEL) profiles of superluminal quasars with apparent jet velocities, $\\beta_{a}>10$, (ultraluminal QSOs, or ULQSOs hereafter) are studied as a diagnostic of the velocity field of the BEL emitting gas in quasars. The ULQSOs are useful because they satisfy a very strict kinematical constraint, their parsec scale jets must be propagating within $12^{\\circ}$ of the line of sight. We know the orientation of these objects with great certainty. The large BEL FWHM, $\\sim 3,000 \\mathrm{km/s} - 6,000 \\mathrm{km/s}$, in ULQSOs tend to indicate that the BEL gas has a larger component of axial velocity (either random or in a wind) along the jet direction than previously thought.

Brian Punsly

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Keywords: oil or gas field exploration, decision making under uncertainty, multistage stochastic be addressed. E-mail: grossmann@cmu.edu #12;2 1. Introduction Oil and gas field exploration and production1 A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

135

Direct Experimental Evaluation of the Grain Boundaries Gas Content in PWR fuels: New Insight and Perspective of the ADAGIO Technique  

SciTech Connect

Over the last decades, many analytical experiments (in-pile and out-of-pile) have underlined the active role of the inter-granular gases on the global fuel transient behavior under accidental conditions such as RIA and/or LOCA. In parallel, the improvement of fission gas release modeling in nuclear fuel performance codes needs direct experimental determination/validation regarding the local gas distribution inside the fuel sample. In this context, an experimental program, called 'ADAGIO' (French acronym for Discriminating Analysis of Accumulation of Inter-granular and Occluded Gas), has been initiated through a joint action of CEA, EDF and AREVA NP in order to develop a new device/technique for quantitative and direct measurement of local fission gas distribution within an irradiated fuel pellet. ADAGIO technique is based on the fact that fission gas inventory (intra and inter-granular parts) can be distinguished by controlled fuel oxidation, since grain boundaries oxidize faster than the bulk. The purpose of the current paper is to present both the methodology and the associated results of the ADAGIO program performed at CEA. It has been divided into two main parts: (i) feasibility (UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels), (ii) application on high burn up UO{sub 2} fuel. (authors)

Pontillon, Y.; Noirot, J.; Caillot, L. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, DEN/DEC/SA3C, Centre d'Etudes de Cadarache, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul Les Durance (France); Muller, E. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, DEN/DEC/SESC, Centre d'Etudes de Cadarache, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul Les Durance (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Plume Dispersion in the Convective Boundary Layer. Part I: CONDORS Field Experiment and Example Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project CONDORS (CONvective Diffusion Observed by Remote Sensors) measured the dispersion of a nonbuoyant plume in the highly convective boundary layer. Laboratory and numerical models have predicted vertical profiles of a passive tracer that are ...

W. L. Eberhard; W. R. Moninger; G. A. Briggs

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

An energy absorbing far-field boundary condition for the elastic wave equation  

SciTech Connect

The authors present an energy absorbing non-reflecting boundary condition of Clayton-Engquist type for the elastic wave equation together with a discretization which is stable for any ratio of compressional to shear wave speed. They prove stability for a second order accurate finite-difference discretization of the elastic wave equation in three space dimensions together with a discretization of the proposed non-reflecting boundary condition. The stability proof is based on a discrete energy estimate and is valid for heterogeneous materials. The proof includes all six boundaries of the computational domain where special discretizations are needed at the edges and corners. The stability proof holds also when a free surface boundary condition is imposed on some sides of the computational domain.

Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Soil gases have been used as an exploration tool for minerals, oil and gas, and geothermal energy, through the detection of anomalous gas levels. This paper describes a soil gas survey conducted over a large part of the Rotorua geothermal field to supplement the sparse gas data from drillhole samples and to determine gas distribution patterns over the field. Data collected from a reference hole were used to observe the effect changing meteorological conditions had on soil gas levels. The results were

139

Liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter with density-dependent relativistic mean-field models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is studied within density-dependent relativistic mean-field models where the density dependence is introduced according to the Brown-Rho scaling and constrained by available data at low densities and empirical properties of nuclear matter. The critical temperature of the liquid-gas phase transition is obtained to be 15.7 MeV in symmetric nuclear matter falling on the lower edge of the small experimental error bars. In hot asymmetric matter, the boundary of the phase-coexistence region is found to be sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy. The critical pressure and the area of phase-coexistence region increases clearly with the softening of the symmetry energy. The critical temperature of hot asymmetric matter separating the gas phase from the LG coexistence phase is found to be higher for the softer symmetry energy.

Guang-Hua Zhang; Wei-Zhou Jiang

2012-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

140

A novel branch and bound algorithm for optimal development of gas fields under uncertainty in reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models for planning in the oil and gas exploration and production industry. A major challenge of the available literature that deals with planning of oil and gas field infrastruc- tures uses a deterministicA novel branch and bound algorithm for optimal development of gas fields under uncertainty

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Scanning retarding field analyzer for plasma profile measurements in the boundary of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak  

SciTech Connect

A new Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) head has been created for the outer-midplane scanning probe system on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The new probe head contains back-to-back retarding field analyzers aligned with the local magnetic field. One faces 'upstream' into the field-aligned plasma flow and the other faces 'downstream' away from the flow. The RFA was created primarily to benchmark ion temperature measurements of an ion sensitive probe; it may also be used to interrogate electrons. However, its construction is robust enough to be used to measure ion and electron temperatures up to the last-closed flux surface in C-Mod. A RFA probe of identical design has been attached to the side of a limiter to explore direct changes to the boundary plasma due to lower hybrid heating and current drive. Design of the high heat flux (>100 MW/m{sup 2}) handling probe and initial results are presented.

Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D. [MIT PSFC Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Phase-Field Simulation of Void and Fission-Gas Bubble Evolution in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Mechanical Performance for Current and Next-Generation Nuclear Reactors. Presentation Title, Phase-Field Simulation of Void and Fission-Gas ...

143

Measurement of gas temperature field in a flame spreading over solid fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An experimental measurement is developed to measure the gas temperature field in a flame spreading downward over thermally thin filter paper. A flame stabilizer apparatus… (more)

Alghamdi, Abdulaziz Othman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

3-D nonlinear force-free field reconstruction of solar active region 11158 by direct boundary integral equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 3-D coronal magnetic field is reconstructed for NOAA 11158 on Feb 14, 2011. A GPU-accelerated direct boundary integral equation (DBIE) method is implemented. This is about 1000 times faster than the original DBIE used on solar NLFFF modeling. Using the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram as the bottom boundary condition, the reconstructed magnetic field lines are compared with the projected EUV loop structures from different views three-dimensionally by SDO/AIA and STEREO A/B spacecraft simultaneously for the first time. They show very good agreement so that the topological configurations of the magnetic fields can be analyzed, thus its role in the flare process of the active region can be better understood. A quantitative comparison with some stereoscopically reconstructed coronal loops shows that the present averaged misalignment angles are at the same order as the state-of-the-art results obtained with reconstructed coronal loops as prescribed conditions and better than other NLFFF methods. It is found that the o...

Wang, Rui; Tan, Baolin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

An Application of the Immersed Boundary Method for Recovering the Three-Dimensional Wind Fields over Complex Terrain Using Multiple-Doppler Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study develops an extension of a variational-based multiple-Doppler radar synthesis method to construct the three-dimensional wind field over complex topography. The immersed boundary method (IBM) is implemented to take into account the ...

Yu-Chieng Liou; Shao-Fan Chang; Juanzhen Sun

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

About the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Florida Florida Geology Survey, Department of Environmental ...

147

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Million Barrels) U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

148

New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

149

Decision of optimal scheduling scheme for gas field pipeline network based on hybrid genetic algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model of optimal scheduling scheme for natural gas pipeline network is established, which takes minimal annual operating cost of compressor stations as objective function after comprehensively considering the resources of gas field, operating ... Keywords: differential evolution algorithm, genetic algorithm, natural gas pipeline network, optimization, scheduling scheme

Wu Liu; Min Li; Yi Liu; Yuan Xu; Xinglan Yang

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Field validation of the DNDC model for greenhouse gas emissions in East Asian cropping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field validation of the DNDC model for greenhouse gas emissions in East Asian cropping systems annual variations of greenhouse gas emissions from cropping systems and effects of land management a powerful tool for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from terrestrial ecosystems. INDEX TERMS: 1610 Global

151

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Storage Fields" Salt Cavern Storage Fields" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields",8,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm10vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/data_publications/natural_gas_monthly/ngm.html" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

152

Plume Dispersion in the Convective Boundary Layer. Part II: Analyses of CONDORS Field Experiment Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive analyses are performed on data from the CONDORS (convective diffusion observed with remote sensors) field experiment, described in detail by Ebeerhard et al. Convective scaling is used to facilitate comparisons with laboratory and ...

G. A. Briggs

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

MULTIVARIATE PRODUCTION OPTIMIZATION OF A NATURAL GAS FIELD.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Any production well is drilled and completed for the extraction of oil or gas from itsoriginal location in the reservoir to the stock tank or… (more)

Nago, Annick

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

NETL: Methane Hydrates - 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Performers ConocoPhillips Company, Houston TX and Anchorage AK ConocoPhillips Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC), Japan JOGMEC...

155

NETL: Methane Hydrates - 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluid, by flowmeters in the Low-flow Gas Measurement Skid. Compositional analysis of methane, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and tracers pumped during injection are being monitored...

156

Production of unleaded gasoline in gas condensate fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

P. Leprins, in: 0il, Gas, and Petrochemicals in Other Countries [Russian translation], ... N. I. Zelenin and I. M. Ozerov, Oil Shale Handbook [in Russian], Nedra, ...

157

Field tests of probes for detecting internal corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes for detecting corrosion in environments similar to those found in natural gas transmission pipelines. Results and interpretation will be reported from four different field tests. Flange and flush-mount probes were used in four different environments at a gas-gathering site and one environment but two different orientations at a natural gas plant. These sites were selected to represent normal and upset conditions in a gas transmission pipeline. The environments consisted of 2 different levels of humidified natural gas/organic/water mixtures removed from natural gas, and the environments at the 6 and 12 o'clock positions of a natural gas pipeline carrying 2-phase gas/liquid flow. Data are also presented comparing the ECR probe data to that for coupons used to determine corrosion rate and to detect the presence of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Cayard, Michael S. (Intercorr International Inc.); Kane, Russell D. (Intercorr International Inc.); Meidinger, Brian (RMOTC-DOE)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List, 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as ... order to uniquely identify a particular field, the field

159

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List Updates 1996  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 1 presents a flow chart of the activities necessary to process new field information. All new field information received by EIA goes through this cycle, ...

160

Integrated Reservoir Characterization and Simulation Studies in Stripper Oil and Gas Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for oil and gas is increasing yearly, whereas proven oil and gas reserves are being depleted. The potential of stripper oil and gas fields to supplement the national energy supply is large. In 2006, stripper wells accounted for 15% and 8% of US oil and gas production, respectively. With increasing energy demand and current high oil and gas prices, integrated reservoir studies, secondary and tertiary recovery methods, and infill drilling are becoming more common as operators strive to increase recovery from stripper oil and gas fields. The primary objective of this research was to support optimized production of oil and gas from stripper well fields by evaluating one stripper gas field and one stripper oil field. For the stripper gas field, I integrated geologic and engineering data to build a detailed reservoir characterization model of the Second White Specks (SSPK) reservoir in Garden Plains field, Alberta, Canada. The objectives of this model were to provide insights to controls on gas production and to validate a simulation-based method of infill drilling assessment. SSPK was subdivided into Units A ? D using well-log facies. Units A and B are the main producing units. Unit A has better reservoir quality and lateral continuity than Unit B. Gas production is related primarily to porosity-netthickness product and permeability and secondarily to structural position, minor structural features, and initial reservoir pressure. For the stripper oil field, I evaluated the Green River formation in the Wells Draw area of Monument Butte field, Utah, to determine interwell connectivity and to assess optimal recovery strategies. A 3D geostatistical model was built, and geological realizations were ranked using production history matching with streamline simulation. Interwell connectivity was demonstrated for only major sands and it increases as well spacing decreases. Overall connectivity is low for the 22 reservoir zones in the study area. A water-flood-only strategy provides more oil recovery than a primary-then-waterflood strategy over the life of the field. For new development areas, water flooding or converting producers to injectors should start within 6 months of initial production. Infill drilling may effectively produce unswept oil and double oil recovery. CO2 injection is much more efficient than N2 and CH4 injection. Water-alternating-CO2 injection is superior to continuous CO2 injection in oil recovery. The results of this study can be used to optimize production from Garden Plains and Monument Butte fields. Moreover, these results should be applicable to similar stripper gas and oil field fields. Together, the two studies demonstrate the utility of integrated reservoir studies (from geology to engineering) for improving oil and gas recovery.

Wang, Jianwei

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's Engineering group has found a new site for the project at a Duke Energy gas processing plant in Milfay, Oklahoma.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology Group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group first found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produced about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit was built to bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid was built by ABB. NTE ordered the required compressor and MTR made the membrane modules for a December 2004 delivery. However, the gas supply was not steady enough for field testing, and MTR/ABB have now located other sites for field testing and commercial development.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is now working with the company's Randall Gas Technology Group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group first found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produced about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit was built to bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid was built by ABB. NTE ordered the required compressor and MTR made the membrane modules for a December 2004 delivery. However, the gas supply was not steady enough for field testing, and MTR/ABB have now located other sites for field testing and commercial development.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Number of Existing Natural Gas Aquifers Storage Fields  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Existing fields ...

165

Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 96 108 95 1980's 99 77 208 329 327 163 398 242 163 146 1990's 437 259 110 108 79 53 66 84 42 37 2000's 42 52 18 13 9 48 12 56 85 178 2010's 1 18 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

166

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd nitrogen removal/gas treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project field test at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Characterization of Field-Exposed Iron Aluminide Hot Gas Filters  

SciTech Connect

The use of a power turbine fired with coal-derived synthesis gas will require some form of gas cleaning in order to protect turbine and downstream components from degradation by erosion, corrosion, or deposition. Hot-gas filtration is one form of cleaning that offers the ability to remove particles from the gases produced by gasification processes without having to substantially cool and, possibly, reheat them before their introduction into the turbine. This technology depends critically on materials durability and reliability, which have been the subject of study for a number of years (see, for example, Alvin 1997, Nieminen et al. 1996, Oakey et al. 1997, Quick and Weber 1995, Tortorelli, et al. 1999).

McKamey, C.G.; McCleary, D.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Sawyer, J.; Lara-Curzio, E.; Judkins, R.R.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

168

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has started to negotiate a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

169

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) continued to negotiate a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

Electromagnetic fields and transport coefficients in a hot pion gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present recent results on finite temperature electromagnetic form factors and the electrical conductivity in a pion gas. The standard Chiral Perturbation Theory power counting needs to be modified for transport coefficients. We pay special attention to unitarity and to possible applications for dilepton and photon production.

A. Gomez Nicola; D. Fernandez-Fraile

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

171

Field and numerical studies of tracer gas transport and surface gas tranfer in laterally uniform, partially stratified estuaries  

SciTech Connect

Techniques for determination of reaeration rates in natural waterbodies are reviewed. The tracer gas technique for reaeration rate determination offers many advantages over other existing methods and is widely used in rivers and streams. The tracer gas method seems to be the most promising of available techniques for estuarine reaeration rate determination. The two-dimensional late-rally averaged equations describing flow and transport in estuaries are derived and discussed. A laterally averaged numerical model of estaurine hydrodynamics and transport is modified so that tracer gas releases may be simulated. Field studies conducted as a part of the study are described. Two dye releases were made in the upper Houston Ship Channel; two dye tracer gas releases were later made in the same region. The data from these studies are presented and analyzed. Mechanical mixing by shipping traffic proved to be the predominant mixing mechanism and a hindrance to further studies at that site. An intensive field study was conducted in the Colorado River estuary. Field data included velocities, salinity profiles, water surface elevations, and dye concentration data from three dye releases. The data from this study are used to calibrate and test the numerical model of estuarine tracer gas transport.

Bales, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Field Studies of Soil Vapor Intrusion at a Vacant Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Site in Wisconsin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive two-phase field-based research program was completed at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site located in Wisconsin during the summer of 2008. The purpose of this ongoing research study is to develop improved approaches and methodologies for characterizing the potential for vapor intrusion (VI) at MGP sites. This report describes the methods, results, and limited data interpretation of Phase I (Passive Soil Gas Survey) and Phase II (Soil, Groundwater, and Soil Gas Sampling) at the vac...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

Natural gas pipelines after field price decontrol : a study of risk, return and regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a study of a regulated industry undergoing rapid change. For the first time in its history, following the partial decontrol of field prices in 1978, natural gas is being priced at a level which places it in direct ...

Carpenter, Paul R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Field Test of Manufactured Gas Plant Remediation Technologies: Material Removal and Handling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Common manufactured gas plant (MGP) site structures are often sources of contamination and present a number of unique material removal and handling challenges. This report provides results from a field-scale study involving the excavation of the contents of a subgrade gas holder tank. Specifically discussed are the material handling activities needed to prepare MGP impacted soils and debris for remediation processes.

1996-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

175

Understanding Sectoral Labor Market Dynamics: An Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examines the response of employment and wages in the US oil and gas ...eld services industry to changes the dynamic response of wages and employment in the U.S. Oil and Gas Field Services (OGFS) industry to changes in the price of crude petroleum using quarterly data from 1972 to 2002. The oil industry provides an important

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

176

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1-MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technologies group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The system has been installed in the field and initial startup activities have been completed. The system has not yet produced the flow rate required for continuous stable operation. NTE, the company hosting this test site/pilot plant, will drill additional wells to increase the inlet flow rate. The system is expected to be in full continuous operation by May 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Increasing Well Productivity in Gas Condensate Wells in Qatar's North Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Condensate blockage negatively impacts large natural gas condensate reservoirs all over the world; examples include Arun Field in Indonesia, Karachaganak Field in Kazakhstan, Cupiagua Field in Colombia,Shtokmanovskoye Field in Russian Barents Sea, and North Field in Qatar. The main focus of this thesis is to evaluate condensate blockage problems in the North Field, Qatar, and then propose solutions to increase well productivity in these gas condensate wells. The first step of the study involved gathering North Field reservoir data from previously published papers. A commercial simulator was then used to carry out numerical reservoir simulation of fluid flow in the North Field. Once an accurate model was obtained, the following three solutions to increasing productivity in the North Field are presented; namely wettability alteration, horizontal wells, and reduced Non Darcy flow. Results of this study show that wettability alteration can increase well productivity in the North Field by adding significant value to a single well. Horizontal wells can successfully increase well productivity in the North Field because they have a smaller pressure drawdown (compared to vertical wells). Horizontal wells delay condensate formation, and increase the well productivity index by reducing condensate blockage in the near wellbore region. Non Darcy flow effects were found to be negligible in multilateral wells due to a decrease in fluid velocity. Therefore, drilling multilateral wells decreases gas velocity around the wellbore, decreases Non Darcy flow effects to a negligible level, and increases well productivity in the North Field.

Miller, Nathan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Utah Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves New Field...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0 - No Data Reported; -- Not...

179

Magnetism of a relativistic degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The magnetization and magnetic susceptibility of a degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field in which electrons are located on the ground Landau level and the electron gas has the properties of a nonlinear paramagnet have been calculated. The paradoxical properties of the electron gas under these conditions-a decrease in the magnetization with the field and an increase in the magnetization with the temperature-have been revealed. It has been shown that matter under the corresponding conditions of neutron stars is a paramagnet with a magnetic susceptibility of {chi} {approx} 0.001.

Skobelev, V. V., E-mail: v.skobelev@inbox.ru [Moscow State Industrial University (Russian Federation)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Spatially-Resolved Studies of Grain-Boundary Effects in Polycrystalline Solar Cells Using Micro-Photoluminescence and Near-Field Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photoluminescence and photocurrent spectroscopies combined with diffraction-limited and sub- diffraction-limited spatial resolution are achieved via micro-photoluminescence (m-PL) and near-field microscopy (NSOM). These methods are used to examine the photo-response of individual grain boundaries in thin-film, polycrystalline solar cells at room and cryogenic temperatures. A systematic m-PL study of the effect of CdCl2-treatment on recombination in CdTe/CdS solar cell structures of varying thickness directly reveals the grain-boundary and surface passivation action of this important post-growth processing step. We achieve 50nm (l/10) spatial resolution in near-field Optical Beam Induced Current imaging (n-OBIC) of polycrystalline silicon solar cells using NSOM, at varying stages of silicon nitride grain-boundary passivation, and measure lateral variations in photo-response of CdTe/CdS solar cells with subwavelength spatial resolution.

Smith, S.; Dhere, R.; Gessert, T.; Stradins, P.; Mascarenhas, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. The target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Andre Da Costa

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

184

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPERATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. System fabrication was completed in January 2004 and the membrane inserts were loaded. Additional pressure testing and verification will be completed prior to shipment, which is expected in early February 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. System fabrication was completed in January 2004 and the membrane inserts were loaded. Additional pressure testing and verification will be completed prior to shipment, which is expected in early February 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

NETL: News Release - Field Testing Underway of Remote Sensor Gas Leak  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 16, 2004 September 16, 2004 Field Testing Underway of Remote Sensor Gas Leak Detection Systems CASPER, WY-An extensive field test that will document and demonstrate how effective technologies are in remotely detecting natural gas leaks is being held September 13-17, as the Department of Energy simulates natural gas leaks along a predetermined course at DOE's Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). Low-flying aircraft, satellites and special ground vehicles carrying advanced leak detection sensors will participate as representatives of the gas industry and potential technology manufacturers observe the technologies in a real-world environment and evaluate their readiness for commercialization. The test plan was devised with strong input from an industry advisory board and test participants to compare the effectiveness of several gas-leak detection devices from ground, air and satellite based platforms.

187

Flow and heat transfer in gas turbine disk cavities subject to nonuniform external pressure field  

SciTech Connect

Ingestion of hot gas from the main-stream gas path into turbine disk cavities, particularly the first-stage disk cavity, has become a serious concern for the next-generation industrial gas turbines features high rotor inlet temperature. Fluid temperature in the cavities increases further due to windage generated by fluid drag at the rotating and stationary surfaces. The resulting problem of rotor disk heat-up is exacerbated by the high disk rim temperature due to adverse (relatively flat) temperature profile of the mainstream gas in the annular flow passage of the turbine. This describes an investigation into local convective heat transfer coefficient and cooling effectiveness of the rotor disk, flow field in the disk cavity, computation of the flow field and heat transfer in the disk cavity, and mainstream gas injection and rotor disk cooling effectiveness by mass transfer analogy.

Roy, R.P.; Kim, Y.W.; Tong, T.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Role Of Generalized Cosmic Chaplygin Gas In Accelerating Universe : A Field Theoretical Prescription  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the role played by dark energy in the form of Generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas in an accelerating universe described by FRW cosmology. We have tried to describe the model from the theoretical point of view of a field, by introducing a scalar field $\\phi$ and a self interacting potential $V(\\phi)$. The corresponding expressions for the field are obtained for the given model. Statefinder parameters have been used to characterize the dark energy model. Plots have been generated for characterizing different phases of universe diagrammatically and a comparative study is performed with the Modified Chaplygin gas model. As an outcome of the study, Generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas is identified as a much less constrained form of dark energy as compared to modified Chaplygin gas.

Prabir Rudra

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field, Colombia. Experimental and simulation studies were conducted to achieve these objectives. The experimental study consisted of injecting reconstituted gas into a cell containing sand and "live" San Francisco oil. Experimental runs were made with injection of (i) the two field gases and their 50-50 mixture, (ii) the two field gases enriched with propane, and (iii) WAG with the two field gases enriched with propane. Produced oil volume, density, and viscosity; and produced gas volume and composition were measured and analyzed. A 1D 7-component compositional simulation model of the laboratory injection cell and its contents was developed. After a satisfactory history-match of the results of a WAG run, the prediction runs were made using the gas that gave the highest oil recovery in the experiments, (5:100 mass ratio of propane:Balcon gas). Oil production results from simulation were obtained for a range of WAG cycles and gas injection rate. The main results of the study may be summarized as follows. For all cases studied, the lowest oil recovery is obtained with injection of San Francisco gas, (60% of original oil-in-place OOIP), and the highest oil recovery (84% OOIP) is obtained with a WAG 7.5-7.5 (cycle of 7.5 minutes water injection followed by 7.5 minutes of gas injection at 872 ml/min). This approximately corresponds to WAG 20-20 in the field (20 days water injection followed by 20 days gas injection at 6.8 MMSCF/D). Results clearly indicate increase in oil recovery with volume of the gas injected. Lastly, of the three injection schemes studied, WAG injection with propane-enriched gas gives the highest oil recovery. This study is based on the one-dimensional displacement of oil. The three-dimensional aspects and other reservoir complexities that adversely affect oil recovery in reality have not been considered. A 3D reservoir simulation study is therefore recommended together with an economic evaluation of the cases before any decision can be made to implement any of the gas or WAG injection schemes.

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Effects of solute and vacancy segregation on antiphase boundary migration in stoichiometric and Al-rich Fe?Al: a phase-field simulation study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of segregation of solute atoms and vacancies on migration of antiphase boundaries (APBs) in stoichiometric (Fe-25 at%Al) and Al-rich (Fe-28 at%Al) Fe?Al at 673 K have been studied using a phase-field method in which ...

Koizumi, Yuichiro

191

Three-Dimensional Wind Field Analysis from Dual-Doppler Radar Data. Part III: The Boundary Condition: An Optimum Determination Based on a Variational Concept  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The choice of the boundary condition when integrating the air mass continuity equation, is a major problem of the 3D wind field analysis from dual (or multiple) Doppler radar data. A zero vertical velocity at ground level seems the most natural ...

M. Chong; J. Testud

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Gas Kinetic Study of Magnetic Field Effects on Plasma Plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma flow physics in magnetic nozzles must be clearly understood for optimal design of plasma propulsion devices. Toward that end, in this thesis we: i) perform an extensive literature survey of magnetic nozzle physics, ii) assess the validity of magnetohydrodynamics for studying magnetic nozzle physics, and iii) illustrate the effects of the Hall term in simple flows as well as in magnetic nozzle configurations through numerical experiments with the Magneto-Gas Kinetic Method (MGKM). The crucial steps necessary for thrust generation in magnetic nozzles are energy conversion, plasma detachment, and momentum transfer. These three physical phenomena must be understood to optimize magnetic nozzle design. The operating dimensionless parameter ranges of six prominent experiments are considered and the corresponding mechanisms are discussed. An order of magnitude analysis of the governing equations reveal: i) most magnetic nozzles under consideration operate at the edge of the continuum regime rendering continuum-based description and computation valid; ii) in the context of MHD framework, the generalized Ohm’s law must be used to capture all of the relevant physics. This work also continues the development of the Magneto Gas Kinetic Method (MGKM) computational tool. Validation of the solver is performed in shock-tube and Hartmann channel flows in the Hall physics regime. Comparison with theory and available data is made whenever possible. Novel numerical experiments of magnetic nozzle plasma jets in the Hall regime are performed, confirming the theoretically predicted azimuthal rotation of the plasma jet due to Hall physics. The primary conclusion from this work is that the addition of the Hall effect generates helical structures in magnetic nozzle plasma flows. Preliminary results are encouraging for future magnetic nozzle studies and further challenges are identified.

Ebersohn, Frans 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. MTR then located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; the units will be delivered in mid-2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we are now negotiating with Atmos Energy for a final test of the project demonstration unit. Several commercial sales have also resulted from the partnership with ABB, and sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units now total $2.3 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

195

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we continue, but have as yet been unsuccessful in our attempts, to negotiate with Atmos Energy for a final test of the original project demonstration unit. In the meantime, MTR has located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract with Towne Exploration for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA, to be run through May 2007. Several commercial sales have resulted from the partnership with ABB, and total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units are now approaching $2.6 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Flexible gas insulated transmission line having regions of reduced electric field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line having radially flexible field control means for reducing the electric field along the periphery of the inner conductor at predetermined locations wherein the support insulators are located. The radially flexible field control means of the invention includes several structural variations of the inner conductor, wherein careful controlling of the length to depth of surface depressions produces regions of reduced electric field. Several embodiments of the invention dispose a flexible connector at the predetermined location along the inner conductor where the surface depressions that control the reduced electric field are located.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fischer, William H. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Meyer, Jeffry R. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Natural Gas Liquids 650,794 652,822 697,124 757,019 808,865 881,306 1981-2012 Pentanes Plus 95,899 96,530 98,904 101,155 106,284 116,002 1981-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 554,895 556,292 598,220 655,864 702,581 765,304 1981-2012 Ethane 258,682 256,713 280,590 317,180 337,972 356,592 1981-2012 Propane 185,099 187,340 199,398 213,782 230,227 260,704 1981-2012 Normal Butane 46,833 48,976 49,528 56,655 57,399 65,555 1981-2012 Isobutane 64,281 63,263 68,704 68,247 76,983 82,453 1981-2012 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

198

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas Liquids 74,056 76,732 74,938 79,040 82,376 81,196 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 9,772 10,464 10,689 11,270 11,542 11,167 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 64,284 66,268 64,249 67,770 70,834 70,029 1981-2013 Ethane 27,647 28,274 26,311 27,829 30,063 30,015 1981-2013 Propane 23,332 24,191 24,157 25,425 25,974 25,545 1981-2013 Normal Butane 5,876 6,383 6,543 6,399 6,508 6,893 1981-2013 Isobutane 7,429 7,420 7,238 8,117 8,289 7,576 1981-2013 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

199

Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field Services Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the response of employment and wages in the US oil and gas …eld services industry to changes in the price of crude petroleum using a time series of quarterly data spanning the period 1972-2002. I …nd that labor quickly reallocates across sectors in response to price shocks but that substantial wage premia are necessary to induce such reallocation. The timing of these premia is at odds with the predictions of standard models — wage premia emerge quite slowly, peaking only as labor adjustment ends and then slowly dissipating. After considering alternative explanations, I argue that a dynamic market clearing model with sluggish movements in industry wide labor demand is capable of rationalizing these …ndings. I proceed to structurally estimate the parameters of the model by minimum distance and …nd that simulated impulse responses match key features of the estimated dynamics. I also provide auxiliary evidence corroborating the implied dynamics of some important unobserved variables. I conclude with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the model and implications for future research. I am deeply indebted to Chris House for sharing with me the art of formulating and solving dynamic

Patrick Kline; Patrick Kline

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

One Dimensional Magnetized TG Gas Properties in an External Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With Girardeau's Fermi-Bose mapping, we have constructed the eigenstates of a TG gas in an external magnetic field. When the number of bosons $N$ is commensurate with the number of potential cycles $M$, the probability of this TG gas in the ground state is bigger than the TG gas raised by Girardeau in 1960. Through the comparison of properties between this TG gas and Fermi gas, we find that the following issues are always of the same: their average value of particle's coordinate and potential energy, system's total momentum, single-particle density and the pair distribution function. But the reduced single-particle matrices and their momentum distributions between them are different.

Zhao Liang Wang; An Min Wang

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Caloric curve for nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in relativistic mean-field hadronic model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main thermodynamical properties of the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition were explored in the framework of the relativistic mean-field hadronic model in three statistical ensembles: canonical, grand canonical and isobaric. We have found that the liquid-gas phase transition, i.e., the first order phase transition which is defined by the plateau in the isotherms, cannot contain the plateau in the caloric curves in the canonical and microcanonical ensembles. The plateau in the isotherms is incompatible with the plateau in the caloric curves at fixed baryon density. Moreover, for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition the caloric curve has a plateau only at fixed pressure or chemical potential. The results of the statistical multifragmentation models for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition were reanalyzed. It was revealed that one class of statistical multifragmentation models do indeed predict the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition for the nuclear multifragmentation. However, there is another class o...

Parvan, A S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

On the delayed gas breakdown in a ringing theta-pinch with bias magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A single particle model and particle-in-cell simulations are used to elucidate the breakdown physics in a ringing theta-pinch with a bias magnetic field. Previous experimental results show that gas breakdown occurs when the bias magnetic field is nullified by the theta-pinch magnetic field. The analyses presented here agree with the experimental results and show that electron kinetic energy does not exceed the ionization threshold of deuterium until the net magnetic field is approximately zero. Despite the presence of a strong electric field, the gyromotion of electrons within the bias magnetic field prevents them from gaining energy necessary to ionize the gas. Parametric analysis of the peak electron energy as a function of the bias and pre-ionization magnetic fields reveals that: (1) when the bias magnetic field is Almost-Equal-To 97% of the pre-ionization magnetic field, peak electron energies are highly erratic resulting in poor overall ionization, and (2) full ionization with repeatable behavior requires a pre-ionization to bias magnetic field ratio of approximately 2 to 1 or higher.

Meeks, Warner C.; Rovey, Joshua L. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409-0050 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Wisconsin Arlington Research Station Fields 295 and 27 (Alfalfa)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes field research in Wisconsin as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) Agricultural Network. The objective of this study, conducted during 2009-2010, was to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of FGDG as a soil amendment to improve alfalfa production. FGDG was compared to a commercially available gypsum product (C-GYP) widely sold in the U.S. Midwest and other areas. A study was established in two fields (Field 295 in 2009/2010 and Field 27 in 2010) at ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

205

U.S. Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,173 3,860 3,188 1980's 2,539 3,731 2,687 1,574 2,536 999 1,099 1,089 1,638 1,450 1990's 2,004 848 649 899 1,894 1,666 1,451 2,681 1,074 1,568 2000's 1,983 3,578 1,332 1,222 759 942 409 796 1,170 1,372 2010's 850 947 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: New Field Discoveries of Dry Natural Gas Reserves U.S. Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries

206

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Analysis of three geopressured geothermal aquifer-natural gas fields; Duson Hollywood and Church Point, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The available well logs, production records and geological structure maps were analyzed for the Hollywood, Duson, and Church Point, Louisiana oil and gas field to determine the areal extent of the sealed geopressured blocks and to identify which aquifer sands within the blocks are connected to commercial production of hydrocarbons. The analysis showed that over the depth intervals of the geopressured zones shown on the logs essentially all of the sands of any substantial thickness had gas production from them somewhere or other in the fault block. It is therefore expected that the sands which are fully brine saturated in many of the wells are the water drive portion of the producing gas/oil somewhere else within the fault block. In this study only one deep sand was identified, in the Hollywood field, which was not connected to a producing horizon somewhere else in the field. Estimates of the reservoir parameters were made and a hypothetical production calculation showed the probable production to be less than 10,000 b/d. The required gas price to profitably produce this gas is well above the current market price.

Rogers, L.A.; Boardman, C.R.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. In early 2002, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) began to negotiate a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR and ABB Lummus have now completed negotiations and have signed a joint development, marketing and sales agreement with a focus on natural gas applications. Part of the agreement calls for the Randall Gas Technology division of ABB Lummus to provide cost share for the current project.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

Field test results of the physical solvent N-Formyl morpholine for gas treating applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is developing gas processing technology that will reduce gas processing costs for current production and allow subquality gas to be economically produced that would have been otherwise, not produced. The experimental program has primarily focused on the evaluation of N-Formyl Morpholine (NFM) as a physical solvent for the cost-effective upgrading of subquality natural gas to pipeline quality. The selection of NFM for this program was based on previous work conducted by IGT in the selective removal of hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide from coal gasifier effluents. That work showed that the use of NFM resulted in a significant cost advantage over 107 other solvents for that application. The project approach for the development of NFM process has been divided into following main categories: obtain vapor-liquid equilibrium, physical properties and additional published literature data; obtain mass-transfer coefficients using 2 inch absorber/stripper apparatus and calculate equation of state parameters and binary interaction parameters using VLE data; develop a gas processing model using Aspen Plus simulation program and evaluate economic advantages of the NFM process compared to commercial physical solvent; and design a pilot plant skid mounted field test unit and conduct field test experiments.

Palla, N.; Lee, A.L.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Exploration and Development of U.S. Oil and Gas Fields, 1955-2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the exploration and development of oil and gas fields in the United States over the period 1955-2002. We make four contributions to explaining the economic evolution of the oil and gas industry during this period. First, we derive a testable model of the dynamics of competitive oil and gas field exploration and development. Second, we show how to empirically distinguish Hotelling scarcity effects from effects due to technological change. Third, we test these hypotheses using statewide panel data of exploration and development drilling. We find that the time paths of exploration, development and total wells drilled are dominated by Hotelling scarcity effects. Our final contribution is to offer an explanation for why fixed costs from exploration can make the contracting equilibrium in the mineral rights market efficient.

John R. Boyce; Linda Nøstbakken

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

An Intelligent Portfolio Management Approach to Gas Storage Field Deliverability Maintenance and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Intelligent Portfolio Management Approach to Gas Storage Field Deliverability Maintenance. #12;Objective To modify and apply the state-of-the-art intelligent, optimum portfolio management Intelligence Tool can predict Skin with high confidence The Portfolio Management for re-stimulation candidate

Mohaghegh, Shahab

212

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

213

,"Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sms_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sms_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

214

,"Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18smi_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18smi_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

215

,"Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18swy_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18swy_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

216

,"Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18spa_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18spa_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

217

,"Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sco_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sco_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

218

,"Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sva_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sva_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

219

,"Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sal_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sal_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

220

,"North Dakota Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18snd_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18snd_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

,"Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sfl_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sfl_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

222

,"New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18snm_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18snm_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

223

,"Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sar_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sar_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

224

,"Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18smt_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18smt_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

225

,"Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sok_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sok_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

226

,"West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18swv_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18swv_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

227

,"Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sky_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sky_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

228

Gas chemistry and thermometry of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field  

SciTech Connect

Gas compositions of Cerro Prieto wells in 1977 reflected strong boiling in the reservoir around wells M-20 and M-25. This boiling zone appeared to be collapsing in 1982 when a number of wells in this area of the field were shut-in. In 1977 and 1982, gas compositions also showed boiling zones corresponding to faults H and L postulated by Halfman et al. (1982). Four gas geothermometers were applied, based on reservoir equilibria and calculated fugacities. The Fisher - Tropsch reaction predicted high temperatures and appeared to re-equilibrate slowly, whereas the H/sub 2/S reaction predicted low temperatures and appeared to re-equilibrate rapidly. Hydrogen and NH/sub 3/ reactions were intermediate. Like gas compositions, the geothermometers reflected reservoir processes, such as boiling. Surface gas compositions are related to well compositions, but contain large concentrations of N/sub 2/ originating from air dissolved in groundwater. The groundwater appears to originate in the east and flow over the production field before mixing with reservoir gases near the surface.

Nehring, N.L.; D'Amore, F.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

230

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Ichnology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, and trace fossil-permeability relationships in the Upper Cretaceous Medicine Hat Member, Medicine Hat gas field, southeast Alberta, Canada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Upper Cretaceous Medicine Hat Member (Niobrara Formation) in western Canada contains abundant reserves of biogenic natural gas. In the Medicine Hat gas field area… (more)

La Croix, Andrew David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A new generation of multilateral well enhances small gas field economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this study is to investigate the applicability of a new multilateral well architecture in the domain of small size and offshore gas fields. The new architecture completely reverses the current multilateral technology. The innovative concept suggests that laterals can be achieved like any conventional wells. They could be drilled from the surface and tied back to a common wellbore referred to as the mother well. Production would go through the toe of laterals into the mother well. The mother well could be as simple as a large diameter casing equipped with prepared connections to tie in feeder wells. This study looked past the mechanical challenge of achieving the new architecture. I demonstrated important benefits in terms of cost reduction, well completion and operations, and reservoir drainage. I looked at a typical field case, Phoenix, located in West Africa. Its actual development plan targets an ultimate recovery of 600 BCF with a total of four sub-vertical wells. I implemented a new development scenario with the innovative multilateral architecture. For comparison purposes, I achieved a reservoir simulation and a production forecast with both scenarios. The only simulation variable was the well architecture definition. As a main result, the new multilateral structure could produce as many as four vertical wells with three slim-hole laterals. I achieved a quantitative risk analysis on both development plans. I assessed the development cost of each scenario and performed a Monte Carlo simulation to account for cost uncertainties. In addition to the actual 70 MMSCFD gas contract, I simulated a progressive gas demand increase of 20 MMSCFD every five years and a 150 MMSCFD gas market. The study demonstrates the economic benefits of the new technology in the domain of offshore and small gas fields. This work also shows that this new generation of multilaterals brings new option values to the domain of multilateral technology.

Atse, Jean-Philippe

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Improving Gas Furnace Performance: A Field and Laboratory Study at End of Life  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas furnaces are rated for efficiency using the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) test standard under controlled laboratory test conditions. In the home, these furnaces are then installed under conditions that can vary significantly from the standard, require adjustment by the installing contractor to adapt to field conditions, may or may not be inspected over their useful lifetimes, and can operate with little maintenance over a 30-year period or longer. At issue is whether the installation practices, field conditions, and wear over the life of the furnace reduce the efficiency significantly from the rated efficiency. In this project, nine furnaces, with 15-24 years of field service, were removed from Iowa homes and tested in the lab under four conditions to determine the effects of installation practices, field operating conditions, and age on efficiency.

Brand, L.; Yee, S.; Baker, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modified Chaplygin Gas as Scalar Field and Holographic Dark Energy Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the correspondence between field theoretic and holographic dark energy density of the universe with the modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) respectively both in a flat and non-flat FRW universe. We present an equivalent representation of the MCG with a homogeneous minimally coupled scalar field by constructing the corresponding potential. A new scalar field potential is obtained here which is physically realistic and important for cosmological model building. In addition we also present holographic dark energy model described by the MCG. The dynamics of the corresponding holographic dark energy field is determined by reconstructing the potential in a non-flat universe. The stability of the holographic dark energy in this case in a non-flat universe is also discussed.

B. C. Paul; P. Thakur; A. Saha

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

235

Report on field experiment program lithium bromide absorption chiller: Field gas conditioning project, Grayson County, Texas. Topical report, May 1991-December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was to determine the applicability of using commercial absorption air conditioning technology in an oil and gas field environment to condition natural gas to meet contractual limitations. Operational and maintenance requirements were documented throughout the test period of 1992 through 1994.

Lane, M.J.; Kilbourn, R.A.; Huey, M.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Characterization of gas condensate reservoirs using pressure transient and production data - Santa Barbara Field, Monagas, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a field case history of the integrated analysis and interpretation developed using all of the available petrophysical, production, and well test data from the condensate zone of Block A, Santa Barbara Field (Monagas, Venezuela). The reservoir units in Santa Barbara Field present substantial structural and fluid complexity, which, in turn, presents broad challenges for assessment and optimization of well performance behavior. Approximately 60 well tests have been performed in the gas condensate sections within Santa Barbara Field, and the analysis and interpretation of this data suggests the existence of condensate banking and layered reservoir behavior, as well as "well interference" effects. We demonstrate and discuss analysis and interpretation techniques that can be utilized for wells that exhibit condensate banking, layered reservoir behavior, and well interference effects (where all of these phenomena are observed in the well performance data taken from Block A in Santa Barbara Field). We have established that the layered reservoir model (no crossflow), coupled with the model for a two-zone radial composite reservoir, is an appropriate reservoir model for the analysis and interpretation of well performance data (i.e., well test and production data) taken from wells in Santa Barbara Field. It is of particular importance to note our success in using the "well interference" approach to analyze and interpret well test data taken from several wells in Santa Barbara Field. While it is premature to make broad conclusions, it can be noted that well interference effects (interference between production wells) could be (and probably is) a major influence on the production performance of Santa Barbara Field. In addition, our well test analysis approach corroborates the use of the Correa and Ramey (variable rate) plotting function for the analysis of drillstem test (DST) data. In summary, we are able to use our integrated analysis developed for Block A (Santa Barbara Field) estimate areal distributions of "flow" properties (porosity, effective permeability, and skin factor), as well as "volumetric" properties (original gas-in-place, gas reserves, and reservoir drainage area (all on a "per-well" basis)).

Medina Tarrazzi, Trina Mercedes

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

DOI: 10.1007/s10955-005-4427-9 Effects of Field Orientation on the Driven Lattice Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steady states of the driven lattice gas (DLG) on triangular, hexagonal and square lattices with the field at several fixed orientations to the principal lattice vectors were studied by Monte Carlo simulation. In most cases a strong field suppressed change to a low-temperature ordered phase. On each lattice, one field orientation that caused nonequilibrium ordering was identified. On triangular and hexagonal lattices, dependence of energy and anisotropy on field strength was studied at those orientations. Anisotropic ordering along the field developed at intermediate temperatures under weak fields. Partial ordering along the field persisted to low temperature under strong fields.

Paul D. Siders

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

U.S. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,301 4,579 2,566 1980's 2,577 2,998 3,419 2,965 2,686 2,960 1,771 1,499 1,909 2,243 1990's 2,412 1,604 1,724 1,866 3,480 2,452 3,110 2,382 2,162 2,196 2000's 2,368 2,800 1,694 1,610 1,206 1,208 1,155 1,188 1,622 2,598 2010's 1,668 1,227 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

240

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:06 PM"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

,"Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sut_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sut_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:11:13 PM"

242

,"Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sak_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sak_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:11:07 PM"

243

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:05 PM"

244

,"Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sks_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sks_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:11:09 PM"

245

,"Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18soh_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18soh_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:11:11 PM"

246

,"Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18stx_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18stx_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:11:12 PM"

247

CFD Simulation of 3D Flow field in a Gas Centrifuge  

SciTech Connect

A CFD method was used to study the whole flow field in a gas centrifuge. In this paper, the VSM (Vector Splitting Method) of the FVM (Finite Volume Method) was used to solve the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit second-order upwind scheme was adopted. The numerical simulation was successfully performed on a parallel cluster computer and a convergence result was obtained. The simulation shows that: in the withdrawal chamber, a strong detached shock wave is formed in front of the scoop; as the radial position increases, the shock becomes stronger and the distance to scoop front surface is smaller. An oblique shock forms in the clearance between the scoop and the centrifuge wall; behind the shock-wave, the radially-inward motion of gas is induced because of the imbalance of the pressure gradient and the centrifugal force. In the separation chamber, a countercurrent is introduced. This indicates that CFD method can be used to study the complex three-dimensional flow field of gas centrifuges. (authors)

Dongjun Jiang; Shi Zeng [Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

249

Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using electric field stress shields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by use of main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. The flexing elements and the stress shields may also be utilized in connection with a plug and socket arrangement for providing electrical connection between main conductor sections. 10 figs.

Cookson, A.H.; Dale, S.J.; Bolin, P.C.

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

250

Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using electric field stress shields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by use of main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. The flexing elements and the stress shields may also be utilized in connection with a plug and socket arrangement for providing electrical connection between main conductor sections.

Cookson, Alan H. (Churchill Borough, PA); Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA); Bolin, Philip C. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

251

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Predicting Well Stimulation Results in a Gas Storage Field in the Absence of Reservoir Data, Using Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sand. The Clinton is a tight gas-bearing sandstone. Natural fracturing is thought to account storage field located in Northeastern Ohio. The formation is a tight gas sandstone known as the Clinton for production in economic quantities. Sand occurs in lenses and is largely discontinuous from one well

Mohaghegh, Shahab

253

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

254

ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those predicted by fracture models. There was no accepted optimal method for conducting hydraulic fracturing in the Bossier. Each operator used a different approach. Anadarko, the most active operator in the play, had tested at least four different kinds of fracture treatments. The ability to arrive at an optimal fracturing program was constrained by the lack of adequate fracture models to simulate the fracturing treatment, and an inability to completely understand the results obtained in previous fracturing programs. This research aimed at a combined theoretical, experimental and field-testing program to improve fracturing practices in the Bossier and other tight gas plays.

Mukul M. Sharma

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Gas field ion source current stability for trimer and single atom terminated W(111) tips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten W(111) oriented trimer-terminated tips as well as single atom tips, fabricated by a gas and field assisted etching and evaporation process, were investigated with a view to scanning ion microscopy and ion beam writing applications. In particular, ion current stability was studied for helium and neon imaging gases. Large ion current fluctuations from individual atomic sites were observed when a trimer-terminated tip was used for the creation of neon ion beam. However, neon ion current was stable when a single atom tip was employed. No such current oscillations were observed for either a trimer or a single atom tip when imaged with helium.

Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Pitters, Jason L. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada)

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

256

Characterization of the reactive flow field dynamics in a gas turbine injector using high frequency PIV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present work details the analysis of the aerodynamics of an experimental swirl stabilized burner representative of gas turbine combustors. This analysis is carried out using High Frequency PIV (HFPIV) measurements in a reactive situation. While this information is usually available at a rather low rate, temporally resolved PIV measurements are necessary to better understand highly turbulent swirled flows, which are unsteady by nature. Thanks to recent technical improvements, a PIV system working at 12 kHz has been developed to study this experimental combustor flow field. Statistical quantities of the burner are first obtained and analyzed, and the measurement quality is checked, then a temporal analysis of the velocity field is carried out, indicating that large coherent structures periodically appear in the combustion chamber. The frequency of these structures is very close to the quarter wave mode of the chamber, giving a possible explanation for combustion instability coupling.

Barbosa, Séverine; Ducruix, Sébastien

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Analysis and optimization of gas pipeline networks and surface production facilities for the Waskom Field--Harrison County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research has developed a computer simulation of the production facilities model of the Waskom Field in order to analyze existing and future production methods. The Waskom Field, located in East Texas, is a redeveloped reservoir sequence that produces primarily natural gas with minor amounts of oil and gas-condensate from the Upper and Lower Cotton Valley Sands as well as Sands in the Travis Peak sequence. The present gas production at Waskom Field averages about 12,000 Mcf/D. We have used data and the current production history to create a model of the surface production facilities, and we will simulate field performance by using a computer simulation package. In particular, all of the field facilities as well as the production history are included in these simulation Surface facilities for the Waskom field include pipelines of varying, sizes, separators, compressors, valves, and production manifolds. After creating and verifying the field model, we determined that the field possesses greater compressor capabilities than it requires. A simulation was performed where by the rental compressor in the Reuben Pierce lease was removed. The computer simulation showed that we can lower the last line pressure to 200 psig from 450 psig (which the operator was eventually able to negotiate) and the remaining compressors can sufficiently compress all of the gas currently produced in the field. Our few additional recommendations are to clean the separators, remove dual separator layouts, and remove several constricting valves that were identified from the simulation.

Pang, Jason Ui-Yong

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Improving the Field Performance of Natural Gas Furnaces, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to examine the impact that common installation practices and age-induced equipment degradation may have on the installed performance of natural gas furnaces, as measured by steady-state efficiency and AFUE. PARR identified twelve furnaces of various ages and efficiencies that were operating in residential homes in the Des Moines Iowa metropolitan area and worked with a local HVAC contractor to retrieve them and test them for steady-state efficiency and AFUE in the lab. Prior to removal, system airflow, static pressure, equipment temperature rise, and flue loss measurements were recorded for each furnace. After removal from the field the furnaces were transported to the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) laboratory, where PARR conducted steady-state efficiency and AFUE testing. The test results show that steady-state efficiency in the field was 6.4% lower than that measured for the same furnaces under standard conditions in the lab, which included tuning the furnace input and air flow rate. Comparing AFUE measured under ASHRAE standard conditions with the label value shows no reduction in efficiency for the furnaces in this study over their 15 to 24 years of operation when tuned to standard conditions. Further analysis of the data showed no significant correlation between efficiency change and the age or the rated efficiency of the furnace.

Rothgeb, S.; Brand, L.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas: Nineteenth Quarterly Progress Report (Second Quarter 2006)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation, and is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we continue, but have as yet been unsuccessful in our attempts, to negotiate with Atmos Energy for a final test of the project demonstration unit. In the meantime, MTR has located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA. Several commercial sales have resulted from the partnership with ABB, and total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units are now approaching $2.6 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Subsurface structure of the north Summit gas field, Chestnut Ridge anticline of the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Chestnut Ridge anticline is the westernmost of the High Plateau folds in southwestern Pennsylvania and north-central West Virginia that are detached primarily in the Marcellus Shale, and the Martinsburg, Salina, and Rome Formations. The primary, basal detachment at the Summit field occurs in the Salina salt. Production from fracture porosity in the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone commenced in 1936. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, 14 wells were drilled preparatory to conversion of the reservoir to gas storage. Schlumberger`s Formation MicroScanner (FMS) logs were run in each of these wells to provide information on the structural configuration and fracture patterns of the reservoir. These data indicate that two inward-facing, tight folds at the Oriskany level form the upper flanks and core of the anticline at the northern end of the field, whereas the main part of the field to the south is a comparatively simple, broad closure at the Oriskany level. The structure is a broad, slightly asymmetric open fold in the Mississippian Greenbrier Formation at the surface. Fracture patterns mapped using FMS logs indicate a complex fracture system which varies slightly along the trend of the fold and among the units analyzed, including the Helderberg Formation, Huntersville Chert, Oriskany Sandstone, and Onondaga Formation. An orthogonal joint system strikes toward the northwest and northeast slightly askew to the trend of the fold`s crestal trace. A similar, but more complex fracture pattern is found in an oriented core of these units.

Zhou, G.; Shumaker, R.C. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Staub, W.K. [Consolidated Gas Transmission Co., Clarksburg, WV (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

262

Optimizing the efficiency of cylindrical cyclone gas/liquid separators for field applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Problems associated with the use of compact cylindrical cyclone gas/liquid (CCGL) separators can be attributed to two physical phenomena: gas carry-under and liquid carryover (LCO). Inadequate understanding of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow pattern inside the cylindrical separator has inhibited complete confidence in its design and use, hence the need for more research. While many works have been done with a fixed inlet slot to predict the operational efficiency of the cyclone separator, very little is known about how separator performance can be influenced due to changes in fluid properties. During the operations of the CCGL separator the complex flow situations arising from severe foaming within the separator has not been addressed. Also the effects of emulsion formation under three phase flow conditions on the properties of cyclone separators are yet to be studied. An understanding of liquid holdup and hydrodynamic nature of flow in a compact separator under zero net liquid flow (ZNLF) and zero net gas flow (ZNGF) conditions is necessary in many field applications, especially for the prediction of LCO and in the design of the CCGL separators. Also, ZNLF holdup is an important parameter in predicting bottom-hole pressures in pumping oil wells. This research investigated the effects of fluid properties such as density, foam and emulsion formation on ZNLF, zero net gas flow ZNGF, and LCO in compact cyclone separators; this was achieved by replacing water, which is the conventional fluid used as the liquid medium in many previous research efforts with a foamy oil while maintaining air as the gas phase. Variable-inlet-slots that regulate the artificial gravity environment created by the separator were used to check for improved separator performance. Also experiments to check separator response to a range of water-cut in three-phase flow were performed. All experiments were carried out under low constant separator pressures. The ZNLF holdup is observed to decrease as the density of the fluid medium decreases. Varying the inlet slot configurations and recombination points does not have any effect on the ZNLF holdup when changes in density of the liquid phase occur. Comparisons with previous work show that there exists a wide variation in the LCO operational envelope when severe foaming occurs in the CCGL separator. At high watercut (greater than 30%), the separator LCO performance was observed to be normal. However, at water-cut below 30%, LCO was initiated much earlier; this is attributed to severe foaming in the CCGL separator.

Adebare, Adedeji

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Detecting internal corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines: field tests of probes and systems for real-time corrosion measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of automated, multi-technique electrochemical corrosion-rate monitoring devices and probes for detecting corrosion in environments similar to those found in natural gas transmission pipelines. It involved measurement of real-time corrosion signals from operating pipelines. Results and interpretation were reported from four different field test locations. Standard flush-mount and custom flange probes were used in four different environments at a gas-gathering site and one environment but two different probe orientations at a natural gas site. These sites were selected to represent normal and upset conditions common in gas transmission pipelines. The environments consisted of two different levels of humidified natural gas, liquid hydrocarbon, and water from natural gas. Probe locations included the 6 and 12 o?clock positions of a natural gas pipeline carrying 2-phase gas/liquid flow. The probe data was monitored using completely remote solar powered systems that provided real-time data transmission via wireless back to a pipeline control station. Data are also presented comparing the ECR probe data to that for coupons used to determine corrosion rate and to detect the presence of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Kane, R.D. (InterCorr International); Meidinger, B. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

“Costs and Indices for Domestic Oil and Gas Field Equipment and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Lease Equipment Costs for Gas Production in the Mid-Continent: Direct Annual Operating Costs for Gas Production in the Mid-Continent: Gas Production--the Rocky Mountains

265

SLE boundary visits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the probabilities with which chordal Schramm-Loewner Evolutions (SLE) visit small neighborhoods of boundary points. We find explicit formulas for general chordal SLE boundary visiting probability amplitudes, also known as SLE boundary zig-zags or order refined SLE multi-point Green's functions on the boundary. Remarkably, an exact answer can be found to this important SLE question for an arbitrarily large number of marked points. The main technique employed is a spin chain - Coulomb gas correspondence between tensor product representations of a quantum group and functions given by Dotsenko-Fateev type integrals. We show how to express these integral formulas in terms of regularized real integrals, and we discuss their numerical evaluation. The results are universal in the sense that apart from an overall multiplicative constant the same formula gives the amplitude for many different formulations of the SLE boundary visit problem. The formula also applies to renormalized boundary visit probabilities for interfaces in critical lattice models of statistical mechanics: we compare the results with numerical simulations of percolation, loop-erased random walk, and Fortuin-Kasteleyn random cluster models at Q=2 and Q=3, and find good agreement.

Niko Jokela; Matti Järvinen; Kalle Kytölä

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

A comparison of microseismicity induced by gel-proppant-and water-injected hydraulic fractures, Carthage Cotton Valley gas field, East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-precision location technique to improve the image resolution of a hydraulic fracture treatment in a tight gas sand, another thick (~ 450-600 m) interval of productive, tight-gas sands interbedded with mudstones (Dutton in the Carthage Cotton Valley gas field of east Texas. Gas is produced from multiple, low-permeability sands

267

,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_gp_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:17:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production" "Sourcekey","MNGFPUS1","MPPFPUS1","MLPFPUS1","METFPUS1","MPRFPUS1","MBNFPUS1","MBIFPUS1"

268

,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_gp_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:17:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production" "Sourcekey","MNGFPUS1","MPPFPUS1","MLPFPUS1","METFPUS1","MPRFPUS1","MBNFPUS1","MBIFPUS1"

269

Long Cycles in a Perturbed Mean Field Model of a Boson Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we give a precise mathematical formulation of the relation between Bose condensation and long cycles and prove its validity for the perturbed mean field model of a Bose gas. We decompose the total density $\\rho=\\rho_{{\\rm short}}+\\rho_{{\\rm long}}$ into the number density of particles belonging to cycles of finite length ($\\rho_{{\\rm short}}$) and to infinitely long cycles ($\\rho_{{\\rm long}}$) in the thermodynamic limit. For this model we prove that when there is Bose condensation, $\\rho_{{\\rm long}}$ is different from zero and identical to the condensate density. This is achieved through an application of the theory of large deviations. We discuss the possible equivalence of $\\rho_{{\\rm long}}\

Teunis C. Dorlas; Philippe A. Martin; Joseph V. Pulé

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

270

Caloric curve for nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in relativistic mean-field hadronic model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main thermodynamical properties of the first order phase transition of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic model were explored in the isobaric, the canonical and the grand canonical ensembles on the basis of the method of the thermodynamical potentials and their first derivatives. It was proved that the first order phase transition of the RMF model is the liquid-gas type one associated with the Gibbs free energy $G$. The thermodynamical potential $G$ is the piecewise smooth function and its first order partial derivatives with respect to variables of state are the piecewise continuous functions. We have found that the energy in the caloric curve is discontinuous in the isobaric and the grand canonical ensembles at fixed values of the pressure and the chemical potential, respectively, and it is continuous, i.e. it has no plateau, in the canonical and microcanonical ensembles at fixed values of baryon density, while the baryon density in the isotherms is discontinuous in the isobaric and the canonical ensembles at fixed values of the temperature. The general criterion for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble was identified.

A. S. Parvan

2011-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

Method and system for detecting polygon boundaries of structures in images as particle tracks through fields of corners and pixel gradients  

SciTech Connect

A stochastic method and system for detecting polygon structures in images, by detecting a set of best matching corners of predetermined acuteness .alpha. of a polygon model from a set of similarity scores based on GDM features of corners, and tracking polygon boundaries as particle tracks using a sequential Monte Carlo approach. The tracking involves initializing polygon boundary tracking by selecting pairs of corners from the set of best matching corners to define a first side of a corresponding polygon boundary; tracking all intermediate sides of the polygon boundaries using a particle filter, and terminating polygon boundary tracking by determining the last side of the tracked polygon boundaries to close the polygon boundaries. The particle tracks are then blended to determine polygon matches, which may be made available, such as to a user, for ranking and inspection.

Paglieroni, David W. (Pleasanton, CA); Manay, Siddharth (Livermore, CA)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provided onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dewpoint and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 11 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions was conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute partially supported the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. During the course of this project, MTR has sold thirteen commercial units related to the field test technology. Revenue generated from new business is already more than four times the research dollars invested in this process by DOE. The process is ready for broader commercialization and the expectation is to pursue the commercialization plans developed during this project, including collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provides onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 13 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

275

Field comparison of conventional HVAC systems with a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump  

SciTech Connect

Through its Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical and administrative support to federal agency programs directed at reducing energy consumption and cost in federal buildings and facilities. One such program is the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP). In this context, NTDP is a demonstration of a US energy-related technology at a federal site. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate new technologies. The partnership of these interests is secured through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The Fort Sam Houston (San Antonio, Texas) NTDP is a field evaluation of a 3-ton gas-engine-driven residential heat pump. Details of the technical approach used in the evaluation, including instrumentation and methodology, are presented. Dynamic performance maps, based on field data, are developed for the existing residential furnaces and air conditioners at Fort Sam Houston. These maps are the basis for comparisons between the candidate and current equipment. The approach offers advantages over pre/post-measure evaluations by decoupling the measured equipment performance from the effects of different envelope characteristics, occupant behavior, and weather.

Miller, J.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Preliminary Gas and Isotope Geochemistry in the Rehai Geothermal Field, P.R. China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on gas and sulphur isotopic composition, two types of steam in Rehai geothermal field are identified. One is with higher CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S concentration, the {delta}{sup 34}S of H{sub 2}S is in the range 2.49{per_thousand} to -1.04{per_thousand} (vs CDT), from which the H{sub 2}S-temperature is over than 250 C. The other is with lower CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S concentration, the {delta}{sup 34}S of H{sub 2}S is in the range -4.0{per_thousand} to -8.36{per_thousand}, from which the H{sub 2}S- and H{sub 2}-temperatures are 180 C-210 C, in good agreement with quartz temperature. The thermal water in the Rehai field is of local meteoric origin. Maximum {delta}{sup 18}O-value shift is less than 2.0{per_thousand} (vs SMOW). Mixing is widespread and could be identified on isotope and solute chemistry.

P., Zhao; Z., Liao

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Numerical modeling of gas migration into and through faulted sand reservoirs in Pabst Field (Main Pass East Block 259), northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The further exploration and development of Pabst Gas Field with faulted sand reservoirs require an understanding of the properties and roles of faults, particularly Low Throw near Vertical Faults (LTNVFs), in gas migration and accumulation at a reservoir scale. This study presents numerical modeling of gas migration and accumulation processes in Pabst Field. Based on studies of the reservoirs, structure, faults, and fluid properties of the field, reservoir scale modeling was performed to determine the gas supply style and the fault properties by means of hundreds of iterations in which the fault properties and gas supply pattern were modified to match the gas distribution obtained from modeling with the gas distribution inferred from seismic data constrained by well data and production data. This study finds that in the main three sand reservoirs of Pabst Field the overlying younger sands cut down into the underlying older sands, so that partial connections between the three sands allow gas communication among the sands. Meanwhile, three fault families break up the three sands into numerous compartments. A primary fault and large synthetic and antithetic faults act as gas migration pathways: the synthetic and antithetic faults are inlets for gas flow and the primary fault is an outlet, and LTNVFs act as barriers to gas flow. Modeling requires fault properties in the field to change while the field is formed. The porosity and permeability of the faults in Pabst Field are 10% and 0.1 md, respectively, during gas charging of the sand reservoirs. But when there is no gas charging and large gas columns are maintained, the porosity and permeability of the faults decrease to 6% and 0.001 md, respectively. Pabst Field probably has an impulse gas charge history. Fault opening and closing, gas charge and recharge, and replacement of gas by formation water may occur. A combination of stratigraphy, structure, overpressure and gas charge rate control gas migration style, gas charge history, and gas distribution in the field. The significance of the study is that this improved numerical approach for modeling gas migration into and through specifically faulted sand reservoirs fills the gap between basin modeling and production modeling.

Li, Yuqian

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; R. Hofmann; K.A. Lokhandwala

2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

280

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00AM EST Overview During July and August 2013, protests at major oil loading ports in the central-eastern region of Libya forced the complete or partial shut-in of oil fields linked to the ports. As a result of protests at ports and at some oil fields, crude oil production fell to 1.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in July and 600,000 bbl/d in August, although the production level at the end of August was far lower. At the end of August, an armed group blocked pipelines that connect the El Sharara and El Feel (Elephant) fields to the Zawiya and Mellitah export terminals, respectively, forcing the shutdown of those fields. El Sharara had been

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Improving the accuracy of flow units prediction through two committee machine models: An example from the South Pars Gas Field, Persian Gulf Basin, Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intelligent reservoir characterization is a prerequisite study for development of oil and gas fields. Hydraulic flow units are mappable portions of hydrocarbon-bearing rocks that control fluid flow, and their modeling allows an accurate understanding ... Keywords: Committee machine, Flow units, Fuzzy logic, Genetic algorithm, Iran, Neural network, Neuro-fuzzy, South Pars Gas Field

Javad Ghiasi-Freez; Ali Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi; Mansur Ziaii

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A prediction investigated: Antrim gas fields in central and southern Michigan  

SciTech Connect

An exploration rationale based on observations in the Appalachian basin has been applied to Michigan. The rationale assumes that not all shale gas is indigenous and that gas production is related to both a greater gas content and a greater fracture density than regional average. Areas [open quotes]charged with gas[close quotes] can be expected where methane has migrated from downdip Antrim or from older sources into stratigraphic traps created by shale facies change. Increased fracturing requires geologically [open quotes]new[close quotes] crustal movement. Small areas of predicted shale gas potential were identified using (1) mapped facies changes, (2) bitumen concentrations, (3) Traverse Lime structure, and (4) glacial hinge lines. Three areas, about 6 by 15 mi, in south central Michigan showed an organic matter (bitumen) equal to or greater than in Otsego County. Each area was crossed by a shale to shale facies change with less permeable shale positioned updip of expected gas movement. All three areas lie along projections of glacial hinge lines, where geologically [open quotes]new[close quotes] flexing ([approximately]13,000 YBP) is postulated to have created [open quotes]fresh[close quotes], localized breakage. The areas were superimposed on an oil and gas map and well records in and around the areas were searched for evidence of gas, water, or lost circulation. Antrim [open quotes]gas[close quotes] occurred in two areas; specifically, seven wells in or near the southern, shallowest area and in four wells in or bordering another. Although the evidence is inconclusive, the gas reported where gas was predicted is presented as support for the exploration methodology advanced.

Matthews, R.D. (R.D. Matthews, Incs., Chicago, IL (United States)); Jones, M.W. (Michigan Petroleum Geologists, Inc., Litchfield, MI (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

A Ruggedized Ultrasensitive Field Air Sampler for Differentially Determining Tritium Oxide and Gas in Ambient Air Atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The instrument described is an operational, practical, ruggedized, ultrasensitive, tritium field air sampler assembled for the simultaneous, differential sampling of the environmental air for tritium oxide and elemental tritium. The system uses hardware assembled and packaged in such manner as to facilitate use in the field as well as in the laboratory. The sampling system occupies relatively small space and is simple to operate. The detection sensitivity approaches tritium background levels and is achieved by high volume sampling, efficient removal of tritium oxide and elemental tritium ("tritium gas"), and counting the recovered fractions by liquid scintillation spectrometry.

Brown, R.; Meyer, H. E.; Robinson, B.; Sheehan, W. E.

1971-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

284

Electron random walk and collisional crossover in a gas in presence of electromagnetic waves and magnetostatic fields  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with random walk of electrons and collisional crossover in a gas evolving toward a plasma, in presence of electromagnetic (EM) waves and magnetostatic (B) fields, a fundamental subject of importance in areas requiring generation and confinement of wave assisted plasmas. In presence of EM waves and B fields, the number of collisions N suffered by an electron with neutral gas atoms while diffusing out of the volume during the walk is significantly modified when compared to the conventional field free square law diffusion; N=1.5({Lambda}/{lambda}){sup 2}, where {Lambda} is the characteristic diffusion length and {lambda} is the mean free path. There is a distinct crossover and a time scale associated with the transition from the elastic to inelastic collisions dominated regime, which can accurately predict the breakdown time ({tau}{sub c}) and the threshold electric field (E{sub BD}) for plasma initiation. The essential features of cyclotron resonance manifested as a sharp drop in {tau}{sub c}, lowering of E{sub BD} and enhanced electron energy gain is well reproduced in the constrained random walk.

Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Paul, Samit [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016, Uttar Pradesh (India); Dey, Indranuj [Kyushu University, Kasuga Kouen 6-1, Kasuga City, 816-8580 (Japan)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Migration and methanogens: A review of current landfill gas field research at ANL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas recovery research at Argonne National Laboratory is focusing on a project studying gas movement through landfill cover materials and a pilot investigation of microbial populations in landfills. Vertical gas pressure and concentration gradients between the top of refuse and the landfill cover are being examined. In particular, changes in the vertical gradients indicative of changes in magnitude and direction of pressure or diffusional flow with time are being monitored. This study emphasizes changes in vertical pressure and concentration gradients related to barometric pressure and other meteorological variables, soil moisture changes, and pumping rates at simulated recovery wells. Preliminary results suggest that changes in soil-gas pressures in the landfill cover and top of refuse closely follow changes in barometric pressure. Measurable concentration gradients exist between the top of refuse and the cover materials indicating that diffusion is a major mechanism for gas movement, particularly during dry weather when pressure gradients are negligible. A pilot investigation has begun on microbial populations in sanitary landfills. First, a series of leachate samples from various depths at the Blackwell Forest Preserve Landfill were evaluated for microbial populations, selected chemical constituents, and methane production. Diverse motile populations of fluorescing organisms were found in selected samples. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Torpy, M.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.; Moore, C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Many new ventures in the Middle East focus on old oil, gas fields  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the oil and supplies of the world and then focuses on the Middle East as the primary source of oil and gas for the world in the future. It provides data on the total world production and reserves and compares that to the Middle East production and reserves. Data is also provided on pricing and consumption from 1965 to 1995. It goes on to provide information on petroleum exports for the major users and makes predictions on future trends. Finally the paper presents aspects of investment opportunities, sources or needs for capital investments, and the politics associated with the Middle East oil and gas industry.

Takin, M. [Centre for Global Energy Studies, London (United Kingdom)

1996-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

287

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2000 - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

respondents to Form FPC 15, “Interstate Pipeline’s Annual ... conventions imposed by the data block length on DOE forms and by the field naming ...

288

Radiating Instability of a Meridional Boundary Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear stability analysis of a meridional boundary current on the beta plane is presented. The boundary current is idealized as a constant-speed meridional jet adjacent to a semi-infinite motionless far field. The far-field region can be ...

Hristina G. Hristova; Joseph Pedlosky; Michael A. Spall

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

SEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Piceance basin area have created the Mesaverde Group tight gas sand reservoirs. As shown in Figure 2 of siltstones, shales and tight sandstones with a coaly interval at the base. The main producing interval was predominantly from the fluvial point bar sand bodies, with extremely low matrix permeabilities (

290

Deducing Ground-to-Air Emissions from Observed Trace Gas Concentrations: A Field Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas emission rate Q from an artificial 36-m2 surface area source was inferred from line-average concentration CL measured by an open-path laser situated up to 100 m downwind. Using a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) model, a theoretical C...

T. K. Flesch; J. D. Wilson; L. A. Harper; B. P. Crenna; R. R. Sharpe

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Using Flue Gas Huff 'n Puff Technology and Surfactants to Increase Oil Production from the Antelope Shale Formation of the Railroad Gap Oil Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to test cyclic injection of exhaust flue gas from compressors located in the field to stimulate production from Antelope Shale zone producers. Approximately 17,000 m{sup 3} ({+-}600 MCF) of flue gas was to be injected into each of three wells over a three-week period, followed by close monitoring of production for response. Flue gas injection on one of the wells would be supplemented with a surfactant.

McWilliams, Michael

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

293

Improving the Field Performance of Natural Gas Furnaces, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Field Performance the Field Performance of Natural Gas Furnaces Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Improving Gas Furnace Performance-A Field and Lab Study at End of Life Location: Chicago, IL Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Natural Gas Furnaces Application: New and/or retrofit; Single and/or multifamily Year Tested: 2012/2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): All or specify which ones PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $250 for adjustments Projected Energy Savings: 6.4% heating savings Projected Energy Cost Savings: $100/year climate-dependent Gas furnaces can successfully operate in the field for 20 years or longer with

294

Effects of Grain Boundary Precipitation on Creep Rupture Properties ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

gas turbine disks 'JU5). For Alloy 706, a stabilizing heat treatment is proposed to improve the creep rupture life, which is performed to produced grain boundary ...

295

A Long Term Field Emissions Study of Natural Gas Fueled Refuse Haulers in New York City  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New York City Department of Sanitation has operated natural gas fueled refuse haulers in a pilot study: a major goal of this study was to compare the emissions from these natural gas vehicles with their diesel counterparts. The vehicles were tandem axle trucks with GVW (gross vehicle weight) rating of 69,897 pounds. The primary use of these was for street collection and transporting the refuse to a landfill. West Virginia University Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratories have been engaged in monitoring the tailpipe emissions from these trucks for seven-years. In the later years of testing the hydrocarbons were speciated for non-methane and methane components. Six of these vehicles employed the older technology (mechanical mixer) Cummins L-10 lean burn natural gas engines. Five trucks were equipped with electronically controlled Detroit Diesel Series 50 lean burn engines, while another five were powered by Caterpillar stoichiometric burn 3306 natural gas engines, The Ca terpillar engines employed an exhaust oxygen sensor feedback and three way catalysts. Since the refuse haulers had automatic Allison transmissions, and since they were employed in stop-and-go city service, initial emissions measurements were made using the Central Business Cycle (SAE Jl376) for buses at 42,000 pound test weight. Some additional measurements were made using an ad hoc cycle that has been designed to be more representative of the real refuse hauler use that included several compaction cycles. The Cummins powered natural gas vehicles showed oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide emission variations typically associated with variable fuel mixer performance. In the first Year of testing, the stoichiometric Caterpillar engines yielded low emission levels, but in later years two of these refuse haulers had high carbon monoxide attributed to failure of the feedback system. For example, carbon monoxide on these two vehicles rose from 1.4 g/mile and 10 g/mile in 1995 to 144.9 g/mile and 57.8 g/mile in 1996. These stoichiometric engines were also less fuel efficient than their lean burn counterparts. The Detroit Diesel Series 50 powered refuse haulers produced high levels of oxides of nitrogen. However, it was found that changing the shifting patterns of the transmission lowered the oxides of nitrogen. All three engine types showed the potential for low emissions operation and the particulate matter reduction advantage offered by natural gas was evident from the results.

Nigel N. Clark; Byron l. Rapp; Mridul Gautam; Wenguang Wang; Donald W. Lyons

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geometrical Field Representation of Solid, Fluid, and Gas as Continuum in Rational Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the points-set transformation concept about the motion transformation in continuum, the macro classical strain is expressed by the additive addition of the intrinsic stretching of material element and its intrinsic local rotation. For zero classical strain (no macro deformation observed on its configuration surface, suitable container is required for liquid and gas to make up macro invariant configuration), the results show that: (1) For solid, the local rotation angular is zero. The material element has no intrinsic stretching. (2) For liquid, the local rotation will not change the basic gauge tensor. The material element has intrinsic plane stretching on the rotation plane. (3) For gas state, the intrinsic local rotation will amplify the basic gauge tensor. The material element has intrinsic stretching along the rotation direction. Hence, under the condition of no macro classical strain be observed, the material element has three different physical states: solid (no intrinsic stretching), fluid (plane intrinsic stretching), and gas (directional intrinsic stretching). Furthermore, for the three states, the free conditions are defined by zero intrinsic stretching. Referring to this free condition, the constitutive equations for the materials at multiple states are established.

Jianhua Xiao

2009-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 1, Cooling season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer, Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

Miller, J.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normally in tight gas sands, water production is not a problem but in such low permeability reservoirs it is difficult to produce gas at commercial flow rates. Since water is more viscous than gas, very little water is normally produced in low permeability reservoirs. The production of large volumes of water from tight gas sands, say 50-100 bbls of water per MMcf of gas constitutes a cause for concern. High water production (>200 bbls of water per MMcf of gas) has been observed in the low permeability Cotton Valley sands in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields of North Louisiana. This research evaluates water production in the above tight gas sands using field data provided by Matador Resource, a member of the Crisman Institute in Texas A&M university. The research is aimed at providing realistic reservoir scenarios of excess water production in tight gas sands. Log analysis, property trends and well production profiles have been used in establishing the different scenarios. The reservoir simulation results and the production trends show a possible water source from faults and fractures connecting the Travis Peak/Smackover sands to the Cotton Valley sands. An improved understanding of the reservoir would help in further field development.

Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD IMPLEMENTATION OF AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR HEADSPACE GAS SAMPLING OF TRANSURANIC WASTE DRUMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast, safe, and cost-effective method for obtaining headspace gas samples has been developed and implemented at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A sample port is installed directly into a drum lid using a pneumatic driver, allowing sampling with a side-port needle. Testing has shown that the sample port can be installed with no release of radioactive material. Use of this system at LANL has significantly reduced the time required for sampling, and eliminates the need for many safety precautions previously used. The system has significantly improved productivity and lowered radiation exposure and cost.

Polley, M.; Ankrom, J.; Wickland, T.; Warren, J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

300

Carbon Dioxide Storage: Geological Security and Environmental Issues – Case Study on the Sleipner Gas Field in Norway Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one option for mitigatining atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide and thereby contributes in actions for stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Carbon dioxide storage in geological formations has been in practice since early 1970s. Information and experience gained from the injection and/or storage of CO2 from a large number of existing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects indicate that it is feasible to safely store CO2 in geological formations as a CO2 mitigation option. Industrial analogues, including underground natural gas storage projects around the world and acid gas injection projects, provide additional indications that CO2 can be safely injected and stored at well-characterized and properly managed sites. Geological storage of CO 2 is in practice today beneath the North Sea, where nearly 1 MtCO2 has been successfully injected annually in the Utsira formation at the Sleipner Gas Field since 1996. The site is well characterized and the CO 2 injection process was monitored using seismic methods and this provided insights into the geometrical distribution of the injected CO 2. The injected CO2 will potentially be trapped geochemically pressure build up as a result of CO2 injection is unlikely to occur. Solubility and density dependence of CO2-water composition will become the controlling fluid parameters at Sleipner. The solubility trapping has the effect of eliminating the buoyant forces that drive CO2 upwards, and through time it can lead to mineral trapping, which is the most permanent and secure form of geological storage. Overall, the study at the Sleipner area demonstrates the geological security of carbon dioxide storage. The monitoring tools strengthen the verification of safe injection of CO2 in the Utsira formation. This proves that CO2 capture and storage is technically feasible and can be an effective method for greenhouse mitigation provided the site is well characterized and monitored properly. 1

Semere Solomon; The Bellona Foundation

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Field strength correlators in the instanton gas: The importance of the two-instanton contribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The field strength correlators at zero temperature are semi-classically evaluated fitting the random instanton liquid model to lattice data for quenched SU(3) lattice gauge theory. We restrict ourselves to the lowest order in an instanton density expansion necessary to explain the difference between transverse and longitudinal correlation functions. In the instanton-instanton and instanton-antiinstanton contributions the Schwinger line factors neglected in a previous analysis are numerically taken into account in a weighted Monte Carlo evaluation. This leads to different estimates for instanton size and density. A reasonable description of the correlators within the intermediate range from 0.4 fm to 1 fm is obtained.

E. -M. Ilgenfritz; B. V. Martemyanov; M. Muller-Preussker

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

302

Creation and recovery of a W(111) single atom gas field ion source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten single atom tips have been prepared from a single crystal W(111) oriented wire using the chemical assisted field evaporation and etching method. Etching to a single atom tip occurs through a symmetric structure and leads to a predictable last atom unlike etching with polycrystalline tips. The single atom tip formation procedure is shown in an atom by atom removal process. Rebuilds of single atom tips occur on the same crystalline axis as the original tip such that ion emission emanates along a fixed direction for all tip rebuilds. This preparation method could be utilized and developed to prepare single atom tips for ion source development.

Pitters, Jason L. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Urban, Radovan [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Wolkow, Robert A. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada)

2012-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

Gas-fired desiccant dehumidification system field evaluation in a quick-service restaurant. Final report, October 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a field evaluation of state-of-art desiccant dehumidification equipment in Houston, TX. The evaluation demonstrated that comfort control in a quick-service restaurant could be improved dramatically. However, available gas-fired desiccant dehumidification equipment is too expensive, inefficient, and unreliable to be considered for wide application in the restaurant industry. Results of a technical and economic analysis of four HVAC options in four U.S. cities indicated that improved comfort control could be achieved with only a modest increase in operating costs with an advanced system. This, coupled with the economic benefits achieved through lower indoor humidity such as improved crew performance and reduced maintenance costs, could justify the introduction of an advanced, integrated, HVAC system using desiccant technology which has an installed cost similar to current equipment.

Koopman, R.N.; Marciniak, T.J.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

Peggy Robinson

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sources of methane in China: A program to estimate emissions from rice paddy fields, bio-gas pits, and urban areas: Annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are measuring methane from rice paddy fields and bio-gas pits. The project has produced new results that we are using to sharply focus the present study. We measured ambient concentrations at Minqin, Beijing, and Chendu. We obtained flux measurements from bio-gas pits, and flux measurements from rice paddy fields. Minqin is a background site with no large local sources of methane such as rice fields or urban areas. It serves as control for the experiment. Beijing is representative of a large industrialized Chinese city not affected by rice agriculture but heavily dependent on burning coal for cooking and heating. Chendu is in the heart of the rice producing areas of China where rice paddies cover millions of acres and methane from bio-gas pits is an important source of energy. Further progress was impeded by a lack of a formal agreement between the US and PRC, which was not signed until August 1987. 9 figs.

Rasmussen, R.A.; Khalil, M.A.K.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

FLARING SOLAR HALE SECTOR BOUNDARIES  

SciTech Connect

The sector structure that organizes the magnetic field of the solar wind into large-scale domains has a clear pattern in the photospheric magnetic field as well. The rotation rate, 27-28.5 days, implies an effectively rigid rotation originating deeper in the solar interior than the sunspots. The photospheric magnetic field is known to be concentrated near that portion (the Hale boundary) in each solar hemisphere, where the change in magnetic sector polarity matches that between the leading and following sunspot polarities in active regions in the respective hemispheres. We report here that flares and microflares also concentrate at the Hale boundaries, implying that flux emergence and the creation of free magnetic energy in the corona also have a direct cause in the deep interior.

Svalgaard, L. [HEPL, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94304 (United States); Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S., E-mail: leif@leif.org [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Adiabatic Eastern Boundary Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of the eastern boundary current of a high-resolution, idealized model of oceanic circulation are analyzed and interpreted in terms of residual mean theory. In this framework, it is clear that the eastern boundary current is adiabatic ...

Paola Cessi; Christopher L. Wolfe

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

310

Deducing Ground-to-Air Emissions from Observed Trace Gas Concentrations: A Field Trial with Wind Disturbance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inverse-dispersion techniques allow inference of a gas emission rate Q from measured air concentration. In “ideal surface layer problems,” where Monin–Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) describes the winds transporting the gas, the application of ...

T. K. Flesch; J. D. Wilson; L. A. Harper

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal creep flow (TCF) is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary. Here, TCF is demonstrated experimentally in a dusty plasma. Stripes on a glass box are heated by laser beam absorption, leading to both TCF and a thermophoretic force. The design of the experiment allows isolating the effect of TCF. A stirring motion of the dust particle suspension is observed. By eliminating all other explanations for this motion, we conclude that TCF at the boundary couples by drag to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result provides an experimental verification, for the field of fluid mechanics, that TCF in the slip-flow regime causes steady-state gas flow in a confined volume.

Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Mobility of Interfaces and Grain Boundaries from Molecular ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, The Mobility of Interfaces and Grain Boundaries from Molecular ... A Hybrid Phase-Field / Transmission Electron Microscopy Approach for ...

313

South Dakota-Minnesota Boundary Waters Commission (South Dakota...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings South Dakota-Minnesota Boundary Waters Commission (South Dakota) South Dakota-Minnesota...

314

Beyond Boundary Objects: Collaborative Reuse in Aircraft Technical Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boundary objects are a critical, but understudied, theoretical construct in CSCW. Through a field study of aircraft technical support, we examined the role of boundary objects in the practical achievement of safety by service engineers. Their resolution ... Keywords: boundary objects, collaborative work, high reliability organizations, hotlines, information reuse, organizational memory, safety, service engineering, technical support

Wayne G. Lutters; Mark S. Ackerman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

316

Supergravity at the boundary of AdS supergravity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We give a general analysis of AdS boundary conditions for spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger fields and investigate boundary conditions preserving supersymmetry for a graviton multiplet in AdS{sub 4}. Linear Rarita-Schwinger fields in AdS{sub d} are shown to admit mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary conditions when their mass is in the range 0{dictionary, Neumann boundary conditions in d=4 supergravity correspond to gauging the superconformal group of the three-dimensional CFT describing M2-branes, while N=1 supersymmetric mixed boundary conditions couple the CFT to N=1 superconformal topologically massive gravity.

Amsel, Aaron J.; Compere, Geoffrey [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Development of A Low Angle Grain Boundary Resistant Single ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

single crystal buckets or vanes of industrial gas turbines. First, the effects of ... In the field of industrial gas turbines (IGT), application of SC components is ...

318

Non-equilibrium Lorentz gas on a curved space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The periodic Lorentz gas with external field and iso-kinetic thermostat is equivalent, by conformal transformation, to a billiard with expanding phase-space and slightly distorted scatterers, for which the trajectories are straight lines. A further time rescaling allows to keep the speed constant in that new geometry. In the hyperbolic regime, the stationary state of this billiard is characterized by a phase-space contraction rate, equal to that of the iso-kinetic Lorentz gas. In contrast to the iso-kinetic Lorentz gas where phase-space contraction occurs in the bulk, the phase-space contraction rate here takes place at the periodic boundaries.

Felipe Barra; Thomas Gilbert

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

319

Diagenesis and cement fabric of gas reservoirs in the Oligocene Vicksburg Formation, McAllen Ranch Field, Hidalgo County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

McAllen Ranch field produces natural gas from 12 deep, overpressured sandstone packages, each interpreted to be the deposit of a prograding shelf-edge delta. One hundred and sixty thin sections from 350 ft of core were petrographically described. The sandstones are feldspathic litharenites containing subequal proportions of volcanic rock fragments (VRF), feldspar, and quartz grains. Grain size ranges from very fine to coarse sand. Porosity is mostly secondary, having formed through dissolution of VRF and feldspar grains. There are four major diagenetic facies (portions of core that can be grouped by the predominance of one diagenetic cement and similar appearance in hand specimen): (1) calcite cemented; (2) chlorite cemented, tight; (3) chlorite cemented, porous; and (4) quartz overgrowths, porous. The calcite-cemented facies predominates in very fine grained sandstones and siltstones and encroaches into adjoining sandstones irrespective of grain size. Sparry calcite filled all available pores and replaced some feldspar. Core permeabilities are generally less than 0.01 md, and porosities range from 7 to 15%. Authigenic clay (predominantly chlorite) generally cements sands intermediate in grain size between those cemented by calcite and those cemented by quartz. Two types of diagenetic clay fabric are interbedded, forming distinct alternating bands 0.1 in. to 3 ft thick. Gray, tightly chlorite-cemented bands are macroscopically and microscopically distinct from green, porous chlorite-cemented bands. In the tightly chlorite-cemented facies, permeabilities are less than 0.3 md, and porosities range from 8 to 16%. Small plates of chlorite fill interparticle pores, and secondary pores are rare. In the porous chlorite-cemented facies, dissolution of framework grains and chlorite cement increased porosity, and a second chlorite cement was precipitated. Core permeability ranges from 0.1 to 1 md, and porosities range from 15 to 20%.

Langford, R.P.; Lynch, F.L. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Evaluation of hydrogen and ammonia gas mixtures with the suspended- gate field-effect transistor sensor array  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generation of hydrogen represents a severe industrial hazard primarily because the mixture of hydrogen with air in the ratio 4.0--74.2 vol % is explosive. In some industrial applications, such as waste remediation, hydrogen, as a product of radiolysis and corrosion, occurs in the presence of ammonia, nitrous oxide, water vapor and other molecules. A low cost, reliable method for monitoring these gaseous mixtures is essential. Palladium-based layers have been used successfully as hydrogen sensitive layers in several potentiometric sensors for many years. Since the sensing mechanism is based on the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen molecules, other hydrogen-bearing gases can also produce a response. From this viewpoint, using an array of sensing elements with catalytic and noncatalytic chemically selective layers in these applications can be highly effective. Moreover, integration of this array on a single chip can be routinely achieved. The Suspended Gate Field-Effect Transistor (SGFET) is microfabricated in silicon. The metal gate of the transistor is separated from the substrate by an air gap. The chemically sensitive layer is electrodeposited on the bottom of the suspended gate. Chemical species can penetrate into the gate area and interact with the sensing layer. This interaction modulates the work function of the layer. The change in the work function results in the shift of the transistor threshold voltage. The measured threshold voltage shift is a function of the gas concentration in the sensor vicinity. By passing a small current through the suspended gate, it is possible to control the operating temperature of the sensing layer (up to 200{degrees}C) and, therefore, to modulate the sensor sensitivity, selectivity, response and recovery times. Due to the very low thermal mass, the heat is localized on the gate so that many devices can be operated on a single chip, each with the gate at different temperature.

Domansky, K.; Li, H.S.; Josowicz, M.; Janata, J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Membranes with a boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the recently developed theory of multiple membranes. In particular, we consider open membranes, i.e. the theory defined on a membrane world volume with a boundary. We first restrict our attention to the gauge sector of the theory. We obtain a boundary action from the Chern-Simons terms. Secondly, we consider the addition of certain boundary terms to various Chern-Simons theories coupled to matter. These terms ensure the full bulk plus boundary action has the correct amount of supersymmetry. For the ABJM model, this construction motivates the inclusion of a boundary quartic scalar potential. The boundary dynamics obtained from our modified theory produce Basu-Harvey type equations describing membranes ending on a fivebrane. The ultimate goal of this work is to throw light on the theory of fivebranes using the theory of open membranes.

David S Berman; Daniel C Thompson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Boundary conditions for metric fluctuations in Lifshitz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the quantisation of linearised fluctuations of the metric and matter fields about a Lifshitz background, exploring the possibility of alternative boundary conditions, allowing the slow fall-off modes to fluctuate. We find that for $z >2$, slow fall-off modes for some of the linearised fluctuations are normalizable, which opens up the possibility of considering alternative boundary conditions. Analysing stability, we find that alternative boundary conditions for the momentum density are allowed, but alternative boundary conditions for the energy density lead to an instability of the type we recently discovered in a similar analysis for scalar fields on a fixed Lifshitz background. Our investigation is in the context of the simple massive vector model, but we would expect the conclusions to be more general.

Andrade, Tomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Grain Boundaries and Interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Applying this algorithm to symmetric tilt grain boundaries offers direct links ... recognized role as an influential component of microstructure.

324

Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols  

SciTech Connect

Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

325

A new Jeans resolution criterion for (M)HD simulations of self-gravitating gas: Application to magnetic field amplification by gravity-driven turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic structure formation is characterized by the complex interplay between gravity, turbulence, and magnetic fields. The processes by which gravitational energy is converted into turbulent and magnetic energies, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we show with high-resolution, adaptive-mesh simulations that MHD turbulence is efficiently driven by extracting energy from the gravitational potential during the collapse of a dense gas cloud. Compressible motions generated during the contraction are converted into solenoidal, turbulent motions, leading to a natural energy ratio of E_sol/E_tot of approximately 2/3. We find that the energy injection scale of gravity-driven turbulence is close to the local Jeans scale. If small seeds of the magnetic field are present, they are amplified exponentially fast via the small-scale dynamo process. The magnetic field grows most efficiently on the smallest scales, for which the stretching, twisting, and folding of field lines, and the turbulent vortices are sufficientl...

Federrath, Christoph; Schleicher, Dominik R G; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A Pilot Scale Evaluation of Surfactant-Enhanced In Situ Chemical Oxidation (S-ISCO) Technology: A Field Application at a Former Manu factured Gas Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites commonly contain areas where coal tar has been released, potentially existing in several phases including non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in portions of the subsurface site soils. This report describes a field-based pilot scale study of an in situ oxidation technology called Surfactant-Enhanced In Situ Chemical Oxidation (S-ISCO), which was developed by VeruTEK Technologies, Inc.BackgroundCoal tar can remain as ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

Shape from the Light Field Boundary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ray-based representations of shape have received little attention in computer vision. In this paper we show that the problem of recovering shape from silhouettes becomes considerably simplified if it is formulated as a reconstruction problem in the space ... Keywords: ray-based representations, 3D surface reconstruction, shape from silhouettes, shape from occluding contour

Kiriakos N. Kutulakos

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Nuclear symmetry energy effects on liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated within relativistic mean-field model using the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy constrained from the measured neutron skin thickness of finite nuclei. We find symmetry energy has a significant influence on several features of liquid-gas phase transition. The boundary and area of the liquid-gas coexistence region, the maximal isospin asymmetry and the critical values of pressure and isospin asymmetry all of which systematically increase with increasing softness in the density dependence of symmetry energy. The critical temperature below which the liquid-gas mixed phase exists is found higher for a softer symmetry energy.

Bharat K. Sharma; Subrata Pal

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Methodology for the Assessment of Unconventional (Continuous) Resources with an Application to the Greater Natural Buttes Gas Field, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Greater Natural Buttes tight natural gas field is an unconventional (continuous) accumulation in the Uinta Basin, Utah, that began production in the early 1950s from the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group. Three years later, production was extended to the Eocene Wasatch Formation. With the exclusion of 1100 non-productive ('dry') wells, we estimate that the final recovery from the 2500 producing wells existing in 2007 will be about 1.7 trillion standard cubic feet (TSCF) (48.2 billion cubic meters (BCM)). The use of estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) per well is common in assessments of unconventional resources, and it is one of the main sources of information to forecast undiscovered resources. Each calculated recovery value has an associated drainage area that generally varies from well to well and that can be mathematically subdivided into elemental subareas of constant size and shape called cells. Recovery per 5-acre cells at Greater Natural Buttes shows spatial correlation; hence, statistical approaches that ignore this correlation when inferring EUR values for untested cells do not take full advantage of all the information contained in the data. More critically, resulting models do not match the style of spatial EUR fluctuations observed in nature. This study takes a new approach by applying spatial statistics to model geographical variation of cell EUR taking into account spatial correlation and the influence of fractures. We applied sequential indicator simulation to model non-productive cells, while spatial mapping of cell EUR was obtained by applying sequential Gaussian simulation to provide multiple versions of reality (realizations) having equal chances of being the correct model. For each realization, summation of EUR in cells not drained by the existing wells allowed preparation of a stochastic prediction of undiscovered resources, which range between 2.6 and 3.4 TSCF (73.6 and 96.3 BCM) with a mean of 2.9 TSCF (82.1 BCM) for Greater Natural Buttes. A second approach illustrates the application of multiple-point simulation to assess a hypothetical frontier area for which there is no production information but which is regarded as being similar to Greater Natural Buttes.

Olea, Ricardo A., E-mail: olea@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey (United States); Cook, Troy A. [Denver Federal Center (United States); Coleman, James L. [U.S. Geological Survey (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Realization of the D'B' boundary condition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we find a realization for the D'B'-boundary conditions, which imposes vanishing normal derivatives of the normal components of the D and B fields. The implementation of the DB boundary, requiring vanishing normal components of D and B, is known. It is shown that the realization of the D'B' boundary can be based on a layer of suitable metamaterial, called the wave-guiding quarter-wave transformer, which transforms the DB boundary to the D'B' boundary. In an appendix, the mixed-impedance boundary, which is a generalization of both DB and D'B' boundaries, is shown to transform to another mixed-impedance boundary through the same transformer.

I. V. Lindell; A. Sihvola; L. bergamin; A. Favaro

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

331

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A STUDY OF GAS-SOLID SUSPENSIONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES AND EFFECT OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS. Technical Report IIL-7-P  

SciTech Connect

The equilibrium between thermionic emission from solid particles and space charges of the phases in a gas-solid suspension (thermal electrification) was previously studied. Some further considerations are examined. Investigation of the effects of the properties of the solid phase on thermal electrification indicates that solid particies in a gassolid system could be much hotter than the gas phase since thermal electrification depends mainly on solid particle temperature. Control of thermal electrification by the initial charge of solid particles, particularly removal of electrons by positively charged particles, is considered. The rate of solid particle dispersion is found to be the main factor in deionization of hot gases by charged solid particles. Investigation of the electrical conductivity of a mixture of electrons, charged solid particles, and the gas atoms of the suspending gas reveals that thermal electrification is not the only contributor to high electrical conductivity. Use of a gas-solid system for magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion is also examined. Solid particles of controlled size contribute favorably to MHD generation, but in plasma MHD accelerators would reduce performance. (D.C.W.)

Soo, S.L.

1962-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

ARM - Measurement - Planetary boundary layer height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Planetary boundary layer height Top of the planetary boundary layer; also known as depth or height of the mixing layer. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments

334

Design and Testing of a Landfill Gas Cleanup System for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Plants: Volume 1: Field Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an effort to develop a low-cost cleanup system that would enable landfill gas to be used in carbonate fuel cells or other power generation devices. The EPRI-developed system is now available for license to commercial applications.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

335

Shale Gas Glossary | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Glossary Shale Gas Glossary Shale Gas Glossary Energy.gov Careers & Internships...

336

Shale gas - what happened? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale gas - what happened? Shale gas - what happened? It seems like shale gas came out of...

337

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

338

AC/AB Stacking Boundaries in Bilayer Graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boundaries, including phase boundaries, grain boundaries, and domain boundaries, are known to have an important influence on material properties. Here, dark-field (DF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging are combined to provide a full view of boundaries between AB and AC stacking domains in bilayer graphene across length scales from discrete atoms to the macroscopic continuum. Combining the images with results obtained by density functional theory (DFT) and classical molecular dynamics calculations, we demonstrate that the AB/AC stacking boundaries in bilayer graphene are nanometer-wide strained channels, mostly in the form of ripples, producing smooth low-energy transitions between the two different stackings. Our results provide a new understanding of the novel stacking boundaries in bilayer graphene, which may be applied to other layered two-dimensional materials as well.

Lin, Junhao [ORNL; Fang, Wenjing [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Zhou, Wu [ORNL; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C [ORNL; Kong, Jing [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Pantelides, Sokrates T [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Spectral Scaling in a Tidal Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simple scaling of a tidal bottom boundary layer by the shear velocity, u*, and the wall to the wall describes well the mean Bow field. To test the full extent of this scaling measurements were made of the turbulence spectra in a natural tidal ...

Thomas F. Gross; Arthur R. M. Nowell

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Observed Boundary Layer Wind Structure and Balance in the Hurricane Core. Part I: Hurricane Georges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GPS dropsonde allows observations at unprecedentedly high horizontal and vertical resolution, and of very high accuracy, within the tropical cyclone boundary layer. These data are used to document the boundary layer wind field of the core of ...

Jeffrey D. Kepert

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modeling the Effects of the Spatially Varying Sea Surface Temperature on the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional marine planetary boundary layer model is developed and applied to simulate the evolution of coupled dynamic, thermodynamic and cloud properties of the marine boundary layer over a zonally varying sea surface temperature field. ...

Mickey Man-Kui Wai

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Accounting for Adsorbed gas and its effect on production bahavior of Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas reservoirs have become a major source of energy in recent years. Developments in hydraulic fracturing technology have made these reservoirs more accessible and productive. Apart from other dissimilarities from conventional gas reservoirs, one major difference is that a considerable amount of gas produced from these reservoirs comes from desorption. Ignoring a major component of production, such as desorption, could result in significant errors in analysis of these wells. Therefore it is important to understand the adsorption phenomenon and to include its effect in order to avoid erroneous analysis. The objective of this work was to imbed the adsorbed gas in the techniques used previously for the analysis of tight gas reservoirs. Most of the desorption from shale gas reservoirs takes place in later time when there is considerable depletion of free gas and the well is undergoing boundary dominated flow (BDF). For that matter BDF methods, to estimate original gas in place (OGIP), that are presented in previous literature are reviewed to include adsorbed gas in them. More over end of the transient time data can also be used to estimate OGIP. Kings modified z* and Bumb and McKee’s adsorption compressibility factor for adsorbed gas are used in this work to include adsorption in the BDF and end of transient time methods. Employing a mass balance, including adsorbed gas, and the productivity index equation for BDF, a procedure is presented to analyze the decline trend when adsorbed gas is included. This procedure was programmed in EXCEL VBA named as shale gas PSS with adsorption (SGPA). SGPA is used for field data analysis to show the contribution of adsorbed gas during the life of the well and to apply the BDF methods to estimate OGIP with and without adsorbed gas. The estimated OGIP’s were than used to forecast future performance of wells with and without adsorption. OGIP estimation methods when applied on field data from selected wells showed that inclusion of adsorbed gas resulted in approximately 30 percent increase in OGIP estimates and 17 percent decrease in recovery factor (RF) estimates. This work also demonstrates that including adsorbed gas results in approximately 5percent less stimulated reservoir volume estimate.

Mengal, Salman Akram

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma  

SciTech Connect

Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Development of a screened cathode gas flow proportional counter for in situ field determination of alpha contamination in soil  

SciTech Connect

This study resulted in the design, construction and testing of a gas flow proportional counter for in-situ determination of soil contamination. The uniqueness of this detector is the screened material used for the cathode. A Pu-239 source of 0.006 {micro}Ci was mounted to the outside of the cathode to simulate radioactive soil. The detector probe was placed into a laboratory mock-up and tested to determine operating voltage, efficiency and energy resolution. Two gas flow proportional counters were built and tested. The detectors are cylindrical, each with a radius of 1.905 cm, having an anode wire with a radius of 0.0038 cm. The length of the smaller detector`s anode was 2.54 cm, and the length of the larger detector`s anode was 7.64 cm. Therefore, the active volumes were 28.96 cm{sup 3} and 87.10 cm{sup 3}, respectively, for the small and large detector. An operating voltage of 1,975 volts was determined to be sufficient for both detectors. The average efficiency was 2.59 {+-} 0.12% and 76.71 {+-} 10.81% for the small volume and large volume detectors, respectively. The average energy resolution for the low-energy peak of the small detector was 4.24 {+-} 1.28% and for the large-energy peak was 1.37 {+-} 0.66%. The large detectors` energy resolution was 17.75 {+-} 3.74%. The smaller detector, with better energy resolution, exhibited a bi-modal spectrum, whereas the larger detector`s spectrum centered around a single broad peak.

Bush, S.P.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Observed Diurnal Cycle Climatology of Planetary Boundary Layer Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observational climatology of the planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) diurnal cycle, specific to surface characteristics, is derived from 58 286 fine-resolution soundings collected in 14 major field campaigns around the world. An objective ...

Shuyan Liu; Xin-Zhong Liang

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Daytime Evolution of Relative Humidity at the Boundary Layer Top  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the Hydrological and Atmospheric Pilot Experiment-Modélisation du Bilan Hydrigue (HAPEX-MOBILHY) field program and results from a one-dimensional model of the soil and atmospheric boundary layer are analyzed to study the daytime ...

M. Ek; L. Mahrt

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Surface Boundary Conditions for Mesoscale Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper utilizes the best available quality data from multiple sources to develop consistent surface boundary conditions (SBCs) for mesoscale regional climate model (RCM) applications. The primary SBCs include 1) fields of soil characteristic (...

Xin-Zhong Liang; Hyun I. Choi; Kenneth E. Kunkel; Yongjiu Dai; Everette Joseph; Julian X. L. Wang; Praveen Kumar

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Boundary Layer Characteristics over Areas of Inhomogeneous Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from a June 1992 field program to study the response of the boundary layer over a site with well-defined extreme differences in sensible and latent heat fluxes over clearly separated areas, each with characteristic ...

J. C. Doran; W. J. Shaw; J. M. Hubbe

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Observations in the Azores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility at Graciosa Island, Azores, in the context of the Clouds, Aerosol and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) field campaign added the most ...

Jasmine Rémillard; Pavlos Kollias; Edward Luke; Robert Wood

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development of an assessment methodology for geopressured zones of the upper Gulf Coast based on a study of abnormally pressured gas fields in south Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed study of the producing gas fields in south Texas has identified a total of 47 abnormally pressured fields in a six-county area including Hidalgo, Brooks, Cameron, Willacy, Kenedy, and Live Oak Counties. An assessment methodology for assessing the potential of the deep geopressured zone in south Texas as an energy resource was developed, based on investigation of the reservoir parameters of these fields. This methodology is transferrable to broad areas of the Gulf Coast. The depth of the geopressured zone in the study area ranges from 7000 ft in western Hidalgo to 12,000 ft in central Cameron County. Temperature data from within the fields, corrected to undisturbed reservoir values, yields a 300/sup 0/F isogeothermal surface at depths from 10,500 ft to 17,000 ft over the study area. The question of fluid deliverability was found to be paramount in determining the potential of the geopressure-geothermal resource as a practical source of energy. The critical parameter is the effective reservoir permeability throughout the study region. Individual fields were assessed for their potential to produce large quantities of geothermal fluid based on reservoir study and detailed geological investigation. Five locations within the study region have been selected as potential candidates for further evaluation and possible eventual testing. Based on investigation of permeability and temperature, the upper limit of fluid temperature likely to be produced in the lower south Texas study region is 300/sup 0/F. In Live Oak County, the possibility of producing fluid at higher temperatures is somewhat improved, with a reasonable possibility of producing fluid at 350/sup 0/ to 375/sup 0/F.

Swanson, R K; Oetking, P; Osoba, J S; Hagens, R C

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,451,1,35,17,,,10,3,0,48...

352

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,13889,36,837,1016,,,1129,181,...

353

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,151,-1,1,6,,,0,0,0,36...

354

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,6305,-3,226,165,,,884,391,10,...

355

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,495,-3,48,11,,,113,0,31,60...

356

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,11457,-3,122,171,,,219,21,7,7...

357

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,877,0,37,79,,,93,32,2,62...

358

Compressibility Consideration in the Boundary of a Strongly Collapsing Bubble  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equations of radial motion of a gas bubble in a compressible viscous liquid have been modified to account for compressibility at the bubble boundary. It has been done by deriving a new bubble boundary equation. This equation has a new term due to liquid compressibility. The influence of this term in the bubble dynamics has been numerically investigated using isothermal-adiabatic model for the gas bubble evolution. The results clearly indicate that at the end of the collapse the new term has very significant role and its consideration dramatically changes the bubble characteristics. The effect of this term is more prominent for the more intense collapses, so that its consideration scales up the maximum values of gas pressure and gas temperature. We have also reasoned that the new bubble behavior will be established even when the effects of mass (water vapor) exchange, chemical reactions, and gas dynamics inside the bubble are taken into account in the model.

Moshaii, A; Taeibi-Rahni, M; Moshaii, Ahmad; Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasool; Taeibi-Rahni, Mohammad

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Where can I find shale gas and coal bed methane production and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Where is the boundary for state and federal offshore oil and gas production? Which states consume and produce the most natural gas?

360

2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington October 2007 ............................................................................................6 Operational Boundaries.......................................................................................................................21 Montlake Landfill

Kaminsky, Werner

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Field Test of a Catalytic Combustion System for Non-Ammonia Control of Gas Turbine NOx Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under federal Award/Proposal Number DE-FG26-04NT42078, the California Energy Commission (CEC) will subgrant $100,000 to the City of Riverside, California, where the project will be located. In turn, the City of Riverside will subaward the federal funds to Alliance Power and/or Catalytica Energy Systems, Inc. (CESI). Alliance Power will coordinate administrative and management activities associated with this task to ensure compliance with CEC grant requirements. CESI will design and fabricate two Xonon{trademark} modules according to General Electric (GE) specification for operating conditions in the GE-10 gas turbine. CESI will ship the modules to the GE test facility for engine testing. CESI will provide test personnel as required to oversee the installation, testing and removal of the Xonon modules. GE will perform an engine test of the CESI-supplied Xonon modules on a GE-10 test engine in the fall of 2004. GE will record all test data as appropriate to evaluate the emissions and operating performance of the Xonon module. Following the test, GE will provide a letter report of the engine test findings. The letter report shall summarize the testing and provide an assessment of Xonon's ability to ultimately achieve less than 3 ppm NOx emissions on the GE-10. All expenses incurred by GE for this task will be paid by GE; no federal funds will be used. Following the reporting of findings, GE will make a decision whether or not to proceed with the Riverside retrofit project. GE will write a letter to CESI giving their decision. GE and CESI will report of engine test findings and the decision letter to the CEC Project Manager.

James F. Burns

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Field Test of a Catalytic Combustion System for Non-Ammonia Control of Gas Turbine NOx Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Under federal Award/Proposal Number DE-FG26-04NT42078, the California Energy Commission (CEC) will subgrant $100,000 to the City of Riverside, California, where the project will be located. In turn, the City of Riverside will subaward the federal funds to Alliance Power and/or Catalytica Energy Systems, Inc. (CESI). Alliance Power will coordinate administrative and management activities associated with this task to ensure compliance with CEC grant requirements. CESI will design and fabricate two Xonon{trademark} modules according to General Electric (GE) specification for operating conditions in the GE-10 gas turbine. CESI will ship the modules to the GE test facility for engine testing. CESI will provide test personnel as required to oversee the installation, testing and removal of the Xonon modules. GE will perform an engine test of the CESI-supplied Xonon modules on a GE-10 test engine in the fall of 2004. GE will record all test data as appropriate to evaluate the emissions and operating performance of the Xonon module. Following the test, GE will provide a letter report of the engine test findings. The letter report shall summarize the testing and provide an assessment of Xonon's ability to ultimately achieve less than 3 ppm NOx emissions on the GE-10. All expenses incurred by GE for this task will be paid by GE; no federal funds will be used. Following the reporting of findings, GE will make a decision whether or not to proceed with the Riverside retrofit project. GE will write a letter to CESI giving their decision. GE and CESI will report of engine test findings and the decision letter to the CEC Project Manager.

James F. Burns

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Self-Generated Magnetic Fields in Galactic Cooling Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interstellar magnetic fields in elliptical galaxies are assumed to have their origin in stellar fields that accompany normal mass loss from an evolving population of old stars. The seed fields are amplified by interstellar turbulence driven by stellar mass loss and supernova events. These disordered fields are further amplified by time-dependent compression in the inward moving galactic cooling flow and are expected to dominate near the galactic core. Under favorable circumstances, fields similar in strength to those observed $B \\sim 1-10~(r/10~kpc)^{-1.2}\\mu$G can be generated solely from these natural galactic processes. In general the interstellar field throughout elliptical galaxies is determined by the outermost regions in the interstellar gas where the turbulent dynamo process can occur. Because of the long hydrodynamic flow times in galactic cooling flows, currently observed magnetic fields may result from periods of intense turbulent field amplification that occurred in the outer galaxy in the distant past. Particularly strong fields in ellipticals may result from ancient galactic mergers or shear turbulence introduced at the boundary between the interstellar gas and ambient cluster gas.

William G. Mathews; Fabrizio Brighenti

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fluid-inclusion gas composition from an active magmatic-hydrothermal system: a case study of The Geysers, California geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modem-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modem vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum temperatures and salinities ranged from 440 C and 44 wt. percent NaCl equivalent in the biotite hornfels adjacent to the pluton to 305 C and 5 wt. percent NaCl equivalent at distances of 1730 m from the intrusive contact. The major, minor, and noble gas compositions of fluid inclusions in the hydrothermally altered rocks were integrated with microthermometric and mineralogic data to determine their sources and the effects of mixing and boiling. Major and minor gaseous species were released from the inclusions by crushing or thermal decrepitation; noble gases were released by crushing. The samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The analyses document the presence of magmatic, crustal, and meteoric components in the trapped fluids. Hydrothermal fluids present during the liquid-dominated phase of the system contained gaseous species derived mainly from crustal and magmatic sources. At The Geysers, N-2/Ar ratios greater than 525 and He-3/He-4 ratios of 6-10.7 Ra are diagnostic of a magmatic component. Crustal gas has CO2/CH4 ratios less than 4, N-2/Ar ratios between 45 and 525, and low 3He/4He ratios (0.5 Ra). Meteoric fluids have CO2/CH4 ratios greater than 4 and N2/Ar ratios between 38 (air-saturated water) and 84 (air). However, N-2/Ar ratios between 15 and 110 can result from boiling. Ratios less than 15 reflect the incorporation of N-2 into NH3-bearing clay minerals. In the central Geysers, the incursion of meteoric fluids occurred during the transition from the liquid- to vapor-dominated regime. Variations in the relative CH4, CO2, and H-2 contents of the gas analyses demonstrate that boiling took place under open-system conditions. The gas data indicate that the inclusions have remained closed to the diffusion of He and H-2 since their formation.

Moore, Joseph N.; Norman, David I.; Kennedy, B. Mack.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Shear Response of an Al S5 Asymmetrical Tilt Grain Boundary ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... grain boundaries is obviously smaller than that of the symmetrical ones. ... Phase Field Crystal Modeling of Microstructure in Multi-component Alloys.

366

Deformation and Transitions at Grain Boundaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formation of cell-wall structure during deformation • Intragranular boundaries: GNBs, IDBs, cell-block boundaries, etc. ... Hot Spots and Grain Boundaries.

367

Stratigraphic Boundaries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphic Boundaries Stratigraphic Boundaries Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Stratigraphic Boundaries Dictionary.png Stratigraphic Boundaries: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Stratigraphic Boundaries Fissure Swarms Caldera Rim Margins Lithologically Controlled Hydrothermal circulation may occur at the contacts between different lithologies. Examples

368

Plasma waves reflection from a boundary with specular accommodative boundary conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present work the linearized problem of plasma wave reflection from a boundary of a half--space is solved analytically. Specular accommodative conditions of plasma wave reflection from plasma boundary are taken into consideration. Wave reflectance is found as function of the given parameters of the problem, and its dependence on the normal electron momentum accommodation coefficient is shown by the authors. The case of resonance when the frequency of self-consistent electric field oscillations is close to the proper (Langmuir) plasma oscillations frequency, namely, the case of long wave limit is analyzed. Refs. 17. Figs. 6.

N. V. Gritsienko; A. V. Latyshev; A. A. Yushkanov

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

THE THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS CENTRIFUGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Onsager's analysis of the hydrodynamics of fluid circulation in the boundary layer on the rotor wall of a gas centrifuge is reviewed. The description of the flow in the boundary layers on the top and bottom end caps due to Carrier and Maslen is summarized. The method developed by Wood and Morton of coupling the flow models in the rotor wall and end cap boundary layers to complete the hydrodynamic analysis of the centrifuge is presented. Mechanical and thermal methods of driving the internal gas circulation are described. The isotope enrichment which results from the superposition of the elementary separation effect due to the centrifugal field in the gas and its internal circulation is analyzed by the Onsager-Cohen theory. The performance function representing the optimized separative power of a centrifuge as a function of throughput and cut is calculated for several simplified internal flow models. The use of asymmetric ideal cascades to exploit the distinctive features of centrifuge performance functions is illustrated.

Olander, Donald R.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Far field acceleration  

SciTech Connect

Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

Fernow, R.C.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Flammability Limits of a Premixed Gas with Steam Addition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many industrial processes utilized for synthesis gas production are carried out at elevated temperatures, and therefore knowledge of flammability boundaries is quite important for safety… (more)

Kutzler, Patrick

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented for approximately 165 abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma that have produced 10,000 or more barrels of oil prior to abandonment. The following information is provided for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date of field; year of last production, if known; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Chism, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A committee machine with intelligent systems for estimation of total organic carbon content from petrophysical data: An example from Kangan and Dalan reservoirs in South Pars Gas Field, Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total organic carbon (TOC) content present in reservoir rocks is one of the important parameters, which could be used for evaluation of residual production potential and geochemical characterization of hydrocarbon-bearing units. In general, organic-rich ... Keywords: Committee machine, Fuzzy logic, Genetic algorithm, Neural network, Neuro-fuzzy, Petrophysical data, South Pars Gas Field, Total organic carbon

Ali Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi; Hossain Rahimpour-Bonab; Mohammadreza Rezaee

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Artificial neural network modeling and cluster analysis for organic facies and burial history estimation using well log data: A case study of the South Pars Gas Field, Persian Gulf, Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intelligent and statistical techniques were used to extract the hidden organic facies from well log responses in the Giant South Pars Gas Field, Persian Gulf, Iran. Kazhdomi Formation of Mid-Cretaceous and Kangan-Dalan Formations of Permo-Triassic Data ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Burial history, Cluster analysis, Organic facies, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Well log data

Bahram Alizadeh; Saeid Najjari; Ali Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Parameterization of Joint Frequency Distributions of Potential Temperature and Water Vapor Mixing Ratio in the Daytime Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Joint frequency distributions (JFDs) of potential temperature (?) versus water vapor mixing ratio (r) within the convective boundary layer were measured during a new field experiment named Boundary Layer Experiment 1996 (BLX96). These JFDs were ...

Larry K. Berg; Roland B. Stull

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water Shale Gas...

377

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air Shale Gas Development Challenges: Air Shale Gas...

378

Understanding the Impacts of Incremental Gas Supply on the Flow ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

High natural gas prices and sharply higher oil and natural gas field revenues are expected to drive a resurgence in natural gas-directed drilling activity this year ...

379

Boundary effects of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations on charged particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations with the boundary on charged particles is investigated. They may be observed via an electron interference experiment near the conducting plate, where boundary effects of vacuum fluctuations are found significant on coherence reduction of the electrons. The dynamics of the charge under the influence of quantized electromagnetic fields with a conducting plate is also studied. The corresponding stochastic equation of motion is derived in the semiclassical approximation, and the behavior of the charge's velocity fluctuations is discussed.

Tai-Hung Wu; Jen-Tsung Hsiang; Da-Shin Lee

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

Boundary effects of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations on charged particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations with the boundary on charged particles is investigated. They may be observed via an electron interference experiment near the conducting plate, where boundary effects of vacuum fluctuations are found significant on coherence reduction of the electrons. The dynamics of the charge under the influence of quantized electromagnetic fields with a conducting plate is also studied. The corresponding stochastic equation of motion is derived in the semiclassical approximation, and the behavior of the charge's velocity fluctuations is discussed.

Wu, Tai-Hung; Lee, Da-Shin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Collett, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

383

A Lagrangian Long-Range Transport Model with Atmospheric Boundary Layer Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper reports on the combination of a chemical model for the gas phase chemistry of the atmospheric boundary layer, with a Lagrangian model for the long-range transport of air pollutants. The resulting combined chemistry/transport ...

Anton Eliassen; Jørgen Saltbones; Frode Stordal; Øystein Hov; Ivar S. A. Isaksen; Frode Stordal

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Airship Measurements of Ship’s Exhaust Plumes and Their Effect on Marine Boundary Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution aerosol, trace gas, and cloud microphysical measurements were made from an airship during transects across ships exhaust plumes advecting downwind of ships in the marine boundary layer (MBL). This study was part of the Office of ...

G. M. Frick; W. A. Hoppel

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends Helen C. Flynn and Pete Smith #12;Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends Helen C or boundaries. #12;3Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends About

Levi, Ran

386

Parameterizing Grid-Averaged Longwave Fluxes for Inhomogeneous Marine Boundary Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the relative impacts on grid-averaged longwave flux transmittance (emittance) for marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud fields arising from horizontal variability of optical depth ? and cloud sides. First, using fields of Landsat-...

Howard W. Barker; Bruce A. Wielicki

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Epitaxial Stabilization of a Morphotropic Phase Boundary in Lead-Free Ferroelectric Thin Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy barrier for phase transformation in these films. The piezoelectric andpiezoelectric charge coefficient direct current density functional theory dysprosium scandate electric field coercive field energyenergy surface” near a structural phase boundary is the origin of the enhanced piezoelectric

Zeches, Robert James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

389

New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

390

Pipeline constraints in wholesale natural gas markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Natural gas markets in the United States depend on an extensive network of pipelines to transport gas from production fields to end users. While these… (more)

Avalos, Roger George.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil...

392

Natural Gas Consumption (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil...

393

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture...

394

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Earthquakes | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Earthquakes Shale Gas Development Challenges: Earthquakes...

395

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface...

396

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

397

Boundary stabilization of transmission problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the transmission problem in bounded domains with dissipative boundary conditions. Under some natural assumptions, we prove uniform bounds of the corresponding resolvents on the real axis at high frequency, and as a consequence, we obtain free of eigenvalues regions. As an application, we get exponential decay of the energy of the solutions of the correpsonding mixed boundary value problems.

Fernando Cardoso; Georgi Vodev

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

2, 77102, 2005 Greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 2, 77­102, 2005 Greenhouse gas emissions from Indian rice fields H. Pathak et al. Title Page Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Greenhouse gas emissions from Indian Commons License. 77 #12;BGD 2, 77­102, 2005 Greenhouse gas emissions from Indian rice fields H. Pathak et

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

399

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

400

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

402

An Evaluation of Boundary Conditions for Modeling Urban Boundary Layers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical modeling of the urban boundary layer is complicated by the need to describe airflow patterns outside of the computational domain. These patterns have an impact on how successfully the simulation is able to model the turbulence associated with the urban boundary layer. This talk presents experiments with the model boundary conditions for simulations that were done to support two Department of Energy observational programs involving the Salt Lake City basin. The Chemical/Biological Non-proliferation Program (CBNP) is concerned with the effects of buildings on influencing dispersion patterns in urban environments. The Vertical Transport and Mixing Program (VTMX) investigating mixing mechanisms in the stable boundary layer and how they are influenced by the channeling caused by drainage flows or by obstacles such as building complexes. Both of these programs are investigating the turbulent mixing caused by building complexes and other urban obstacles.

Calhoun, R.J.; Chan, S.T.; Lee, R.L.

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Import Threat : Detroit's Boundary Objects During the 1980s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ler who sold the car to the consumer, the bank that provided financing to the consumer, the marketing agency that created the advertisements that enticed the consumer to buy the car, the group of individuals who assembled the car, the corporation that hired and trained those individuals, the corporation that provided the tyres, the corporation that provided the rubber for the tyres,... and finally, the government that established the trade policies that made the creation of that car possible and profitable. Coordinating activity and information amongst these various actors is not an easy task. They each have different motivations and goal and lack a common perspective or language. Inter-organizational communication requires a special animal: the Boundary Object. Boundary Objects Star and Griesemer (1989) introduced the Boundary Object to the field of Science Studies. Although they were studying how scientists collected samples for a museum nearly a century ago, Boundary Objects have b

George Goodall

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Method of Boundary Perturbation,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method of Boundary Perturbation, Method of Boundary Perturbation, and Its Application to Wakefield Calculationst Weiren Chou+ Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439 USA Spring Meeting of The American Physical Society Division of Physics of Beams Washington, D.C. April 16-19, 1990 tWork supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract W-31-109-ENG-38. tPresent address: SSC Laboratory, Accelerator Division, MS-I046, 2550 Beckleymeade Ave., Dallas, TX 75237, USA. LS-/~ Boundary Perturbation, and Its Application to Wakefield Calculations ABSTRACT The boundary perturbation method, suggested by Zhang and, independently, by Chatard-Moulin, Cooper, and their colleagues, is employed to the wakefield cal-

405

Modeling the Benthic Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A second-order turbulence closure model is used to study the development of the benthic boundary layer. Results are presented on the effects of a time-dependent oscillatory forcing flow and an initially stably stratified density gradient. Using ...

K. J. Richards

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

What is shale gas? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home What is shale gas? What is shale gas? What is shale gas? Energy.gov Careers & Internships Science &...

407

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and increase carbon injection when inlet loading and mercury removal were low. The resulting mercury removal varied between 50 and 98%, with an overall average of 85.6%, showing that the process was successful at removing high percentages of vapor-phase mercury even with a widely varying mass loading. In an effort to improve baghouse performance, high-permeability bags were tested. The new bags made a significant difference in the cleaning frequency of the baghouse. Before changing the bags, the baghouse was often in a continuous clean of 4.4 p/b/h, but with the new bags the cleaning frequency was very low, at less than 1 p/b/h. Alternative sorbent tests were also performed using these high-permeability bags. The results of these tests showed that most standard, high-quality activated carbon performed similarly at this site; low-cost sorbent and ash-based sorbents were not very effective at removing mercury; and chemically enhanced sorbents did not appear to offer any benefits over standard activated carbons at this site.

C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Development of an assessment methodology for geopressured zones of the upper Gulf Coast based on a study of abnormally pressured gas fields in South Texas. Progress report, 1 March 1976--31 May 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the fourth quarterly reporting period project change-in-scope was approved extending the study area to include Brooks, the remainder of Kenedy and Live Oak Counties. An interim progress report covering that reporting period is presented. Effort during the quarter was directed toward (1) locating drillstem and production test results from geopressured formations, (2) determining formation parameters in an additional large number of producing wells, and (3) searching production records for assessment of geopressured production in Brooks and Kenedy Counties. Several unsuccessful completion tests of geopressured water sands (attempted as gas completions) have been located and these give insight into the problems of completing high-volume water wells in that zone. A successful fracture treatment in a geopressured gas well indicates a producibility increase equivalent to a two-fold improvement in permeability. Permeability calculations for a large number of geopressured and normally pressured gas wells throughout the study area have been completed. In no case has a producing Rio Grande Valley gas well deeper than 10,000 ft. been identified with effective permeability as great as 10 md. Preliminary investigation of Brooks County production has located geopressured production in seven gas fields and in North Kenedy County, an additional three.

Swanson, R.K.; Oetking, P.; Osoba, J.S.; Hagens, R.C.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Grain-boundaries and Triple Junctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... For each tilt angle, the perfect boundary is created, as well as one containing a ... The stimulation of migration of general boundary by GBS is ...

410

Grain boundary segregation of carbon in iron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Excess carbon was present near grain boundaries in specimens equilibrated at ... the amount of carbon near the grain boundaries was found to decrease as the

411

Investigating Grain Boundary Structure-Kinetic Property ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Grain boundary energy landscapes contain all the information that is required to describe the kinetic behavior of grain boundaries (GBs).

412

Wind on the boundary for the Abelian sandpile model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We continue our investigation of the two-dimensional Abelian sandpile model in terms of a logarithmic conformal field theory with central charge c=-2, by introducing two new boundary conditions. These have two unusual features: they carry an intrinsic orientation, and, more strangely, they cannot be imposed uniformly on a whole boundary (like the edge of a cylinder). They lead to seven new boundary condition changing fields, some of them being in highest weight representations (weights -1/8, 0 and 3/8), some others belonging to indecomposable representations with rank 2 Jordan cells (lowest weights 0 and 1). Their fusion algebra appears to be in full agreement with the fusion rules conjectured by Gaberdiel and Kausch.

Philippe Ruelle

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

413

CFD Modelling of Generic Gas Turbine Combustor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New computational methods are continuously developed in order to solve problems in different engineering fields. One of these fields is gas turbines, where the challenge… (more)

KHODABANDEH, AMIR

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Plant ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million Barrels)

415

Measuring Devices: Liquefied Petroleum Gas Liquid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquefied Petroleum Gas Liquid-Measuring Devices. Intro about it. EPOs, Field Manual, Training Materials & Presentaions, Newsletter Articles, Other ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

416

4. Natural Gas Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gas fields, i.e., tight sands, shales, and coalbeds. Consideringthegrowingcontributionofthisgastothe National total, the term “unconventional” is ...

417

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in waters up to 9000 feet deep. Southern Natural Gas Company has scheduled a shut-in test at the Muldon Storage Field in Mississippi for April 5 through April 11. Under the...

418

Boundary Layer Parameterization for a Non-Gaussian Puff Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents two boundary layer parameterizations for a model based on a general technique for solving the K equation using the truncated Gram–Charlier expansion (type A) of the concentration field and a finite set of equations for the ...

T. Tirabassi; U. Rizza

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Von Kármán's Constant in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow: Reevaluated  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field experiment has been carried out with the specific objective in mind to determine the value of von Kármán's constant in atmospheric boundary layer flow, and also to investigate its possible dependence on the surface Rossby number Ro0. Data ...

Ulf Högström

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modeling open boundaries in dissipative MHD simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The truncation of large physical domains to concentrate computational resources is necessary or desirable in simulating many natural and man-made plasma phenomena. Three open boundary condition (BC) methods for such domain truncation of dissipative magnetohydrodynamics ... Keywords: Approximate Riemann, Artificial boundary, Calderon method, Dissipative, Lacuna, Lacunae, MHD, Magnetohydrodynamics, Non-reflecting boundary, Nonlinear, Open boundary, hyperbolic-parabolic

E. T. Meier; A. H. Glasser; V. S. Lukin; U. Shumlak

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Metric deformation and boundary value problems in 3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel perturbative method, proposed by Panda {\\it et al.} [1] to solve the Helmholtz equation in two dimensions, is extended to three dimensions for general boundary surfaces. Although a few numerical works are available in the literature for specific domains in three dimensions such a general analytical prescription is presented for the first time. An appropriate transformation is used to get rid of the asymmetries in the domain boundary by mapping the boundary into an equivalent sphere with a deformed interior metric. The deformed metric produces new source terms in the original homogeneous equation. A deformation parameter measuring the deviation of the boundary from a spherical one is introduced as a perturbative parameter. With the help of standard Rayleigh-Schr{\\"o}dinger perturbative technique the transformed equation is solved and the general solution is written down in a closed form at each order of perturbation. The solutions are boundary condition free and which make them widely applicable for various situations. Once the boundary conditions are applied to these general solutions the eigenvalues and the wavefunctions are obtained order by order. The efficacy of the method has been tested by comparing the analytic values against the numerical ones for three dimensional enclosures of various shapes. The method seems to work quite well for these shapes for both, Dirichlet as well as Neumann boundary conditions. The usage of spherical harmonics to express the asymmetries in the boundary surfaces helps us to consider a wide class of domains in three dimensions and also their fast convergence guarantees the convergence of the perturbative series for the energy. Direct applications of this method can be found in the field of quantum dots, nuclear physics, acoustical and electromagnetic cavities.

Subhasis Panda; S. Pratik Khastgir

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

422

String Gas Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

String gas cosmology is a string theory-based approach to early universe cosmology which is based on making use of robust features of string theory such as the existence of new states and new symmetries. A first goal of string gas cosmology is to understand how string theory can effect the earliest moments of cosmology before the effective field theory approach which underlies standard and inflationary cosmology becomes valid. String gas cosmology may also provide an alternative to the current standard paradigm of cosmology, the inflationary universe scenario. Here, the current status of string gas cosmology is reviewed.

Brandenberger, Robert H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: analysis of water an dissolved natural gas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Edna Delcambre et al. No. 1 gas well, shut-in since June 1975, was made available for the project. Two geopressured sand-bed aquifers were tested: sand No. 3 at a depth of 12,900 feet and sand No. 1 at a depth of 12,600 feet. Each aquifer was subjected to flow tests which lasted approximately three weeks in each case. Water samples were obtained during flow testing of the two geopressured aquifers. The water contained 11.3 to 13.3% dissolved solids. Several radioactive species were measured. Radium-226 was found to be approximately 10 times more concentrated than the average amount observed in surface waters. No appreciable amount of heavy metals was detected. Recombination studies at bottom-hole conditions indicate the solubility of natural gas per barrel of water to be about 24 SCF. The methane content was 93 to 95%, and the gas had a heating value in the range of 1020 to 1070 Btu/cu.ft. During the flow tests, the gas/water ratio at the well-head was observed to be 45 to 88 SCF/Bbl water produced. (MHR)

Hankins, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Abandoned oil fields in Kansas and Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

Data on approximately 400 abandoned oil fields in Kansas and 90 abandoned oil fields in Nebraska are presented. The following information is obtained on each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date; year of last production; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; API gravity; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (DMC)

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Field ionization from carbon nanofibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Micro Gas Analyzer project aims to develop power-efficient, high resolution, high sensitivity, portable and real-time gas sensors. We developed a field ionizer array based on gated CNTs. Arrays of CNTs are used because ...

Adeoti, Bosun J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

427

Practical scheme for a light-induced gauge field in an atomic Bose gas Kenneth J. Gnter,* Marc Cheneau, Tarik Yefsah, Steffen P. Rath, and Jean Dalibard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by laser fields. To comprehend the underlying mechanism, consider atoms with a ground state g, which fields are linear combinations of the Zeeman substates g,Jg,m m =-Jg, ... ,Jg . Both the eigenenergies E with positive and negative helicity, respectively, and both the ground g and the excited e states have unit

Dalibard, Jean

428

Pipeline Access and Market Integration in the Natural Gas Industry: Evidence from Cointegration Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contract with the Natural Gas Supply Association. Strateconsupply fields form a common pool. Our empirical examination of natural gas

De Vany, Arthur; Walls, W. David

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Storage About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Underground Natural Gas Storage Overview | Regional Breakdowns Overview Underground natural gas storage provides pipelines, local distribution companies, producers, and pipeline shippers with an inventory management tool, seasonal supply backup, and access to natural gas needed to avoid imbalances between receipts and deliveries on a pipeline network. There are three principal types of underground storage sites used in the United States today. They are: · depleted natural gas or oil fields (326), · aquifers (43), or · salt caverns (31). In a few cases mine caverns have been used. Most underground storage facilities, 82 percent at the beginning of 2008, were created from reservoirs located in depleted natural gas production fields that were relatively easy to convert to storage service, and that were often close to consumption centers and existing natural gas pipeline systems.

430

New topics in coherent anti-stokes raman scattering gas-phase diagnostics : femtosecond rotational CARS and electric-field measurements.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss two recent diagnostic-development efforts in our laboratory: femtosecond pure-rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for thermometry and species detection in nitrogen and air, and nanosecond vibrational CARS measurements of electric fields in air. Transient pure-rotational fs-CARS data show the evolution of the rotational Raman polarization in nitrogen and air over the first 20 ps after impulsive pump/Stokes excitation. The Raman-resonant signal strength at long time delays is large, and we additionally observe large time separation between the fs-CARS signatures of nitrogen and oxygen, so that the pure-rotational approach to fs-CARS has promise for simultaneous species and temperature measurements with suppressed nonresonant background. Nanosecond vibrational CARS of nitrogen for electric-field measurements is also demonstrated. In the presence of an electric field, a dipole is induced in the otherwise nonpolar nitrogen molecule, which can be probed with the introduction of strong collinear pump and Stokes fields, resulting in CARS signal radiation in the infrared. The electric-field diagnostic is demonstrated in air, where the strength of the coherent infrared emission and sensitivity our field measurements is quantified, and the scaling of the infrared signal with field strength is verified.

Lempert, Walter R. (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Barnat, Edward V.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Serrano, Justin Raymond

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

A Modeling Study of the Effects of Inhomogeneous Surface Fluxes on Boundary-Layer Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical modeling study was conducted to examine the response of the atmospheric boundary layer to inhomogeneous surface fluxes. The study was used to extend the results obtained from a field experiment carried out in spring 1992 in north-...

Shiyuan Zhong; J. C. Doran

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

An Investigation of the Development of Cumulonimbus Systems over South Florida. Part I: Boundary Layer Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the interactions between two developing cumulonimbus systems and the boundary layer (surface winds, pressure, divergence and temperature fields) on a case study day, 25 August 1975. These two systems formed within 45 min ...

John B. Cunning; Mark Demaria

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Sensitivity of MM5-Simulated Boundary Layer Characteristics to Turbulence Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of high-resolution mesoscale simulations to boundary layer turbulence parameterizations is investigated using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) and observations from two field campaigns. ...

Larry K. Berg; Shiyuan Zhong

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Wind Direction Dependence of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence Parameters in the Urban Roughness Sublayer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of atmospheric boundary layer parameters are examined as a function of wind direction in both urban and suburban settings in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, derived from measurements during the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign. Heterogeneous ...

Cheryl Klipp

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

A PDF Dispersion Model for Buoyant Plumes in the Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A probability density function (PDF) dispersion model is presented for buoyant plumes in the convective boundary layer (CBL), where the mean concentration field C is obtained from the PDFs py and pz of tracer particle position in the lateral y ...

J. C. Weil; L. A. Corio; R. P. Brower

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

An Investigation of the Boundary Layer Dynamics of Sardinia Island under Sea-Breeze Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical mesoscale model is used to study the wind field and the boundary layer structure of the island of Sardinia during typical summer conditions. The numerical model is three-dimensional and employs a higher-order turbulence closure ...

Dimitrios Melas; Alfredo Lavagnini; Anna-Maria Sempreviva

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Laboratory Study of the Zonal Structure of Western Boundary Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The zonal structure of strongly nonlinear inertial western boundary currents (WBCs) is studied experimentally along a straight “meridional” coast in a 5-m-diameter rotating basin by analyzing the “zonal” profile of the meridional velocity field ...

Stefano Pierini; Vincenzo Malvestuto; Giuseppe Siena; Thomas A. McClimans; Stig M. Løvås

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Numerical Simulations of a Stratocumulus-Capped Boundary Layer Observed over Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed observations of both mean and turbulence fields of an anticyclonic, quasi-steady state, stratocumulus-capped boundary layer obtained with ground-based and balloonborne equipment during the night of 19/20 November 1976 at Cardington, ...

Chih-Yue Jim Kao; Tetsuji Yamada

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Aspects of Convective Boundary Layer Turbulence Measured by a Dual-Doppler Lidar System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Special designed dual-Doppler setups can be used to retrieve simultaneous measurements of two wind components with high temporal resolution in several heights throughout the atmospheric boundary layer. During a field campaign in summer 2011, ...

Luisa Röhner; Katja Träumner

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Retrieval of Urban Boundary Layer Structures from Doppler Lidar Data. Part II: Proper Orthogonal Decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proper orthogonal decomposition technique is applied to 74 snapshots of 3D wind and temperature fields to study turbulent coherent structures and their interplay in the urban boundary layer over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. These snapshots of ...

Ching-Long Lin; Quanxin Xia; Ronald Calhoun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Effects of mesoscale surface inhomogeneities on atmospheric boundary layer transfer  

SciTech Connect

Defining the nature of turbulent transfer over horizontally inhomogeneous surfaces remains one of the challenges in meteorology. Because the transfer of energy and momentum through the atmospheric boundary layer forms part of the lower boundary condition for global climate models (GCMs), the problem is important. Over the last two decades, advances in sensor and computer technology wave made good point measurements of turbulent fluxes fairly routine. A fundamental question with respect to climate models, however, is how such point measurements are related to average fluxes over the area of a GCM grid box. In this paper we will use data from the field program to depict the evolution of the boundary layer over adjacent, sharply contrasting surface types on two separate occasions. We will then use simple scaling based on the observations to argue that sub-gridscale motions would often be likely to significantly alter the estimates and resulting parameterizations of GCM-scale surface fluxes in the region.

Shaw, W.J.; Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

An Experimental Field Dataset with Buoyant, Neutral, and Dense Gas Atmospheric Releases and Model Comparisons in Low–Wind Speed (Diffusion) Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique field dataset from a series of low–wind speed experiments, modeling efforts using three commonly used models to replicate these releases, and statistical analysis of how well these models were able to predict the plume concentrations is ...

Veronica E. Wannberg; Gustavious Williams; Patrick Sawyer; Richard Venedam

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Resolving discrepancies in predicting critical rates in low pressure stripper gas wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The minimum gas rate for unloading liquids from a gas well has been the subject of much interest, especially in old gas producing fields with… (more)

Awolusi, Olufemi S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60 3. Rio Vista Natural Gas Field: The 193677 4. Calpine Natural Gas Company…………………………………………….82 5.Company [B0120] 4. Calpine Natural Gas, L.P. [C1330] ******

Gbedema, Tometi Koku

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The gravity field and plate boundaries in Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free-air and simple Bouguer anomaly maps of the Venezuelan continental margin (from 60°W to 72°W and from 7°N to 13°N) are presented. The major features of the free-air map are: the large lows associated with the deep ...

Folinsbee, Robert Allin

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Nenad Antonic & Kresimir Burazin Boundary operator from matrix field formulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@math.hr kburazin@mathos.hr This work is supported in part by the Croatian MZOS trough projects 037 systems, encompassing also a variety of elliptic and parabolic problems. Even more, he provided

Burazin, Kresimir

447

Boundary determinations for trivariate solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trivariate tensor-product B-spline solid is a direct extension of the B-spline patch and has been shown to be useful in the creation and visualization of free-form geometric solids. Visualizing these solid objects requires the determination of the boundary surface of the solid, which is a combination of parametric and implicit surfaces. This paper presents a method that determines the implicit boundary surface by examination of the Jacobian determinant of the defining B-spline function. Using an approximation to this determinant, the domain space is adaptively subdivided until a mesh can be determined such that the boundary surface is close to linear in the cells of the mesh. A variation of the marching cubes algorithm is then used to draw the surface. Interval approximation techniques are used to approximate the Jacobian determinant and to approximate the Jacobian determinant gradient for use in the adaptive subdivision methods. This technique can be used to create free-form solid objects, useful in geometric modeling applications.

Duchaineau, M; Joy, K I

1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

448

Salt caverns account for 23% of U.S. underground natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The U.S. has three primary types of underground natural gas storage facilities: depleted fields, aquifers, and salt caverns. Depleted natural gas fields provide by ...

449

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Monsoon Trough Boundary Layer Experiment (MONTBLEX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Monsoon Trough Boundary Layer Experiment (MONTBLEX) is a multi-institutional, all-India coordinated program to study the atmospheric boundary-layer processes in the monsoon trough (MT) area of northern India. The experiment is being organized ...

Malti Goel; H. N. Srivastava

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Disturbances along the Arizona Monsoon Boundary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of disturbances along the boundary between two air masses in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico during the summer is examined. This boundary is an approximately north-south confluent zone resulting from the ...

Thomas J. Moore; Robert L. Gall; Thomas C. Adang

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Large-Eddy Boundary Layer Entrainment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of large-eddy simulations have been performed to explore boundary layer entrainment under conditions of a strongly capped inversion layer with the boundary layer dynamics driven dominantly by buoyant forcing. Different conditions ...

D. C. Lewellen; W. S. Lewellen

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Ocean Boundary Mixing during Ekman Layer Arrest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a water parcel comes into contact with an ocean boundary, energy is dissipated within the boundary layer with some fraction directed into vertical mixing. In a stratified flow this increases the potential energy associated with the density ...

Scott A. Condie

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The properties of mixed reality boundaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed reality boundaries establish transparent windows between physical and virtual spaces. We introduce a set of properties that allow such boundaries to be configured to support different styles of co-operative activity. These properties are grouped ...

Boriana Koleva; Steve Benford; Chris Greenhalgh

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Beyond the no-slip boundary condition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper offers a simple macroscopic approach to the question of the slip boundary condition to be imposed upon the tangential component of the fluid velocity at a solid boundary. Plausible reasons are advanced for ...

Brenner, Howard

456

The GATE Boundary Layer Instrumentation System (BLIS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tethered sonde, the Boundary Layer Instrument System (BLIS), was designed for use from shipboard platforms in the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE). This system was able to monitor the thermal and kinematic properties of the boundary ...

Donald P. Wylie; Chester F. Ropelewski

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Ethane prices trail other natural gas liquids - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... shift their drilling programs to the more liquids-rich portions of natural gas fields to take advantage of considerable price premiums over dry natural gas. ...

458

Withdrawals of Liquefied Natural Gas from Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil...

459

Pipeline constraints raise average spot natural gas prices in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The chart shows that spot natural gas prices for Henry Hub, Chicago, ... and gas from Pennsylvania storage fields on to Atlantic coast markets. ...

460

Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer Modern Shale Gas Development in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{trademark} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{trademark} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{trademark} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury--elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{trademark}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{trademark} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{trademark} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

462

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

464

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

465

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001 ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury: elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Tom Millar

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

466

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

467

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

468

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

469

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction