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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

SLE($?,?$)and Boundary Coulomb Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the coulomb gas model on the upper half plane with different boundary conditions, namely Drichlet, Neuman and mixed. We related this model to SLE($\\kappa,\\rho$) theories. We derive a set of conditions connecting the total charge of the coulomb gas, the boundary charges, the parameters $\\kappa$ and $\\rho$. Also we study a free fermion theory in presence of a boundary and show with the same methods that it would lead to logarithmic boundary changing operators.

S. Moghimi-Araghi; M. A. Rajabpour; S. Rouhani

2005-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

A gas-solid free boundary problem for compressible viscous gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Chemical, Beijing,100029,China Abstract In this paper we propose a gas-solid free boundary problem is physically natural because the density of the gas transited in phase from the solid is usually much less thanA gas-solid free boundary problem for compressible viscous gas Feimin Huang y Akitaka Matsumura y

3

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the ninth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1990 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. There are 54,963 field records in this year's Oil and Gas Field Code Master List (FCML). This amounts to 467 more than in last year's report. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes: Field records for each state and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides;field records for each alias field name; fields crossing state boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective state naming authorities.

Not Available

1991-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

4

Geometric Boundary Data for the Gravitational Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An outstanding issue in the treatment of boundaries in general relativity is the lack of a local geometric interpretation of the necessary boundary data. For the Cauchy problem, the initial data is supplied by the 3-metric and extrinsic curvature of the initial Cauchy hypersurface.. This Cauchy data determines a solution to Einstein's equations which is unique up to a diffeomorphism. Here, we show how three pieces of boundary data, which are associated locally with the geometry of the boundary, likewise determine a solution of the initial-boundary value problem which is unique up to a diffeomorphism. One piece of this data, constructed from the extrinsic curvature of the boundary, determines the dynamical evolution of the boundary. The other two pieces constitute a conformal class of rank-2, positive definite metrics, which represent the two gravitational degrees of freedom.

H-O. Kreiss; J. Winicour

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

Optimization of offshore natural gas field development.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In this thesis the target is to find the optimal development solution of an offshore natural gas field. Natural gas is increasing in importance… (more)

Johansen, Gaute Rannem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Consideration of Grain Size Distribution in the Diffusion of Fission Gas to Grain Boundaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the accumulation of fission gas on grain boundaries in a polycrystalline microstructure with a distribution of grain sizes. The diffusion equation is solved throughout the microstructure to evolve the gas concentration in space and time. Grain boundaries are treated as infinite sinks for the gas concentration, and we monitor the cumulative gas inventory on each grain boundary throughout time. We consider two important cases: first, a uniform initial distribution of gas concentration without gas production (correlating with post-irradiation annealing), and second, a constant gas production rate with no initial gas concentration (correlating with in-reactor conditions). The results show that a single-grain-size model, such as the Booth model, over predicts the gas accumulation on grain boundaries compared with a polycrystal with a grain size distribution. Also, a considerable degree of scatter, or variability, exists in the grain boundary gas accumulation when comparing all of the grain boundaries in the microstructure.

Paul C. Millett; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks; S. B. Biner

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3,Cloud OD Sensor TWST Cloud OD SensorgovCampaignsBoundary

8

Oil and Gas field code master list 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fourteenth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1995 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the US. The Field Code Index, a listing of all field names and the States in which they occur, ordered by field code, has been removed from this year`s publications to reduce printing and postage costs. Complete copies (including the Field Code Index) will be available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA World-Wide Web Site. Future editions of the complete Master List will be available on CD-ROM and other electronic media. There are 57,400 field records in this year`s Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes the following: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (see definition of alias below); and fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. Taking into consideration the double-counting of fields under such circumstances, EIA identifies 46,312 distinct fields in the US as of October 1995. This count includes fields that no longer produce oil or gas, and 383 fields used in whole or in part for oil or gas Storage. 11 figs., 6 tabs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Oil and gas field code master list 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997 is the sixteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the US. It is updated with field information collected through October 1997. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry. As a result of their widespread adoption they have in effect become a national standard. The use of field names and codes listed in this publication is required on survey forms and other reports regarding field-specific data collected by EIA. There are 58,366 field records in this year`s FCML, 437 more than last year. The FCML includes: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (definition of alias is listed); fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. This report also contains an Invalid Field Record List of 4 records that have been removed from the FCML since last year`s report. These records were found to be either technically incorrect or to represent field names which were never recognized by State naming authorities.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Gas-surface interaction and boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas-surface interaction and boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation StÂŽephane Brull, Pierre Equation. The interaction between the wall atoms and the gas molecules within a thin surface layer of the gas in the bulk flow. Boundary conditions are formally derived from this model by using classical

Mieussens, Luc

11

The boundary F-theorem for free fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The boundary free energy, as defined by Gaiotto, is further analysed for free scalars on a hemisphere and shown to be the same as the N-D determinant that earlier occurred in a treatment of GJMS operators. It is also shown to be identical, up to spin degeneracy, to the free energy for a spin-half field on the hemisphere boundary. This is also true if the hemisphere is replaced by a lune. The calculations are carried out in arbitrary dimensions.

J. S. Dowker

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

12

Turbine exhaust diffuser with region of reduced flow area and outer boundary gas flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inwardly toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. At least one gas jet is provided including a jet exit located on the outer boundary. The jet exit may discharge a flow of gas downstream substantially parallel to an inner surface of the outer boundary to direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the outer boundary to effect a radially outward flow of at least a portion of the exhaust gas flow toward the outer boundary to balance an aerodynamic load between the outer and inner boundaries.

Orosa, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

13

Integrated Simulations for Multi-Component Analysis of Gas Turbines : RANS Boundary Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More recently the coupling method has also been applied to a Pratt & Whitney gas turbine.7 The RANSIntegrated Simulations for Multi-Component Analysis of Gas Turbines : RANS Boundary Conditions 94305, U.S.A The aero-thermal computation of the flow path of an entire gas turbine engine can

Kim, Sangho

14

Model of Trace Gas Flux in Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the nonzero vorticity. Generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for arbitrary number components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers.

I. I. Vasenev; I. S. Nurgaliev

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

15

NSTX High Field Side Gas Fueling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fueling National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas with gas injected from the high field side (HFS) has produced earlier, more reliable transitions to the H-mode, longer H-mode durations, higher toroidal rotation, and higher edge electron temperature compared with similar discharges using the low field side (LFS) gas fueling injectors. The HFS gas fueling system consists of a Center Stack midplane injector, and an injector at the inner, upper corner of the Center Stack. The challenging design and installation constraints for the HFS gas system involved placing the control components as close as possible to the machine-vacuum interface, devising a special feed-through flange, traversing through vessel regions whose temperatures during bake-out range from 150 to 350 degrees Centigrade, adapting the gas transport tubing size and route to the small instrumentation wire channels behind the existing graphite plasma facing component tiles on the Center Stack, and providing output orifices shielded from excessive plasma power depositions while concentrating the output flow to facilitate fast camera viewing and analysis. Design, recent performance, and future upgrades will be presented.

H.W. Kugel; M. Anderson; G. Barnes; M. Bell; W. Blanchard; L. Dudek; D. Gates; R. Gernhardt; R. Maingi; D. Mueller; T. Provost; R. Raman; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Winston

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Ising Model on a Dynamically Triangulated Disk with a Boundary Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use Monte Carlo simulations to study a dynamically triangulated disk with Ising spins on the vertices and a boundary magnetic field. For the case of zero magnetic field we show that the model possesses three phases. For one of these the boundary length grows linearly with disk area, while the other two phases are characterized by a boundary whose size is on the order of the cut-off. A line of continuous magnetic transitions separates the two small boundary phases. We determine the critical exponents of the continuous magnetic phase transition and relate them to predictions from continuum 2-d quantum gravity. This line of continuous transitions appears to terminate on a line of discontinuous phase transitions dividing the small boundary phases from the large boundary phase. We examine the scaling of bulk magnetization and boundary magnetization as a function of boundary magnetic field in the vicinity of this tricritical point.

Scott McGuire; Simon Catterall; Mark Bowick; Simeon Warner

2001-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluation of Wall Boundary Condition Parameters for Gas-Solids Fluidized Bed Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wall boundary conditions for the solids phase have significant effects on numerical predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the open literature for numerical modeling of gas-solids flow. In this study, a model for specularity coefficient used in Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions by Li and Benyahia (AIChE Journal, 2012, 58, 2058-2068) is implemented in the open-source CFD code-MFIX. The variable specularity coefficient model provides a physical way to calculate the specularity coefficient needed by the partial-slip boundary conditions for the solids phase. Through a series of 2-D numerical simulations of bubbling fluidized bed and circulating fluidized bed riser, the model predicts qualitatively consistent trends to the previous studies. Furthermore, a quantitative comparison is conducted between numerical results of variable and constant specularity coefficients to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal variations in specularity coefficient.

Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A unified physical boundary condition for massless fields of arbitrary spin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boundary conditions for the Maxwell and Dirac fields at material surfaces are widely-used and physically well-motivated, but do not appear to have been generalised to deal with higher spin fields. A consequence of this is that calculations of, for example, Casimir forces associated with higher spin fields always select some arbitrary mathematical boundary conditions, rather than those which are physically motivated. Here, we use the two-spinor calculus formalism to present a unified treatment of the boundary conditions routinely employed in the treatment of spin-1/2 and spin-1 fields. We then use this unification to obtain a completely new boundary condition that can be applied to massless fields of any spin, including the spin-2 graviton, and its supersymmetric partner the spin-3/2 gravitino. We demonstrate one important consequence of our generalisation, which is that periodic boundary conditions cannot be applied to any physically-confined fermionic field.

Adam Stokes; Robert Bennett

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

19

Solution of the Kramers' problem about isothermal sliding of moderately dense gas with accomodation boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Half-space boundary Kramers' problem about isothermal sliding of moderate dense gas with accomodation boundary conditions along a flat firm surface is solving. The new method of the solution of boundary problems of the kinetic theory is applied (see JVMMF, 2012, 52:3, 539-552). The method allows to receive the solution with arbitrary degree of accuracy. The idea of representation of boundary condition on distribution function in the form of source in the kinetic equation serves as the basis for the method mentioned above. By means of Fourier integrals the kinetic equation with a source comes to the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. The solution has been received in the form of Neumann's number.

A. V. Latyshev; A. D. Kurilov

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Oil and gas field code master list, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains data collected through October 1993 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. Other Federal and State government agencies, as well as industry, use the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List as the standard for field identification. A machine-readable version of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List is available from the National Technical Information Service.

Not Available

1993-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field was not a certainty, this current study determined the undeniable presence of gas hydrates in the reservoir. This study uses four models of the Messoyakha field structure and reservoir conditions...

Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

22

A three-phase free boundary problem with melting ice and dissolving gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a mathematical model for a three-phase free boundary problem in one dimension that involves the interactions between gas, water and ice. The dynamics are driven by melting of the ice layer, while the pressurized gas also dissolves within the meltwater. The model incorporates a Stefan condition at the water-ice interface along with Henry's law for dissolution of gas at the gas-water interface. We employ a quasi-steady approximation for the phase temperatures and then derive a series solution for the interface positions. A non-standard feature of the model is an integral free boundary condition that arises from mass conservation owing to changes in gas density at the gas-water interface, which makes the problem non-self-adjoint. We derive a two-scale asymptotic series solution for the dissolved gas concentration, which because of the non-self-adjointness gives rise to a Fourier series expansion in eigenfunctions that do not satisfy the usual orthogonality conditions. Numerical simulations of the original governing equations are used to validate the series approximations.

Maurizio Ceseri; John M. Stockie

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

23

Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gases are stored, separated, and/or concentrated. An electric field is applied across a porous dielectric adsorbent material. A gas component from a gas mixture may be selectively separated inside the energized dielectric. Gas is stored in the energized dielectric for as long as the dielectric is energized. The energized dielectric selectively separates, or concentrates, a gas component of the gas mixture. When the potential is removed, gas from inside the dielectric is released.

Currier, Robert P; Obrey, Stephen J; Devlin, David J; Sansinena, Jose Maria

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

24

,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

25

Modeling the influence of bubble pressure on grain boundary separation and fission gas release  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grain boundary (GB) separation as a mechanism for fission gas release (FGR), complementary to gas bubble interlinkage, has been experimentally observed in irradiated light water reactor fuel. However there has been limited effort to develop physics-based models incorporating this mechanism for the analysis of FGR. In this work, a computational study is carried out to investigate GB separation in UO2 fuel under the effect of gas bubble pressure and hydrostatic stress. A non-dimensional stress intensity factor formula is obtained through 2D axisymmetric analyses considering lenticular bubbles and Mode-I crack growth. The obtained functional form can be used in higher length-scale models to estimate the contribution of GB separation to FGR.

Pritam Chakraborty; Michael R. Tonks; Giovanni Pastore

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Gas plants, new fields spark production rise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas plant construction is welcomed by operators in the Williston Basin, North Dakota. Petroleum and gas production has increased. The Montana portion of the Williston Basin shows new discoveries. Some secondary recovery efforts are in operation. Industrial officials share the same enthusiasm and optimism for rising production as they do for exploration potential in the basin. 5 tables.

Lenzini, D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Oil and gas field code master list 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the thirteenth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1994 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. The master field name spellings and codes are to be used by respondents when filing the following Department of Energy (DOE) forms: Form EIA-23, {open_quotes}Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves,{close_quotes} filed by oil and gas well operators (field codes are required from larger operators only); Forms FERC 8 and EIA-191, {open_quotes}Underground Gas Storage Report,{close_quotes} filed by natural gas producers and distributors who operate underground natural gas storage facilities. Other Federal and State government agencies, as well as industry, use the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List as the standard for field identification. A machine-readable version of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List is available from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161, (703) 487-4650. In order for the Master List to be useful, it must be accurate and remain current. To accomplish this, EIA constantly reviews and revises this list. The EIA welcomes all comments, corrections, and additions to the Master List. All such information should be given to the EIA Field Code Coordinator at (214) 953-1858. EIA gratefully acknowledges the assistance provides by numerous State organizations and trade associations in verifying the existence of fields and their official nomenclature.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Thermodynamic formalism for the Lorentz gas with open boundaries in $d$ dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Lorentz gas may be defined as a system of fixed dispersing scatterers, with a single light particle moving among these and making specular collisions on encounters with the scatterers. For a dilute Lorentz gas with open boundaries in $d$ dimensions we relate the thermodynamic formalism to a random flight problem. Using this representation we analytically calculate the central quantity within this formalism, the topological pressure, as a function of system size and a temperature-like parameter $\\ba$. The topological pressure is given as the sum of the topological pressure for the closed system and a diffusion term with a $\\ba$-dependent diffusion coefficient. From the topological pressure we obtain the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy on the repeller, the topological entropy, and the partial information dimension.

Henk van Beijeren; Oliver Muelken

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

29

Polytropic gas scalar field models of dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we investigate the polytropic gas dark energy model in the non flat universe. We first calculate the evolution of EoS parameter of the model as well as the cosmological evolution of Hubble parameter in the context of polytropic gas dark energy model. Then we reconstruct the dynamics and the potential of the tachyon and K-essence scalar field models according to the evolutionary behavior of polytropic gas model.

Mohammad Malekjani

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

30

Trip report for field visit to Fayetteville Shale gas wells.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a visit to several gas well sites in the Fayetteville Shale on August 9, 2007. I met with George Sheffer, Desoto Field Manager for SEECO, Inc. (a large gas producer in Arkansas). We talked in his Conway, Arkansas, office for an hour and a half about the processes and technologies that SEECO uses. We then drove into the field to some of SEECO's properties to see first-hand what the well sites looked like. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) made several funding awards under a program called Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil (LINGO). One of the projects that received an award is 'Probabilistic Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems'. The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has the lead on the project, and Argonne National Laboratory is a partner. The goal of the project is to develop a Web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of gas reserves in sensitive areas. The project focuses on a large new natural gas field called the Fayetteville Shale. Part of the project involves learning how the natural gas operators do business in the area and the technologies they employ. The field trip on August 9 provided an opportunity to do that.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Geology, compositional heterogeneities, and geochemical origin of the Yacheng gas field, Qiongdongnan Basin, South China Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yacheng gas field is located in the footwall of the No. 1 fault, the boundary fault between the Yinggehai and Qiongdongnan basins. All strata are normally pressured in the gas field except for the Meishan Formation. The Meishan Formation is overpressured near the No. 1 fault in the gas field and in the adjacent Yinggehai Basin. An obvious thermal anomaly occurs below 3600 m in the gas field. This anomaly, characterized by an abrupt increase in drill-stem test and fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures, vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}), and Rock-Eval T{sub max}, and by an abnormally low temperature/R{sub o}/T{sub max} gradient, diminishes away from the Yinggehai Basin. The gases and condensates have abnormally high aromatic hydrocarbon contents and show obvious heterogeneities. Away from the No. 1 fault, the C{sub 2+} hydrocarbon content and C{sub 2+}/{Sigma}C{sub n} increase; carbon dioxide content decreases; {delta}{sup 13}C values for methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide become lighter; the heptane and isoheptane values decrease; and the relative contents of aromatic hydrocarbons, both in C{sub 6}/C{sub 7} light hydrocarbons and in the condensates, decrease. The gas field was charged from both the Qiongdongnan and the Yinggehai basins. Hydrocarbons sourced from the Qiongdongnan Basin have relatively low maturities, whereas hydrocarbons from the Yinggehai Basin have relatively higher maturities and seem to have been in association with hydrothermal fluids. The hydrothermal fluids from the Yinggehai Basin, in which methane, ethane, carbon dioxide, and especially aromatic hydrocarbons dissolved under the high-temperature and high-pressure subsurface conditions, migrated along the No. 1 fault and caused the abnormally high concentration of aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as the thermal anomalies in the gas field, especially near the No. 1 fault.

Hao, F.; Li, S.; Sun, Y. [China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei (China). Dept. of Petroleum Geology; Zhang, Q. [Nanhai West Oil Corp., Guangdong (China). Inst. of Petroleum Exploration and Development

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Lattice gas models derived from effective field theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We start from a low-energy effective field theory for interacting fermions on the lattice and expand in the hopping parameter to derive the nearest-neighbor interactions for a lattice gas model. In this model the renormalization of couplings for different lattice spacings is inherited from the effective field theory, systematic errors can be estimated a priori, and the breakdown of the lattice gas model description at low temperatures can be understood quantitatively. We apply the lattice gas method to neutron matter and compare with results from a recent quantum simulation.

Matthew Hamilton; Iyam Lynch; Dean Lee

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

33

HOT GAS HALOS IN EARLY-TYPE FIELD GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use Chandra and XMM-Newton to study the hot gas content in a sample of field early-type galaxies. We find that the L {sub X}-L {sub K} relationship is steeper for field galaxies than for comparable galaxies in groups and clusters. The low hot gas content of field galaxies with L {sub K} {approx_lt} L {sub *} suggests that internal processes such as supernovae-driven winds or active galactic nucleus feedback expel hot gas from low-mass galaxies. Such mechanisms may be less effective in groups and clusters where the presence of an intragroup or intracluster medium can confine outflowing material. In addition, galaxies in groups and clusters may be able to accrete gas from the ambient medium. While there is a population of L {sub K} {approx_lt} L {sub *} galaxies in groups and clusters that retain hot gas halos, some galaxies in these rich environments, including brighter galaxies, are largely devoid of hot gas. In these cases, the hot gas halos have likely been removed via ram pressure stripping. This suggests a very complex interplay between the intragroup/intracluster medium and hot gas halos of galaxies in rich environments, with the ambient medium helping to confine or even enhance the halos in some cases and acting to remove gas in others. In contrast, the hot gas content of more isolated galaxies is largely a function of the mass of the galaxy, with more massive galaxies able to maintain their halos, while in lower mass systems the hot gas escapes in outflowing winds.

Mulchaey, John S. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: mulchaey@obs.carnegiescience.ed, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.or [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

34

Photophoretic contribution to the transport of absorbing particles across combustion gas boundary layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since radiation energy fluxes can be comparable to convective (Fourier) fluxes in large fossil-fuel-fired power stations and furnaces, the authors have examined particle drift (phoresis) induced by nonuniform photon-particle heating in a host gas. The authors analysis of the photophoretic velocity includes the important slipflow regime, and the numerical results show that photophoresis is a significant transport mechanism for micron-sized absorbing particles in high radiative transfer combustion environments, with equivalent photophoretic diffusivities (dimensionless photophoretic velocities) being as large as 10% of the better-known thermophoretic diffusivity (Rosner, 1980, 1985). Since previous experimental results (Rosner and Kim, 1984) demonstrated that thermophoresis causes over a 3-decade increase in particle deposition rates by convective diffusion, clearly, for small, absorbing particles, photophoresis will also be an important contributor to observed deposition rates. Accordingly, they present mass transfer coefficients for particle transport across laminar gaseous boundary layers, including both particle thermophoresis and photophoresis.

Castillo, J.L. (U.N.E.D., Madrid (Spain)); Mackowski, D.W.; Rosner, D.E. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Largest US oil and gas fields, August 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Largest US Oil and Gas Fields is a technical report and part of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) series presenting distributions of US crude oil and natural gas resources, developed using field-level data collected by EIA`s annual survey of oil and gas proved reserves. The series` objective is to provide useful information beyond that routinely presented in the EIA annual report on crude oil and natural gas reserves. These special reports also will provide oil and gas resource analysts with a fuller understanding of the nature of US crude oil and natural gas occurrence, both at the macro level and with respect to the specific subjects addressed. The series` approach is to integrate EIA`s crude oil and natural gas survey data with related data obtained from other authoritative sources, and then to present illustrations and analyses of interest to a broad spectrum of energy information users ranging from the general public to oil and gas industry personnel.

Not Available

1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Electromagnetic field of a charge intersecting a cold plasma boundary in a waveguide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the electromagnetic field of a charge crossing a boundary between a vacuum and cold plasma in a waveguide. We obtain exact expressions for the field components and the spectral density of the transition radiation. With the steepest descent technique, we investigate the field components. We show that the electromagnetic field has a different structure in a vacuum than in cold plasma. We also develop an algorithm for the computation of the field based on a certain transformation of the integration path. The behavior of the field depending on distance and time and the spectral density depending on frequency are explored for different charge velocities. Some important physical effects are noted. A considerable increase and concentration of the field near the wave front in the plasma is observed for the case of ultrarelativistic particles. In the plasma, the mode envelopes and spectral density show zero points when the charge velocity is within certain limits.

Alekhina, Tatiana Yu.; Tyukhtin, Andrey V. [Radiophysics Department of St. Petersburg University, 1 Ulyanovskaya, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Geology of new Springdale gas field in northeastern Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Springdale gas field in Leavenworth County, Kansas, is east of the old McLouth and north of the old Ackerland/Jarbolo fields, both now used for gas storage. Gas production from McLouth sand bodies and the Burgess sand in the Cherokee Group (Pennsylvanian) ranges from 1350 to 1400 ft and extends to the nearby Great Kansas City area. Gas pressures range from 350 to 500 psi and open-flow tests produced up to 675 MCFGD. Structurally, the better wells are high on the flanks of a paleovalley opening toward the north. This structure is reflected on the erosional surface of the Mississippian rocks below and is preserved in the now-deformed base of the Kansas City Group of rocks. The Springdale field is only one of several new Pennsylvanian gas fields in Leavenworth, Wyandotte, and Johnson Counties, Kansas, that are currently commercial. These fields serve as a good example of opening a new frontier in an old area.

Goebel, E.D.; Dow, V.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) byCampaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS)

39

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) byCampaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling

40

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) byCampaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) byCampaign govCampaignsPrecision GasCampaign

42

AN ANALYTICAL MODEL OF INTERSTELLAR GAS IN THE HELIOSPHERE TAILORED TO INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stationary distribution of interstellar neutral gas in the heliosphere subject to solar gravity, solar radiation pressure, photoionization, and charge exchange is investigated analytically assuming ionization rates and radiation pressure that are proportional to R{sup -2}, where R is the heliocentric radius. The collisionless hyperbolic trajectories of the individual atoms including ionization losses are combined with Liouville's Theorem to construct the heliospheric phase-space distribution function of an interstellar gas species in the solar reference frame under the assumption that the distribution is a drifting Maxwellian at large distances from the Sun. The distribution is transformed to the Earth (essentially Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX)) frame as a function of solar longitude. The expression is then tailored to the latitudinal scan of IBEX as a function of longitude using the fact that IBEX detects each atom close to perihelion in its hyperbolic orbit. The distribution is further adapted to IBEX by integrating the differential intensity over the entrance aperture solid angle of the IBEX-Lo collimator, and over energy to predict the IBEX count rate of helium. The major features of the predicted count rate are described, including a peak in longitude, a peak in latitude at each longitude, and the widths of the major peak in both latitude and longitude. Analytical formulae for these features are derived for comparison with IBEX observations in order to determine the temperature and bulk velocity of the gas in interstellar space. Based in part on these formulae, the results for helium are presented in the companion paper by Moebius et al.

Lee, Martin A.; Kucharek, Harald; Moebius, Eberhard; Wu Xian [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Bzowski, Maciej [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); McComas, David, E-mail: marty.lee@unh.edu [Engineering and Space Science Division, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Reservoir and stimulation analysis of a Devonian Shale gas field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The Gas Research Institute (GRI) which sponsored this work under GRI Contract No. 5084-213-0980, "Analysis of Eastern Devonian Gas Shales Production Data;" 2. Doug Terry and Joe Petty with Union Drilling, Inc. who showed great interest in this study... and enhance productivity. ~St h The Devonian Shales in the Mason County Field study area can be subdivided using gamma ray logs as follows (in descending order): Upper Devonian Undivided, Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, Java Formation, Angola Shale...

Shaw, James Stanley

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

SOLAS Mid Term Strategy Initiative "Air-sea gas fluxes at Eastern boundary upwelling and Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) systems"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of SOLAS and to the Workshop Véronique Garçon 09:50 Surface (energy and water) fluxes at the air1 SOLAS Mid Term Strategy Initiative "Air-sea gas fluxes at Eastern boundary upwelling and Oxygen

45

An Embedded Boundary Method for the Modeling of Unsteady Combustion in an Industrial GasFired Furnace \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the convective, viscous, and radiative heat transport terms in the mixed cells, while a finite element [20] which accounts for species diffusion, convective and radiative heat transfer, viscous transportAn Embedded Boundary Method for the Modeling of Unsteady Combustion in an Industrial Gas

46

Experimentally observed field–gas interaction in intense optical lattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a gas perturbed by a laser interference pattern, an optical lattice, exhibits a periodic modulation of its refractive index, strong Bragg diffraction of the perturbing light can occur. This scattering reduces the field's ability to further manipulate the gas. Experimental observations of Bragg scattering, evidence of a two-way coupling, are compared to the evolution of the light fields calculated by solutions to the wave equation. Comparison indicates momentum deposition as a prime contributor to the shape of the scattering function vs. lattice velocity, a rationale further supported through additional direct simulation Monte Carlo simulation.

Graul, Jacob S.; Cornella, Barry M.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Lilly, Taylor C. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States); Shneider, Mikhail N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

47

MAGNETIC FIELD GENERATION AND PARTICLE ENERGIZATION AT RELATIVISTIC SHEAR BOUNDARIES IN COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON-POSITRON PLASMAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using particle-in-cell simulations, we study the kinetic physics of relativistic shear flow in collisionless electron-positron (e+e-) plasmas. We find efficient magnetic field generation and particle energization at the shear boundary, driven by streaming instabilities across the shear interface and sustained by the shear flow. Nonthermal, anisotropic high-energy particles are accelerated across field lines to produce a power-law tail turning over just below the shear Lorentz factor. These results have important implications for the dissipation and radiation of jets in blazars and gamma-ray bursts.

Liang, Edison; Smith, Ian [Rice University, MS 108, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Boettcher, Markus, E-mail: liang@rice.edu, E-mail: iansmith@rice.edu, E-mail: boettchm@ohio.edu [Physics and Astronomy Department, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

Haszeldine, Stuart

49

Nonequilibrium transport through quantum-wire junctions and boundary defects for free massless bosonic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a model of quantum-wire junctions where the latter are described by conformal-invariant boundary conditions of the simplest type in the multicomponent compactified massless scalar free field theory representing the bosonized Luttinger liquids in the bulk of wires. The boundary conditions result in the scattering of charges across the junction with nontrivial reflection and transmission amplitudes. The equilibrium state of such a system, corresponding to inverse temperature $\\beta$ and electric potential $V$, is explicitly constructed both for finite and for semi-infinite wires. In the latter case, a stationary nonequilibrium state describing the wires kept at different temperatures and potentials may be also constructed. The main result of the present paper is the calculation of the full counting statistics (FCS) of the charge and energy transfers through the junction in a nonequilibrium situation. Explicit expressions are worked out for the generating function of FCS and its large-deviations asym...

Gaw?dzki, Krzysztof

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

Milton, J.D. [CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Edwards, E.B. [ Ogle & Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States); Heck, R.G. [Ogle & Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

Milton, J.D. (CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Edwards, E.B. ( Ogle Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Heck, R.G. (Ogle Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Geology and development of Pitas Point gas field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pitas Point field produces gas from the Pliocene Pico and Repetto formations along an east-west-trending anticline located on OCS leases P-0233, P-0234, and P-0346, 9 mi south of Carpinteria in the Santa Barbara Channel, California. The field has produced 84 bcf (through July 1987), at an average daily rate of 60 MMCFGD, from low-resistivity turbidite sandstones. the Pitas Point structure is an asymmetric (steeper north flank), broad, unfaulted anticline. The maximum area of gas accumulation is 1900 ac. In the field area, 15,000 ft of Pliocene-Pleistocene sandstones and shales are present. The major gas pay zones occur between 9900 and 12,000 ft subsea. Shallow pay zones are also present from 3500 to 7500 ft subsea. The deep zone reservoir sandstones are thinly bedded, deep-marine, distal submarine-fan deposits. Bed thickness, grain size, and the sandstone-to-shale ratio all increase upsection, suggesting southwestward progradation of a submarine fan across the field area through time. Pay sandstone resistivities are typically less than 3 ohms and can be less than 2 ohms. Resistivities are suppressed because of (1) high water saturations, (2) conductive pore-lining clays (smectite), and (3) bed thicknesses that are less than logging-tool resolution. Between 1983 and 1986, 17 directional wells were drilled from Platform Habitat (20 slots). In the deep pay zones, seven wells were dually completed and three are single completions. Average initial production for individual completion zones was 4 MMCFGD. Four wells are completed in the shallower gas zones.

Nelson, M.P.; Hart, S.L.; Cavette, G.J.; Ziemianski, W.P.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Thermodynamics of Modified Chaplygin Gas and Tachyonic Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we generalize the results of the work of ref. [10] in modified Chaplygin gas model and tachyonic field model. Here we have studied the thermodynamical behaviour and the equation of state in terms of volume and temperature for both models. We have used the solution and the corresponding equation of state of our previous work [12] for tachyonic field model. We have also studied the thermodynamical stability using thermal equation of state for the tachyonic field model and have shown that there is no critical points during thermodynamical expansion. The determination of $T_{*}$ due to expansion for the tachyonic field have been discussed by assuming some initial conditions. Here, the thermal quantities have been investigated using some reduced parameters.

Samarpita Bhattacharya; Ujjal Debnath

2010-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

54

Increasing Well Productivity in Gas Condensate Wells in Qatar's North Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Condensate blockage negatively impacts large natural gas condensate reservoirs all over the world; examples include Arun Field in Indonesia, Karachaganak Field in Kazakhstan, Cupiagua Field in Colombia,Shtokmanovskoye Field in Russian Barents Sea...

Miller, Nathan

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

55

SEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a quarter of the proven natural gas reserves in the United States. Rulison Field, located in the PiceanceSEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO by Gerardo J-based rock physics to estimate the seismic anisotropy of the tight gas reservoir at Rulison Field. Seismic

56

Yukawa-field approximation of electrostatic free energy and dielectric boundary force This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yukawa-field approximation of electrostatic free energy and dielectric boundary force This article.1088/0951-7715/24/11/011 Yukawa-field approximation of electrostatic free energy and dielectric boundary force Hsiao-Bing Cheng1. The electrostatic free energy determines the dielectric boundary force that in turn influences crucially

Li, Bo

57

Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0 0 0 0Feet) New Field

58

Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343Decade81Feet)3,174Feet) New Field

59

Liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter with density-dependent relativistic mean-field models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is studied within density-dependent relativistic mean-field models where the density dependence is introduced according to the Brown-Rho scaling and constrained by available data at low densities and empirical properties of nuclear matter. The critical temperature of the liquid-gas phase transition is obtained to be 15.7 MeV in symmetric nuclear matter falling on the lower edge of the small experimental error bars. In hot asymmetric matter, the boundary of the phase-coexistence region is found to be sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy. The critical pressure and the area of phase-coexistence region increases clearly with the softening of the symmetry energy. The critical temperature of hot asymmetric matter separating the gas phase from the LG coexistence phase is found to be higher for the softer symmetry energy.

Guang-Hua Zhang; Wei-Zhou Jiang

2012-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. SPE SPE 23442 Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer, Richardson, TX 7S0834S36 U.5A. Telex, 730989 SPEDAL. ABSTRACT A family of pressure and production decline as gas reservoirs which produce substan- tial amounts of water together with ~as. Production of water

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field, Houston, TX 77098 Abstract The planning of offshore oil or gas field infrastructure under uncertainty is addressed in this paper. The main uncertainties considered are in the initial maximum oil or gas flowrate

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

62

Understanding Sectoral Labor Market Dynamics: An Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding Sectoral Labor Market Dynamics: An Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field examines the response of employment and wages in the US oil and gas ...eld services industry to changes the dynamic response of wages and employment in the U.S. Oil and Gas Field Services (OGFS) industry to changes

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

63

Methane hydrate potential and development of a shallow gas field in the arctic: The Walakpa Field North Slope Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the North Slope Hydrate Study is to evaluate the methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa gas field, a shallow gas field located near Barrow, Alaska. Observing, understanding, and predicting the production characteristics of the Walakpa field will be accomplished by the analysis of the reservoir geology, and of the individual well production data, derived from reservoir engineering studies conducted in the field.

Glenn, R.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Methane hydrate potential and development of a shallow gas field in the arctic: The Walakpa Field North Slope Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the North Slope Hydrate Study is to evaluate the methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa gas field, a shallow gas field located near Barrow, Alaska. Observing, understanding, and predicting the production characteristics of the Walakpa field will be accomplished by the analysis of the reservoir geology, and of the individual well production data, derived from reservoir engineering studies conducted in the field.

Glenn, R.K.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column heights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column that the CO2 is in a dense phase (either liquid or supercritical). Accurate assessment of the storage capacity also requires an estimation of the amount of CO2 that can be safely stored beneath the reservoir seal

66

,"New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

67

Phase-Boundary of several Multicube Superconducting Circuits in a Magnetic-Field of Arbitrary Magnitude and Direction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this study ?although we did not provide a rigorous proof ?is that the phase boundary T, (H) of an infinite three dim-ensional superconducting network is a continuous fractal hypersurface in four dimensions, i.e., in the space of (T?H?,H, H, ) or (T...?H,a,P). This con- clusion is actually an expected generalization of the well- known result for some time that the phase boundary T, (H) of a two dimens-ional infinite superconducting net- work in a perpendicular magnetic field H is a continuous fractal curve...

YI, YM; Hu, Chia-Ren.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A novel branch and bound algorithm for optimal development of gas fields under uncertainty in reserves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in reserves Vikas Goel , Ignacio E. Grossmann Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University and operational planning for development of gas fields under uncertainty in gas reserves. Assuming uncertainties models for planning in the oil and gas exploration and production industry. A major challenge

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

69

Integrated Reservoir Characterization and Simulation Studies in Stripper Oil and Gas Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The demand for oil and gas is increasing yearly, whereas proven oil and gas reserves are being depleted. The potential of stripper oil and gas fields to supplement the national energy supply is large. In 2006, stripper wells accounted for 15% and 8...

Wang, Jianwei

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the Horizon Lines cargo container M/V Spirit provided nearly 200 days of intraseasonal high-resolution observations of clouds, precipitation, and marine boundary layer (MBL) structure on multiple legs between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. During the deployment, MBL clouds exhibited a much higher frequency of occurrence than other cloud types and occurred more often in the warm season than in the cold season. MBL clouds demonstrated a propensity to produce precipitation, which often evaporated before reaching the ocean surface. The formation of stratocumulus is strongly correlated to a shallow MBL with a strong inversion and a weak transition, while cumulus formation is associated with a much weaker inversion and stronger transition. The estimated inversion strength is shown to depend seasonally on the potential temperature at 700 hPa. The location of the commencement of systematic MBL decoupling always occurred eastward of the locations of cloud breakup, and the systematic decoupling showed a strong moisture stratification. The entrainment of the dry warm air above the inversion appears to be the dominant factor triggering the systematic decoupling, while surface latent heat flux, precipitation, and diurnal circulation did not play major roles. MBL clouds broke up over a short spatial region due to the changes in the synoptic conditions, implying that in real atmospheric conditions the MBL clouds do not have enough time to evolve as in the idealized models. (auth)

Zhou, Xiaoli [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Lewis, Ernie R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental, and Climate Sciences Dept.

2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

An energy absorbing far-field boundary condition for the elastic wave equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present an energy absorbing non-reflecting boundary condition of Clayton-Engquist type for the elastic wave equation together with a discretization which is stable for any ratio of compressional to shear wave speed. They prove stability for a second order accurate finite-difference discretization of the elastic wave equation in three space dimensions together with a discretization of the proposed non-reflecting boundary condition. The stability proof is based on a discrete energy estimate and is valid for heterogeneous materials. The proof includes all six boundaries of the computational domain where special discretizations are needed at the edges and corners. The stability proof holds also when a free surface boundary condition is imposed on some sides of the computational domain.

Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Field tests of probes for detecting internal corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes for detecting corrosion in environments similar to those found in natural gas transmission pipelines. Results and interpretation will be reported from four different field tests. Flange and flush-mount probes were used in four different environments at a gas-gathering site and one environment but two different orientations at a natural gas plant. These sites were selected to represent normal and upset conditions in a gas transmission pipeline. The environments consisted of 2 different levels of humidified natural gas/organic/water mixtures removed from natural gas, and the environments at the 6 and 12 o'clock positions of a natural gas pipeline carrying 2-phase gas/liquid flow. Data are also presented comparing the ECR probe data to that for coupons used to determine corrosion rate and to detect the presence of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Cayard, Michael S. (Intercorr International Inc.); Kane, Russell D. (Intercorr International Inc.); Meidinger, Brian (RMOTC-DOE)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A -moment approach to monotonic boundaries estimation: with applications in econometric and nuclear fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A -moment approach to monotonic boundaries estimation: with applications in econometric and nuclear application concerns frontier estimation in econometrics : the data typically consist of input factors Xi R of outputs y. Econometric considerations lead to the natural assumption that the cost function is isotonic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

75

Transport in a field aligned magnetized plasma/neutral gas boundary: the end of the plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in millimeter wave plasma diagnostics with applications toI. (2002). Principles of Plasma Diagnostics. Janev, R. K. (probe . . . as a diagnostic for exploding plasmas. (43), 1–

Cooper, Christopher M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Natural gas pipelines after field price decontrol : a study of risk, return and regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a study of a regulated industry undergoing rapid change. For the first time in its history, following the partial decontrol of field prices in 1978, natural gas is being priced at a level which places it in direct ...

Carpenter, Paul R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Characterization of transient cavitation in gas sparged solutions exposed to megasonic field using cyclic voltammetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of transient cavitation in gas sparged solutions exposed to megasonic field using 2011 Keywords: Megasonic energy Transient cavitation Acoustic streaming Dissolved gases Microelectrode been a significant interest in understanding the phenomena of cavitation and acoustic streaming, which

Deymier, Pierre

78

Electromagnetic fields and transport coefficients in a hot pion gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present recent results on finite temperature electromagnetic form factors and the electrical conductivity in a pion gas. The standard Chiral Perturbation Theory power counting needs to be modified for transport coefficients. We pay special attention to unitarity and to possible applications for dilepton and photon production.

A. Gomez Nicola; D. Fernandez-Fraile

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

79

Optimization of offshore oil and gas field development using mathematical programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPTIMIZATION OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD DEVELOPMENT USING MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING A Thesis by TODD THATCHER GRIMMETT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering OPTIMIZATION OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD DEVELOPMENT VSING MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING A Thesis by TODD THATCHER GRIMMETT Approved as to style and content by: R. A. Startzma...

Grimmett, Todd Thatcher

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Vacuum energy densities of a field in a cavity with a mobile boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the zero-point field fluctuations, and the related field energy densities, inside a one-dimensional and a three-dimensional cavity with a mobile wall. The mechanical degrees of freedom of the mobile wall are described quantum mechanically and they are fully included in the overall system dynamics. In this optomechanical system, the field and the wall can interact with each other through the radiation pressure on the wall, given by the photons inside the cavity or even by vacuum fluctuations. We consider two cases: the one-dimensional electromagnetic field and the three-dimensional scalar field, and use the Green's functions formalism, which allows extension of the results obtained for the scalar field to the electromagnetic field. We show that the quantum fluctuations of the position of the cavity's mobile wall significantly affect the field energy density inside the cavity, in particular at the very proximity of the mobile wall. The dependence of this effect from the ultraviolet cutoff frequency, related to the plasma frequency of the cavity walls, is discussed. We also compare our new results for the one-dimensional electromagnetic field and the three-dimensional massless scalar field to results recently obtained for the one-dimensional massless scalar field. We show that the presence of a mobile wall also changes the Casimir-Polder force on a polarizable body placed inside the cavity, giving the possibility to detect experimentally the new effects we have considered.

Federico Armata; Roberto Passante

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The quantum mechanics of ion-enhanced field emission and how it influences microscale gas breakdown  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of a positive gas ion can enhance cold electron field emission by deforming the potential barrier and increasing the tunneling probability of electrons—a process known as ion-enhanced field emission. In microscale gas discharges, ion-enhanced field emission produces additional emission from the cathode and effectively reduces the voltage required to breakdown a gaseous medium at the microscale (<10??m). In this work, we enhance classic field emission theory by determining the impact of a gaseous ion on electron tunneling and compute the effect of ion-enhanced field emission on the breakdown voltage. We reveal that the current density for ion-enhanced field emission retains the same scaling as vacuum cold field emission and that this leads to deviations from traditional breakdown theory at microscale dimensions.

Li, Yingjie [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Go, David B., E-mail: dgo@nd.edu [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

82

Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0Month PreviousThousandCubic0Feet)

83

Mississippi Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15Thousand CubicYear46 4722252 254

84

Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15ThousandExtensions (Billion

85

Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 47Extensions (Billion Cubic

86

Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623and2,819 143,4362009 2010Year622

87

Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623and2,819 143,4362009 2010Year622622

88

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623and2,819 143,4362009207 5,098170

89

SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data 2010Feet)PercentCoal1.Report No.:GasThe VBA

90

Technologies to characterize natural gas emissions tested in field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManusScience and Innovationexperiments Natural gas

91

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Environmental assessment of deep-water sponge fields in relation to oil and gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Environmental assessment of deep-water sponge fields in relation to oil and gas activity: a west of Shetland case study industry and government identified sponge grounds in areas of interest to the oil and gas sector

Henderson, Gideon

92

Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 2, offshore gulf coast over-pressured, dry gas reservoirs. Topical report, July 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of reservoir management strategies for optimization of ultimate hydrocarbon recovery and net present value from an overpressured, high yield gas condensate reservoir with water influx is reported. This field evaluation was based on a reservoir simulation. Volumetric and performance-derived original gas-in-place estimates did not agree: the performance-derived values were significantly lower than those predicted from volumetric analysis. Predicted field gas recovery was improved significantly by methods which accelerated gas withdrawals. Recovery was also influenced by well location. Accelerated withdrawals from wells near the aquifer tended to reduce sweep by cusping and coning water. This offset any benefits of increased gas rates.

Jones, R.E.; Jirik, L.A.; Hower, T.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Open-closed field line boundary position: A parametric study using an MHD model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA Received 29 July 2003; revised 26 March 2004 in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), solar wind dynamic pressure, and dipole tilt angle on the position as a function of the solar wind By and Bz which we find to have the largest effect on the OCB location. We

De Zeeuw, Darren L.

94

A field example of a gas orifice meter with debris-ridden liquid in mist flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field example of debris-ridden liquids in an orifice meter is presented in this paper. Flow conditions in gas pipelines containing hydrocarbon liquids and particulate matter are discussed. Known effects on measurement of the presence of these materials in orifice meters is presented. By definition, gas measurement is accurate if performed on a clean and dry flow stream. This paper demonstrates the importance of removing as much liquid and debris as possible prior to measurement.

Chisholm, J.L.; Mooney, C.V. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States); Datta-Barua, L.; Feldmann, R.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade (MillionThousandFeet) New Field

96

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Thermodynamic functions of a nonrelativistic degenerate neutron gas in a magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fermi energy, partial concentrations of polarized neutrons, pressure, and volume energy density of a degenerate nonrelativistic neutron gas in a magnetic field are calculated using numerical methods taking into account the anomalous magnetic moment of a neutron. The results of calculations are a generalization of relations underlying the Oppenheimer-Volkov model of a neutron star to the case of an applied magnetic field. An ultrastrong (up to 10{sup 17} G) magnetic field changes the pressure and internal energy of the star and affects it static configuration and evolution. It is shown that a degenerate neutron gas in ultrastrong and weak magnetic fields is paramagnetic; the corresponding values of magnetic susceptibility differ by a factor on the order of unity. The possibility of experimentally verifying the results from analysis of pulsar-emitted radiation is discussed.

Skobelev, V. V., E-mail: v.skobelev@inbox.ru [Moscow State Industrial University (Russian Federation)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Hydrodynamic flow in lower Cretaceous Muddy sandstone, Gas Draw Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control readily available for analysis of rock properties and fluid pressures. The nine-township area surrounding the Gas Draw field is well-suited for study of hydrodynamic effects on oil accumulation. Regional Geology Structure The citations... of southeastern Montana. It is bounded by the Miles City arch and Black Hills uplift on the east, the Hartville uplift on the southeast, and Bighorn Mountains and Casper arch on the west. Muddy stratigraphic oil fields are located on the east flank...

Lin, Joseph Tien-Chin

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Shallow gas in Arkoma basin - Pine Hollow and South Ashland fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pine Hollow and South Ashland fields located in Pittsburg and Coal Counties, Oklahoma, established a combined reserve exceeding 200 bcf of gas. The Hartshorne Sandstone of early Desmoinesian (Pennsylvanian) age is the producing zone at a depth of 4000 ft (1200 m). Gas, probably of biogenic origin, migrated into the reservoir shortly after deposition. Subsequent folding and faulting of the Ashland anticline resulted in repositioning of the gas in a downthrown fault trap. The upthrown anticline portion of the Hartshorne is water-bearing. Moderate well costs and high individual reserves have resulted in excellent economics. Competitive bidding on federal leases has resulted in a high bid exceeding $1 million for one tract in the South Ashland field.

Woncik, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Play analysis and stratigraphic position of Uinta Basin tertiary - age oil and gas fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tertiary-age sediments in the Uinta basin produce hydrocarbons from five types of plays. These play types were determined by hydrocarbon type, formation, depositional environment, rock type, porosity, permeability, source, and per-well recovery. Each well was reviewed to determine the stratigraphic position and producing characteristics of each producing interval. The five types of plays are as follows: (1) naturally fractured oil reservoirs, (2) low-permeability oil reservoirs, (3) high-permeability of oil reservoirs, (4) low-permeability gas reservoirs, and (5) tight gas sands. Several fields produce from multiple plays, which made it necessary to segregate the hydrocarbon production into several plays. The stratigraphic position of the main producing intervals is shown on a basin-wide cross section, which is color-coded by play type. This 61-well cross section has several wells from each significant Tertiary oil and gas field in the Uinta basin.

Williams, R.A. (Pennzoil Exploration and Production Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Field studies of leaf gas exchanges in oil palm tree (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field studies of leaf gas exchanges in oil palm tree (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) E. Dufrene B This study is part of a larger research pro- gram on climatic and biological factors affecting oil palm yield (A) in oil palm. Most of them have used young plants under laboratory conditions to study effects

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

103

,"Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbedShale Proved ReservesField

104

Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Study of Inflationary Generalized Cosmic Chaplygin Gas for Standard and Tachyon Scalar Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider an inflationary universe model in the context of generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas by taking matter field as standard and tachyon scalar fields. We evaluate the corresponding scalar fields and scalar potentials during intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by modifying the first Friedmann equation. In each case, we evaluate the number of e-folds, scalar as well as tensor power spectra, scalar spectral index and important observational parameter, i.e., tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflatons. The graphical behavior of this parameter shows that the model remains incompatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data in each case.

M. Sharif; Rabia Saleem

2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

106

Case study of a horizontal well in a layered Rotliegendes gas field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A horizontal well was drilled in the Ravenspurn North field to drain a thin gas column above the aquifer. The field has a significant variation in reservoir quality, with most of the wells requiring stimulation by hydraulic fracturing. The reservoir is formed from a stacked sequence of aeolian dune and fluvial sandstones with a wide permeability range. The horizontal well was chosen as an alternative to stimulation by hydraulic fracturing to avoid water production from the aquifer. The well was successful, flowing at higher gas rates than expected with no water production. Production, core, and production logging data were used to demonstrate greater than expected lateral heterogeneity in the field. The horizontal well was found to be appropriate for the very specific conditions found in one part of the reservoir; however, the overall development strategy of using hydraulic fracture remains the preferred technique.

Catterall, S.J.A.; Yaliz, A. (Hamilton Oil Co. Ltd., London (United Kingdom))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

High-resolution moisture fields retrieved for the first time from both operational and research radars illustrate the low-level moisture variability associated with boundary layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radars illustrate the low-level moisture variability associated with boundary layer processes-Resolution, Low-Level Moisture Fields from Operational NexRad and Research Radars by Rita D. RobeRts, FRĂ©DĂ©Ric Fab vapor measurements extracted from radar using an index of refraction (refractivity) technique developed

Reising, Steven C.

108

Effects of solute and vacancy segregation on antiphase boundary migration in stoichiometric and Al-rich Fe?Al: a phase-field simulation study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of segregation of solute atoms and vacancies on migration of antiphase boundaries (APBs) in stoichiometric (Fe-25 at%Al) and Al-rich (Fe-28 at%Al) Fe?Al at 673 K have been studied using a phase-field method in which ...

Koizumi, Yuichiro

109

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

Not Available

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

111

Lyapunov Exponents from Kinetic Theory for a Dilute, Field-driven Lorentz Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Positive and negative Lyapunov exponents for a dilute, random, two-dimensional Lorentz gas in an applied field, $\\vec{E}$, in a steady state at constant energy are computed to order $E^{2}$. The results are: $\\lambda_{\\pm}=\\lambda_{\\pm}^{0}-a_{\\pm}(qE/mv)^{2}t_{0}$ where $\\lambda_{\\pm}^{0}$ are the exponents for the field-free Lorentz gas, $a_{+}=11/48, a_{-}=7/48$, $t_{0}$ is the mean free time between collisions, $q$ is the charge, $m$ the mass and $v$ is the speed of the particle. The calculation is based on an extended Boltzmann equation in which a radius of curvature, characterizing the separation of two nearby trajectories, is one of the variables in the distribution function. The analytical results are in excellent agreement with computer simulations. These simulations provide additional evidence for logarithmic terms in the density expansion of the diffusion coefficient.

H. van Beijeren; J. R. Dorfman; E. G. D. Cohen; H. A. Posch; Ch. Dellago

1996-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Semiclassical Approximation for Non-Abelian Field Strength Correlators in the Instanton Dilute Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field strength correlators are semi-classically evaluated in the dilute gas model of non-Abelian sources (instantons) and compared with lattice data for QCD at zero temperature. We show that one of the Euclidean invariant, tensorial structures vanishes for configurations being purely selfdual or anti-selfdual. We compute the invariant functions contributing to the correlators within the two lowest orders in an instanton density expansion. Fitting instanton size and density for quenched and full QCD, we obtain a reasonable description.

E. -M. Ilgenfritz; B. V. Martemyanov; S. V. Molodtsov; M. Müller--Preussker; Yu. A. Simonov

1997-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

113

A New Variable Modified Chaplygin Gas Model Interacting with Scalar Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this letter we present a new form of the well known Chaplygin gas model by introducing inhomogeneity in the EOS. This model explains $\\omega=-1$ crossing. Also we have given a graphical representation of the model using $\\{r,s\\}$ parameters. We have also considered an interaction of this model with the scalar field by introducing a phenomenological coupling function and have shown that the potential decays with time.

Writambhara Chakraborty; Ujjal Debnath

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

114

Production management teachniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 3. Offshore gulf coast normally pressured, dry gas reservoir. Topical report, July 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoir, the study conducted on an offshore, normally pressured, dry gas reservoir is reported. The strategies that were particularly effective in increasing both the ultimate recovery and the net present value of the field are high volume water production from strategically located downdip wells and the recompletion of an upstructure well to recover trapped attic gas. High volume water production lowered the average reservoir pressure, which liberated residual gas trapped in the invaded region. Recompleting a new well into the reservoir also lowered the pressure and improved the volumetric displacement efficiency by recovering trapped attic gas. Ultimate recovery is predicted to increase 5-12% of the original gas-in-place.

Hower, T.L.; Uttley, S.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Modified Chaplygin Gas as Scalar Field and Holographic Dark Energy Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the correspondence between field theoretic and holographic dark energy density of the universe with the modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) respectively both in a flat and non-flat FRW universe. We present an equivalent representation of the MCG with a homogeneous minimally coupled scalar field by constructing the corresponding potential. A new scalar field potential is obtained here which is physically realistic and important for cosmological model building. In addition we also present holographic dark energy model described by the MCG. The dynamics of the corresponding holographic dark energy field is determined by reconstructing the potential in a non-flat universe. The stability of the holographic dark energy in this case in a non-flat universe is also discussed.

B. C. Paul; P. Thakur; A. Saha

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

116

Power spectrum in the Chaplygin gas model: tachyonic, fluid and scalar field representations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Chaplygin gas model, characterized by an equation of state of the type $p = - \\frac{A}{\\rho}$ emerges naturally from the Nambu-Goto action of string theory. This fluid representation can be recast under the form of a tachyonic field given by a Born-Infeld type Lagrangian. At the same time, the Chaplygin gas equation of state can be obtained from a self-interacting scalar field. We show that, from the point of view of the supernova type Ia data, the three representations (fluid, tachyonic, scalar field) lead to the same results. However, concerning the matter power spectra, while the fluid and tachyonic descriptions lead to exactly the same results, the self-interacting scalar field representation implies different statistical estimations for the parameters. In particular, the estimation for the dark matter density parameter in the fluid representation favors a universe dominated almost completely by dark matter, while in the self-interacting scalar field representation the prediction is very closed to that obtained in the $\\Lambda$CDM model.

C. E. M. Batista; J. C. Fabris; M. Morita

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hadron resonance gas and mean-field nuclear matter for baryon number fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give an estimate for the skewness and the kurtosis of the baryon number distribution in two representative models; i.e., models of a hadron resonance gas and relativistic mean-field nuclear matter. We emphasize formal similarity between these two descriptions. The hadron resonance gas leads to a deviation from the Skellam distribution if quantum statistical correlation is taken into account at high baryon density, but this effect is not strong enough to explain fluctuation data seen in the beam-energy scan at RHIC/STAR. In the calculation of mean-field nuclear matter the density correlation with the vector \\omega-field rather than the effective mass with the scalar \\sigma-field renders the kurtosis suppressed at higher baryon density so as to account for the experimentally observed behavior of the kurtosis. We finally discuss the difference between the baryon number and the proton number fluctuations from correlation effects in isospin space. Our numerical results suggest that such effects are only minor even in the case of complete randomization of isospin.

Kenji Fukushima

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

120

Influence of spatially varying pseudo-magnetic field on a 2D electron gas in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of a varying pseudo-magnetic field, which falls as $1/x^2$, on a two dimensional electron gas in graphene is investigated. By considering the second order Dirac equation, we show that its correct general solution is that which might present singular wavefunctions since such field induced by elastic deformations diverges as $x\\rightarrow0$. We show that only this consideration yields the known relativistic Landau levels when we remove such elastic field. We have observed that the zero Landau level fails to develop for certain values of it. We then speculate about the consequences of these facts to the quantum Hall effect on graphene. We also analyze the changes in the relativistic cyclotron frequency. We hope our work being probed in these contexts, since graphene has great potential for electronic applications.

L. G. da Silva Leite; D. Cogollo; C. Filgueiras; Edilberto O. Silva

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hydrodynamic flow in lower cretaceous muddy sandstone, Gas Draw field, Powder River basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lower Cretaceous Muddy sandstones form a simple stratigraphic trap at Gas Draw field, northeast Power River Basin. The Muddy at Gas Draw can be subdivided into six zones. The lowest, sixth Muddy sandstone is fluvial in origin, and the overlying fifth sandstone is a transgressive marine deposit. The fourth zone represents a fluvial origin below to shallow marine above. The third zone is interpreted to be of fluvial-overbank origin with possibly a bay-lagoonal association. The second sandstone is suggested to be a deposit of a fluvial or deltaic environment. The first zone was deposited in a lagoonal and poorly-drained marsh environment. At Gas Draw, the second Muddy sandstone is the major producing zone and has the highest average porosity and permeability of 22.6% and 209 md. It had high initial production rates of up to 1200 BOPD (191 m/sup 3//day). From correlation of well logs, the Muddy reservoirs appear to be separated by thin shales, but analysis of drill stem tests show that these reservoirs are connected at some points within the area. Analysis of drill-stem test pressures provides the basis for interpreting fluid potential relationships. The average potentiometric gradient of 32 ft/mi across the field results in a hydrodynamic oil column of 210 feet, whereas capillary-pressure differences due to permeability changes can account for only 38 feet of oil column. The observed oil column over most of the field has a height somewhat greater than 250 feet which agrees well with total calculated oil column of about 248 feet. Furthermore, local decrease in permeability to oil may be responsible for water production at any place within the field, even updip from the producing area.

Lin, J.T.C.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using electric field stress shields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by use of main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. The flexing elements and the stress shields may also be utilized in connection with a plug and socket arrangement for providing electrical connection between main conductor sections. 10 figs.

Cookson, A.H.; Dale, S.J.; Bolin, P.C.

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those predicted by fracture models. There was no accepted optimal method for conducting hydraulic fracturing in the Bossier. Each operator used a different approach. Anadarko, the most active operator in the play, had tested at least four different kinds of fracture treatments. The ability to arrive at an optimal fracturing program was constrained by the lack of adequate fracture models to simulate the fracturing treatment, and an inability to completely understand the results obtained in previous fracturing programs. This research aimed at a combined theoretical, experimental and field-testing program to improve fracturing practices in the Bossier and other tight gas plays.

Mukul M. Sharma

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Estimated gas reserves and availability of the Viking-Kinsella Field, Alberta, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the author. h study of thi. s field was a part of a pro, ]act in which T~s- canada pipe Lines Limited cojmsissioned the firm oi' DeGolyer and thc?aughton to determine the resez-its and the a-, nilability of gas of the Pe&vince of Alberta, Canada i..., ' aa ths kogpxiteL %egs. Operating. pzessmze cf the pips ~ "%asst ef the pme~? ' The smyaztsg pressers drep psr maft of ~metfcef mast be dieted- Xf mdaymba, ssd aee~ ptzessmms verses ~foa dsga sea ~le foz a peodseing reaervofr fer i+feh She...

Meyer, Lawrence Joffre

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384 388 413New Field Discoveries

126

Characterization of the reactive flow field dynamics in a gas turbine injector using high frequency PIV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work details the analysis of the aerodynamics of an experimental swirl stabilized burner representative of gas turbine combustors. This analysis is carried out using High Frequency PIV (HFPIV) measurements in a reactive situation. While this information is usually available at a rather low rate, temporally resolved PIV measurements are necessary to better understand highly turbulent swirled flows, which are unsteady by nature. Thanks to recent technical improvements, a PIV system working at 12 kHz has been developed to study this experimental combustor flow field. Statistical quantities of the burner are first obtained and analyzed, and the measurement quality is checked, then a temporal analysis of the velocity field is carried out, indicating that large coherent structures periodically appear in the combustion chamber. The frequency of these structures is very close to the quarter wave mode of the chamber, giving a possible explanation for combustion instability coupling.

Barbosa, Séverine; Ducruix, Sébastien

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Improving the Field Performance of Natural Gas Furnaces, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to examine the impact that common installation practices and age-induced equipment degradation may have on the installed performance of natural gas furnaces, as measured by steady-state efficiency and AFUE. PARR identified twelve furnaces of various ages and efficiencies that were operating in residential homes in the Des Moines Iowa metropolitan area and worked with a local HVAC contractor to retrieve them and test them for steady-state efficiency and AFUE in the lab. Prior to removal, system airflow, static pressure, equipment temperature rise, and flue loss measurements were recorded for each furnace. After removal from the field the furnaces were transported to the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) laboratory, where PARR conducted steady-state efficiency and AFUE testing. The test results show that steady-state efficiency in the field was 6.4% lower than that measured for the same furnaces under standard conditions in the lab, which included tuning the furnace input and air flow rate. Comparing AFUE measured under ASHRAE standard conditions with the label value shows no reduction in efficiency for the furnaces in this study over their 15 to 24 years of operation when tuned to standard conditions. Further analysis of the data showed no significant correlation between efficiency change and the age or the rated efficiency of the furnace.

Rothgeb, S.; Brand, L.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Application of oil gas-chromatography in reservoir compartmentalization in a mature Venezuelan oil field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas chromatographic oil {open_quotes}fingerprinting{close_quotes} was successfully applied in a multidisciplinary production geology project by Maraven, S.A. to define the extent of vertical and lateral continuity of Eocene and Miocene sandstone reservoirs in the highly faulted Bloque I field, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela. Seventy-five non-biodegraded oils (20{degrees}-37.4{degrees} API) were analyzed with gas chromatography. Fifty were produced from the Eocene Misoa C-4, C-5, C-6 or C-7 horizons, fifteen from the Miocene basal La Rosa and ten from multizone completions. Gas chromatographic and terpane and sterane biomarker data show that all of the oils are genetically related. They were expelled from a type II, Upper Cretaceous marine La Luna source rock at about 0.80-0.90% R{sub o} maturity. Alteration in the reservoir by gas stripping with or without subsequent light hydrocarbons mixing was observed in some oils. Detailed chromatographic comparisons among the oils shown by star plots and cluster analysis utilizing several naphthenic and aromatic peak height ratios, resulted in oil pool groupings. This led to finding previously unknown lateral and vertical reservoir communication and also helped in checking and updating the scaling character of faults. In the commingled oils, percentages of each contributing zone in the mixture were also determined giving Maraven engineers a proven, rapid and inexpensive tool for production allocation and reservoir management The oil pool compartmentalization defined by the geochemical fingerprinting is in very good agreement with the sequence stratigraphic interpretation of the reservoirs and helped evaluate the influence of structure in oil migration and trapping.

Munoz, N.G.; Mompart, L. [Maraven, Caracas (Venezuela); Talukdar, S.C.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Detecting internal corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines: field tests of probes and systems for real-time corrosion measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of automated, multi-technique electrochemical corrosion-rate monitoring devices and probes for detecting corrosion in environments similar to those found in natural gas transmission pipelines. It involved measurement of real-time corrosion signals from operating pipelines. Results and interpretation were reported from four different field test locations. Standard flush-mount and custom flange probes were used in four different environments at a gas-gathering site and one environment but two different probe orientations at a natural gas site. These sites were selected to represent normal and upset conditions common in gas transmission pipelines. The environments consisted of two different levels of humidified natural gas, liquid hydrocarbon, and water from natural gas. Probe locations included the 6 and 12 o?clock positions of a natural gas pipeline carrying 2-phase gas/liquid flow. The probe data was monitored using completely remote solar powered systems that provided real-time data transmission via wireless back to a pipeline control station. Data are also presented comparing the ECR probe data to that for coupons used to determine corrosion rate and to detect the presence of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Kane, R.D. (InterCorr International); Meidinger, B. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Numerical, Laboratory And Field Studies of Gas Production From Natural Hydrate Accumulations in Geologic Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrate (Class 1W) or gas and hydrate (Class 1G). In Class 1Economic Geology of Natural Gas Hydrates, M. Max, A.H. John-of the thermal test of gas hydrate dissociation in the

Moridis, George J.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Kowalsky, Michael; Reagan, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

132

Exciton Bose condensation : the ground state of an electron-hole gas I. Mean field description of a simplified model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1069 Exciton Bose condensation : the ground state of an electron-hole gas I. Mean field description dégénérées. Nous étudions la condensation de Bose de ce systÚme en fonction de la densité, négligeant dans-hole gas in a simple model semiconductor, with direct gap and isotropic, non degenerate bands. We study

Boyer, Edmond

133

Field evaluation of natural gas and dry sorbent injection for MWC emissions control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), in cooperation with the Olmsted Waste-to-Energy Facility (OWEF) and with subcontracted engineering services from the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), has completed the detailed engineering and preparation of construction specifications for an Emissions Reduction Testing System (ERTS). The ERTS has been designed for retrofit to one of two 100-ton/day municipal waste combustors at the OWEF, located in Rochester, Minnesota. The purpose of the retrofit is to conduct a field evaluation of a combined natural gas and sorbent injection process (IGT`s METHANE de-TOX{sup SM}, IGT Patent No. 5,105,747) for reducing the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), hydrochloric acid (HCI), oxides of sulfur (SO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC), and chlorinated hydrocarbons (dioxin/furans). In addition, the design includes modifications for the control of heavy metals (HM). Development of the process should allow the waste-to-energy industry to meet the Federal New Source Performance Standards for these pollutants at significantly lower costs when compared to existing technology of Thermal deNO{sub x} combined with spray dryer scrubber/fabric filters. Additionally, the process should reduce boiler corrosion and increase both the thermal and power production efficiency of the facility.

Wohadlo, S.; Abbasi, H.; Cygan, D. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)] Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Long Cycles in a Perturbed Mean Field Model of a Boson Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we give a precise mathematical formulation of the relation between Bose condensation and long cycles and prove its validity for the perturbed mean field model of a Bose gas. We decompose the total density $\\rho=\\rho_{{\\rm short}}+\\rho_{{\\rm long}}$ into the number density of particles belonging to cycles of finite length ($\\rho_{{\\rm short}}$) and to infinitely long cycles ($\\rho_{{\\rm long}}$) in the thermodynamic limit. For this model we prove that when there is Bose condensation, $\\rho_{{\\rm long}}$ is different from zero and identical to the condensate density. This is achieved through an application of the theory of large deviations. We discuss the possible equivalence of $\\rho_{{\\rm long}}\

Teunis C. Dorlas; Philippe A. Martin; Joseph V. Pulé

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

135

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provides onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 13 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

136

Controls of coal fabric on coalbed gas production and compositional shift in both field production and canister desorption tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production rates of coalbed gas wells commonly vary significantly, even in the same field with similar reservoir permeability and gas content. The compositional variation in produced gas is also not everywhere predictable, although in most fields produced gas becomes progressively enriched in CO, through the production life of a reservoir, such as parts of the San Juan basin. In contrast, it is generally observed that the ratio of CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} declines with time during field and laboratory desorption testing of coal cores. In this study, we investigate numerically the importance of coal fabric, namely cleat spacing and aperture width, on the performance of coalbed gas wells and gas compositional shifts during production. Because of the cubic relationship between fracture permeability and fracture aperture width (and thus fracture porosity) for a given cleat permeability, the production profile of coal seams varies depending on whether the permeability is distributed among closely spaced fractures (cleat) with narrower apertures or more widely spaced fractures (cleat) with wider apertures. There is a lower fracture porosity for coal with widely spaced fractures than for coal with closely spaced fractures. Therefore, the relative permeability to gas increases more rapidly for coals with more widely spaced cleats as less dewatering from fractures is required, assuming that the fractures are initially water saturated. The enrichment of CO{sub 2} in the production gas with time occurs because of the stronger adsorption of coals for CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 4}. However, during desorption of coal cores, CO{sub 2} desorbs more rapidly than methane because desorption rate is governed more by diffusion than by sorption affinity, and CO{sub 2} has much higher effective diffusivity in microporous coals than CH{sub 4}.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Reserves determination using type-curve matching and EMB methods in the Medicine Hat shallow gas field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tight, shallow gas reservoirs in the Western Canada basin present a number of unique challenges in determining reserves accurately. Traditional methods such as decline analysis and material balance are inaccurate owing to the formation`s low permeabilities and poor pressure data. The low permeabilities cause long transient periods that are not separated easily from production decline with conventional decline analysis, resulting in lower confidence in selecting the appropriate decline characteristics (exponential or harmonic), which effects recovery factors and remaining reserves significantly. Limited, poor-quality pressure data and commingled production from the three producing zones results in nonrepresentative pressure data and hence inaccurate material-balance analysis. This paper presents two new methods of reserve evaluation that address the problems described above for tight, shallow gas in the Medicine Hat field. The first method applies type-curve matching, which combines the analytical pressure solutions of the diffusivity equation (transient) with the empirical decline equation. The second method is an extended material balance (EMB), which incorporates the gas deliverability theory to allow selection of appropriate p/z derivatives without relying on pressure data. Excellent results were obtained when these two methods were applied to 10 properties that gather gas from 2,300 wells. The two independent techniques resulted in similar production forecasts and reserves, confirming their validity. They proved to be valuable, practical tools in overcoming the various challenges of tight, shallow gas and in improving the accuracy in gas-reserves determination in the Medicine Hat field.

West, S.L. [Imperial Oil Resources Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Cochrane, P.J.R. [Imperial Oil Resources Ltd., Cold Lake, Alberta (Canada)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Optimizing the efficiency of cylindrical cyclone gas/liquid separators for field applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Problems associated with the use of compact cylindrical cyclone gas/liquid (CCGL) separators can be attributed to two physical phenomena: gas carry-under and liquid carryover (LCO). Inadequate understanding of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic...

Adebare, Adedeji

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time,… (more)

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field number 1, onshore gulf coast over-pressured, high yield condensate reservoir. Topical report, July 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoirs, the study conducted on an overpressured high yield gas condensate reservoir is reported. The base recovery factor for the field was projected to be only 47.8%, due to high residual gas saturation and a relatively strong aquifer which maintained reservoir pressure.

Hower, T.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Release model for in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas treatment system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual model for the vapor and aerosol transport and deposition in the in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas system (OGS) has been developed. This model can be used to predict the emissions from the OGS under normal and off-normal conditions. Results generated by the model can be used to evaluate design and/or procedural modifications, define tests, and predict results. The OGS vapor and aerosol transport and deposition is modeled using the PULSE/MOD-ISV/VER 1.0.0 developmental computer code. Input data requirements for this code include the specific geometries of the OGS components; the composition, rate, and temperature of the vapors and aerosols entering the OGS; and the OGS component surface temperatures or heat fluxes. Currently, not all of these model inputs are available. Therefore, conceptual input parameters are developed. Using this input data, preliminary calculations with the code have been performed. These calculations include a demonstration that the code predicts convergent results, a comparison of predicted results with performance data for one of the OGS components, and a preliminary sensitivity study of the complete model.

Pafford, D.J.; Tung, V.X.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Effect of neutral gas heating on the wave magnetic fields of a low pressure 13.56?MHz planar coil inductively coupled argon discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The axial and radial magnetic field profiles in a 13.56?MHz (radio frequency) laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor are simulated with the consideration of the effect of neutral gas heating. Spatially resolved electron densities, electron temperatures, and neutral gas temperatures were obtained for simulation using empirically fitted electron density and electron temperature and heuristically determined neutral gas temperature. Comparison between simulated results and measured fields indicates that neutral gas heating plays an important role in determining the skin depth of the magnetic fields.

Jayapalan, Kanesh K., E-mail: kane-karnage@yahoo.com; Chin, Oi-Hoong, E-mail: ohchin@um.edu.my [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)] [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Effect on cavity optomechanics of the interaction between a cavity field and a one-dimensional interacting bosonic gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate optomechanical coupling between one-dimensional interacting bosons and the electromagnetic field in a high-finesse optical cavity. We show that by tuning interatomic interactions, one can realize effective optomechanics with mechanical resonators ranging from side-mode excitations of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) to particle-hole excitations of a Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gas. We propose that this unique feature can be formulated to detect the BEC-TG gas crossover and measure the sine-Gordon transition continuously and nondestructively.

Sun Qing [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Center of Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Hu Xinghua; Liu, W. M. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Xie, X. C. [International Center for Quantum Materials, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States); Ji Anchun [Center of Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Lagrangian Variational Framework for Boundary Value Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A boundary value problem is commonly associated with constraints imposed on a system at its boundary. We advance here an alternative point of view treating the system as interacting "boundary" and "interior" subsystems. This view is implemented through a Lagrangian framework that allows to account for (i) a variety of forces including dissipative acting at the boundary; (ii) a multitude of features of interactions between the boundary and the interior fields when the boundary fields may differ from the boundary limit of the interior fields; (iii) detailed pictures of the energy distribution and its flow; (iv) linear and nonlinear effects. We provide a number of elucidating examples of the structured boundary and its interactions with the system interior. We also show that the proposed approach covers the well known boundary value problems.

Alexander Figotin; Guillermo Reyes

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

145

A critical review of methods used in the estimation of natural gas reserves: Natural gas reserves in the state of Texas. Some educational prerequisites in the field of petroleum economics and evaluation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for oil. In order to make an a- urete determination of the recovery factor, it is necessary to pre-determine the pressure history of the field. by material balance and water influx calculations, or by extra- polatutg a curve cf pressure agatnst...-Associated Gas Reserves Volumetr ic Method Discussion of the Factors in tne Volumetri. Formula The Decline Curve Method 7 7 12 Ie Methods of Estimating Associated Gas Reserves Methods of Estimatmg Dissolved Gas Reserves Water Drive Constant Voluxne...

Crichton, John Alston

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Application of convolution and average pressure approximation for solving non-linear flow problems. constant pressure inner boundary condition for gas flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

character of the solution), each of the existing approximate solutions does have disadvantages. The purpose of this work is to provide a solution mechanism for the case of timedependent real gas flow which contains as few "limitations" as possible...

Zhakupov, Mansur

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska`s North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Tracer Gas as a Practical Field Diagnostic Tool for Assessing Duct System Leaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diagnostic tools for detecting and locating leaks in the air distribution system. The tracer gas tests described are a good complement to these tools in the detection, location, and measurement of duct leakage. Testing for house infiltration once with the air...

Cummings, J. B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Long-time-tail Effects on Lyapunov Exponents of a Random, Two-dimensional Field-driven Lorentz Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the Lyapunov exponents for a moving, charged particle in a two-dimensional Lorentz gas with randomly placed, non-overlapping hard disk scatterers placed in a thermostatted electric field, $\\vec{E}$. The low density values of the Lyapunov exponents have been calculated with the use of an extended Lorentz-Boltzmann equation. In this paper we develop a method to extend these results to higher density, using the BBGKY hierarchy equations and extending them to include the additional variables needed for calculation of Lyapunov exponents. We then consider the effects of correlated collision sequences, due to the so-called ring events, on the Lyapunov exponents. For small values of the applied electric field, the ring terms lead to non-analytic, field dependent, contributions to both the positive and negative Lyapunov exponents which are of the form ${\\tilde{\\epsilon}}^{2} \\ln\\tilde{\\epsilon}$, where $\\tilde{\\epsilon}$ is a dimensionless parameter proportional to the strength of the applied field. We show that these non-analytic terms can be understood as resulting from the change in the collision frequency from its equilibrium value, due to the presence of the thermostatted field, and that the collision frequency also contains such non-analytic terms.

D. Panja; J. R. Dorfman; Henk van Beijeren

2000-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

Geometrical Field Representation of Solid, Fluid, and Gas as Continuum in Rational Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the points-set transformation concept about the motion transformation in continuum, the macro classical strain is expressed by the additive addition of the intrinsic stretching of material element and its intrinsic local rotation. For zero classical strain (no macro deformation observed on its configuration surface, suitable container is required for liquid and gas to make up macro invariant configuration), the results show that: (1) For solid, the local rotation angular is zero. The material element has no intrinsic stretching. (2) For liquid, the local rotation will not change the basic gauge tensor. The material element has intrinsic plane stretching on the rotation plane. (3) For gas state, the intrinsic local rotation will amplify the basic gauge tensor. The material element has intrinsic stretching along the rotation direction. Hence, under the condition of no macro classical strain be observed, the material element has three different physical states: solid (no intrinsic stretching), fluid (plane intrinsic stretching), and gas (directional intrinsic stretching). Furthermore, for the three states, the free conditions are defined by zero intrinsic stretching. Referring to this free condition, the constitutive equations for the materials at multiple states are established.

Jianhua Xiao

2009-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

The thermodynamics for a hadronic gas of fireballs with internal color structures and chiral fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermodynamical partition function for a gas of color-singlet bags consisting of fundamental and adjoint particles in both $U(N_c)$ and $SU(N_c)$ group representations is reviewed in detail. The constituent particle species are assumed to satisfy various thermodynamical statistics. The gas of bags is probed to study the phase transition for a nuclear matter in the extreme conditions. These bags are interpreted as the Hagedorn states and they are the highly excited hadronic states which are produced below the phase transition point to the quark-gluon plasma. The hadronic density of states has the Gross-Witten critical point and exhibits a third order phase transition from a hadronic phase dominated by the discrete low-lying hadronic mass spectrum particles to another hadronic phase dominated by the continuous Hagedorn states. The Hagedorn threshold production is found just above the highest known experimental discrete low-lying hadronic mass spectrum. The subsequent Hagedorn phase undergoes a first order deconfinement phase transition to an explosive quark-gluon plasma. The role of the chiral phase transition in the phases of the discrete low-lying mass spectrum and the continuous Hagedorn mass spectrum is also considered. It is found crucial in the phase transition diagram. Alternate scenarios are briefly discussed for the Hagedorn gas undergoes a higher order phase transition through multi-processes of internal color-flavor structure modification.

Ismail Zakout; Carsten Greiner

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

152

Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 2, Heating season  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US Government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer; Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

Miller, J.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 1, Cooling season  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer, Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

Miller, J.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Mean-field approach in the multi-component gas of interacting particles applied to relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalized mean-field approach for thermodynamic description of relativistic single- and multi-component gas in the grand canonical ensemble is formulated. In the framework of the proposed approach different phenomenological excluded-volume procedures are presented and compared to the existing ones. The mean-field approach is then used to effectively include hard-core repulsion in hadron-resonance gas model for description of chemical freeze-out in heavy-ion collisions. We calculate the collision energy dependence of several quantities for different values of hard-core hadron radius and for different excluded-volume procedures such as van der Waals and Carnahan-Starling models. It is shown that a choice of the excluded-volume model becomes important for large particle densities, and for large enough values of hadron radii ($r\\gtrsim0.9$ fm) there can be a sizable difference between different excluded-volume procedures used to describe the chemical freeze-out in heavy-ion collisions. For the smaller and more commonly used values of hard-core hadron radii ($r\\lesssim0.5$ fm) the van der Waals excluded-volume procedure is shown to be sufficient.

D. Anchishkin; V. Vovchenko

2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

Alabama Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet) Base Gas)1,727 1,342 1,298 1,210 1,006

156

Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet) Base Gas)1,727 1,342 1,298ExtensionsNew

157

Kansas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0YearDecadeThousand Cubic7

158

Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet)New

159

Kentucky Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0Month PreviousThousandCubic0 0 0 0 0

160

Louisiana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2013Cubic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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161

Michigan Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343Decade81Feet) Vehicle3Commercial52

162

Montana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384 388 413 2009-2013

163

Florida Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003ofDec. 31ES5CommercialCubic

164

Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003ofDec.Adjustments

165

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas New Field Discoveries, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 566 8021 1 2 22008 2009 2010Separation,

166

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 566 8021 1 2 22008 2009

167

Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2002, Gnomon, Inc., entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for a project entitled, Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming (DE-FC26-02NT15445). This project, funded through DOE’s Preferred Upstream Management Practices grant program, examined cultural resource management practices in two major oil- and gas-producing areas, southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming (Figure 1). The purpose of this project was to examine how cultural resources have been investigated and managed and to identify more effective management practices. The project also was designed to build information technology and modeling tools to meet both current and future management needs. The goals of the project were described in the original proposal as follows: Goal 1. Create seamless information systems for the project areas. Goal 2. Examine what we have learned from archaeological work in the southeastern New Mexico oil fields and whether there are better ways to gain additional knowledge more rapidly or at a lower cost. Goal 3. Provide useful sensitivity models for planning, management, and as guidelines for field investigations. Goal 4. Integrate management, investigation, and decision- making in a real-time electronic system. Gnomon, Inc., in partnership with the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office (WYSHPO) and Western GeoArch Research, carried out the Wyoming portion of the project. SRI Foundation, in partnership with the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (NMHPD), Statistical Research, Inc., and Red Rock Geological Enterprises, completed the New Mexico component of the project. Both the New Mexico and Wyoming summaries concluded with recommendations how cultural resource management (CRM) processes might be modified based on the findings of this research.

Eckerle, William; Hall, Stephen

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

Gas productivity related to cleat volumes derived from focused resistivity tools in coalbed methane (CBM) fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleats are critical for coal-bed methane (CBM) production, but operators usually lack a viable method to determine productivity except for costly well tests. Wireline logs, run over the CBM deposits of the Drunkards Wash Unit located in the Uinta Basin of Utah, were used to develop a new method to relate productivity to the cleat volume. The latter is derived from a focused resistivity log and the wellbore-fluid resistivity. Induction tools are unsuitable for this method, because they are dominated by borehole effects in high resistivity coals and low resistivity mud. Moreover, they read too deep to be significantly affected by the substitution of formation fluid by borehole fluid in the cleats on which the method is based. The method was demonstrated by relating cleat volume to CBM gas productivity in 24 wells, an exercise that clearly separated good from poor producers.

Yang, Y.H.; Peeters, M.; Cloud, T.A.; Van Kirk, C.W. [Kerr McGee Rocky Mountain Corporation, Denver, CO (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

Peggy Robinson

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the first six months of 2004 (January 1, 2004-June 30, 2004) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Azotea Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Azote Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico.

Peggy Robinson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the second six months (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico.

Peggy Robinson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

North Dakota Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecade Year-0 Year-18Feet) New Field Discoveries

175

Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade Year-0Year JanDecadeEstimatedNew Field

176

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinter 2013-14DeliveriesProvedBarrels) New Field

177

Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198Separation 321 601 631New Field Discoveries

178

Conformally covariant boundary correlation functions with a quantum group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particular boundary correlation functions of conformal field theory are needed to answer some questions related to random conformally invariant curves known as Schramm-Loewner evolutions (SLE). In this article, we introduce a correspondence and establish its fundamental properties, which are used in companion articles for explicitly solving two such problems. The correspondence associates Coulomb gas type integrals to vectors in a tensor product representation of a quantum group, a q-deformation of the Lie algebra sl2. We show that desired properties of the functions are guaranteed by natural representation theoretical properties of the vectors.

Kalle Kytölä; Eveliina Peltola

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

179

Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal creep flow (TCF) is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary. Here, TCF is demonstrated experimentally in a dusty plasma. Stripes on a glass box are heated by laser beam absorption, leading to both TCF and a thermophoretic force. The design of the experiment allows isolating the effect of TCF. A stirring motion of the dust particle suspension is observed. By eliminating all other explanations for this motion, we conclude that TCF at the boundary couples by drag to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result provides an experimental verification, for the field of fluid mechanics, that TCF in the slip-flow regime causes steady-state gas flow in a confined volume.

Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

2D and 3D simulations of damage in 5-grain copper gas gun samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2D and 3D Hydrocode simulations were done of a gas gun damage experiment involving a 5 grain sample with a polycrystalline flyer with a velocity of about 140 m/s. The simulations were done with the Flag hydrocode and involved explicit meshing of the 5 grains with a single crystal plasticity model and a pressure based damage model. The calculated fields were compared with two cross sections from the recovered sample. The sample exhibited grain boundary cracks at high angle and tilt grain boundaries in the sample but not at a sigma 3 twin boundary. However, the calculation showed large gradients in stress and strain at only the twin boundary, contrary to expectation. This indicates that the twin boundary is quite strong to resist the predicted high gradients and that the calculation needs the addition of a grain boundary fracture mode. The 2D and 3D simulations were compared.

Tonks, Davis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dennis - Koller, Darcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Escobedo - Diaz, Juan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bingert, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Non-equilibrium Lorentz gas on a curved space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The periodic Lorentz gas with external field and iso-kinetic thermostat is equivalent, by conformal transformation, to a billiard with expanding phase-space and slightly distorted scatterers, for which the trajectories are straight lines. A further time rescaling allows to keep the speed constant in that new geometry. In the hyperbolic regime, the stationary state of this billiard is characterized by a phase-space contraction rate, equal to that of the iso-kinetic Lorentz gas. In contrast to the iso-kinetic Lorentz gas where phase-space contraction occurs in the bulk, the phase-space contraction rate here takes place at the periodic boundaries.

Felipe Barra; Thomas Gilbert

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nuclear symmetry energy effects on liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated within relativistic mean-field model using the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy constrained from the measured neutron skin thickness of finite nuclei. We find symmetry energy has a significant influence on several features of liquid-gas phase transition. The boundary and area of the liquid-gas coexistence region, the maximal isospin asymmetry and the critical values of pressure and isospin asymmetry all of which systematically increase with increasing softness in the density dependence of symmetry energy. The critical temperature below which the liquid-gas mixed phase exists is found higher for a softer symmetry energy.

Bharat K. Sharma; Subrata Pal

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

In the field. Pilot project uses innovative process to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot project at We Energies' Pleasant Prairie Power Plant uses chilled ammonia to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. 3 photos.

NONE

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Casimir pistons with hybrid boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Casimir effect giving rise to an attractive or repulsive force between the configuration boundaries that confine the massless scalar field is reexamined for one to three-dimensional pistons in this paper. Especially, we consider Casimir pistons with hybrid boundary conditions, where the boundary condition on the piston is Neumann and those on other surfaces are Dirichlet. We show that the Casimir force on the piston is always repulsive, in contrast with the same problem where the boundary conditions are Dirichlet on all surfaces.

Xiang-hua Zhai; Xin-zhou Li

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fluid pressure arrival time tomography: Estimation and assessment in the presence of inequality constraints, with an application to a producing gas field at Krechba, Algeria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deformation in the overburden proves useful in deducing spatial and temporal changes in the volume of a producing reservoir. Based upon these changes we estimate diffusive travel times associated with the transient flow due to production, and then, as the solution of a linear inverse problem, the effective permeability of the reservoir. An advantage an approach based upon travel times, as opposed to one based upon the amplitude of surface deformation, is that it is much less sensitive to the exact geomechanical properties of the reservoir and overburden. Inequalities constrain the inversion, under the assumption that the fluid production only results in pore volume decreases within the reservoir. We apply the formulation to satellite-based estimates of deformation in the material overlying a thin gas production zone at the Krechba field in Algeria. The peak displacement after three years of gas production is approximately 0.5 cm, overlying the eastern margin of the anticlinal structure defining the gas field. Using data from 15 irregularly-spaced images of range change, we calculate the diffusive travel times associated with the startup of a gas production well. The inequality constraints are incorporated into the estimates of model parameter resolution and covariance, improving the resolution by roughly 30 to 40%.

Rucci, A.; Vasco, D.W.; Novali, F.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

On the renormalization of the Gibbons-Hawking boundary term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bulk (Einstein-Hilbert) and boundary (Gibbons-Hawking) terms in the gravitational action are generally renormalized differently when integrating out quantum fluctuations. The former is affected by nonminimal couplings, while the latter is affected by boundary conditions. We use the heat kernel method to analyze this behavior for a nonminimally coupled scalar field, the Maxwell field, and the graviton field. Allowing for Robin boundary conditions, we examine in which cases the renormalization preserves the ratio of boundary and bulk terms required for the effective action to possess a stationary point. The implications for field theory and black hole entropy computations are discussed.

Ted Jacobson; Alejandro Satz

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

189

Simulation of the influence high-frequency (2 MHz) capacitive gas discharge and magnetic field on the plasma sheath near a surface in hypersonic gas flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plasma sheath near the surface of a hypersonic aircraft formed under associative ionization behind the shock front shields the transmission and reception of radio signals. Using two-dimensional kinetic particle-in-cell simulations, we consider the change in plasma-sheath parameters near a flat surface in a hypersonic flow under the action of electrical and magnetic fields. The combined action of a high-frequency 2-MHz capacitive discharge, a constant voltage, and a magnetic field on the plasma sheath allows the local electron density to be reduced manyfold.

Schweigert, I. V., E-mail: ischweig@itam.nsc.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Degenerate Metric Phase Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structure of boundaries between degenerate and nondegenerate solutions of Ashtekar's canonical reformulation of Einstein's equations is studied. Several examples are given of such "phase boundaries" in which the metric is degenerate on one side of a null hypersurface and non-degenerate on the other side. These include portions of flat space, Schwarzschild, and plane wave solutions joined to degenerate regions. In the last case, the wave collides with a planar phase boundary and continues on with the same curvature but degenerate triad, while the phase boundary continues in the opposite direction. We conjecture that degenerate phase boundaries are always null.

Ingemar Bengtsson; Ted Jacobson

1999-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

Controlled-source electromagnetic modeling of the masking effect of marine gas hydrate on a deeper hydrocarbon reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that electric field data were reliable to roughly 5000 m of TX-RX offset for the 1 Hz and 3 Hz cases, and to 6500 m offset for 10 Hz. The gas hydrate/hydrocarbon model was then run with zero-value boundary conditions. The goal was to determine what effect...

Dickins, David

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

192

From Neuman to Dirichlet boundary conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dirichlet boundary conditions for the end-point of the open string define Dp-brane. It is parameterized by the rest of coordinates, with Neuman boundary conditions. The relations between background fields can produce the local gauge symmetries of the world-sheet action. After gauge fixing, some Neuman boundary conditions turn into the Dirichlet ones, decreasing the number of Dp-brane dimensions. The physical Dp-brane is gauge invariant part of the initial one. The gauge invariant coordinates are expressed as linear combinations of the effective coordinates and momenta. This fact explains the origin of non-commutativity and the existence of commutative Dp-brane coordinates.

Nikolic, B.; Sazdovic, B. [Institute of Physics, 11001 Belgrade, P.O.Box 57 (Serbia and Montenegro)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

Comparative laboratory selection and field testing of polymers for selective control of water production in gas wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensive comparative feasibility studies were performed in different laboratories in order to select the most promising polymer based technology for water control in gas production and storage wells exhibiting low matrix permeability, high temperature and high produced brine salinity. Core flow experiments performed under reservoir conditions with different commercially available chemical systems have pointed to the superiority of two relatively low-molecular-weight vinyl sulfonated/vinyl amide/acrylamide terpolymers over other polymers to decrease selectively and effectively the water permeability without affecting the gas flow. These polymers have excellent compatibility with all types of reservoir brines and good thermal stability up to 150 C. Furthermore, because of their high shear resistance, and excellent injectability even in low permeability cores, solutions of these polymers can be pumped at high injection rates with a moderate wellhead pressure.

Ranjbar, M. [Technical Univ., Clausthal (Germany); Czolbe, P. [DBI-GUT, Freiberg (Germany); Kohler, N. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

www.solas-int.org //00//00 surface ocean -lower atmosphere study Mid-Term Strategy theme: Air-sea gas fluxes at Eastern boundary Upwelling and Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.solas-int.org //00//00 surface ocean - lower atmosphere study Mid-Term Strategy theme: Air at the SOLAS workshop on "Air-sea fluxes at the Eastern Boundary Upwelling and OMZ systems" 8-10 November 2010

195

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. Natural GasquestionnairesquestionnairesGasA.San34

196

Supergravity at the boundary of AdS supergravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We give a general analysis of AdS boundary conditions for spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger fields and investigate boundary conditions preserving supersymmetry for a graviton multiplet in AdS{sub 4}. Linear Rarita-Schwinger fields in AdS{sub d} are shown to admit mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary conditions when their mass is in the range 0{<=}|m|<1/2l{sub AdS}. We also demonstrate that mixed boundary conditions are allowed for larger masses when the inner product is 'renormalized' accordingly with the action. We then use the results obtained for |m|=1/l{sub AdS} to explore supersymmetric boundary conditions for N=1 AdS{sub 4} supergravity in which the metric and Rarita-Schwinger fields are fluctuating at the boundary. We classify boundary conditions that preserve boundary supersymmetry or superconformal symmetry. Under the AdS/CFT dictionary, Neumann boundary conditions in d=4 supergravity correspond to gauging the superconformal group of the three-dimensional CFT describing M2-branes, while N=1 supersymmetric mixed boundary conditions couple the CFT to N=1 superconformal topologically massive gravity.

Amsel, Aaron J.; Compere, Geoffrey [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Boundaries and Topological Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a model for the topological structure of situations. In this model, the topological structure of space is altered by the presence or absence of boundaries, such as those at the edges of objects. ...

Fleck, Margaret Morrison

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Transgressing the Boundaries: An Afterword  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Boundaries: Toward a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity'', which appeared in Social Text #46

Sokal, Alan

200

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

Yu, C.M.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

Measurements of 222Rn, 220Rn, and CO Emissions in Natural CO2 Fields in Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated field-laboratory program evaluated the use of radon and CO2 flux measurements to constrain source and timescale of CO2 fluxes in environments proximate to CO2 storage reservoirs. By understanding the type and depth of the gas source, the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir can be assessed and monitored. The concept is based on correlations of radon and CO2 fluxes observed in volcanic systems. This fundamental research is designed to advance the science of Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) and to address the Carbon Storage Program goal of developing and validating technologies to ensure 99 percent storage performance. Graduate and undergraduate students conducted the research under the guidance of the Principal Investigators; in doing so they were provided with training opportunities in skills required for implementing and deploying CCS technologies. Although a final method or “tool” was not developed, significant progress was made. The field program identified issues with measuring radon in environments rich in CO2. Laboratory experiments determined a correction factor to apply to radon measurements made in CO2-bearing environments. The field program also identified issues with radon and CO2-flux measurements in soil gases at a natural CO2 analog. A systematic survey of radon and CO2 flux in soil gases at the LaBarge CO2 Field in Southwest Wyoming indicates that measurements of 222Rn (radon), 220Rn (thoron), and CO2 flux may not be a robust method for monitoring the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir. The field program was also not able to correlate radon and CO2 flux in the CO2-charged springs of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system. However, this part of the program helped to motivate the aforementioned laboratory experiments that determined correction factors for measuring radon in CO2-rich environments. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; she is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Measurement of radon in springs has improved significantly since the field program first began; however, in situ measurement of 222Rn and particularly 220Rn in springs is problematic. Future refinements include simultaneous salinity measurements and systematic corrections, or adjustments to the partition coefficient as needed for more accurate radon concentration determination. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; he is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Both graduate students are poised to begin work in a CCS technology area. Laboratory experiments evaluated important process-level fundamentals that effect measurements of radon and CO2. Laboratory tests established that fine-grained source minerals yield higher radon emissivity compared to coarser-sized source minerals; subtleties in the dataset suggest that grain size alone is not fully representative of all the processes controlling the ability of radon to escape its mineral host. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn increases linearly with temperature due to reaction of rocks with water, consistent with faster diffusion and enhanced mineral dissolution at higher temperatures. The presence of CO2 changes the relative importance of the factors that control release of radon. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn in CO2-bearing experiments is greater at all temperatures compared to the experiments without CO2, but emissivity does not increase as a simple function of temperature. Governing processes may include a balance between enhanced dissolution versus carbonate mineral formation in CO2-rich waters.

Kaszuba, John; Sims, Kenneth

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

For the first 15 years of my life, I lived in the shadow of the oil and gas fields of South Louisiana and became accustomed to the oil indus-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the first 15 years of my life, I lived in the shadow of the oil and gas fields of South Louisiana and became accustomed to the oil indus- try and the people involved in this business. I of this world. My father worked for Humble Oil (which was acquired later by Exxon) and we moved from place

Stephens, Jacqueline

204

Casimir Pistons with General Boundary Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we analyze the Casimir energy and force for a scalar field endowed with general self-adjoint boundary conditions propagating in a higher dimensional piston configuration. The piston is constructed as a direct product $I\\times N$, with $I=[0,L]\\subset\\mathbb{R}$ and $N$ a smooth, compact Riemannian manifold with or without boundary. The study of the Casimir energy and force for this configuration is performed by employing the spectral zeta function regularization technique. The obtained analytic results depend explicitly on the spectral zeta function associated with the manifold $N$ and the parameters describing the general boundary conditions imposed. These results are then specialized to the case in which the manifold $N$ is a $d$-dimensional sphere.

Guglielmo Fucci

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

205

Boundary transfer matrices and boundary quantum KZ equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple relation between inhomogeneous transfer matrices and boundary quantum KZ equations is exhibited for quantum integrable systems with reflecting boundary conditions, analogous to an observation by Gaudin for periodic systems. Thus the boundary quantum KZ equations receive a new motivation. We also derive the commutativity of Sklyanin's boundary transfer matrices by merely imposing appropriate reflection equations, i.e. without using the conditions of crossing symmetry and unitarity of the R-matrix.

Bart Vlaar

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Viscous drag reduction in boundary layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present volume discusses the development status of stability theory for laminar flow control design, applied aspects of laminar-flow technology, transition delays using compliant walls, the application of CFD to skin friction drag-reduction, active-wave control of boundary-layer transitions, and such passive turbulent-drag reduction methods as outer-layer manipulators and complex-curvature concepts. Also treated are such active turbulent drag-reduction technique applications as those pertinent to MHD flow drag reduction, as well as drag reduction in liquid boundary layers by gas injection, drag reduction by means of polymers and surfactants, drag reduction by particle addition, viscous drag reduction via surface mass injection, and interactive wall-turbulence control.

Bushnell, D.M.; Hefner, J.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Boundary streaming with Navier boundary condition Jin-Han Xiea)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the fluid's kinematic shear viscosity and is the wave's angular frequency. In water, and for frequencies applications involving high-frequency acoustic waves over a solid boundary, the Stokes boundary-layer thickness to travelling and standing waves shows that the boundary slip respectively increases and decreases the streaming

Vanneste, Jacques

208

Boundary unitarity without firewalls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Both AdS/CFT duality and more general reasoning from quantum gravity point to a rich collection of boundary observables that always evolve unitarily. The physical quantum gravity states described by these observables must be solutions of the spatial diffeomorphism and Wheeler-deWitt constraints, which implies that the state space does not factorize into a tensor product of localized degrees of freedom. The "firewall" argument that unitarity of black hole S-matrix implies the presence of a highly excited quantum state near the horizon is based on such a factorization, hence is not applicable in quantum gravity. In fact, there appears to be no conflict between boundary unitarity and regularity of the event horizon.

Ted Jacobson

2014-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

209

ENTROPY BOUNDARY LAYERS FRANCK SUEUR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the boundary. These conditions are used in a reduction of the system. We construct BKW expansions at all order

Sueur, Franck

210

Boundaries on Spacetimes: An Outline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The causal boundary construction of Geroch, Kronheimer, and Penrose has some universal properties of importance for general studies of spacetimes, particularly when equipped with a topology derived from the causal structure. Properties of the causal boundary are detailed for spacetimes with spacelike boundaries, for multi-warped spacetimes, for static spacetimes, and for spacetimes with group actions.

Steven G. Harris

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

Dilley, Lorie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

Dilley, Lorie

213

Holographic Chaplygin gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider a correspondence between the holographic dark energy density and Chaplygin gas energy density in FRW universe. Then we reconstruct the potential and the dynamics of the scalar field which describe the Chaplygin cosmology.

M R Setare

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

214

Topology of the Future Chronological Boundary: Universality for Spacelike Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is presented for imputing a topology for any chronological set, i.e., a set with a chronology relation, such as a spacetime or a spacetime with some sort of boundary. This topology is shown to have several good properties, such as replicating the manifold topology for a spacetime and replicating the expected topology for some simple examples of spacetime-with-boundary; it also allows for a complete categorical characterization, in topological categories, of the Future Causal Boundary construction of Geroch, Kronheimer, and Penrose, showing that construction to have a universal property for future-completing chronological sets with spacelike boundaries. Rigidity results are given for any reasonable future completion of a spacetime, in terms of the GKP boundary: In the imputed topology, any such boundary must be homeomorphic to the GKP boundary (if all points have indecomposable pasts) or to a topological quotient of a closely related boundary (if boundaries are spacelike). A large class of warped-product-type spacetimes with spacelike boundaries is examined, calculating the GKP and other possible boundaries, and showing that the imputed topology gives expected results; included among these are the Schwarzschild singularity and those Robertson-Walker singularities which are spacelike.

Steven G. Harris

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

Microfluidics: The no-slip boundary condition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The no-slip boundary condition at a solid-liquid interface is at the center of our understanding of fluid mechanics. However, this condition is an assumption that cannot be derived from first principles and could, in theory, be violated. We present a review of recent experimental, numerical and theoretical investigations on the subject. The physical picture that emerges is that of a complex behavior at a liquid/solid interface, involving an interplay of many physico-chemical parameters, including wetting, shear rate, pressure, surface charge, surface roughness, impurities and dissolved gas.

Eric Lauga; Michael P. Brenner; Howard A. Stone

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. [Jurassic Smackover Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Appendix 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

West Short Pine Hills field, Harding County, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Short Pine Hills field is a shallow gas field that produces from the Shannon Sandstone Member, on the Camp Crook anticline in southwestern Harding County, South Dakota. The Alma McCutchin 1-17 Heikkila discovery was drilled in the NW1/4, Sec. 17, T16N, R2E, to a depth of 1600 ft and completed in October 1977 for 600 MCFGD from perforations at 1405-1411 ft. To date, 40 gas wells have been completed with total estimated reserves of more than 20 bcf. The field encompasses 12,000 ac, with a current drill-site spacing unit of 160 ac. The field boundaries are fairly well defined, except on the south edge of the field. The wells range in depth from 1250 to 2200 ft, and cost $60,000-$85,000 to drill and complete. Core and log analyses indicate that the field has 70 ft of net pay, with average porosity of 30% and average permeability of 114 md. Most wells have been completed with nitrogen-sand frac. Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company of Bismarck, North Dakota, operates a compressor station and 2.5 mi of 4-in. line that connects the field to their 160 in. north-south transmission line to the Rapid City area. Currently, producers are netting $1.10-$1.25/million Btu. The late Mathew T. Biggs of Casper, Wyoming, was the geologist responsible for mapping and finding this gas deposit.

Strothman, B.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Laminar boundary layers in convective heat transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study Rayleigh-Benard convection in the high-Rayleigh-number and high-Prandtl-number regime, i.e., we consider a fluid in a container that is exposed to strong heating of the bottom and cooling of the top plate in the absence of inertia effects. While the dynamics in the bulk are characterized by a chaotic convective heat flow, the boundary layers at the horizontal container plates are essentially conducting and thus the fluid is motionless. Consequently, the average temperature exhibits a linear profile in the boundary layers. In this article, we rigorously investigate the average temperature and oscillations in the boundary layer via local bounds on the temperature field. Moreover, we deduce that the temperature profile is indeed essentially linear close to the horizontal container plates. Our results are uniform in the system parameters (e.g. the Rayleigh number) up to logarithmic correction terms. An important tool in our analysis is a new Hardy-type estimate for the convecting velocity field, which can be used to control the fluid motion in the layer. The bounds on the temperature field are derived with the help of local maximal regularity estimates for convection-diffusion equations.

Christian Seis

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

Grain boundary microstructure, chemistry, and IGSCC in Alloy 600 and Alloy 690  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The resistance to intergranular stress corrosion cracking of six different Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 steam generator tubes has been investigated. The composition of the materials at grain boundaries has been investigated using analytical transmission electron microscopy and atom probe field ion microscopy techniques. The depletion of chromium at the grain boundaries has been related to the type of grain boundary precipitates. Segregation of carbon and boron to the grain boundaries has been observed and quantified.

Norring, K. [Studsvik AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Stiller, K. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Nilsson, J.O. [AB Sandvik Steel, Sandviken (Sweden)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Excitation in low-current discharges and breakdown in He at low pressures and very high electric field to gas density ratios E/N  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate optical emission from low-current discharges in He at very high electric field to gas density ratios E/N between parallel plate electrodes. We also determine the electrical breakdown and the voltage-current behavior at low currents. The E/N are 300 Td to 9 kTd (1 Td=10{sup -21} V m{sup 2}) at pressures times electrode separations p{sub 0}d from 3 to 0.9 Torr cm. Absolute optical emission probabilities versus distance are determined for the 501.6 nm line (3 {sup 1}P{yields}2 {sup 1}S) and for the 587.6 nm line (3 {sup 3}D{yields}2 {sup 3}P) by reference to Boltzmann calculations at our lowest E/N and to published pressure dependent electron beam experiments. At E/N below 1 kTd, the emission follows the exponential growth of the electron density, while at above 7 kTd heavy particle excitation is evident near the cathode. Collisional transfer of excitation from the singlet to the triplet system dominates the 587.6 nm excitation. Comparisons of models with experiments show the importance of excitation and of electron production at the cathode by fast He atoms produced by charge transfer collisions of He{sup +} with He. The breakdown voltage versus p{sub 0}d is multivalued for p{sub 0}d{approx}1.5 Torr cm. At currents below 100 {mu}A and our lower E/N, the discharge voltage decreases linearly with current as expected for an increasing electron yield with ion energy and E/N at the cathode.

Jelenkovic, B.M.; Phelps, A.V. [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States); Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 75, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

ARM - SGP Boundary Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstrumentsPolar YearResearchBoundary

223

Plasma waves reflection from a boundary with specular accommodative boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work the linearized problem of plasma wave reflection from a boundary of a half--space is solved analytically. Specular accommodative conditions of plasma wave reflection from plasma boundary are taken into consideration. Wave reflectance is found as function of the given parameters of the problem, and its dependence on the normal electron momentum accommodation coefficient is shown by the authors. The case of resonance when the frequency of self-consistent electric field oscillations is close to the proper (Langmuir) plasma oscillations frequency, namely, the case of long wave limit is analyzed. Refs. 17. Figs. 6.

N. V. Gritsienko; A. V. Latyshev; A. A. Yushkanov

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

224

Decay of an ultracold fermionic lithium gas near a Feshbach resonance The interactions between atoms can be strongly modified by tuning magnetic fields to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decay of an ultracold fermionic lithium gas near a Feshbach resonance The interactions between the interaction strength is crucial in the search for a superfluid phase transition. Otherwise, the phase lithium gas near a Feshbach resonance, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 203201 (2002). 2. K.M. O'Hara, S.L. Hemmer, S

225

Boundary Effects on Bose-Einstein Condensation in Ultra-Static Space-Times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The boundary effects on the Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal Bose gas on an ultra-static space-time are studied by a Mellin-Barnes type asymptotic analysis of the harmonic sum representing the depletion coefficient. Small $\\beta m$ regime, which is the relevant regime for the relativistic gas, is studied through the heat kernel expansion for both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The analysis is made for both charged bosons and neutral bosons.

L. Akant; E. Ertugrul; Y. Gul; O. T. Turgut

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

226

Boundary Effects on Bose-Einstein Condensation in Ultra-Static Space-Times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The boundary effects on the Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal Bose gas on an ultra-static space-time are studied by a Mellin-Barnes type asymptotic analysis of the harmonic sum representing the depletion coefficient. Small $\\beta m$ regime, which is the relevant regime for the relativistic gas, is studied through the heat kernel expansion for both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The analysis is made for both charged bosons and neutral bosons.

Akant, L; Gul, Y; Turgut, O T

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and increase carbon injection when inlet loading and mercury removal were low. The resulting mercury removal varied between 50 and 98%, with an overall average of 85.6%, showing that the process was successful at removing high percentages of vapor-phase mercury even with a widely varying mass loading. In an effort to improve baghouse performance, high-permeability bags were tested. The new bags made a significant difference in the cleaning frequency of the baghouse. Before changing the bags, the baghouse was often in a continuous clean of 4.4 p/b/h, but with the new bags the cleaning frequency was very low, at less than 1 p/b/h. Alternative sorbent tests were also performed using these high-permeability bags. The results of these tests showed that most standard, high-quality activated carbon performed similarly at this site; low-cost sorbent and ash-based sorbents were not very effective at removing mercury; and chemically enhanced sorbents did not appear to offer any benefits over standard activated carbons at this site.

C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Prediction of potential and current density distribution using the boundary element method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

boundary. 12 7. Discontinuous 2D boundary elements in intrinsic coordinate system. . . . . 25 8. Discontinuous 3D linear (boundary) element (a) global coordinates (b) intrinsic coordinates. 30 9. A simple galvanic corrosion couple (potential field... in two dimensions). . . 35 10. Potential distribution along the surface of the electrodes (i. e. , at yW). . . . 38 11. A simple problem of a cube (potential field in three dimensions). . . , . . . 41 12. Corrosion cell (a) perspective (b) cross...

Pakalapati, Surya Narayana Raju

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Grain boundary compositon in NiAl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high temperature strength and oxidation resistance of many transition metal aluminides makes these intermetallic materials attractive for high temperature applications. However, these aluminides are generally brittle at low temperatures and this restricts their technological applications. However, these aluminides are generally brittle at low temperatures and this restricts their technological applications. It has been demonstrated that the addition of more than 200 ppm of boron to the L1{sub 2}-ordered Ni{sub 3}Al changes the fracture behavior from intergranular to transgranular and increases the ductility. The B2-ordered NiAl nickel aluminide is particularly attractive because of its low density and high melting temperature. This aluminide also fractures intergranularly at room temperature. However, no improvement in ductility is observed with similar boron additions even though the intergranular fracture is suppressed and there is a significant increase in the yield strength. In this paper, the results of an atom probe field ion microscopy investigation of the compositions of the grain boundaries in undoped and boron-doped NiAl are presented. The suitability of the atom probe field ion microscopy technique for the characterization of boundaries has clearly been demonstrated in many previous investigations including the characterization of boron segregation to grain boundaries and other planar features in Ni{sub 3}Al.

Miller, M.K.; Jayaram, R.; Camus, P.P. (Metals and Ceramics Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (US))

1992-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

A comparison of microseismicity induced by gel-proppant-and water-injected hydraulic fractures, Carthage Cotton Valley gas field, East Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May and July, 1997, a consortia of operators and service companies conducted a series of hydraulic fracture imaging tests in the Carthage Cotton Valley gas field of East Texas (Walker, 1997). Microseismic data were collected and processed for six hydraulic fracture treatments in two wells (3 completion intervals per well) (Mayerhofer et al., 2000). One well was completed with gel-proppant treatments in which a viscous crosslink gel was injected to entrain high concentrations of sand proppant into formation. The second well was completed using treated water and very low proppant concentrations (waterfracs). Waterfracs have been shown to be just as effective as the conventional gel-proppant treatments in Cotton Valley reservoirs, but at greatly reduced cost. Mayerhofer and Meehan (1998) suggest two possible reasons why waterfracs are successful: (1) Induced shear displacement along natural and hydraulic fractures results in self-propping (shear dilation enhanced by fracture branching, proppant and spalled rock fragments), and (2) Fracture extension and cleanup is easier to achieve with low-viscosity fluids. With improved source location precision and focal mechanism determination (fracture plane orientation and sense of slip), we have reexamined the Cotton Valley data, comparing the seismicity induced by water and gel-proppant treatments at common depth intervals. We have improved the location precision and computed focal mechanism of microearthquakes induced during a series of hydraulic fracture completions within the Cotton Valley formation of East Texas. Conventional gel-proppant treatments and treatments using treated water and very low proppant concentrations (waterfracs) were monitored. Waterfracs have been shown to be just as effective as the conventional gel-proppant treatments in Cotton Valley reservoirs, but at greatly reduced cost (Mayerhofer and Meehan, 1998). Comparison of the seismicity induced by the two treatment types show similar distributions of event locations and focal mechanisms for common depth intervals. We interpret the induced seismicity to be primarily controlled by the natural fracture geometry and independent of treatment design. By implication, we expect the effectiveness of shear-induced fracture propping to be independent of the treatment fluid in Cotton Valley reservoirs.

Rutledge, J. T. (James T.); Phillips, W. S. (William Scott)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60 3. Rio Vista Natural Gas Field: The 193677 4. Calpine Natural Gas Company…………………………………………….82 5.Company [B0120] 4. Calpine Natural Gas, L.P. [C1330] ******

Gbedema, Tometi Koku

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Simulator for unconventional gas resources multi-dimensional model SUGAR-MD. Volume I. Reservoir model analysis and validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, has been supporting the development of flow models for Devonian shale gas reservoirs. The broad objectives of this modeling program are: (1) To develop and validate a mathematical model which describes gas flow through Devonian shales. (2) To determine the sensitive parameters that affect deliverability and recovery of gas from Devonian shales. (3) To recommend laboratory and field measurements for determination of those parameters critical to the productivity and timely recovery of gas from the Devonian shales. (4) To analyze pressure and rate transient data from observation and production gas wells to determine reservoir parameters and well performance. (5) To study and determine the overall performance of Devonian shale reservoirs in terms of well stimulation, well spacing, and resource recovery as a function of gross reservoir properties such as anisotropy, porosity and thickness variations, and boundary effects. The flow equations that are the mathematical basis of the two-dimensional model are presented. It is assumed that gas transport to producing wells in Devonian shale reservoirs occurs through a natural fracture system into which matrix blocks of contrasting physical properties deliver contained gas. That is, the matrix acts as a uniformly distributed gas source in a fracture medium. Gas desorption from pore walls is treated as a uniformly distributed source within the matrix blocks. 24 references.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

2. System boundaries; Balance equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;5/28 Systems and boundaries /3 An isolated system is a special kind of closed system Pictures: KJ05 Q = heat W Example: an electric hot water heater in a house ­ The electric heater is a closed system ­ The water1/28 2. System boundaries; Balance equations Ron Zevenhoven �bo Akademi University Thermal and flow

Zevenhoven, Ron

234

8, 88178846, 2008 Observed boundary-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H. Marsham et and Enviroment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK 2 Institut fšur Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Universit@env.leeds.ac.uk) 8817 #12;ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

235

Superconducting circuit boundary conditions beyond the Dynamical Casimir Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study analytically the time-dependent boundary conditions of superconducting microwave circuit experiments in the high plasma frequency limit, in which the conditions are Robin-type and relate the value of the field to the spatial derivative of the field. We give an explicit solution to the field evolution for boundary condition modulations that are small in magnitude but may have arbitrary time dependence, in a formalism that applies both to a semiopen waveguide and to a closed waveguide with two independently adjustable boundaries. The correspondence between the microwave Robin boundary conditions and the mechanically-moving Dirichlet boundary conditions of the Dynamical Casimir Effect is shown to break down at high field frequencies, approximately one order of magnitude above the frequencies probed in the 2011 experiment of Wilson et al. Our results bound the parameter regime in which a microwave circuit can be used to model relativistic effects in a mechanically-moving cavity, and they show that beyond this parameter regime moving mirrors produce more particles and generate more entanglement than their non-moving microwave waveguide simulations.

Jason Doukas; Jorma Louko

2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

236

Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Field evaluation of cofiring gas with coal for quantifying operational benefits and emissions trim in a utility boiler. Volume 2. Topical report, 1989-1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The volume consists of 14 appendixes to accompany volume 1 of the report, and covers the following test data: analysis of coal, fylash, and bottom ash samples; cleanliness factors; slagging observation record sheets; stack opacity measurements; stack sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides measurements; total coal flow; fuel gas flow; furnace exit gas temperature; percent oxygen at economizer outlet; percent excess air; bulk steam temperatures at secondary superheater and reheater outlets; secondary superheater and reheater tube outlet leg temperatures; unit heat rate; and models used for data interpretation.

Clark, K.J.; Torbov, T.S.; Impey, R.J.; Hara, K.G.; Burnett, T.D.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

South Campus Boundary/Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South Campus Boundary/Landscape April 18, 2012 #12;#12;7:00 - 7:05 Introductions and Review of the Agenda 7:05 - 7:20 Principles of the South Campus Boundary/Landscape from the Feb 21 Design Charette 7:20 - 7:30 Landscape Examples 7:30 - 7:45 Concepts and Ideas for LeMarchant St. 7:45 - 7:50 Break

Brownstone, Rob

239

Changing the Structure Boundary Geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of previously obtained results shows that hexagonal crystal lattice is the dominant type of ordering, in particular, in striated glow discharges. We explore the possibility for changing the dust distribution in horizontal cross sections of relatively highly ordered structures in a glow-discharge. Presuming that boundary geometry can affect dust distribution, we used cylindrical coolers held at 0 deg. C and placed against a striation containing a structure, to change the geometry of its outer boundary. By varying the number of coolers, their positions, and their separations from the tube wall, azimuthally asymmetric thermophoretic forces can be used to form polygonal boundaries and vary the angles between their segments (in a horizontal cross section). The corner in the structure's boundary of 60 deg. stimulates formation of hexagonal cells. The structure between the supported parallel boundaries is also characterized by stable hexagonal ordering. We found that a single linear boundary segment does not give rise to any sizable domain, but generates a lattice extending from the boundary (without edge defects). A square lattice can be formed by setting the angle equal to 90 deg. . However, angles of 45 deg. and 135 deg. turned out easier to form. Square lattice was created by forming a near-135 deg. corner with four coolers. It was noted that no grain ordering is observed in the region adjacent to corners of angles smaller than 30 deg. , which do not promote ordering into cells of any shape. Thus, manipulation of a structure boundary can be used to change dust distribution, create structures free of the ubiquitous edge defects that destroy orientation order, and probably change the crystal lattice type.

Karasev, Viktor; Dzlieva, Elena; Ivanov, Artyom [St.-Petersburg State University, Physics Faculty, Ulianovskaya 1, Peterhof, St. Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation)

2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

VLT-SINFONI integral field spectroscopy of low-z luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies I. Atlas of the 2D gas structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an atlas of a sample of local (U)LIRGs covering the luminosity range log(L_IR/L_sun)=11.1-12.4. The atlas is based on near-infrared H and K-band VLT-SINFONI IFS, and presents the ionised, partially ionised, and warm molecular gas 2D flux distributions and kinematics over a FoV of 3x3 kpc (LIRGs) and 12x12kpc (ULIRGs) and with average linear resolutions of 0.2kpc and 0.9kpc, respectively. The different phases of the gas show a wide morphological variety with the nucleus as the brightest Br_g source for 33% of the LIRGs and 71% of the ULIRGs, whereas all the (U)LIRGs have their maximum H_2 emission in their nuclear regions. In LIRGs, the ionised gas distribution is dominated by the emission from the star-forming rings or giant HII regions in the spiral arms. The Br_g and [FeII] line at 1.644 micron trace the same structures, although the emission peaks at different locations in some of the objects, and the [FeII] seems to be more extended and diffuse. The ULIRG subsample contains mainly pre-coalescen...

López, J Piqueras; Arribas, S; Alonso-Herrero, A; Bedregal, A G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Wind on the boundary for the Abelian sandpile model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We continue our investigation of the two-dimensional Abelian sandpile model in terms of a logarithmic conformal field theory with central charge c=-2, by introducing two new boundary conditions. These have two unusual features: they carry an intrinsic orientation, and, more strangely, they cannot be imposed uniformly on a whole boundary (like the edge of a cylinder). They lead to seven new boundary condition changing fields, some of them being in highest weight representations (weights -1/8, 0 and 3/8), some others belonging to indecomposable representations with rank 2 Jordan cells (lowest weights 0 and 1). Their fusion algebra appears to be in full agreement with the fusion rules conjectured by Gaberdiel and Kausch.

Philippe Ruelle

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

242

Field ionization from carbon nanofibers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Micro Gas Analyzer project aims to develop power-efficient, high resolution, high sensitivity, portable and real-time gas sensors. We developed a field ionizer array based on gated CNTs. Arrays of CNTs are used because ...

Adeoti, Bosun J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Natural gas hydrates - issues for gas production and geomechanical stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occurring at the field. Further, the controlling parameters for hydrate dissociation in porous media are quantified and a sensitivity study is presented. Chapter VI presents the results of a simulation experiment done to evaluate the performance of a..., the location iv of perforations and the gas hydrate saturation to be important parameters for gas production at the Messoyakha. Second, I simulated the gas production using a hydraulic fracture in hydrate bearing sediments. The simulation results showed...

Grover, Tarun

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

244

Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma T. M. Flanagan and J. Goree  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma T. M. Flanagan and J. Goree Department of Physics 2009 Thermal creep flow TCF is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result

Goree, John

245

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Boundary Layer Yin-Chiu Kan , Beekman Izaak and low- speed features, found in subsonic experiments, are present in our supersonic and hypersonic and hypersonic regimes due to the lack of detailed flow field data, and the studies have been mostly restricted

MartĂ­n, Pino

246

Oil and Gas CDT Quantifying the role of groundwater in hydrocarbon systems using noble gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Quantifying the role of groundwater in hydrocarbon systems using noble gas isotopes by groundwater (or oil) degassing. Other natural gas fields may have been produced in-situ or migrated as a free expert academics from across the CDT and also experienced oil and gas industry professionals

Henderson, Gideon

247

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{trademark} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{trademark} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{trademark} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury--elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{trademark}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{trademark} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{trademark} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

248

Study of turbulence-chemistry interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of turbulence-chemistry interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers Lian Duan and M of the turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) are performed in hypersonic tur- bulent boundary layers using direct numerical simulation (DNS) flow fields under typical hypersonic conditions representative of blunt

MartĂ­n, Pino

249

High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

Madden, M.P.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Fractal boundary basins in spherically symmetric $?^4$ theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results are presented from numerical simulations of the flat-space nonlinear Klein-Gordon equa- tion with an asymmetric double-well potential in spherical symmetry. Exit criteria are defined for the simulations that are used to help understand the boundaries of the basins of attraction for Gaussian "bubble" initial data. The first exit criteria, based on the immediate collapse or expan- sion of bubble radius, is used to observe the departure of the scalar field from a static intermediate attractor solution. The boundary separating these two behaviors in parameter space is smooth and demonstrates a time-scaling law with an exponent that depends on the asymmetry of the potential. The second exit criteria differentiates between the creation of an expanding true-vacuum bubble and dispersion of the field leaving the false vacuum; the boundary separating these basins of attraction is shown to demonstrate fractal behavior. The basins are defined by the number of bounces that the field undergoes before inducing a phase transition. A third, hybrid exit criteria is used to determine the location of the boundary to arbitrary precision and to characterize the threshold behavior. The possible effects this behavior might have on cosmological phase transitions are briefly discussed.

Ethan P. Honda

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

251

Wavelet analysis study of microbubble drag reduction in a boundary channel flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and pressure measurement techniques were performed to investigate the drag reduction due to microbubble injection in the boundary layer of a fully developed turbulent channel flow. Two-dimensional full-field velocity...

Zhen, Ling

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

252

High gas flow alpha detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors. 4 figs.

Bolton, R.D.; Bounds, J.A.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.

1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

253

High gas flow alpha detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors.

Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Schrödinger functional boundary conditions and improvement for N>3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The standard method to calculate non-perturbatively the evolution of the running coupling of a SU(N) gauge theory is based on the Schr\\"odinger functional (SF). In this paper we construct a family of boundary fields for general values of N which enter the standard definition of the SF coupling. We provide spatial boundary conditions for fermions in several representations which reduce the condition number of the squared Dirac operator. In addition, we calculate the O(a) improvement coefficients for N>3 needed to remove boundary cutoff effects from the gauge action. After this, residual cutoff effects on the step scaling function are shown to be very small even when considering non-fundamental representations. We also calculate the ratio of Lambda parameters between the MS-bar and SF schemes.

Ari Hietanen; Tuomas Karavirta; Pol Vilaseca

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

255

Anti-FFBRST Transformations for the BLG Theory in Presence of a Boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we will analyse the anti-BRST symmetries of Bagger-Lambert-Gustavsson (BLG) theory in presence of a boundary. We will analyses these symmetries in both linear and non-linear gauges. We will also derive the finite field version of the anti-BRST transformations for the BLG theory in presence of a boundary. These finite field transformations will be used to relate generating functional in linear gauge to the generating functional in the non-linear gauge.

Faizal, Mir; Mandal, Bhabani P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A density functional tight binding/force field approach to the interaction of molecules with rare gas clusters: Application to (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}){sup +/0}Ar{sub n} clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose in the present paper a SCC-DFTB/FF (Self-Consistent-Charge Density Functional based Tight Binding/Force-Field) scheme adapted to the investigation of molecules trapped in rare gas environments. With respect to usual FF descriptions, the model involves the interaction of quantum electrons in a molecule with rare gas atoms in an anisotropic scheme. It includes polarization and dispersion contributions and can be used for both neutral and charged species. Parameters for this model are determined for hydrocarbon-argon complexes and the model is validated for small hydrocarbons. With the future aim of studying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Ar matrices, extensive benchmark calculations are performed on (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}){sup +/0}Ar{sub n} clusters against DFT and CCSD(T) calculations for the smaller sizes, and more generally against other experimental and theoretical data. Results on the structures and energetics (isomer ordering and energy separation, cohesion energy per Ar atom) are presented in detail for n = 1–8, 13, 20, 27, and 30, for both neutrals and cations. We confirm that the clustering of Ar atoms leads to a monotonous decrease of the ionization potential of benzene for n ? 20, in line with previous experimental and FF data.

Iftner, Christophe; Simon, Aude; Korchagina, Kseniia; Rapacioli, Mathias; Spiegelman, Fernand [Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique Quantiques LCPQ/IRSAMC, Université de Toulouse (UPS) and CNRS, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France)] [Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique Quantiques LCPQ/IRSAMC, Université de Toulouse (UPS) and CNRS, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

258

Direct injection of ionospheric O sup + into the dayside low latitude boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations from the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) indicate the presence of two distinct O{sup +} populations in the dayside subsolar low latitude boundary layer during some periods of northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). The first population is O{sup +} convected into the boundary layer from the outer magnetosphere and has been reported previously. It is suggested here that the new, second, O{sup +} population is injected into the dayside boundary layer directly from the high latitude ionosphere. This second population can have a significant density and distinct characteristics such as field-aligned flow relative to boundary layer H{sup +} that modify both the plasma composition and dynamics in the low latitude boundary layer. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

Fuselier, S.A.; Klumpar, D.M.; Peterson, W.K.; Shelley, E.G. (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, Palo Alto, California (US))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Ligand field photofragmentation spectroscopy of [Ag(L){sub N}]{sup 2+} complexes in the gas phase: Experiment and theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments have been undertaken to record photofragmentation spectra from a series of [Ag(L){sub N}]{sup 2+} complexes in the gas phase. Spectra have been obtained for silver(II) complexed with the ligands (L): acetone, 2-pentanone, methyl-vinyl ketone, pyridine, and 4-methyl pyridine (4-picoline) with N in the range of 4-7. A second series of experiments using 1,1,1,3-fluoroacetone, acetonitrile, and CO{sub 2} as ligands failed to show any evidence of photofragmentation. Interpretation of the experimental data has come from time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), which very successfully accounts for trends in the spectra in terms of subtle differences in the properties of the ligands. Taking a sample of three ligands, acetone, pyridine, and acetonitrile, the calculations show all the spectral transitions to involve ligand-to-metal charge transfer, and that wavelength differences (or lack of spectra) arise from small changes in the energies of the molecular orbitals concerned. The calculations account for an absence in the spectra of any effects due to Jahn-Teller distortion, and they also reveal structural differences between complexes where the coordinating atom is either oxygen or nitrogen that have implications for the stability of silver(II) compounds. Where possible, comparisons have also been made with the physical properties of condensed phase silver(II) complexes.

Guan, Jingang; Puskar, Ljiljana; Esplugas, Ricardo O.; Cox, Hazel; Stace, Anthony J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

260

Compressional boundaries in the Earth's foreshock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The terrestrial foreshock is a highly dynamic region populated by particles, waves and non-linear structures such as shocklets, SLAMS, hot flow anomalies, cavities and cavitons. Recently a new structure named foreshock compressional boundary (FCB) was reported in global hybrid simulations by Omidi et al. (2009). This structure represents a transition region that separates the highly disturbed foreshock plasma from pristine solar wind or from the region of field-aligned ion beams. The FCB is associated with a strong compression of magnetic field and density. Besides the enhancements in the field and density, the FCB also shows a region where these two quantities decrease below the ambient solar wind (SW) values. Here, we study a FCB observed by Cluster-1. This FCB shows that although sometimes FCBs are transition regions between the pristine solar wind plasma and the foreshock plasma, in this case the FCB separates a region with large amplitude waves from regions with high frequency (f{approx}1.7 Hz) small amplitude waves. We analyze the FCB properties, ion distributions inside them, and the waves near the structure.

Rojas-Castillo, D.; Blanco-Cano, X. [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan (Mexico); Kajdic, P. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse (France); Omidi, N. [Solana Scientific Inc., Solana Beach, California (United States)

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

PHASE TRANSITION NEAR A LIQUID-GAS COEXISTENCE EQUILIBRIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, are the states in which gas and liquid can stay in equilibrium. We denote c± = -p (±), the speed of sound) in general in a oscillatory manner with fre- quency determined in part by the speeds of sound in gas, the time needed for the sound wave to travel in liquid from the interface to the tube boundary

Wang, Xiao-Ping

262

Dudley Ridge, a geomorphic trap - lacustrine gas in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dudley Ridge gas field is about 6 mi southeast of Kettleman City, California. The abandoned field straddles the boundary between T23S, R19E, and T23S, R20E, MDBM, in Kings County, California. The Tulare Lake depression was formed during the Pleistocene. It is bounded by the Temblor Range on the west, the Sierra Nevada rise on the east, the north tilt of the San Joaquin Valley to the south, and a gentle rise in the San Joaquin Valley floor to the north. The depression is almost circular except for the west side where North Kettleman dome formed a peninsula. The prevailing longshore current was to the south due to Coriolis-directed winds. Dudley Ridge was formed as a spit, trailing south off the side of North Kettleman dome. The spit is sandy, silty clay, with sand lense onlaps. The geomorphic trap formed by the sand lenses serves as a trap for the methane gas being produced in the organic-rich lake-bed sediments.

Sugden, H.E.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Agegraphic Chaplygin gas model of dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We establish a connection between the agegraphic models of dark energy and Chaplygin gas energy density in non-flat universe. We reconstruct the potential of the agegraphic scalar field as well as the dynamics of the scalar field according to the evolution of the agegraphic dark energy. We also extend our study to the interacting agegraphic generalized Chaplygin gas dark energy model.

Ahmad Sheykhi

2010-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

264

Critical Temperature Associated to Symmetry Breaking of Klein--Gordon fields versus Condensation Temperature in a Weakly interacting Bose--Einstein Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We deduce the relation between the critical temperature associated to the symmetry breaking of scalar fields with one--loop correction potential immersed in a thermal bath and the condensation temperature of the aforementioned system, assuming a harmonic oscillator type potential. We show that these two temperatures are related through the \\emph{scale} associated to the system. In this aim, we infer the order of magnitude for the \\emph{scale} as a function of the corresponding healing length, in order to give a criterium to compare both temperatures. Additionally, we prove that the condensation temperature is independent of the thermal bath within the semiclassical approximation, for a positive coupling constant, assuming that the thermal bath contribution is the lowest energy associated to the system.

Elias Castellanos; Tonatiuh Matos

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Beyond the no-slip boundary condition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper offers a simple macroscopic approach to the question of the slip boundary condition to be imposed upon the tangential component of the fluid velocity at a solid boundary. Plausible reasons are advanced for ...

Brenner, Howard

266

Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

Paul KT Liu

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

267

34th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit, June 28July 1, 2004/Portland, OR DNS of Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers M. Pino Martin Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and hypersonic turbu- lent boundary layers. The systematic procedure for initializing the turbulent flow fields layers is important in advancing supersonic and hypersonic flight technology. In a high-speed boundary

MartĂ­n, Pino

268

The gravity field and plate boundaries in Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free-air and simple Bouguer anomaly maps of the Venezuelan continental margin (from 60°W to 72°W and from 7°N to 13°N) are presented. The major features of the free-air map are: the large lows associated with the deep ...

Folinsbee, Robert Allin

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

ARM - Field Campaign - 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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270

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3,Cloud OD Sensor TWST Cloud OD Sensor

271

ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3,CloudgovCampaignsIR CloudgovCampaignsLower Atmospheric

272

Educing the volume out of the phase space boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explicitly show that, in a system with T-duality symmetry, the configuration space volume degrees of freedom may hide on the surface boundary of the region of accessible states with energy lower than a fixed value. This means that, when taking the decompactification limit (big volume limit), a number of accessible states proportional to the volume is recovered even if no volume dependence appears when energy is high enough. All this behavior is contained in the exact way of computing sums by making integrals. We will also show how the decompactification limit for the gas of strings can be defined in a microcanonical description at finite volume.

Manuel A. Cobas; M. A. R. Osorio; María Suárez

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

273

Using multi-layer models to forecast gas flow rates in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressure at the inner boundary. He combined a back-pressure gas rate equation (Eq 2.9) with the materials balance equation Eq 2.10 onto a rate-time equation for gas wells as described in Eq 2.11, and then he generated the new set of type curves as shown.......................................................................................... 10 2.1 Introduction ...................................................................................................10 2.2 Decline Curve Analysis...

Jerez Vera, Sergio Armando

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ultrafast gas switching experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

RIS-M-2612 ON TRANSPORT OF HELIUM TO GRAIN BOUNDARIES DURING IRRADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters determining the integrity and lifetime of the structural components of a fusion reactor. A diffusion calculation i s made of the flux of helium to a grain boundary. The flux i s found to depend interior. The calculated accumulation of helium i s in good agreement with the measured gas content

276

On the outer boundary of the sunspot penumbra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of photographic observations and vector-magnetograph measurements demonstrate, that the outer boundary of the sunspot penumbra --even in complex sunspot groups-- closely follows the 0.075T isogauss line of the total value of the magnetic field, corresponding approximately to the equipartition value in the photosphere. Radio observations also show this feature. The thick penumbra model with interchange convection (Jahn and Schmidt, 1994) gives the best explanation of the penumbral structure.

B. Kalman

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

Assessment of hot gas contaminant control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Petrophysical rock classification in the Cotton Valley tight-gas sandstone reservoir with a clustering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petrophysical rock classification in the Cotton Valley tight-gas sandstone reservoir classification method with field data acquired in the Cotton Valley tight-gas sandstone reservoir located

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

279

Universality of the Future Chronological Boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this note is to establish, in a categorical manner, the universality of the Geroch-Kronheimer-Penrose causal boundary when considering the types of causal structures that may profitably be put on any sort of boundary for a spacetime. Actually, this can only be done for the future causal boundary (or the past causal boundary) separately; furthermore, only the chronology relation, not the causality relation, is considered, and the GKP topology is eschewed. The final result is that there is a unique map, with the proper causal properties, from the future causal boundary of a spacetime onto any ``reasonable" boundary which supports some sort of chronological structure and which purports to consist of a future completion of the spacetime. Furthermore, the future causal boundary construction is categorically unique in this regard.

Steven G. Harris

1997-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

280

Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Shaping Environmental Justice: Applying Science, Technology, and Society Boundary Work  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying Science, Technology and Society Boundary Work Chih-the STS (Science, Technology and Society) study as boundary-

Huang, Chih-Tung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Improved gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Maxey, D.V.; Carter, J.G.

1980-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

283

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

284

Second order adaptive boundary conditions for exterior flow problems: non-symmetric stationary flows in two dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

called "artificial boundary conditions" to replace the boundary conditions at infinity. To solve this problem we construct -- by combining results from dynamical systems theory with matched asymptotic field depending explicitly on drag and lift and describing the solution to second and dominant third

285

Hot Gas Halos in Galaxies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use Chandra and XMM-Newton to study how the hot gas content in early-type galaxies varies with environment. We find that the L{sub X}-L{sub K} relationship is steeper for field galaxies than for comparable galaxies in groups and clusters. This suggests that internal processes such as supernovae driven winds or AGN feedback may expel hot gas from low mass field galaxies. Such mechanisms are less effective in groups and clusters where the presence of an intragroup or intracluster medium may confine outflowing material.

Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E. [UCO/Lick Observatories (United States)

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Design of an electronically-actuated gas lift safety valve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas lift valves are widely used in oil production fields to pump recycled gas and nitrogen into the production tubing, to sustain production by aerating the oil and lifting it to the ground or sea surface. Today's industry ...

Yu, Changkuan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Wet-gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

encountered when operating under conditions with high gas volume fractions (GVF). Twin-screw multiphase pumps experience a severe decrease in efficiency when operating under wet-gas conditions, GVF over 95%. Field operations have revealed severe vibration...

Chan, Evan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

Jeffrey Savidge

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Multi-dimensional Longwave Forcing of Boundary Layer Cloud Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of multi-dimensional (MD) longwave radiative effects on cloud dynamics is evaluated in a large eddy simulation (LES) framework employing multi-dimensional radiative transfer (Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinate Method —SHDOM). Simulations are performed for a case of unbroken, marine boundary layer stratocumulus and a broken field of trade cumulus. “Snapshot” calculations of MD and IPA (independent pixel approximation —1D) radiative transfer applied to LES cloud fields show that the total radiative forcing changes only slightly, although the MD effects significantly modify the spatial structure of the radiative forcing. Simulations of each cloud type employing MD and IPA radiative transfer, however, differ little. For the solid cloud case, relative to using IPA, the MD simulation exhibits a slight reduction in entrainment rate and boundary layer TKE relative to the IPA simulation. This reduction is consistent with both the slight decrease in net radiative forcing and a negative correlation between local vertical velocity and radiative forcing, which implies a damping of boundary layer eddies. Snapshot calculations of the broken cloud case suggest a slight increase in radiative cooling, though few systematic differences are noted in the interactive simulations. We attribute this result to the fact that radiative cooling is a relatively minor contribution to the total energetics. For the cloud systems in this study, the use of IPA longwave radiative transfer is sufficiently accurate to capture the dynamical behavior of BL clouds. Further investigations are required in order to generalize this conclusion for other cloud types and longer time integrations. 1

Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Y. L.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Davis, Anthony B; Evans, K. F.; Ellingson, Robert G.

2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

290

Moment problems and boundaries of number triangles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The boundary problem for graphs like Pascal's but with general multiplicities of edges is related to a `backward' problem of moments of the Hausdorff type.

Gnedin, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Performance Boundaries in Nb3Sn Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boundaries in Nb 3 Sn Superconductors – Berkeley, CABoundaries in Nb 3 Sn Superconductors – Berkeley, CABoundaries in Nb 3 Sn Superconductors Arno Godeke Berkeley,

Godeke, Arno

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

293

Creating a single twin boundary between two CdTe (111) wafers with controlled rotation angle by wafer bonding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The single twin boundary with crystallographic orientation relationship (1{sup Ż}1{sup Ż}1{sup Ż})//(111) [01{sup Ż}1]//[011{sup Ż}] was created by wafer bonding. Electron diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated the well control of the rotation angle between the bonded pair. At the twin boundary, one unit of wurtzite structure was found between two zinc-blende matrices. High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy images showed Cd- and Te-terminated for the two bonded portions, respectively. The I-V curve across the twin boundary showed increasingly nonlinear behavior, indicating a potential barrier at the bonded twin boundary.

Sun, Ce; Lu, Ning; Wang, Jinguo; Lee, Jihyung; Peng, Xin; Kim, Moon J., E-mail: moonkim@utdallas.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Klie, Robert F. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

294

Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008 2009

295

Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb Marthrough 1996) inthroughthrough 1996)

296

Natural Gas Liquids New Field Discoveries  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb Marthrough Monthly Download Series History802 82735

297

Numerical Investigation of Temperature Distribution on a High Pressure Gas Turbine Blade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical code is developed to calculate the temperature distributions on the surface of a gas turbine blade. This code is a tool for quick prediction of the temperatures by knowing the boundary conditions and the flow conditions, and doesn...

Zirakzadeh, Hootan

2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

300

Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES A computational model of event segmentation from perceptual prediction. Jeremy R. Reynolds, Jeffrey M. Zacks, and Todd S. Braver Washington University Manuscript #12;Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 2 People tend

Zacks, Jeffrey M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Recent developments in drill-stem test interpretation useful to explorationists in tight gas sand plays and in identifying reservoirs with linear geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two major areas of recent development in drill-stem testing are of particular interest to geologists. The first is the use of closed chamber DST's to evaluate the very tight gas sands currently under intense exploration in areas such as Alberta's Deep basin and various intermontane basins in the US Rocky Mountain province. Field examples from the Deep basin of Alberta are shown together with results after completion. Other applications are shown. The second development is the use of DST data to identify reservoirs with linear flow geometry. Geologic situations where flow into the well bore during a test can be considered linear rather than truly radial include long narrow reservoirs with parallel boundaries such as channel sands, zones bounded by parallel sealing-fault boundaries, or naturally fractured reservoirs where an open fracture intersects the well bore.

Reid, H.W.; Davis, T.B.; Alexander, L.G.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by

303

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) byCampaign govCampaignsPrecision

304

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) byCampaign govCampaignsPrecisionCampaign

305

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) byCampaign

306

Green's functions for Neumann boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green's functions for Neumann boundary conditions have been considered in Math Physics and Electromagnetism textbooks, but special constraints and other properties required for Neumann boundary conditions have generally not been noticed or treated correctly. In this paper, we derive an appropriate Neumann Green's function with these constraints and properties incorporated.

Jerrold Franklin

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

307

Cherokee Clitics: The Word Boundary Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of identifying Cherokee clitics is complicated by the fact that the prosodic word, marked by the presence of a tonal boundary, may not match the morphological word. Clitics may or may not respect the the word boundary as marked by tone...

Haag, Marcia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

Krishna, Coimbatore R. (Mt. Sinai, NY); Milau, Julius S. (Port Jefferson, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

New boundary conditions for granular fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present experimental evidence, which contradicts the the standard boundary conditions used in continuum theories of non-cohesive granular flows for the velocity normal to a boundary u.n=0, where n points into the fluid. We propose and experimentally verify a new boundary condition for u.n, based on the observation that the boundary cannot exert a tension force Fb on the fluid. The new boundary condition is u.n=0 if Fb.n>=0 else n.P.n=0, where P is the pressure tensor. This is the analog of cavitation in ordinary fluids, but due the lack of attractive forces and dissipation it occurs frequently in granular flows.

Mark D. Shattuck

2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

310

Holographic Representation of Higher Spin Gauge Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extending the results of \\cite{Heem}, \\cite{KLRS} on the holographic representation of local gauge field operators in anti de Sitter space, here we construct the bulk operators for higher spin gauge fields in the leading order of $\\frac{1}{N}$ expansion. Working in holographic gauge for higher spin gauge fields, we show that gauge field operators with integer spin $s>1$ can be represented by an integration over a ball region, which is the interior region of the spacelike bulk lightcone on the boundary. The construction is shown to be AdS-covariant up to gauge transformations, and the two-point function between higher spin gauge fields and boundary higher spin current exhibit singularities on both bulk and boundary lightcones. We also comment on possible extension to the level of three-point functions and carry out a causal construction for higher spin fields in de Sitter spacetime.

Debajyoti Sarkar; Xiao Xiao

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

311

Bianchi Models with Chaplygin Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Einstein Gravitational Field Equations (EFE) of Chaplygin gas dominated Bianchi-type models are obtained by using metric approximation. The solutions of equations for a special case, namely Bianchi I model which is a generalization of isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology, are obtained. The early and late behaviours of some kinematic parameters in model are presented in graphically.

Gülçin; Uluyazi; Özgür Sevinc

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

312

Gas Model of Gravitons with Light Speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We first review some aspects of gravitational wave and the thermodynamic expression of Einstein field equations, these achieved conclusions allow people to think of Einstein's gravitational wave as a kind of sound wave in ordinary gas which propagates as an adiabatic compression wave. In the following, using the properties of photon gas in "white wall box", we find an analogous relationship between ordinary gas and photon gas through sound velocity formula. At last, by taking the ordinary gas as an intermediary, we find that gravitational wave is analogous to photon gas, or equally, gravitons are analogous to photons although they are different in some ways such as spins and coupling strengths, and these different properties don't affect their propagation speeds. Utilizing this analogous relationship, we achieve the gas model of gravitons and this model naturally gives out the light speed of gravitons

Ming Chen; Yong-Chang Huang

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

313

Interacting holographic generalized Chaplygin gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider a correspondence between the holographic dark energy density and interacting generalized Chaplygin gas energy density in FRW universe. Then we reconstruct the potential of the scalar field which describe the generalized Chaplygin cosmology.

M. R. Setare

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Casimir effect for fields with arbitrary spin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Casimir force between two perfectly reflecting parallel plates is considered. In a recent paper we presented generalised physical boundary conditions describing perfectly reflecting parallel plates. These boundary conditions are applicable to a field possessing any spin, and include the well-known spin-1/2 and spin-1 boundary conditions as special cases. Here we use these general boundary conditions to show that the allowed values of energy-momentum turn out to be the same for any massless fermionic field and the same for any massless bosonic field. As a result one expects to obtain only two possible Casimir forces, one associated with fermions and the other with bosons. We explicitly verify that this is the case for the fields up to spin-2. A significant implication of our work is that periodic boundary conditions cannot be applied to a fermionic field confined between two parallel plates.

Adam Stokes; Robert Bennett

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

315

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A. E.; Copp, J. F. . 111991. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field. Proceedings of () ; () : Sixteenth workshop on...

316

REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) described in this work determine the potential for significant, relatively unconventional, so-called ''basin-center'' hydrocarbon accumulations. If such accumulations occur, they will be characterized by the following critical attributes: (1) Location beneath a regional velocity inversion surface that typically is associated with low-permeability lithologies; (2) Anomalous pressure, both over- and underpressure, and when, less commonly, they appear to be normally pressured, they are not in contact with the meteoric water system; (3) A significant gas component in the regional multiphase fluid-flow system (water-gas-oil) that occurs beneath the regional velocity inversion surface; (4) Domains of intense gas charge (i.e., high gas saturation) within the regional multiphase fluid-flow system; (5) Compartmentalization of the rock/fluid system to a far greater extent beneath the regional velocity inversion surface than above it (i.e., convection of fluids across the regional velocity inversion surface is reduced or eliminated depending on the nature of the capillary properties of the low-permeability rocks associated with the inversion surface); (6) Commercial gas accumulations occurring at the intersection of reservoir intervals characterized by enhanced porosity and permeability and gas-charged domains; (7) Productive intersections of reservoir intervals and gas-charged domains, which are controlled by the structural, stratigraphic, and diagenetic elements affecting the rock/fluid system; and (8) No apparent meteoric water connection with the gas accumulations and gas columns up to several thousand feet in height. Because some of these critical attributes are not associated with conventional hydrocarbon accumulations, a new set of diagnostic tools are required in order to explore for and exploit these types of gas prospects efficiently and effectively. Some of these new diagnostic tools have been discussed in this report; other have been described elsewhere. In order to maximize risk reduction, it is recommended when exploring for these types of gas accu

Ronald C. Surdam

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

Measurements of air-sea gas exchange at high wind speeds in the Southern Ocean: Implications for global parameterizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 2006. [1] The SOLAS Air-Sea Gas Exchange (SAGE) Experiment was conducted in the western Pacific of air-sea gas exchange. Globally, the dominant control of air-sea gas exchange is turbulent energy as the primary source of energy for the atmospheric and oceanic molecular boundary layers have been derived from

Ho, David

318

Comparative Life-cycle Air Emissions of Coal, Domestic Natural Gas, LNG, and SNG for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparative Life-cycle Air Emissions of Coal, Domestic Natural Gas, LNG, and SNG for Electricity from the LNG life-cycle. Notice that local distribution of natural gas falls outside our analysis boundary. Figure 1S: Domestic Natural Gas Life-cycle. Figure 2S: LNG Life-cycle. Processing Transmission

Jaramillo, Paulina

319

The Chemistry of Flammable Gas Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document collects information from field instrumentation, laboratory tests, and analytical models to provide a single source of information on the chemistry of flammable gas generation at the Hanford Site. It considers the 3 mechanisms of formation: radiolysis, chemical reactions, and thermal generation. An assessment of the current models for gas generation is then performed. The results are that the various phenomena are reasonably understood and modeled compared to field data.

ZACH, J.J.

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Gauss Bonnet dark energy Chaplygin Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we incorporate GB dark energy density and its modification, MGB, with Chaplygin gas component. We show that, presence of Chaplygin gas provides us a feature to obtain an exact solution for scalar field and potential of scalar field. Investigation on squared of sound speed provides a lower limit for constant parameters of MGB model. Also, we could find some bounds for free parameters of model.

Karimkhani, Elahe; Khodam-Mohammadi, Abdolhossein

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

International Lige Colloquium on Ocean Dynamics, GAS TRANSFER AT WATER SURFACES, May 2 -6 2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and surface wave measurements and much higher heat fluxes. In addition, the infrared imagery analysis reveals potentially significant the infrared images. It is also shown that the difference in the surface boundary conditions for heat and gas

Jaehne, Bernd

322

Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely decaying gravity wave turbulence in the closed basin. No self-similar decay of the spectrum is observed, whereas its Fourier modes decay first as a time power law due to nonlinear mechanisms, and then exponentially due to linear viscous damping. We estimate the linear, nonlinear and dissipative time scales to test the time scale separation that highlights the important role of a large scale Fourier mode. By estimation of the mean energy flux from the initial decay of wave energy, the Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant is evaluated and found to be compatible with a recent theoretical value.

Luc Deike; Benjamin Miquel; Pablo Gutiérrez-Matus; Timothée Jamin; Benoit Semin; Sébastien Aumaitre; Michael Berhanu; Eric Falcon; Félicien BONNEFOY

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

The No-Boundary Wave Function and the Duration of the Inflationary Period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the simplest minisuperspace model based on a homogeneous, isotropic metric and a minimally coupled scalar field we derive analytic expressions for the caustic which separates Euklidean and Minkowskian region and its breakdown value $\\p_*$. This value represents the prediction of the no-boundary wave function for the scalar field at the beginning of inflation. We use our results to search for inflationary models which can render the no-boundary wave function consistent with the requirement of a sufficiently long inflationary period.

A. Lukas

1994-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Control of water coning in gas reservoirs by injecting gas into the aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the injected gas bubble to not have the expected effect, because the cone established may have a greater radius at the original WGC than the maximum radius of the gas bubble. In other words, the cone tends to avoid the low permeability zone by going around... the warm seasons of the year. The best storage sites found up to now are deleted or partly aeleted gas fields close to large consumption areas. In this study, gas storage reservoirs with gas originally left by a water drive are studied. The production/injection...

Haugen, Sigurd Arild

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The gradient flow running coupling with twisted boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the gradient flow for Yang-Mills theories with twisted boundary conditions. The perturbative behavior of the energy density $\\langle E(t)\\rangle$ is used to define a running coupling at a scale given by the linear size of the finite volume box. We compute the non-perturbative running of the pure gauge $SU(2)$ coupling constant and conclude that the technique is well suited for further applications due to the relatively mild cutoff effects of the step scaling function and the high numerical precision that can be achieved in lattice simulations. We also comment on the inclusion of matter fields.

A. Ramos

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

326

Energy transport using natural convection boundary layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural convection is one of the major modes of energy transport in passive solar buildings. There are two primary mechanisms for natural convection heat transport through an aperture between building zones: (1) bulk density differences created by temperature differences between zones; and (2) thermosyphon pumping created by natural convection boundary layers. The primary objective of the present study is to compare the characteristics of bulk density driven and boundary layer driven flow, and discuss some of the advantages associated with the use of natural convection boundary layers to transport energy in solar building applications.

Anderson, R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Free-Field Representation of Permutation Branes in Gepner Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider free-field realization of Gepner models basing on free-field realization of N=2 superconformal minimal models. Using this realization we analyse A/B-type boundary conditions starting from the ansatz when left-moving and right-moving free-fields degrees of freedom are glued at the boundary by an arbitrary constant matrix. It is shown that the only boundary conditions consistent with the singular vectors structure of unitary minimal models representations are given by permutation matrices and give thereby explicit free-field construction of permutation branes of Recknagel.

S. E. Parkhomenko

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

328

Grain boundary dissipation in high-{Tc} superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin-film and bulk [001] tilt bicrystal grain boundaries (GBs) in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} exhibit a strong dependence of critical current density, J{sub c} on misorientation angle. What was initially difficult to understand was the 30x smaller J{sub c} in bulk GBs which are microscopically more perfect. The authors review an explanation of this zero-field data, which is based on the pinning of Josephson vortices by the meandering found in thin-film GBs. In addition, there is evidence that J{sub c} of GBs does not drop as quickly with applied magnetic field as expected by simple Josephson junction models. The long-wavelength pinning potential due to meandering is less effective at high fields, but Gurevich and Cooley (GC) proposed a new mechanism for an enhanced GB J{sub c} arising from pinned Abrikosov vortices in the banks of a GB which present a static, quasiperiodic pinning potential to pin GB vortices. They find a peak in J{sub c} and an unusual hysteresis which give considerable support to the GC concept. In low fields, the GBs exhibit a larger J{sub c} for field cooling, which is opposite to the usual hysteresis but agrees with GC due to the larger Abrikosov vortex density in the banks. Magnetization data on the same sample are consistent including the identification of the irreversibility field.

Gray, K. E.; Miller, D. J.; Field, M. B.; Kim, D. H.; Berghuis, P.

2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

329

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

330

Topological analysis of the grain boundary space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grain boundaries and their networks have a profound influence on the functional and structural properties of every class of polycrystalline materials and play a critical role in structural evolution and phase transformations. ...

Patala, Srikanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Brownian walkers within subdiffusing territorial boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspired by the collective phenomenon of territorial emergence, whereby animals move and interact through the scent marks they deposit, we study the dynamics of a 1D Brownian walker in a random environment consisting of confining boundaries that are themselves diffusing anomalously. We show how to reduce, in certain parameter regimes, the non-Markovian, many-body problem of territoriality to the analytically tractable one-body problem studied here. The mean square displacement (MSD) of the 1D Brownian walker within subdiffusing boundaries is calculated exactly and generalizes well known results when the boundaries are immobile. Furthermore, under certain conditions, if the boundary dynamics are strongly subdiffusive, we show the appearance of an interesting non-monotonicity in the time dependence of the MSD, giving rise to transient negative diffusion.

Luca Giuggioli; Jonathan R. Potts; Stephen Harris

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

332

Nonlinear boundary value problem of magnetic insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the basis of generalization of upper and lower solution method to the singular two point boundary value problems, the existence theorem of solutions for the system, which models a process of magnetic insulation in plasma is proved.

A. V. Sinitsyn

2000-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

333

Lattice Boltzmann simulations in microfluidics: probing the no-slip boundary condition in hydrophobic, rough, and surface nanobubble laden microchannels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this contribution we review recent efforts on investigations of the effect of (apparent) boundary slip by utilizing lattice Boltzmann simulations. We demonstrate the applicability of the method to treat fundamental questions in microfluidics by investigating fluid flow in hydrophobic and rough microchannels as well as over surfaces covered by nano- or microscale gas bubbles.

Jens Harting; Christian Kunert; Jari Hyväluoma

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Simulating Microstructural Evolution and Electrical Transport in Ceramic Gas Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this paper, using the example of the thermal processing of ceramic gas sensors, an integrated compu- tationalSimulating Microstructural Evolution and Electrical Transport in Ceramic Gas Sensors Yunzhi Wang in ceramic gas sensors has been proposed. First, the particle-flow model and the continuum-phase-field method

Ciobanu, Cristian

335

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav.ntnu.no) Abstract: The information content in measurements of offshore oil and gas production is often low, and when in the context of offshore oil and gas fields, can be considered the total output of production wells, a mass

Johansen, Tor Arne

336

Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future Penn State Natural Gas Utilization Workshop Bradley Hall sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ FossilMMBtuEquivalent Wellhead Gas Price, $/MMBtu Monthly US Spot Oil Price, $/MMBtu* U.S. Crude Oil vs. Natural Gas Prices, 2005

Lee, Dongwon

337

Effects of Transition Metals on the Grain Boundary Cohesion in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transition Metals on the Grain Boundary Cohesion in Tungsten. Effects of Transition Metals on the Grain Boundary Cohesion in Tungsten. Abstract: We report on the effects of...

338

antarctic boundary layer: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences Websites Summary: Boundary Layer Meteorology (METR 5103) Spring 2014 Syllabus General information Fundamentals of the atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and...

339

atmosperic boundary layer: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences Websites Summary: Boundary Layer Meteorology (METR 5103) Spring 2014 Syllabus General information Fundamentals of the atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and...

340

Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial Gear Oils at Elevated Temperatures Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Incorporating local boundary conditions into nonlocal theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study nonlocal equations from the area of peridynamics on bounded domains. In our companion paper, we discover that, on $\\mathbb{R}^n$, the governing operator in peridynamics, which involves a convolution, is a bounded function of the classical (local) governing operator. Building on this, we define an abstract convolution operator on bounded domains. The abstract convolution operator is a function of the classical operator, defined by a Hilbert basis available due to the purely discrete spectrum of the latter. As governing operator of the nonlocal equation we use a function of the classical operator, this allows us to incorporate local boundary conditions into nonlocal theories. For the homogeneous wave equation with the considered boundary conditions, we prove that continuity is preserved by time evolution. We give explicit solution expressions for the initial value problems with prominent boundary conditions such as periodic, antiperiodic, Neumann, and Dirichlet. In order to connect to the standard convolution, we give an integral representation of the abstract convolution operator. We present additional "simple" convolutionsbased on periodic and antiperiodic boundary conditions that lead Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions. We present a numerical study of the solutions of the wave equation. For discretization, we employ a weak formulation based on a Galerkin projection and use piecewise polynomials on each element which allows discontinuities of the approximate solution at the element borders. We study convergence order of solutions with respect to polynomial order and observe optimal convergence. We depict the solutions for each boundary condition.

Burak Aksoylu; Horst Reinhard Beyer; Fatih Celiker

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

342

Results of gas monitoring of double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tanks 103-SY; 101-AW; 103-, 104-, and 105-AN are on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Recently, standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) cabinets have been installed in the vent header of each of these tanks. Grab samples have been taken once per week, and a gas chromatograph was installed on tank 104-AN as a field test. The data that have been collected since gas monitoring began on these tanks are summarized in this document.

Wilkins, N.E.

1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Leidenforst gas ratchets driven by thermal creep Alois Wrger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leidenforst gas ratchets driven by thermal creep Alois Würger Laboratoire Ondes et Matière d is at the origin of the recently discovered Leidenfrost ratchet, where liquid droplets float on a vapor layer along, the asymmetric temperature profile at each ratchet summit rectifies the vapor flow in the boundary layer

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

344

Elevated freestream turbulence effects on heat transfer for a gas turbine vane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbine airfoil, particularly for the first stage nozzle guide vane. For this study, augmentations. To incorporate all of the variables affecting boundary layer development on gas turbine airfoils, studies needElevated freestream turbulence effects on heat transfer for a gas turbine vane K.A. Thole a,*, R

Thole, Karen A.

345

Classical universes of the no-boundary quantum state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the origin of the quasiclassical realm from the no-boundary proposal for the Universe's quantum state in a class of minisuperspace models. The models assume homogeneous, isotropic, closed spacetime geometries, a single scalar field moving in a quadratic potential, and a fundamental cosmological constant. The allowed classical histories and their probabilities are calculated to leading semiclassical order. For the most realistic range of parameters analyzed, we find that a minimum amount of scalar field is required, if there is any at all, in order for the Universe to behave classically at late times. If the classical late time histories are extended back, they may be singular or bounce at a finite radius. The ensemble of classical histories is time symmetric although individual histories are generally not. The no-boundary proposal selects inflationary histories, but the measure on the classical solutions it provides is heavily biased towards small amounts of inflation. However, the probability for a large number of e-foldings is enhanced by the volume factor needed to obtain the probability for what we observe in our past light cone, given our present age. Our results emphasize that it is the quantum state of the Universe that determines whether or not it exhibits a quasiclassical realm and what histories are possible or probable within that realm.

Hartle, James B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Hawking, S. W. [DAMTP, CMS, Wilberforce Road, CB3 0WA Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hertog, Thomas [Laboratoire APC, 10 rue A. Domon et L. Duquet, 75205 Paris (France) and International Solvay Institutes, Boulevard du Triomphe, ULB, C.P. 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Plasma Transport at the Magnetospheric Flank Boundary. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is highlighted in these areas: 1. Model of magnetic reconnection induced by three-dimensional Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes at the magnetospheric flank boundary; 2. Quantitative evaluation of mass transport from the magnetosheath onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 3. Comparison of mass transfer by cusp reconnection and Flank Kelvin Helmholtz modes; 4. Entropy constraint and plasma transport in the magnetotail - a new mechanism for current sheet thinning; 5. Test particle model for mass transport onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 6. Influence of density asymmetry and magnetic shear on (a) the linear and nonlinear growth of 3D Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes, and (b) three-dimensional KH mediated mass transport; 7. Examination of entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail; 8. Entropy change and plasma transport by KH mediated reconnection - mixing and heating of plasma; 9. Entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail - tail reconnection; and, 10. Wave coupling at the magnetospheric boundary and generation of kinetic Alfven waves.

Otto, Antonius

2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

Conversion economics for Alaska North Slope natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the Prudhoe Bay field, this preliminary analysis provides an indication that major gas sales using a gas pipeline/LNG plant scenario, such as Trans Alaska Gas System, or a gas-to-liquids process with the cost parameters assumed, are essentially equivalent and would be viable and profitable to industry and beneficial to the state of Alaska and the federal government. The cases are compared for the Reference oil price case. The reserves would be 12.7 BBO for the base case without major gas sales, 12.3 BBO and 20 Tcf gas for the major gas sales case, and 14.3 BBO for the gas-to-liquids conversion cases. Use of different parameters will significantly alter these results; e.g., the low oil price case would result in the base case for Prudhoe Bay field becoming uneconomic in 2002 with the operating costs and investments as currently estimated.

Thomas, C.P.; Robertson, E.P.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Gas Storage Act (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate...

349

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

350

Industrial Gas Turbines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature,...

351

Gas Utilities (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rules regarding the production, sale, and transfer of manufactured gas will also apply to natural gas. This section regulates natural gas utilities that serve ten or more customers, more than one...

352

Enhanced p-Mode Absorption seen near the Sunspot Umbral-Penumbral Boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate p-mode absorption in a sunspot using SOHO/MDI high-resolution Doppler images. The Doppler power computed from a three and a half hour data set is used for studying the absorption in a sunspot. The result shows an enhancement in absorption near the umbral-penumbral boundary of the sunspot. We attempt to relate the observed absorption with the magnetic field structure of the sunspot. The transverse component of the potential field is computed using the observed SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms. A comparison of the power map and the computed potential field shows enhanced absorption near the umbral-penumbral boundary where the computed transverse field strength is higher.

Shibu K. Mathew

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

Behavior of Turbulent Structures within a Mach 5 Mechanically Distorted Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field of incompressible boundary layer, taken from Adrian et al. (2000). ............................................................................... 138 Figure 6.15 Schematic of an individual hairpin vortex, describing the sweep and ejection... hairpin vortex, identifying the motions contributing to sweeps and ejections ....................................................................................... 235 Figure 7.46 Illustrations of the possible mechanisms contributing to the reduced...

Peltier, Scott Jacob

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

354

Three-Dimensional Nonreflecting Boundary Conditions for Swirling Flow in Turbomachinery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-Dimensional Nonreflecting Boundary Conditions for Swirling Flow in Turbomachinery Pierre turbomachinery problems. Based on the use of precalculated far-field acoustic eigenmodes for a mean flow THERE are different approaches to analyze turbomachinery unsteadiness. These methods vary from the use of linearized

Giles, Mike

355

On asymptotic effects of boundary perturbations in exponentially shaped Josephson junctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A parabolic integro differential operator L, suitable to describe many phenomena in various physical fields, is considered. By means of equivalence between L and the third order equation describing the evolution inside an exponentially shaped Josephson junction (ESJJ), an asymptotic analysis for (ESJJ) is achieved, explicitly evaluating, boundary contributions related to the Dirichlet problem.

Monica De Angelis; Pasquale Renno

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

356

HOW TO DISPATCH OBSERVERS TO TRACK AN EVOLVING BOUNDARY Tingting Jiang and Carlo Tomasi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

boundary of a large phenomenon such as an oil spill, a fire, a hurricane, air or water pollution, or EL Ni it necessary to dispatch a limited number of observers (ships, vehicles, or air- planes with cameras; field~no. This pa- per develops a new framework for controlling the movements of the observers to maximize

Tomasi, Carlo

357

Shock-like structures in the tropical cyclone boundary layer Gabriel J. Williams,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the horizontal and vertical velocity data shown by the blue curves in Figure 1. The extreme horizontal wind m in the northeast sector. Since these extreme structures in the boundary layer wind field occur produces a shock-like structure in the radial wind, i.e., near the radius of maximum tangential wind

Schubert, Wayne H.

358

Concentration profiles across twin boundaries in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+{delta}}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twin boundaries in polycrystalline YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+{delta}} have been studied by atom-probe field-ion microscopy. Oxygen depletion at a twin boundary in a {delta}=0.6 material was observed. The width of the depleted region was 6{endash}7 nm. It agrees well with the width of oxygen depletion calculated from the oxygen-depleted twin boundary model by Jou and Washburn. However, a twin boundary in a {delta}=0.9 material did not show any oxygen depletion. This study provides direct evidence of oxygen depletion at twin boundaries in polycrystalline YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+{delta}} ceramics. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Hu, Q.; Stiller, K.; Olsson, E.; Andren, H. [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Goeteborg, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Goeteborg, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Berastegui, P.; Johansson, L. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Goeteborg, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Goeteborg, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Origin of graphitic filaments on improving the electron field emission properties of negative bias-enhanced grown ultrananocrystalline diamond films in CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural evolution of bias-enhanced grown (BEG) ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films has been investigated using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition in gas mixtures of CH{sub 4} and Ar under different negative bias voltages ranging from ?50 to ?200?V. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the morphology, growth rate, and chemical bonding of the synthesized films. Transmission electron microscopic investigation reveals that the application of bias voltage induced the formation of the nanographitic filaments in the grain boundaries of the films, in addition to the reduction of the size of diamond grains to ultra-nanosized granular structured grains. For BEG-UNCD films under ?200?V, the electron field emission (EFE) process can be turned on at a field as small as 4.08?V/?m, attaining a EFE current density as large as 3.19?mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 8.64?V/?m. But the films grown without bias (0?V) have mostly amorphous carbon phases in the grain boundaries, possessing poorer EFE than those of the films grown using bias. Consequently, the induction of nanographitic filaments in grain boundaries of UNCD films grown in CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma due to large applied bias voltage of ?200?V is the prime factor, which possibly forms interconnected paths for facilitating the transport of electrons that markedly enhance the EFE properties.

Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H., E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw, E-mail: nhtai@mse.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Huang, B. R.; Saravanan, A. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, I. N., E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw, E-mail: nhtai@mse.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

Gas Production Tax (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A tax of 7.5 percent of the market value of natural gas produced in the state of Texas is imposed on every producer of gas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural gas dehydration apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

362

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

363

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

364

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

365

Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A& M University; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Metal precipitation at grain boundaries in silicon: Dependence on grain boundary character and dislocation decoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are combined to determine the dependence of metal silicide precipitate formation on grain boundary character and microstructure in multicrystalline silicon mc-Si . Metal silicide precipitate decoration is observed to increase the local metal silicide precipitate concentrations at various types of grain boundaries, identifying clear

367

Surface and grain boundary scattering in nanometric Cu thin films: A quantitative analysis including twin boundaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relative contributions of various defects to the measured resistivity in nanocrystalline Cu were investigated, including a quantitative account of twin-boundary scattering. It has been difficult to quantitatively assess the impact twin boundary scattering has on the classical size effect of electrical resistivity, due to limitations in characterizing twin boundaries in nanocrystalline Cu. In this study, crystal orientation maps of nanocrystalline Cu films were obtained via precession-assisted electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope. These orientation images were used to characterize grain boundaries and to measure the average grain size of a microstructure, with and without considering twin boundaries. The results of these studies indicate that the contribution from grain-boundary scattering is the dominant factor (as compared to surface scattering) leading to enhanced resistivity. The resistivity data can be well-described by the combined Fuchs–Sondheimer surface scattering model and Mayadas–Shatzkes grain-boundary scattering model using Matthiessen's rule with a surface specularity coefficient of p?=?0.48 and a grain-boundary reflection coefficient of R?=?0.26.

Barmak, Katayun [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Darbal, Amith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ganesh, Kameswaran J.; Ferreira, Paulo J. [Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Rickman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Sun, Tik; Yao, Bo; Warren, Andrew P.; Coffey, Kevin R., E-mail: kb2612@columbia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Turbine exhaust diffuser with a gas jet producing a coanda effect flow control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine includes an inner boundary and an outer boundary with a flow path defined therebetween. The inner boundary is defined at least in part by a hub structure that has an upstream end and a downstream end. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inward toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. The hub structure includes at least one jet exit located on the hub structure adjacent to the upstream end of the tail cone. The jet exit discharges a flow of gas substantially tangential to an outer surface of the tail cone to produce a Coanda effect and direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the inner boundary.

Orosa, John; Montgomery, Matthew

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

369

Do grain boundaries in nanophase metals slide?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanophase metallic materials show a maximum in strength as grain size decreases to the nano scale, indicating a break down of the Hall-Petch relation. Grain boundary sliding, as a possible accommodation mechanisms, is often the picture that explain computer simulations results and real experiments. In a recent paper, Bringa et al. Science 309, 1838 (2005), we report on the observation of an ultra-hard behavior in nanophase Cu under shock loading, explained in terms of a reduction of grain boundary sliding under the influence of the shock pressure. In this work we perform a detailed study of the effects of hydrostatic pressure on nanophase Cu plasticity and find that it can be understood in terms of pressure dependent grain boundary sliding controlled by a Mohr-Coulomb law.

Bringa, E M; Leveugle, E; Caro, A

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

370

Wireless boundary monitor system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments.

Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Wireless boundary monitor system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments. 4 figs.

Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

372

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Bourcier, William L. (Livermore, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

373

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

374

Fermionic Casimir Effect on the Topological Insulator Boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the Casimir effect on the conducting surface of a topological insulator characterized by both $Z_2$ topological index and time reversal symmetry, subject to the action of a static and spatially homogeneous magnetic field perpendicular to that surface, at zero temperature. To do this, we consider modifications in the Gauss' law that arise due to the nonzero gradient of the axion-like pseudoscalar factor coupled to the constant magnetic field, which occur in a term that must be added to the electromagnetic Lagrangian in order to account for the topological properties of the system. Such term allows to find an effective point-like charge that changes the quantum vacuum of a spinor field in 1+2 dimensions confined on the edge under analysis. Since that the Casimir energy found depends on a length defined on the boundary, we show that there is a tangential density of force or a shear stress associated to the surface, tending to shrink or stretch it depending on the magnetic field direction. These results are extended for the case in which the surface forms a interface between two TI's.

C. R. Muniz

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

375

Compressed gas manifold  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD); Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

377

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Use of an Accurate DNS Particulate Flow Method to Supply and Validate Boundary Conditions for the MFIX Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation of particulate flows for industrial applications often requires the use of two-fluid models, where the solid particles are considered as a separate continuous phase. One of the underlining uncertainties in the use of the two-fluid models in multiphase computations comes from the boundary condition of the solid phase. Typically, the gas or liquid fluid boundary condition at a solid wall is the so called no-slip condition, which has been widely accepted to be valid for single-phase fluid dynamics provided that the Knudsen number is low. However, the boundary condition for the solid phase is not well understood. The no-slip condition at a solid boundary is not a valid assumption for the solid phase. Instead, several researchers advocate a slip condition as a more appropriate boundary condition. However, the question on the selection of an exact slip length or a slip velocity coefficient is still unanswered. Experimental or numerical simulation data are needed in order to determinate the slip boundary condition that is applicable to a two-fluid model. The goal of this project is to improve the performance and accuracy of the boundary conditions used in two-fluid models such as the MFIX code, which is frequently used in multiphase flow simulations. The specific objectives of the project are to use first principles embedded in a validated Direct Numerical Simulation particulate flow numerical program, which uses the Immersed Boundary method (DNS-IB) and the Direct Forcing scheme in order to establish, modify and validate needed energy and momentum boundary conditions for the MFIX code. To achieve these objectives, we have developed a highly efficient DNS code and conducted numerical simulations to investigate the particle-wall and particle-particle interactions in particulate flows. Most of our research findings have been reported in major conferences and archived journals, which are listed in Section 7 of this report. In this report, we will present a brief description of these results.

Zhi-Gang Feng

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Loop Gas Model for Open Strings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The open string with one-dimensional target space is formulated in terms of an SOS, or loop gas, model on a random surface. We solve an integral equation for the loop amplitude with Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions imposed on different pieces of its boundary. The result is used to calculate the mean values of order and disorder operators, to construct the string propagator and find its spectrum of excitations. The latter is not sensible neither to the string tension $\\L$ nor to the mass $\\mu$ of the ``quarks'' at the ends of the string. As in the case of closed strings, the SOS formulation allows to construct a Feynman diagram technique for the string interaction amplitudes.

V. Kazakov; I. Kostov

1992-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

380

Practice Field Practice Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courts Soccer Field Swimming pool Bandeen Hall Mountain House # 3 # 2 Golf Course Security Patterson Hall.B. Scott Arena Library Centennial Theater Mc Greer Hall Pollack Hall New Johnson Science Building Dewhurst Dining Hall Champlain Regional College # 4 Mackinnon Hall Residence # 6 Memorial House Retired Faculty

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural gas monthly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

TURBULENCE IN SUPERSONIC AND HYPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TURBULENCE IN SUPERSONIC AND HYPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYERS Alexander J. Smits and M. Pino Martin in supersonic and hypersonic flow where the effects of compressibility have a direct influence on the turbulence. Experimental and DNS results are presented and compared. Key words: Turbulence, supersonic, hypersonic, shocks

MartĂ­n, Pino

383

1. Integrated Database 2. Boundary Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Integrated Database 2. Boundary Analysis Melinda Laituri Colorado State University June 2011 #12 data Model package/ Analysis technique #12;Establishing a Database What are our scales? What are our units of analysis? What commonality do we have? What is the nature of our data? What

384

Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

Sawyer, Virginia

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries H . S C O T T M A T T H E W S , C H R I and organizations are pursuing "carbon footprint" projects to estimate their own contributions to global climate change. Protocol definitions from carbon registries help organizations analyze their footprints

Kammen, Daniel M.

386

New Boundaries | Issue 16 | June 2013 Treatmentandsupport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industries with their development of the strongest, lightest material. Moving from the work our engineers about contemporary society, on page 22. For more research stories, visit our website www cells that form part of the human immune system) attacking a cancer cell #12;NewBoundaries|June2013

Anderson, Jim

387

Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

Sawyer, Virginia

388

Metal precipitation at grain boundaries in silicon: Dependence on grain boundary character and dislocation decoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron-based analytical microprobe techniques, electron backscatter diffraction, and defect etching are combined to determine the dependence of metal silicide precipitate formation on grain boundary character and microstructure in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si). Metal silicide precipitate decoration is observed to increase with decreasing atomic coincidence within the grain boundary plane (increasing {sigma} values). A few low-{sigma} boundaries contain anomalously high metal precipitate concentrations, concomitant with heavy dislocation decoration. These results provide direct experimental evidence that the degree of interaction between metals and structural defects in mc-Si can vary as a function of microstructure, with implications for mc-Si device performance and processing.

Buonassisi, T.; Istratov, A. A.; Pickett, M. D.; Marcus, M. A.; Ciszek, T. F.; Weber, E. R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 and Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 and Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard associated with compressed gas cylinders and methods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

Cadwallader, L.C. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

Lee C. Cadwallader

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Solutions of Laplace's equation with simple boundary conditions, and their applications for capacitors with multiple symmetries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find solutions of Laplace's equation with specific boundary conditions (in which such solutions take either the value zero or unity in each surface) using a generic curvilinear system of coordinates. Such purely geometrical solutions (that we shall call Basic Harmonic Functions BHF's) are utilized to obtain a more general class of solutions for Laplace's equation, in which the functions take arbitrary constant values on the boundaries. On the other hand, the BHF's are also used to obtain the capacitance of many electrostatic configurations of conductors. This method of finding solutions of Laplace's equation and capacitances with multiple symmetries is particularly simple, owing to the fact that the method of separation of variables becomes much simpler under the boundary conditions that lead to the BHF's. Examples of application in complex symmetries are given. Then, configurations of succesive embedding of conductors are also examined. In addition, expressions for electric fields between two conductors a...

Morales, Mayckol; Herrera, William J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Boundary Behavior of the Ginzburg-Landau Order Parameter in the Surface Superconductivity Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the 2D Ginzburg-Landau theory for a type-II superconductor in an applied magnetic field varying between the second and third critical value. In this regime the order parameter minimizing the GL energy is concentrated along the boundary of the sample and is well approximated to leading order by a simplified 1D profile in the direction perpendicular to the boundary. Motivated by a conjecture of Xing-Bin Pan, we address the question of whether this approximation can hold uniformly in the boundary region. We prove that this is indeed the case as a corollary of a refined, second order energy expansion including contributions due to the curvature of the sample. Local variations of the GL order parameter are controlled by the second order term of this energy expansion, which allows us to prove the desired uniformity of the surface superconductivity layer.

M. Correggi; N. Rougerie

2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

Particulate immersed boundary method for complex fluid-particle interaction problems with heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In our recent work [H. Zhang, F.X. Trias, A. Oliva, D. Yang, Y. Tan, Y. Sheng. PIBM: Particulate immersed boundary method for fluid-particle interaction problems. Powder Technology. 272(2015), 1-13.], a particulate immersed boundary method (PIBM) for simulating fluid-particle multiphase flow was proposed and assessed in both two- and three-dimensional applications. In this study, the PIBM was extended to solve thermal interaction problems between spherical particles and fluid. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) was adopted to solve the fluid flow and temperature fields, the PIBM was responsible for the non-slip velocity and temperature boundary conditions at the particle surface, and the kinematics and trajectory of the solid particles were evaluated by the Discrete Element Method (DEM). Four case studies were implemented to demonstrate the capability of the current coupling scheme. Firstly, numerical simulation of natural convection in a two-dimensional square cavity with an isothermal concentric annulus was...

Zhang, Hao; Trias, F Xavier; Yu, Aibing; Tan, Yuanqiang; Oliva, Assensi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hamiltonian, Energy and Entropy in General Relativity with Non-Orthogonal Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A general recipe to define, via Noether theorem, the Hamiltonian in any natural field theory is suggested. It is based on a Regge-Teitelboim-like approach applied to the variation of Noether conserved quantities. The Hamiltonian for General Relativity in presence of non-orthogonal boundaries is analysed and the energy is defined as the on-shell value of the Hamiltonian. The role played by boundary conditions in the formalism is outlined and the quasilocal internal energy is defined by imposing metric Dirichlet boundary conditions. A (conditioned) agreement with previous definitions is proved. A correspondence with Brown-York original formulation of the first principle of black hole thermodynamics is finally established.

M. Francaviglia; M. Raiteri

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

Casimir Pistons for Massive Scalar Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Casimir force on two-dimensional pistons for massive scalar fields with both Dirichlet and hybrid boundary conditions is computed. The physical result is obtained by making use of generalized $\\zeta$-function regularization technique. The influence of the mass and the position of the piston in the force is studied graphically. The Casimir force for massive scalar field is compared to that for massless scalar field.

Xiang-hua Zhai; Yan-yan Zhang; Xin-zhou Li

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 Ś 10{sup 8}, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A., E-mail: anouar.soufiani@ecp.fr [CNRS, UPR 288, Laboratoire EM2C, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France); École Centrale Paris, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France)] [France; Xin, S. [CNRS/INSA-Lyon, UMR 5008, CETHIL, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)] [CNRS/INSA-Lyon, UMR 5008, CETHIL, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Le Quéré, P. [CNRS, UPR 3251, LIMSI, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)] [CNRS, UPR 3251, LIMSI, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Optimization of well rates under gas coning conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production rates under gas caning conditions. This new method applies to an oil reservoir overlain by a large gas cap containing multiple wells. The cases consider have a limit on the maximum field production rate for both oil and gas. It was found... that the optimal p~ion rates are achieved when Eq. 1 is satisfied for any pair of wells i and j: ) I = constant i = 1, . . . , n dqo This condition minimizes the f ield gas production rate when the maximum field production rate for oil is met, and maximizes...

Urbanczyk, Christopher Henry

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Simulations of dislocation pile-ups at assymetric tilt boundaries in aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials deformation processes are increasingly approachable through the both conventional and accelerated molecular dynamics. In one deformation process, dislocation pile-up at a grain boundary, a greater understanding is required as to how dislocations transmit through grain boundaries, causing plastic deformation, or reflect and reconstruct the grain boundary, but with no macroscopic deformation. Here dislocation pile-ups in an alwninum bicrystal with an asymmetric tilt grain boundary are simulated atomistically, introducing effects of dislocation interactions beyond linear elastic ones. The observed responses as functions of the number of explicitly modeled dislocations and the magnitude of the applied stress are discussed. Typical conditions for the simulations consist of thermal relaxation room temperature, five active dislocations inserted within a 6.5-million-atom cell, and an additional fourteen dislocations represented within the atomistic simulation by their elastic strain fields. The dislocations are initially distributed according to linear elastic estimates of their positions in a double-ended pile-up from a chosen far-field stress. The whole cell is allowed to relax according to a procedure to be described. In the ensuing simulations, the system is propagated for some substantial period of time (lOs of ps), followed by small increments of strain. After a number of such increments, we observe all of the anticipated events. Usually several of the closest dislocations are absorbed into the grain boundary, resulting in varying amounts of reconstruction. Reflections from the boundary are common and show a strong dependence on sample thickness. Transmission events are seen on both slip systems in the other grain. The particulars of these events will be described as well.

Valone, Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Jian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoagland, Richard C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

Integrable Boundaries, Conformal Boundary Conditions and A-D-E Fusion Rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The $sl(2)$ minimal theories are labelled by a Lie algebra pair $(A,G)$ where $G$ is of $A$-$D$-$E$ type. For these theories on a cylinder we conjecture a complete set of conformal boundary conditions labelled by the nodes of the tensor product graph $A\\otimes G$. The cylinder partition functions are given by fusion rules arising from the graph fusion algebra of $A\\otimes G$. We further conjecture that, for each conformal boundary condition, an integrable boundary condition exists as a solution of the boundary Yang-Baxter equation for the associated lattice model. The theory is illustrated using the $(A_4,D_4)$ or 3-state Potts model.

Roger E. Behrend; Paul A. Pearce; Jean-Bernard Zuber

1998-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

Multi-Echelon Supply Chain Design in Natural Gas Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: In this paper, a framework is proposed for integrating of the operational parts of Natural Gas Transmission Systems (NGTSs) through pipelines and better coordination for the flow of natural gas and information in the system. The objective functions of this study are to provide a brief review of literature in natural gas supply chain modeling and to design a multi-echelon Supply Chain for the Natural Gas Transmission Systems (NSTSC). To achieve this, extensive and detailed studies in this field of research have been done. Subsequently, a complete study on the transmission of natural gas through pipelines, as well as the supply chain and its application, has been made in gas industry. Next, based on the operational systems in the natural gas industry, the supply chain levels are developed. These designs are very effective for modeling and optimization of the gas networks. In addition, the developed supply chain helps to reduce the costs of the NGTSs and increase customer satisfaction.

Mehrdad Nikbakht; N. Zulkifli; N. Ismail; S. Sulaiman; Abdolhossein Sadrnia; M. Suleiman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule, applicable to gas utilities, establishes rules for calculation of gas cost adjustments, procedures to be followed in establishing gas cost adjustments and refunds, and describes reports...

402

Turbulent heat transfer in parallel flow boundary layers with streamwise step changes in surface conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the convective heat/mass transfer behavior of a turbulent boundary layer with parallel streamlines. The most notable example of such flow is an atmospheric boundary layer with a steady mean wind in the absence of topography. The classic, two-dimensional problem involves the surface boundary condition of a finite-length step change in temperature/concentration in the streamwise direction of an atmospheric flow. In the literature on geophysical evapotranspiration, this problem is known as Sutton's problem (cf. Sutton, 1934, and Brutsaert, 1984). This flow situation is equally applicable to heat/mass transfer in solar ponds, ground solar collectors, and heated roadways, as examples. The present note revisits the Sutton problem, with the can Driest eddy diffusivity model, and expands the types of boundary conditions that are examined to include surface changes in temperature/concentration and fluxes. The parallel streamline condition allows for Graetz-type solutions, with boundary conditions at the surface and in the far flow field. The predicted results are presented as a series of power law correlations of the relevant nondimensional parameters.

Lindberg, W.R.; Lee, R.C.; Smathers, L.B. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie (United States))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Iran seeking help in regaining prerevolution oil and gas flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the goals of the Iranian oil and gas industry to rebuild their oil and gas production facilities by using foreign investment. It discusses the historical consequences of war in the region to diminish the production and postpone the recovery of natural gas which is currently flared. It describes the major projects Iran hopes to develop through international partnerships and includes field development, pipeline construction, gas reinjection, gas treatment facilities, and new offshore operation. The paper also reviews the US policy on Iran and its attempt to apply sanctions towards this country.

Tippee, B.

1996-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

Enhanced membrane gas separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

Prasad, R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

405

Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Ultra-Low-Temperature...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Gas Heaters Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures Building Science "Power Words"...

406

d=3 random field behavior near percolation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The highly diluted antiferromagnet Mn{sub 0.35}Zn{sub 0.65}F{sub 2} has been investigated by neutron scattering for H>0. A low-temperature (T<11 K), low-field (H<1 T) pseudophase transition boundary separates a partially antiferromagnetically ordered phase from the paramagnetic one. For 1field induced but is not enclosed within a transition boundary. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

Montenegro, F. C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife PE, (Brazil)] [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife PE, (Brazil); Belanger, D. P. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Slanic, Z. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Fernandez-Baca, J. A. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6393 (United States)] [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6393 (United States)

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Quasilinear dynamics of a cloud of hot electrons propagating through a plasma in the presence of an externally applied uniform electric field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of a cloud of hot electrons through a plasma and the generation of Langmuir waves are investigated in the presence of an externally applied uniform electric field. Using numerical simulations of the quasilinear equations the evolution of the electron distribution function and the spectral density of Langmuir waves are monitored in coordinate and velocity space. It is found that the Langmuir waves are enhanced in the presence of the electric field and the distribution functions of the beam and Langmuir waves diffuse toward large velocities. The overall self-similar characteristic of the system is preserved in the presence of the electric field. The average beam velocity is no longer constant and increases with time along its trajectory, but the acceleration is much less than that of free streaming particles. The beam number density plateaus in coordinate space and large scale, small amplitude fluctuations develop on the top of this plateau. The level of the fluctuations depends on the strength of the electric field. We also investigated the influence of the external electric field on the evolution of gas-dynamical parameters such as the height of the plateau in the beam distribution function in velocity space, its upper velocity boundary, and the local velocity spread of the beam. Due to the finite quasilinear relaxation time and spatial inhomogeneity of the electron beam, different parts of the beam are in different states of relaxation. In the region of partial relaxation the plateau is specified by both upper and lower velocity boundaries. The upper boundary of plateau increases linearly with the strength of the electric field but the lower boundary is independent of it. Contrary to the free streaming of a beam in an electric field or quasilinear relaxation in the absence of the electric field, the local velocity spread of the beam increases during its propagation. Some of the electrons at the back of the beam are also transferred by the electric field to its front, so that the height of plateau increases at large distan0009c.

Foroutan, G.; Robinson, P. A.; Zahed, H.; Li, B.; Cairns, I. H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996, Tabriz, Iran and School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Condensation and Magnetization of the Relativistic Bose Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a simple proof of the absence of Bose--Einstein condensation of a relativistic boson gas, in any finite local magnetic field in less than five dimensions. We show that the relativistic charged boson gas exhibit a genuine Meissner--Ochsenfeld effect of the Schafroth form at fixed supercritical density. As in the well--known non--relativistic case, this total expulsion of a magnetic field is caused by the condensation of the Bose gas at vanishing magnetic field. The result is discussed in the context of kaon condensation in neutron stars.

P. Elmfors; P. Liljenberg; D. Persson; B. -S. Skagerstam

1994-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

409

Nuclear Power Plant Containment Pressure Boundary Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants is summarized. This research is aimed at understanding the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containment and liners of concrete containment. This understanding will lead to improvements in risk-informed regulatory decision making. Containment pressure boundary components are described and potential aging factors identified. Quantitative tools for condition assessments of aging structures to maintain an acceptable level of reliability over the service life of the plant are discussed. Finally, the impact of aging (i.e., loss of shell thickness due to corrosion) on steel containment fragility for a pressurized water reactor ice-condenser plant is presented.

Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.C.; Costello, J.F.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Natural Gas & Local Governments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-trailers New business ventures Frac services Water hauling Brine water remediation Pipeline Group #12;2. Sublette County, Wyoming Largest gas-producing county in Wyoming (44% of states gas

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

412

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

413

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

415

Gas and Oil (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of the Environment has the authority to enact regulations pertaining to oil and gas production, but it cannot prorate or limit the output of any gas or oil well. A permit from the...

416

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules (Tennessee)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules are implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority). Purchased Gas Adjustment (PGA) Rules are intended to permit the company/LDC (local gas...

418

COMPUTATIONAL OPTIMIZATION OF GAS COMPRESSOR ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 26, 2015 ... When considering cost-optimal operation of gas transport net- works ..... The four most frequently used drive types are gas turbines, gas driven.

2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

419

Bar Mar field Point field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bone Spring Seay Nance Regional Study (Cimarex Energy) West Texas (Various Counties) West Texas Yates Seay Nance Regional Study (Lynx Production) West Texas (Various Counties) #12;Bar Mar field Umbrella Point field Nuare field East Texas field Copano Bay Bar Mar field Umbrella

Texas at Austin, University of

420

[0268] First Galley Proofs MULTIPLICITIES, BOUNDARY POINTS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, multiplicity, extreme point, sharp point, boundary point. c Ð , Zagreb Paper OaM-0268 1 #12;2 W.S. CHEUNG NUMERICAL RANGES WAI-SHUN CHEUNG, XUHUA LIU AND TIN-YAU TAM (Communicated by C.-K. Li) Abstract, XUHUA LIU AND T.Y. TAM Given W(A), Embry [8] introduced M = M (A) := {x Cn : x Ax = x x}. In general

Tam, Tin-Yau

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Technology adaptation and boundary management in bona fide virtual groups.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this research project composed of multiple case studies, I focused on how bona fide virtual groups appropriated multiple media to facilitate group boundary construction and boundary management, which are preconditions of group identity formation...

Zhang, Huiyan

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

System Identification and Active Control of a Turbulent Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental investigation is made into the active control of the near-wall region of a turbulent boundary layer using a linear control scheme. System identification in the boundary layer provides optimal transfer ...

Rathnasingham, Ruben

423

Thermodynamic stability and implications of anisotropic boundary particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) Generally, a boundary is nonplanar in the neighborhood of an attached particle--even when anisotropic interfacial free energies do not produce faceting-and maintains a icKy = 0 while the boundary particles maintain ...

Siem, Ellen J. (Ellen Jane), 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

426

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Multiple-tracer gas analyzer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-gas tracer system has been designed, built, and used on an explosively fractured oil shale rubble bed. This paper deals exclusively with the hardware, software, and overall operation of the tracer system. This system is a field portable, self-contained unit, which utilizes a mass spectrometer for gas analysis. The unit has a 20 channel sample port capability and is controlled by a desk top computer. The system is configured to provide a dynamic sensitivity range of up to six orders of magnitude. A roots blower is manifolded to the unit to provide continuous flow in all sample lines. The continuous flow process allows representative samples as well as decreasing the time between each measurement. Typical multiplex cycle time to evaluate four unique gases is approximately 12 seconds.

Uhl, J.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Gas Cylinders: Proper Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

429

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

430

Static gas expansion cooler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Internal gravity waves and hyperbolic boundary-value problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some of the following aspects will be discussed: energy production and characteristic wave beams; radiation conditions; boundary integral equations.

433

Theoretical investigation of the impact of grain boundaries and fission gases on UO2 thermal conductivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity is one of the most important metrics of nuclear fuel performance. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the impact of microstructure features on thermal conductivity, especially since the microstructure evolves with burn-up or time in the reactor. For example, UO{sub 2} fuels are polycrystalline and for high-burnup fuels the outer parts of the pellet experience grain sub-division leading to a very fine grain structure. This is known to impact important physical properties such as thermal conductivity as fission gas release. In a previous study, we calculated the effect of different types of {Sigma}5 grain boundaries on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity and predicted the corresponding Kapitza resistances, i.e. the resistance of the grain boundary in relation to the bulk thermal resistance. There have been reports of pseudoanisotropic effects for the thermal conductivity in cubic polycrystalline materials, as obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, which means that the conductivity appears to be a function of the crystallographic direction of the temperature gradient. However, materials with cubic symmetry should have isotropic thermal conductivity. For this reason it is necessary to determine the cause of this apparent anisotropy and in this report we investigate this effect in context of our earlier simulations of UO{sub 2} Kapitza resistances. Another source of thermal resistance comes from fission products and fission gases. Xe is the main fission gas and when generated in sufficient quantity it dissolves from the lattice and forms gas bubbles inside the crystalline structure. We have performed studies of how Xe atoms dissolved in the UO{sub 2} matrix or precipitated as bubbles impact thermal conductivity, both in bulk UO{sub 2} and in the presence of grain boundaries.

Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

434

Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 states 1984 through 1996, February 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fourth wellhead productive capacity report. The three previous ones were published in 1991, 1993, and 1994. This report should be of particular interest to those in Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas. The EIA Dallas Field Office has prepared five earlier reports regarding natural gas productive capacity. These reports, Gas Deliverability and Flow Capacity of Surveillance Fields, reported deliverability and capacity data for selected gas fields in major gas producing areas. The data in the reports were based on gas-well back-pressure tests and estimates of gas-in-place for each field or reservoir. These reports use proven well testing theory, most of which has been employed by industry since 1936 when the Bureau of Mines first published Monograph 7. Demand for natural gas in the United States is met by a combination of natural gas production, underground gas storage, imported gas, and supplemental gaseous fuels. Natural gas production requirements in the lower 48 States have been increasing during the last few years while drilling has remained at low levels. This has raised some concern about the adequacy of future gas supplies, especially in periods of peak heating or cooling demand. The purpose of this report is to address these concerns by presenting a 3-year projection of the total productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead for the lower 48 States. Alaska is excluded because Alaskan gas does not enter the lower-48 States pipeline system. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) generates this 3-year projection based on historical gas-well drilling and production data from State, Federal, and private sources. In addition to conventional gas-well gas, coalbed gas and oil-well gas are also included.

NONE

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

435

ANNIVERSARY REVIEW Grain boundary energy anisotropy: a review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy (B) gained when the two surfaces are brought together and new bonds are formed. The grain boundaryANNIVERSARY REVIEW Grain boundary energy anisotropy: a review Gregory S. Rohrer Received: 29 April 2011 Abstract This paper reviews findings on the anisotropy of the grain boundary energies. After

Rohrer, Gregory S.

436

Mineralogical effects on the detectability of the postperovskite boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineralogical effects on the detectability of the postperovskite boundary Brent Grocholskia,1 discontinuity to the Pv - pPv boundary in pyrolite (homogenized mantle composition). Furthermore, the mineralogy have a detectable Pv - pPv boundary due to their distinct mineralogy. Therefore, the observation

Rhoads, James

437

Underground gas storage in New York State: A historical perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New York State has a long history of underground gas storage activity that began with conversion of the Zoar gas field into a storage reservoir in 1916, the first in the United States. By 1961 another fourteen storage fields were developed and seven more were added between 1970 and 1991. All twenty-two operating storage reservoirs of New York were converted from depleted gas fields and are of low-deliverability, base-load type. Nineteen of these are in sandstone reservoirs of the Lower Silurian Medina Group and the Lower Devonian Oriskany Formation and three in limestone reservoirs are located in the gas producing areas of southwestern New York and are linked to the major interstate transmission lines. Recent developments in underground gas storage in New York involve mainly carbonate-reef and bedded salt-cavern storage facilities, one in Stuben County and the other in Cayuga County, are expected to begin operation by the 1996-1997 heating season.

Friedman, G.M.; Sarwar, G.; Bass, J.P. [Brooklyn College of the City Univ., Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Natural Gas Tankless Water Heaters. Center for Energy andhot water from the water heater to each end-use locationMixed Temperature Water Water Heater Drain Indoor Boundary

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Numerical Study of Freestream Waves Receptivity and Nonlinear Breakdown in Hypersonic Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Methods for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Stability.of Instability in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer. TheoreticalA. P. , Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layer to Wall

Lei, Jia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Welcome FUPWG- Natural Gas Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—provides an overview of natural gas, including emissions, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, and landfill gas supplement for natural gas system.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ESP/rotary gas separator duo found to optimize production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test conducted on a low-volume waterflood well in West Texas equipped with an electric submersible pump (ESP) proved to rotary gas separator (RGS) to be more efficient than conventional reverse flow gas separators, achieving gas separation efficiencies close to 90%. Further, the RGS increased the run time of the ESP, thus lowering the wellbore fluid level and increasing oil production. The one drawback found is that RGSs can be susceptible to fluid erosion.

Jacobs, G.H.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

443

Flue gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for removing sulfur oxide from combustion gas to form Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and for reducing the harmful effects of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 on auxiliary heat exchangers in which a sodium compound is injected into the hot combustion gas forming liquid Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 in a gas-gas reaction and the resultant gas containing Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is cooled to below about 1150.degree. K. to form particles of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 prior to contact with at least one heat exchanger with the cooling being provided by the recycling of combustion gas from a cooled zone downstream from the introduction of the cooling gas.

Im, Kwan H. (Lisle, IL); Ahluwalia, Rajesh K. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Invariance properties of boundary sets of open embeddings of manifolds and their application to the abstract boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The {\\em abstract boundary\\/} (or {\\em {\\em a\\/}-boundary\\/}) of Scott and Szekeres \\cite{Scott94} constitutes a ``boundary'' to any $n$-dimensional, paracompact, connected, Hausdorff, $C^\\infty$-manifold (without a boundary in the usual sense). In general relativity one deals with a {\\em space-% time\\/} $(\\cM,g)$ (a 4-dimensional manifold $\\cM$ with a Lorentzian metric $g$), together with a chosen preferred class of curves in $\\cM$. In this case the {\\em a\\/}-boundary points may represent ``singularities'' or ``points at infinity''. Since the {\\em a\\/}-boundary itself, however, does not depend on the existence of further structure on the manifold such as a Lorentzian metric or connection, it is possible for it to be used in many contexts. In this paper we develop some purely topological properties of abstract boundary sets and abstract boundary points ({\\em a\\/}-boundary points). We prove, amongst other things, that compactness is invariant under boundary set equivalence, and introduce another invariant concept ({\\em isolation\\/}), which encapsulates the notion that a boundary set is ``separated'' from other boundary points of the same embedding. ....... [The abstract continues in paper proper - truncated to fit here.

Christopher J. Fama; Susan M. Scott

1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

Mark Scotto

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Thermodynamic functions of degenerate magnetized electron gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fermi energy, pressure, internal energy, entropy, and heat capacity of completely degenerate relativistic electron gas are calculated by numerical methods. It is shown that the maximum admissible magnetic field on the order of 10{sup 9} G in white dwarfs increases the pressure by a factor of 1.06 in the central region, where the electron concentration is {approx}10{sup 33} cm{sup -3}, while the equilibrium radius increases by approximately a factor of 1.03, which obviously cannot be observed experimentally. A magnetic field of {approx}10{sup 8} G or lower has no effect on the pressure and other thermodynamic functions. It is also shown that the contribution of degenerate electron gas to the total pressure in neutron stars is negligible compared to that of neutron gas even in magnetic fields with a maximum induction {approx}10{sup 17} G possible in neutron stars. The neutron beta-decay forbiddeness conditions in a superstrong magnetic field are formulated. It is assumed that small neutron stars have such magnetic fields and that pulsars with small periods are the most probable objects that can have super-strong magnetic fields.

Skobelev, V. V., E-mail: v.skobelev@inbox.ru [Moscow State Industrial University (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

Reserve growth important to U.S. gas supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The term reserve growth refers to the typical increases in estimated ultimate recovery that occur as oil or gas fields are developed and produced. An example for a particular field helps explain the nature of reserve growth. This gas field was discovered in the mid-1940s. In 1977, its ultimate recovery was estimated to be 2.1 tcf of gas. One might think that after some 30 years of development and production, the resource potential of a field would be well understood. However, by 1991 the estimated ultimate recovery of this field had increased to 3.1 tcf. Reserve growth over the 15 year period totaled 1 tcf, and it shows no sign of stopping. The paper discusses reserve growth trends, reserve growth roots, and future reserve growth. It is concluded that much work remains to be done on the phenomenon of reserve growth, which is arguably the most significant research problem in the field of hydrocarbon resource assessment.

Schmoker, J.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Attanasi, E.D. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Harmonic initial-boundary evolution in general relativity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational techniques which establish the stability of an evolution-boundary algorithm for a model wave equation with shift are incorporated into a well-posed version of the initial-boundary value problem for gravitational theory in harmonic coordinates. The resulting algorithm is implemented as a 3-dimensional numerical code which we demonstrate to provide stable, convergent Cauchy evolution in gauge wave and shifted gauge wave testbeds. Code performance is compared for Dirichlet, Neumann, and Sommerfeld boundary conditions and for boundary conditions which explicitly incorporate constraint preservation. The results are used to assess strategies for obtaining physically realistic boundary data by means of Cauchy-characteristic matching.

Babiuc, Maria C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Szilagyi, Bela [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, 14476 Golm (Germany); Winicour, Jeffrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, 14476 Golm (Germany)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Harmonic Initial-Boundary Evolution in General Relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational techniques which establish the stability of an evolution-boundary algorithm for a model wave equation with shift are incorporated into a well-posed version of the initial-boundary value problem for gravitational theory in harmonic coordinates. The resulting algorithm is implemented as a 3-dimensional numerical code which we demonstrate to provide stable, convergent Cauchy evolution in gauge wave and shifted gauge wave testbeds. Code performance is compared for Dirichlet, Neumann and Sommerfeld boundary conditions and for boundary conditions which explicitly incorporate constraint preservation. The results are used to assess strategies for obtaining physically realistic boundary data by means of Cauchy-characteristic matching.

Maria C. Babiuc; Bela Szilagyi; Jeffrey Winicour

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

455

Modeling of grain boundary stresses in Alloy 600  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosive environments combined with high stress levels and susceptible microstructures can cause intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 components on both primary and secondary sides of pressurized water reactors. One factor affecting the IGSCC is intergranular carbide precipitation controlled by heat treatment of Alloy 600. This study is concerned with analysis of elastic stress fields in vicinity of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated in the matrix and at a grain boundary triple point. The local stress concentration which can lead to IGSCC initiation was studied using a two-dimensional finite element model. The intergranular precipitates are more effective stress raisers than the intragranular precipitates. The combination of the elastic property mismatch and the precipitate shape can result in a local stress field substantially different than the macroscopic stress. The maximum local stresses in the vicinity of the intergranular precipitate were almost twice as high as the applied stress.

Kozaczek, K.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sinharoy, A.; Ruud, C.O. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Mcllree, A.R. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

2 Key Achievements 7 Greenhouse Gas Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Princeton University Reports Contents 2 Key Achievements 7 Greenhouse Gas Reduction Campus Energy was established in 2008, the University has invested $5.3 million in energy-savings projects, resulting in annual of a 5.2-megawatt solar collector field. · Audit the remaining 20 of the top 50 energy- consuming

457

Coarse scale simulation of tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is common for field models of tight gas reservoirs to include several wells with hydraulic fractures. These hydraulic fractures can be very long, extending for more than a thousand feet. A hydraulic fracture width is usually no more than about 0...

El-Ahmady, Mohamed Hamed

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Liquid-gas phase transition in a two-components isospin lattice gas model for asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A two-components isospin lattice gas model has been employed to study the liquid-gas phase transition for asymmetric nuclear matter. An additional degree of freedom, namely, the asymmetry parameter alpha has been considered carefully for studying the phase transition. We have shown that under the mean field approximation, the liquid-gas phase transition given by this model is of second order. The entropy continues at the phase transition point. The binodal surface is addressed.

Wei Liang Qian; Ru-Keng Su

2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

459

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive FILE COPY TAP By Irwin Stambler, Field Editor, is sized for a 10-ton heat pump system - will be scaled to power a commercial product line ranging from 7 of the cycle- as a heat pump drive for commercial installations. Company is testing prototype gas turbine

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

460

Holographic Dark Energy Model with Modified Variable Chaplygin Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this letter we consider a correspondence between holographic dark energy and variable modified Chaplygin gas to obtain a holographic dark energy model of the universe. The corresponding potential of the scalar field has been reconstructed which describes the modified variable Chaplygin gas. The stability of the holographic dark energy in this case is also discussed.

B. C. Paul

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

DARK MATTER Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DARK MATTER STARS GAS NEUTRAL HYDROGEN Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas Quasar Quasar Absorption Lines Keck/HIRES Quasar Spectrum Observer baryons dark matter potential isotropic UV only on and the radiation field intensity... H I #12;5 GOAL: the primordial dark matter power spectrum

Steidel, Chuck

462

Incremental natural gas resources through infield reserve growth/secondary natural gas recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Infield Reserve Growth/Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project is to develop, test, and verify technologies and methodologies with near- to midterm potential for maximizing the recovery of natural gasfrom conventional reservoirs in known fields. Additional technical and technology transfer objectives of the SGR project include: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities in reservoirs of conventional permeability cause reservoir compartmentalization and, hence, incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas gulf coast basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications to find secondary gas. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields. To transfer project results to a wide array of natural gas producers, not just as field case studies, but as conceptual models of how heterogeneities determine natural gas flow units and how to recognize the geologic and engineering clues that operators can use in a cost-effective manner to identify incremental, or secondary, gas.

Finley, R.J.; Levey, R.A.; Hardage, B.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in tight gas fields is challenging, not only because of the wide range of depositional environments and large variability in reservoir properties, but also because the evaluation often has to deal with a multitude of wells, limited reservoir information...

Turkarslan, Gulcan

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

464

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

price for a condensing commercial water heater is $1,579.For condensing commercial water heaters with a thermalFound products for water heater in any product field and gas

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Four Dimensional Supersymmetric Theories in Presence of a Boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we study $\\mathcal{N} =1$ supersymmetric theories in four dimensions in presence of a boundary. We demonstrate that it is possible to preserve half the supersymmetry of the original theory by suitably modifying it in presence of a boundary. This is done by adding new boundary terms to the original action, such that the supersymmetric variation of the new terms exactly cancels the boundary terms generated by the supersymmetric transformation of the original bulk action. We also analyze the boundary projections of such supercharges used in such a theory. Finally, we study super-Yang-Mills theories in presence of a boundary using these results. We explicitly construct the action for the modified super-Yang-Mills theory, which preserves half the supersymmetry of the original theory, in presence of a boundary.

Faizal, Mir

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Grain boundary characterization in an X750 alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grain boundary chemistry in an X750 Ni alloy was analyzed by atom probe tomography in an effort to clarify the possible roles of elemental segregation and carbide presence on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of Ni alloys. Two types of cracks are observed: straight cracks along twin boundaries and wavy cracks at general boundaries. It was found that carbides (M23C6 and TiC) are present at both twin and general boundaries, with comparable B and P segregation for all types of grain boundaries. Twin boundaries intercept ?’ precipitates while the general boundaries wave around the ?’ and carbide precipitates. Near a crack tip, oxidation takes place on the periphery of carbide precipitate.

Kevin Fisher; Sebastien Teysseyre; Emmanuelle Marquis

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Prediction of the effects of compositional mixing in a reservoir on conversion to natural gas storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The increased interest in the development of new Gas Storage Fields over the lastseveral decades has created some interesting challenges for the industry. Most existinggas… (more)

Brannon, Alan W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Boundary layer response to wind gusts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the wind tunnel sir stress caused by tbe addition of the in)actors, the decision was osde to use flew visuslstion ?echniques to detsreine if it wss possible to generate s lsuinar boundary layer on the flat plate. Loup black wss suspended in light..., 8. The data reduction procedure used in this thesis follcwed pxi- maxily the procsduxes of rafax'ence 8. Velocity fluctuations were detected using the constant current technique and computed based on square wave calibration. yor the constant...

Morland, Bruce Thomas

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Flue gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Hamilton flow generated by field lines near a toroidal magnetic surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for obtaining the Hamiltonian of a vacuum magnetic field in a given 3D toroidal magnetic surface (superconducting shell). This method is used to derive the expression for the integrable surface Hamiltonian in the form of the expansion of a rotational transform of field lines on embedded near-boundary magnetic surfaces into a Taylor series in the distance from the boundary. This expansion contains the value of the rotational transform and its shear at the boundary surface. It is shown that these quantities are related to the components of the first and second quadratic forms of the boundary surface.

Skovoroda, A. A., E-mail: skovorod@nfi.kiae.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Oil field management system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

Fincke, James R.

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

473

Effects of Solute and Vacancy Segregation on Migration of a/4 and a/2 Antiphase Boundaries in Fe?Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of segregation of solute atoms and vacancies on migration of a/4?1 1 1? and a/2?1 0 0? antiphase domain boundaries (APDBs) in stoichiometric Fe3Al at various temperatures are studied using a phase-field model ...

Allen, Samuel Miller

474

Thailand gas project now operational  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Now operational, Phase 1 of Thailand's first major natural gas system comprises one of the world's longest (264 miles) offshore gas lines. Built for the Petroleum Authority of Thailand (PTT), this system delivers gas from the Erawan field in the Gulf of Thailand to two electrical power plants near Bangkok, operated by the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). The project required laying about 360 miles of pipeline, 34-in., 0.625 in.-thick API-5LX-60 pipe offshore and 28-in., 0.406 in.-thick API-5LX-60 onshore. The offshore pipe received a coal-tar coating, a 3.5-5.0 in. concrete coating, and zinc sacrificial-anode bracelets. The onshore line was coated with the same coal-tar enamel and, where necessary, with concrete up to 4.5 in. thick. Because EGAT's two power plants are the system's only customers, no more pipeline will be constructed until deliveries, currently averaging about 100 million CF/day, reach the 250 million CF/day level. The project's second phase will include additional pipelines as well as an onshore distribution network to industrial customers.

Horner, C.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Gas shielding apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

Brandt, D.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

476

Designer Gravity and Field Theory Effective Potentials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motivated by the anti-de Sitter conformal field theory correspondence, we show that there is remarkable agreement between static supergravity solutions and extrema of a field theory potential. For essentially any function V({alpha}) there are boundary conditions in anti--de Sitter space so that gravitational solitons exist precisely at the extrema of V and have masses given by the value of V at these extrema. Based on this, we propose new positive energy conjectures. On the field theory side, each function V can be interpreted as the effective potential for a certain operator in the dual field theory.

Hertog, Thomas; Horowitz, Gary T. [Department of Physics, UCSB, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

477

Finding new reserves of oil and gas As the world's reserves of oil and gas become exhausted, we urgently need to find new  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finding new reserves of oil and gas As the world's reserves of oil and gas become exhausted, we urgently need to find new fields to answer our energy needs. Oil companies are keen to use novel techniques) techniques represent arguably the most significant technological advance in the field of oil exploration

Anderson, Jim

478

Report on surface geology and groundwater investigations of Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas Project, Converse County, Wyoming; site evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general region of investigation of this report is in the southern part of the Powder River Basin near the Town of Douglas, Wyoming. Two specific areas within this region were investigated to determine the groundwater potential with drilling and testing programs during the years 1973 to 1975. One area of investigation is located approximately 12 miles west of Douglas in T32 and 33N, R73 and 74W, and is known as the Green Valley Well Field. This area is situated in the foothills of the north end of the Laramie Range and encompasses approximately 25 square miles. In this area the Madison Formation limestone and the Flathead Formation sandstone are the aquifers of interest for groundwater production. The second area is located approximately 13 miles north of Douglas in T34 and 35N, R70 and 71W, and is known as the Mortons Well Field. This area encompasses about 30 square miles. In this area, the Lance Formation and Fox Hills Formation sandstones are the aquifers of interest. Contained within the body of this report are two geologic studies prepared by consulting geologists, Dr. Peter Huntoon and Henry Richter. These studies define the pertinent structural and groundwater geologic features in and in the vicinities of the Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. A relatively complex structural geology was encountered in the Green Valley area. The study of the Mortons area suggests that the geology of this area is relatively uniform. Inventories of the water users in the vicinities of the two study areas are included at the back of this report in Appendix B. These inventories are comprised of water appropriations as recognized by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Both groundwater and surface water appropriations are inventoried within the Green Valley study area. Only groundwater appropriations are inventoried within the Mortons study area.

None

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, Charles A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burbage, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Yun Soo Myung

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas field boundary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Numerical calculations of ultrasonic fields I: transducer near fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer code for the calculation of linear acoustic wave propagation in homogeneous fluid and solid materials has been derived from the thermal-hydraulics code STEALTH. The code uses finite-difference techniques in a two-dimensional mesh made up of arbitrarily shaped quadrilaterals. Problems with two-dimensional plane strain or two-dimensional axial symmetries can be solved. Free, fixed, or stressed boundaries can be used. Transducers can be modeled by time dependent boundary conditions or by moving pistons. This paper gives a brief description of the method and shows the results of the calculation of the near fields of circular flat and focused transducers. These results agree with analytic theory along the axis of symmetry and with other codes that use a Huygens reconstruction technique off-axis.

Johnson, J.A.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Numerical calculations of ultrasonic fields I: transducer near fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer code for the calculation of linear acoustic wave propagation in homogeneous fluid and solid materials has been derived from the thermal-hydraulics code STEALTH. The code uses finite-difference techniques in a two dimensional mesh made up of arbitrarily shaped quadrilaterals. Problems with two dimensional plane strain or two dimensional axial symmetries can be solved. Free, fixed or stressed boundaries can be used. Transducers can be modeled by time dependent boundary conditions or by moving pistons. A brief description of the method is given and the results of the calculation of the near fields of circular flat and focused transducers are shown. These results agree with analytic theory along the axis of symmetry and with other codes that use a Huygens' reconstruction technique off axis.

Johnson, J.A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

483