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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Natural Gas Purchasing Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of economic and regulatory changes, the natural gas marketplace now offers multiple options for purchasers. The purpose of this panel is to discuss short-term purchasing options and how to take advantage of these options both to lower energy costs and to secure supply.

Watkins, G.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options  

SciTech Connect

The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

Garcia, N.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Space Conditioning Technology Options for High-Bay Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-bay facility owners are considering the addition of space conditioning systems and technologies to improve their operations. This trend creates an opportunity for utility representatives to provide sound guidance on space conditioning system selection alternatives and other energy efficiency options to cost-effectively meet the owner’s requirements. This report describes the common heating and cooling technologies applicable to high-bay facilities and analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of each in...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

5

Application: Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Option.. Papavergos, PG; 1991. Halon 1301 Use in Oil and Gas Production Facilities: Alaska's North Slope.. Ulmer, PE; 1991. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

6

DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and at past market changes in the energy industry. Both electricity and natural gas distribution are regulated1 DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS Northwest Power Planning Council Issue Paper 94-41 August 11, 1994 Introduction Lower natural gas prices, apparently adequate gas supplies

7

DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The important point is that whether natural gas or electricity is more energy efficient depends on specific1 DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS Northwest Power Planning Council Issue Paper 94-41 August 11, 1994 Introduction Lower natural gas prices, apparently adequate gas supplies

8

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

9

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Facility Winnebago County Landfill Gas Sector Biomass...

10

Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Facility Gas Utilization Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location San Diego County, California Coordinates 33.0933809°, -116.6081653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0933809,"lon":-116.6081653,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Upcoming Natural Gas Storage Facilities.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Energy Hub Project Orbit Gas Storage Inc KY Leader One Gas Storage Project Peregrine Midstream Partners WY Tricor Ten Section Storage Project

12

Use of influence diagrams in gas transfer system option prioritization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A formal decision-analysis methodology was applied to aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in deciding which of several gas transfer system (GTS) options should be selected. The decision objectives for this case study, i.e., risk and cost, were directly derived from the DOE guidelines. Influence diagrams were used to define the structure of the decision problem and clearly delineate the flow if information. A set of performance matrices wee used in conjunction with the influence diagrams to assess and evaluate the degree to which the objectives of the case study were met. These performance measures were extracted from technical models, design and operating data, and professional judgments. The results were aggregated to provide an overall evaluation of the different design options of the gas transfer system. Consequently, the results of this analysis were used as an aid to DOE to select a viable GTS option.

Heger, A.S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Garcia, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Local Option- Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds (Utah)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Under the Utah Industrial Facilities and Development Act, counties, municipalities, and state universities in Utah may issue Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRBs) or Industrial Development Bonds (IDBs)...

14

Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 January 2005 6 January 2005 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN Mark E. Richards Manager, Advanced Energy Systems 2 Gas Technology Institute > GTI is an independent non-profit R&D organization > GTI focuses on energy & environmental issues - Specialize on natural gas & hydrogen > Our main facility is an 18- acre campus near Chicago - Over 350,000 ft 2 GTI's Main Research Facility GTI's Energy & Environmental Technology Center 3 GTI RD&D Organization Robert Stokes Vice-President Research & Deployment Hydrogen Fuel Processing Low-Temperature Fuel Cells High-Temperature Fuel Cells Vehicle Fuel Infrastructure Gerry Runte Executive Director Hydrogen Energy Systems Gasification & Hot Gas Cleanup Process Engineering Thermal Waste Stabilization

15

Natural Gas as a Fuel Option for Heavy Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) is promoting the use of natural gas as a fuel option in the transportation energy sector through its natural gas vehicle program [1]. The goal of this program is to eliminate the technical and cost barriers associated with displacing imported petroleum. This is achieved by supporting research and development in technologies that reduce manufacturing costs, reduce emissions, and improve vehicle performance and consumer acceptance for natural gas fueled vehicles. In collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory, projects are currently being pursued in (1) liquefied natural gas production from unconventional sources, (2) onboard natural gas storage (adsorbent, compressed, and liquefied), (3) natural gas delivery systems for both onboard the vehicle and the refueling station, and (4) regional and enduse strategies. This paper will provide an overview of these projects highlighting their achievements and current status. In addition, it will discuss how the individual technologies developed are being integrated into an overall program strategic plan.

James E. Wegrzyn; Wai Lin Litzke; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

NETL: Fugitive Gas Emissions Detection Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fugitive Gas Emissions Detection Facilities Fugitive Gas Emissions Detection Facilities NETL uses an array of innovative laboratory techniques and field methods to detect and monitor fugitive emissions of CO2 stored in geologic formations. By providing an accurate accounting of stored CO2 and a high level of confidence that the CO2 will permanently remain in storage, these efforts can help ensure the technical soundness and economic viability of carbon sequestration, a technology that is critical to meeting the national goal of reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Successful research to establish the stability and integrity of host formations will help developers of sequestration projects secure permits and emissions reduction credits, while preventing damage to ecosystems and ensuring public health and safety.

17

Options for Gas-to-Liquids Technology in Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purposes of this work was to assess the effect of applying new technology to the economics of a proposed natural gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant, to evaluate the potential of a slower-paced, staged deployment of GTL technology, and to evaluate the effect of GTL placement of economics. Five scenarios were economically evaluated and compared: a no-major-gas-sales scenario, a gas-pipeline/LNG scenario, a fast-paced GTL development scenario, a slow-paced GTL development scenario, and a scenario which places the GTL plant in lower Alaska, instead of on the North Slope. Evaluations were completed using an after-tax discounted cash flow analysis. Results indicate that the slow-paced GTL scenario is the only one with a rate of return greater than 10 percent. The slow-paced GTL development would allow cost saving on subsequent expansions. These assumed savings, along with the lowering of the transportation tariff, combine to distinquish this option for marketing the North Slope gas from the other scenarios. Critical variables that need further consideration include the GTL plant cost, the GTL product premium, and operating and maintenance costs.

Robertson, Eric Partridge

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Options for gas-to-liquids technology in Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to assess the effect of applying new technology to the economics of a proposed natural gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant, to evaluate the potential of a slower-paced, staged deployment of GTL technology, and to evaluate the effect of GTL placement of economics. Five scenarios were economically evaluated and compared: a no-major-gas-sales scenario, a gas-pipeline/LNG scenario, a fast-paced GTL development scenario, a slow-paced GTL development scenario, and a scenario which places the GTL plant in lower Alaska, instead of on the North Slope. Evaluations were completed using an after-tax discounted cash flow analysis. Results indicate that the slow-paced GTL scenario is the only one with a rate of return greater than 10%. The slow-paced GTL development would allow cost saving on subsequent expansions. These assumed savings, along with the lowering of the transportation tariff, combine to distinguish this option for marketing the North Slope gas from the other scenarios. Critical variables that need further consideration include the GTL plant cost, the GTL product premium, and operating and maintenance costs.

Robertson, E.P.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Safety audit of refrigerated liquefied gas facilities  

SciTech Connect

An Exxon Research and Engineering Co. comprehensive review of engineering practices and application of safety requirements at Exxon's world-wide refrigerated liquefied hydrocarbon gas storage and handling installations, which included a field audit of about 90 tanks at 30 locations, showed that catastrophic tank failure was not a credible event with properly operated and maintained tanks designed, constructed, and tested in accordance with API Standard 620, Design and Construction of Large Welded Low-Pressure Storage Tanks, although supplemental requirements were suggested to further enhance safety. The review also showed that any meaningful safety audit should be comprehensive and must include all facilities with careful attention to detail. The review embraces products of -1 to -167C and included LNG, ethylene, LPG, and LPG olefins. Recent and proposed LNG safety legislation; some field audit results; and recommendations as to design, construction, and operation of LNG and LPG storage facilities, marine terminals, and tankers, are also discussed.

Feely, F.J.; Sommer, E.C.; Marshall, B.T.; Palmer, A.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions for climate stabilization: framing regional options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has stated that stabilizing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations will require reduction of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by as much as 80% by 2050. Subnational efforts to cut emissions will inform policy development nationally and globally. We projected GHG mitigation strategies for Minnesota, which has adopted a strategic goal of 80% emissions reduction by 2050. A portfolio of conservation strategies, including electricity conservation, increased vehicle fleet fuel efficiency, and reduced vehicle miles traveled, is likely the most cost-effective option for Minnesota and could reduce emissions by 18% below 2005 levels. An 80% GHG reduction would require complete decarbonization of the electricity and transportation sectors, combined with carbon capture and sequestration at power plants, or deep cuts in other relatively more intransigent GHG-emitting sectors. In order to achieve ambitious GHG reduction goals, policymakers should promote aggressive conservation efforts, which would probably have negative net costs, while phasing in alternative fuels to replace coal and motor gasoline over the long-term. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Laura Schmitt Olabisi; Peter B. Reich; Kris A. Johnson; Anne R. Kapuscinski; Sangwon Suh; Elizabeth J. Wilson [University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN (United States). Ecosystem Science and Sustainability Initiative

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change mitigation strategies cannot be evaluated solely in terms of energy cost and greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential. Maintaining GHGs at a 'safe' level will require fundamental change in the way we approach energy production, and a number of environmental, economic, and societal factors will come into play. Water is an essential component of energy production, and water resource constraints (e.g., insufficient supplies and competing ecological and anthropogenic needs) will limit our options for producing energy and for reducing GHG emissions. This study evaluates these potential constraints from a global perspective by revisiting the 'climate wedges' proposal of Pacala and Sokolow [1], and evaluating the potential water impacts of the 'wedges' associated with energy production. Results indicate that there is a range of water impacts, with some options reducing water demand while others increase water demand. Mitigation options that improve energy conversion and end-use efficiency have the greatest potential for reducing water resources impacts. These options provide 'win-win-win' scenarios for reducing GHG emissions, lowering energy costs and reducing water demand. Thet may merit higher priority than alternative options that emphasize deploying new low-carbon energy facilities or modifying existing facilities with energy intensive GHG mitigation technologies to reduce GHG emissions. While the latter can reduce GHG emissions, they will typically increase energy costs and water impacts.

D. Craig Cooper; Gerald Sehlke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Options and costs for offsite disposal of oil and gas exploration and production wastes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United States, most of the exploration and production (E&P) wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. Certain types of wastes are not suitable for onsite management, and some well locations in sensitive environments cannot be used for onsite management. In these situations, operators must transport the wastes offsite for disposal. In 1997, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) prepared a report that identified offsite commercial disposal facilities in the United States. This information has since become outdated. Over the past year, Argonne has updated the study through contacts with state oil and gas agencies and commercial disposal companies. The new report, including an extensive database for more than 200 disposal facilities, provides an excellent reference for information about commercial disposal operations. This paper describes Argonne's report. The national study provides summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities found in each state. Data are presented by waste type and by disposal method. The categories of E&P wastes in the database include: contaminated soils, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), oil-based muds and cuttings, produced water, tank bottoms, and water-based muds and cuttings. The different waste management or disposal methods in the database involve: bioremediation, burial, salt cavern, discharge, evaporation, injection, land application, recycling, thermal treatment, and treatment. The database includes disposal costs for each facility. In the United States, most of the 18 billion barrels (bbl) of produced water, 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. However, under certain conditions, operators will seek offsite management options for these E&P wastes. Commercial disposal facilities are offsite businesses that accept and manage E&P wastes for a fee. Their services include waste management and disposal, transportation, cleaning of vehicles and tanks, disposal of wash water, and, in some cases, laboratory analysis. Commercial disposal facilities offer a suite of waste management methods and technologies.

Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Gas purification facilities at Purex: Process study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of the results of a process study, requested by the Atomic Energy Commission an the recovery of krypton and xenon from irradiated uranium at the Hanford Purex Plant. This request was prompted by original Commission forecasts of the expanded requirements for Krypton-85 for commercial phosphorescent signal lights and markers and for xenon isotopes of low neutron cross-section for use in liquid xenon scintillation counters, in connection with D.M.A., government and university-sponsored work. It was requested that both Hanford and Savannah River submit order of magnitude cost estimates for recovery facilities at the respective sites for three separate design cases. The cost information developed, along with market survey information obtained-through the A. D. Little Company and Department of Defense market surveys, would serve as the basis for scheduling of the Hanford and Savannah River participation in the Commission`s overall fission rare gas recovery program.

Michels, L.R.; Gerhart, J.M.

1958-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Gas Processing Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In North Dakota, materials purchased for building or expending gas processing facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes. Building materials, equipment, and other tangible property are eligible...

25

Texas Mandate Landfill Gas Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Texas Mandate Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Texas Mandate...

26

ASTM STANDARD GUIDE FOR EVALUATING DISPOSAL OPTIONS FOR REUSE OF CONCRETE FROM NUCLEAR FACILITY DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

Within the nuclear industry, many contaminated facilities that require decommissioning contain huge volumes of concrete. This concrete is generally disposed of as low-level waste at a high cost. Much of the concrete is lightly contaminated and could be reused as roadbed, fill material, or aggregate for new concrete, thus saving millions of dollars. However, because of the possibility of volumetric contamination and the lack of a method to evaluate the risks and costs of reusing concrete, reuse is rarely considered. To address this problem, Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory teamed to write a ''concrete protocol'' to help evaluate the ramifications of reusing concrete within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document, titled the Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. Department of Energy Site (1) is based on ANL-E's previously developed scrap metal recycle protocols; on the 10-step method outlined in DOE's draft handbook, Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material (2); and on DOE Order 4500.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (3). The DOE concrete protocol was the basis for the ASTM Standard Guide for Evaluating Disposal Options for Concrete from Nuclear Facility Decommissioning, which was written to make the information available to a wider audience outside DOE. The resulting ASTM Standard Guide is a more concise version that can be used by the nuclear industry worldwide to evaluate the risks and costs of reusing concrete from nuclear facility decommissioning. The bulk of the ASTM Standard Guide focuses on evaluating the dose and cost for each disposal option. The user calculates these from the detailed formulas and tabulated data provided, then compares the dose and cost for each disposal option to select the best option that meets regulatory requirements. With this information, the reuse of concrete may be possible, thus reducing dose and decontamination and decommissioning costs. This paper outlines ten steps required to release concrete for reuse and discusses the disposal options covered in the ASTM Standard Guide.

Phillips, Ann Marie; Meservey, Richard H.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

27

Technology options and effective policies to reduce greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in increased security of supply - depending on the role of natural gas. When Europe's energy system faces there is a great deal of uncertainty to this assumption. Natural gas prices within Europe, although not explicitly policy. However, in this case, renewables, natural gas and advanced coal- fired plants with CCS are key

28

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

29

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Du Page County, Illinois Coordinates 41.8243831°, -88.0900762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8243831,"lon":-88.0900762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

30

Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Alameda County, California Coordinates 37.6016892°, -121.7195459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6016892,"lon":-121.7195459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CSL Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Broward County, Florida Coordinates 26.190096°, -80.365865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.190096,"lon":-80.365865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Lake Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CID Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Anderson County, Tennessee Coordinates 36.0809574°, -84.2278796° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0809574,"lon":-84.2278796,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Bergen County, New Jersey Coordinates 40.9262762°, -74.07701° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9262762,"lon":-74.07701,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Palos Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Palos Verdes Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Facility Palos Verdes Gas to Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

39

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility BJ Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Gwinnett County, Georgia Coordinates 33.9190653°, -84.0167423° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9190653,"lon":-84.0167423,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Facility Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.7924343°, -72.8042797° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7924343,"lon":-72.8042797,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location St. Joseph County, Indiana Coordinates 41.6228085°, -86.3376761° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6228085,"lon":-86.3376761,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility DFW Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Denton County, Texas Coordinates 33.1418611°, -97.179026° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.1418611,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

Analysis of Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options within a Multi-sector Economic Framework  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

National-scale analysis of greenhouse gas mitigation options is generally carried out using top-down economic models with moderate energy detail but very limited detail in agriculture and forestry. However, a complete analysis of greenhouse gas mitigation options requires an improved representation of agriculture within the top-down economic models used for analysis of climate policy. Greenhouse gas mitigation options within the agricultural sector include changes in afforestation of agricultural lands, crop and livestock management practices, harvesting of biomass crops for fuel, and the sequestration of carbon in agricultural soils. Analysis of such options is usually carried out in a bottom-up model such as the Agricultural Sector Model (ASM). We report on activities to combine the bottom-up agricultural detail from ASM with the top-down economic and energy structure used at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), which has been used extensively for analysis of alternative carbon mitigation strategies.

Sands, Ronald D.; Mccarl, Bruce A.; Gillig, Dhazn; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Gale, J.; Kaya, Y.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Injection/withdrawal scheduling for natural gas storage facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control decisions for gas storage facilities are made in the face of extreme uncertainty over future natural gas prices on world markets. We examine the problem faced by owners of storage contracts of how to manage the injection/withdrawal schedule of ... Keywords: natural gas storage, optimization, scheduling

Alan Holland

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Underground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies & Practicality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environments and are very salty, like the Marcellus shale and other oil and gas formations underlying the areaUnderground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies), Region 3. Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar, February 18, 2010 (Answers provide below by Karen Johnson

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

48

Standard Guide for Evaluating Disposal Options for Concrete from Nuclear Facility Decommissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This standard guide defines the process for developing a strategy for dispositioning concrete from nuclear facility decommissioning. It outlines a 10-step method to evaluate disposal options for radioactively contaminated concrete. One of the steps is to complete a detailed analysis of the cost and dose to nonradiation workers (the public); the methodology and supporting data to perform this analysis are detailed in the appendices. The resulting data can be used to balance dose and cost and select the best disposal option. These data, which establish a technical basis to apply to release the concrete, can be used in several ways: (1) to show that the release meets existing release criteria, (2) to establish a basis to request release of the concrete on a case-by-case basis, (3) to develop a basis for establishing release criteria where none exists. 1.2 This standard guide is based on the “Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. Department of Energy Sites,” (1) from ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Options for converting excess plutonium to feed for the MOX fuel fabrication facility  

SciTech Connect

The storage and safekeeping of excess plutonium in the United States represents a multibillion-dollar lifecycle cost to the taxpayers and poses challenges to National Security and Nuclear Non-Proliferation. Los Alamos National Laboratory is considering options for converting some portion of the 13 metric tons of excess plutonium that was previously destined for long-term waste disposition into feed for the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). This approach could reduce storage costs and security ri sks, and produce fuel for nuclear energy at the same time. Over the course of 30 years of weapons related plutonium production, Los Alamos has developed a number of flow sheets aimed at separation and purification of plutonium. Flow sheets for converting metal to oxide and for removing chloride and fluoride from plutonium residues have been developed and withstood the test oftime. This presentation will address some potential options for utilizing processes and infrastructure developed by Defense Programs to transform a large variety of highly impure plutonium into feedstock for the MFFF.

Watts, Joe A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Paul H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Psaras, John D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Joyce, Jr., Edward L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Project Biomass Facility Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Albany County, New York Coordinates 42.5756797°, -73.9359821° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5756797,"lon":-73.9359821,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

51

Evaluation of irradiation facility options for fusion materials research and development  

SciTech Connect

Successful development of fusion energy will require the design of high-performance structural materials that exhibit dimensional stability and good resistance to fusion neutron degradation of mechanical and physical properties. The high levels of gaseous (H, He) transmutation products associated with deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion neutron transmutation reactions, along with displacement damage dose requirements up to 50-200 displacements per atom (dpa) for a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO), pose an extraordinary challenge. The intense neutron source(s) is needed to address two complimentary missions: 1) Scientific investigations of radiation degradation phenomena and microstructural evolution under fusion-relevant irradiation conditions (to provide the foundation for designing improved radiation resistant materials), and 2) Engineering database development for design and licensing of next-step fusion energy machines such as a fusion DEMO. A wide variety of irradiation facilities have been proposed to investigate materials science phenomena and to test and qualify materials for a DEMO reactor. Currently available and proposed facilities include fission reactors (including isotopic and spectral tailoring techniques to modify the rate of H and He production per dpa), dual- and triple-ion accelerator irradiation facilities that enable greatly accelerated irradiation studies with fusion-relevant H and He production rates per dpa within microscopic volumes, D-Li stripping reaction and spallation neutron sources, and plasma-based sources. The advantages and limitations of the main proposed fusion materials irradiation facility options are reviewed. Evaluation parameters include irradiation volume, potential for performing accelerated irradiation studies, capital and operating costs, similarity of neutron irradiation spectrum to fusion reactor conditions, temperature and irradiation flux stability/control, ability to perform multiple-effect tests (e.g., irradiation in the presence of a flowing coolant, or in the presence of complex applied stress fields), and technical maturity/risk of the concept. Ultimately, it is anticipated that heavy utilization of ion beam and fission neutron irradiation facilities along with sophisticated materials models, in addition to a dedicated fusion-relevant neutron irradiation facility, will be necessary to provide a comprehensive and cost-effective understanding of anticipated materials evolution in a fusion DEMO and to therefore provide a timely and robust materials database.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL; Möslang, Anton [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Closed Loop Test Facility for hot dirty gas valves  

SciTech Connect

A design study of a closed loop test facility for eight-inch hot dirty gas valves is presented. The objective of the facility is to quality valves for use in coal gasifiers, combined cycle plants, and pressurized fluid bed combustors. Outline sketches and estimated costs are presented for the selected design.

Not Available

1980-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

53

Economics of gas supply: the effects of decontrol-policy options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for interpreting the effects of four alternatives to the Natural Gas Policy Act covers the options of accelerated partial decontrol, early full decontrol, and phased decontrol. The effects of these gas-pricing options on the development of domestic supplies of both conventional and unconventional sources, as well as the forecast under current policy, are examined in detail. All of the alternatives have a positive effect on supply relative to continuing controls indefinitely. The methodology for production forecasting appears in the appendix. 6 figures, 5 tables. (DCK)

Muzzo, S.E.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Computational Approach to the Real Option Management of Network Contracts for Natural Gas Pipeline Transport Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commodity merchants use real option models to manage their operations. A central element of such a model is its underlying operating policy. We focus on network contracts for the transport capacity of natural gas pipelines, specific energy conversion ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, capacity valuation, commodity and energy conversion assets, energy-related operations, heuristics, math programming, natural gas pipelines, operations management practice, operations management/finance interface, petroleum/natural gas industries, real options, sensitivities, spread options

Nicola Secomandi; Mulan X. Wang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

IN-PILE GAS-COOLED FUEL ELEMENT TEST FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Paper presented at American Nuclear Society Meeting, June I8-21, 1962, Boston, Mass. Design and operating problems of unclad and ceramic gas-cooled reactor fuels in high temperature circulating gas systems will be studied using a test facility now nearing completion at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A shielded air-tight cell houses a closed circuit gas system equipped for dealing with fission products circulating in the gas. Experiments can be conducted on fuel element performance and stability, fission product deposition, gas clean up, activity levels, component and system performance and shielding, and decontamination and maintenance of system hardware. (auth)

Zasler, J.; Huntley, W.R.; Gnadt, P.A.; Kress, T.S.

1962-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

Gas injection as an alternative option for handling associated gas produced from deepwater oil developments in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shift of hydrocarbon exploration and production to deepwater has resulted in new opportunities for the petroleum industry(in this project, the deepwater depth greater than 1,000 ft) but also, it has introduced new challenges. In 2001,more than 999 Bcf of associated gas were produced from the Gulf of Mexico, with deepwater associated gas production accounting for 20% of this produced gas. Two important issues are the potential environmental impacts and the economic value of deepwater associated gas. This project was designed to test the viability of storing associated gas in a saline sandstone aquifer above the producing horizon. Saline aquifer storage would have the dual benefits of gas emissions reduction and gas storage for future use. To assess the viability of saline aquifer storage, a simulation study was conducted with a hypothetical sandstone aquifer in an anticlinal trap. Five years of injection were simulated followed by five years of production (stored gas recovery). Particular attention was given to the role of relative permeability hysteresis in determining trapped gas saturation, as it tends to control the efficiency of the storage process. Various cases were run to observe the effect of location of the injection/production well and formation dip angle. This study was made to: (1) conduct a simulation study to investigate the effects of reservoir and well parameters on gas storage performance; (2) assess the drainage and imbibition processes in aquifer gas storage; (3) evaluate methods used to determine relative permeability and gas residual saturation ; and (4) gain experience with, and confidence in, the hysteresis option in IMEX Simulator for determining the trapped gas saturation. The simulation results show that well location and dip angle have important effects on gas storage performance. In the test cases, the case with a higher dip angle favors gas trapping, and the best recovery is the top of the anticlinal structure. More than half of the stored gas is lost due to trapped gas saturations and high water saturation with corresponding low gas relative permeability. During the production (recovery) phase, it can be expected that water-gas production ratios will be high. The economic limit of the stored gas recovery will be greatly affected by producing water-gas ratio, especially for deep aquifers. The result indicates that it is technically feasible to recover gas injected into a saline aquifer, provided the aquifer exhibits the appropriate dip angle, size and permeability, and residual or trapped gas saturation is also important. The technical approach used in this study may be used to assess saline aquifer storage in other deepwater regions, and it may provide a preliminary framework for studies of the economic viability of deepwater saline aquifer gas storage.

Qian, Yanlin

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Facility Owner Contractor Award Date End Date Options/Award Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OptionsAward Term Ultimate Potential Expiration Date Contract FY Competed Parent Companies LLC Partners DOE Site Procurement Director DOE Contracting Officer SLAC National...

59

CO2 Offset Options: Comparative Assessment of Terrestial Sinks vs. Natural Gas Combined Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W. South (south@energyresources.com; 202-785-8833) W. South (south@energyresources.com; 202-785-8833) Energy Resources International, Inc. 1015 18 th Street, N.W., Suite 650 Washington, DC 20036 CO 2 Offset Options: Comparative Assessment of Terrestial Sinks vs. Natural Gas Combined Cycle 1 Abstract This study compares the economic value of two CO 2 mitigation actions: terrestrial reforestation to sequester CO 2 emitted from coal-fired power generation versus natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power generation to avoid (minimize) CO 2 release. The same quantity of carbon offset was assumed for both actions. Tree stock growth, carbon absorption/release cycles, and replanting were considered to maintain the quantity of carbon offset via reforestation. The study identified important parameters with both CO 2 mitigation options that should be considered when examining alternative strategies.

60

Assessing Air Pollution Control Options at the Hudson Station of Public Service Electric and Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a pilot-scale assessment of air pollutant emission control options at the Hudson Generating Station of Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G). Tests over a period of a year and a half evaluated the capabilities of a high air-to-cloth ratio pulse jet baghouse (COHPAC) in controlling particulates, acid gases, and mercury and a tubular electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in controlling mercury emissions.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Natural Gas Procurement Challenges for a Project Financed Cogeneration Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A decision to project finance a 110 megawatt combined cycle cogeneration facility in 1986 in place of conventional internal financing greatly changed the way in which natural gas was normally procured by Union Carbide Corporation. Natural gas supply security for the term of financing was a major concern of the financing interest, while competitive fuel cost greatly concerned Union Carbide. In addition, the natural gas contract had to be in place prior to construction financing finalization. This paper will explore the thought process that went into evaluating the various natural gas supply proposals that ultimately resulted in the final contractual arrangements. While the information presented will be deliberately non-specific to the suppliers involved or the contractual terms, the discussion will cover the following areas: PROJECT FINANCING REQUIREMENTS, GAS SUPPLY CONSIDERATIONS, SUPPLY TRANSPORTATION EXPEDITIOUS INTERNAL APPROVAL, and SUPPLIER INTANGIBLES.

Good, R. L.; Calvert, T. B.; Pavlish, B. A.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Decision matrix for liquid loading in gas wells for cost/benefit analyses of lifting options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field-proven solutions already exist to reduce the loss of gas production when liquid loading begins to occur. However, the choice of remedial technique, its feasibility, and its cost, vary considerably depending on a field's location, size export route, and the individual operator's experience. The selection of the best remedial technique and the timeframe within which the remedial action is undertaken are critical to a project's profitability. Although there are literature reviews available regarding solutions to liquid loading problems in gas wells, a tool capable of helping an operator select the best remedial option for a specific field case still does not exist. This thesis proposes a newly developed decision matrix to screen the possible remedial options available to the operator. The matrix can not only provide a critical evaluation of potential solutions to the problem of liquid loading in gas wells vis-a?-vis the existing technical and economic constraints, but can also serve as a reference to operators for investment decisions and as a quick screening tool for the selection of production optimisation strategies. Under its current status of development, this new tool consists of a decision algorithm built around a decision tree. Unlike other data mining techniques, decision trees quickly allow for subdividing large initial datasets into successively smaller sets by a series of decision rules. The rules are based on information available in the public domain. The effectiveness of the matrix is now ready to be tested against real field datasets.

Park, Han-Young

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Considerations in siting long-term radioactive noble gas storage facilities  

SciTech Connect

Cost-benefit analysis indicates that it would be prudent policy to require the prevention of /sup 85/Kr release from fuel reprocessing plants at the present time, assuming this can be accomplished at a cost amounting to less than 00/Ci. Options are discussed for accomplishment of /sup 85/Kr release prevention from fuel reprocessing plants. No value judgments have been attempted in evaluating these options. However, it has been assumed that a policy of concentrating effluent noble gases, retaining them in pressurized storage tanks, and storing them for long periods at some centralized facility will be adopted. Such a policy would appear to be consistent with current AEC policy on high-level waste management. Criteria for siting a long-term noble gas storage facility should include assurance that in the event of a containment failure: (a) maximum permissible dose guidelines (0.5 rem/yr for whole body and 3.0 rem/yr for skin) are not exceeded, and (b) resultant population doses (man-rem) are minimized. Five hypothetical sites have been evaluated to estimate population doses in the event of leakage. From this analysis it appears that geographic siting may be considered relatively unimportant. Site selection should be based on cost- benefit studies considering: (a) transportation and handling costs, (b) maintenance and surveillance costs, and resultant health benefits derived in terms of potential population dose averted. (auth)

Cohen, J.J.; Peterson, K.R.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analysis of Hanford-based Options for Sustainable DOE Facilities on the West Coast  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale conventional energy projects result in lower costs of energy (COE). This is true for most renewable energy projects as well. The Office of Science is interested in its facilities meeting the renewable energy mandates set by Congress and the Administration. Those facilities on the west coast include a cluster in the Bay Area of California and at Hanford in central Washington State. Land constraints at the California facilities do not permit large scale projects. The Hanford Reservation has land and solar insolation available for a large scale solar project as well as access to a regional transmission system that can provide power to facilities in California. The premise of this study is that a large-scale solar project at Hanford may be able to provide renewable energy sufficient to meet the needs of select Office of Science facilities on the west coast at a COE that is competitive with costs in California despite the lower solar insolation values at Hanford. The study concludes that although the cost of solar projects continues to decline, estimated costs for a large-scale project at Hanford are still not competitive with avoided power costs for Office of Science facilities on the west coast. Further, although it is possible to transmit power from a solar project at Hanford to California facilities, the costs of doing so add additional costs. Consequently, development of a large- scale solar project at Hanford to meet the renewable goals of Office of Science facilities on the west coast is currently uneconomic. This may change as solar costs decrease and California-based facilities face increasing costs for conventional and renewable energy produced in the state. PNNL should monitor those cost trends.

Warwick, William M.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

An evaluation of thermal energy storage options for precooling gas turbine inlet air  

SciTech Connect

Several approaches have been used to reduce the temperature of gas turbine inlet air. One of the most successful uses off-peak electric power to drive vapor-compression-cycle ice makers. The ice is stored until the next time high ambient temperature is encountered, when the ice is used in a heat exchanger to cool the gas turbine inlet air. An alternative concept would use seasonal thermal energy storage to store winter chill for inlet air cooling. The objective of this study was to compare the performance and economics of seasonal thermal energy storage in aquifers with diurnal ice thermal energy storage for gas turbine inlet air cooling. The investigation consisted of developing computer codes to model the performance of a gas turbine, energy storage system, heat exchangers, and ancillary equipment. The performance models were combined with cost models to calculate unit capital costs and levelized energy costs for each concept. The levelized energy cost was calculated for three technologies in two locations (Minneapolis, Minnesota and Birmingham, Alabama). Precooling gas turbine inlet air with cold water supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage system provided lower cost electricity than simply increasing the size of the turbine for meteorological and geological conditions existing in the Minneapolis vicinity. A 15 to 20% cost reduction resulted for both 0.05 and 0.2 annual operating factors. In contrast, ice storage precooling was found to be between 5 and 20% more expensive than larger gas turbines for the Minneapolis location. In Birmingham, aquifer thermal energy storage precooling was preferred at the higher capacity factor and ice storage precooling was the best option at the lower capacity factor. In both cases, the levelized cost was reduced by approximately 5% when compared to larger gas turbines.

Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Levels of financial responsibility for liquefied-natural-gas and liquefied-petroleum-gas facilities  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to Section 7(a) of the Pipeline Safety Act of 1979, a study was conducted of the risks associated with liquefied natural gas (LNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) facilities, and of methods of assuring adequate levels of financial responsibility for those who own and/or operate facilities. The main purpose of the study is to provide a basis for determining general levels of financial responsibility for LNG and LPG facilities, as measured by the risk they represent to the public. It must be emphasized that the quantification of risk is a complicated subject. As used in this study, risk is defined as the occurrence of a maximum credible accident and the consequences that would result from such an accident. Part I of the study describes in detail the methodology used in the report to estimate the magnitude of the financial responsibility requirements associated with nine major facility types - e.g., tankships, pipelines, barges, rail tank car, tank truck, etc. - used to store and transport LNG and LPG under 48 separate operational and storage containment modes. Parts II and III of the study, in addition to providing estimates of the risks and corresponding levels of financial responsibility, contain information on the historical safety record and structure of the LNG facilities and LPG facilities.

1981-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Energy Analysis and Energy Conservation Option for the Warehouse Facility at the Human Services Center Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy use of the warehouse facility at the Human Services Center Complex in Austin, Texas was analyzed using the DOE-2.1B building energy simulation program. An analysis was made for each building as specified in the building plans provided by the State Purchasing and General Services Commission.

Farzad, M.; O'Neal, D. L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Miscellaneous: Uruguay energy supply options study assessing the market for natural gas - executive summary.  

SciTech Connect

Uruguay is in the midst of making critical decisions affecting the design of its future energy supply system. Momentum for change is expected to come from several directions, including recent and foreseeable upgrades and modifications to energy conversion facilities, the importation of natural gas from Argentina, the possibility for a stronger interconnection of regional electricity systems, the country's membership in MERCOSUR, and the potential for energy sector reforms by the Government of Uruguay. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of several fuel diversification strategies on Uruguay's energy supply system. The analysis pays special attention to fuel substitution trends due to potential imports of natural gas via a gas pipeline from Argentina and increasing electricity ties with neighboring countries. The Government of Uruguay has contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to study several energy development scenarios with the support of several Uruguayan institutions. Specifically, ANL was asked to conduct a detailed energy supply and demand analysis, develop energy demand projections based on an analysis of past energy demand patterns with support from local institutions, evaluate the effects of potential natural gas imports and electricity exchanges, and determine the market penetration of natural gas under various scenarios.

Conzelmann, G.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

69

Proceedings of the 1999 Oil and Gas Conference: Technology Options for Producer Survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1999 Oil & Gas Conference was cosponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) on June 28 to 30 in Dallas, Texas. The Oil & Gas Conference theme, Technology Options for Producer Survival, reflects the need for development and implementation of new technologies to ensure an affordable, reliable energy future. The conference was attended by nearly 250 representatives from industry, academia, national laboratories, DOE, and other Government agencies. Three preconference workshops (Downhole Separation Technologies: Is it Applicable for Your Operations, Exploring and developing Naturally Fractured Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs from the Rocky Mountains to the Austin Chalk, and Software Program Applications) were held. The conference agenda included an opening plenary session, three platform sessions (Sessions 2 and 3 were split into 2 concurrent topics), and a poster presentation reception. The platform session topics were Converting Your Resources Into Reserves (Sessions 1 and 2A), Clarifying Your Subsurface Vision (Session 2B), and High Performance, Cost Effective Drilling, Completion, Stimulation Technologies (Session 3B). In total, there were 5 opening speakers, 30 presenters, and 16 poster presentations.

None available

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

70

Offsite commercial disposal of oil and gas exploration and production waste :availability, options, and cost.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey conducted in 1995 by the American Petroleum Institute (API) found that the U.S. exploration and production (E&P) segment of the oil and gas industry generated more than 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, almost 18 billion bbl of produced water, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes. The results of that survey, published in 2000, suggested that 3% of drilling wastes, less than 0.5% of produced water, and 15% of associated wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) collected information on commercial E&P waste disposal companies in different states in 1997. While the information is nearly a decade old, the report has proved useful. In 2005, Argonne began collecting current information to update and expand the data. This report describes the new 2005-2006 database and focuses on the availability of offsite commercial disposal companies, the prevailing disposal methods, and estimated disposal costs. The data were collected in two phases. In the first phase, state oil and gas regulatory officials in 31 states were contacted to determine whether their agency maintained a list of permitted commercial disposal companies dedicated to oil. In the second stage, individual commercial disposal companies were interviewed to determine disposal methods and costs. The availability of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities falls into three categories. The states with high oil and gas production typically have a dedicated network of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities in place. In other states, such an infrastructure does not exist and very often, commercial disposal companies focus on produced water services. About half of the states do not have any industry-specific offsite commercial disposal infrastructure. In those states, operators take their wastes to local municipal landfills if permitted or haul the wastes to other states. This report provides state-by-state summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities that are found in each state. In later sections, data are presented by waste type and then by disposal method.

Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

71

USE AND CALIBRATION OF A GAS CHROMATOGRAPH FOR GAS ANALYSIS AT THE PROJECT ROVER TEST FACILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gas-chromatograph system operated by test site personnel was used for over a year to monitor the purity of gases used at the Project Rover test facilities at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. Information was obtained on the efficiency of gas line purges, total impurities of frozen air in a large liquid hydrogen dewar, and the quality of room inerting systems. Daily monitoring of several block and bleed systems, which prevent hydrogen gas from entering a system through a leaky valve, and periodic monitoring of all gas added to the 10/sup 6/ cubic feet gas storage bottles are required for safe facilities operation. In addition the chromatograph proved useful in special cases for leak detection in vacuum and high pressure systems. The calibration and operation of the chromatograph system using a column of Linde 5A Molecular Sieve for analysis of H/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, land O/sub 2/ is described. Observations of a thermal conductivity reversal in the binary mixture He--H/sub 2/ is presented. (auth)

Liebenberg, D.H.; Edeskuty, F.J.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation contains provisions for facilities and service related to electricity, natural gas, water, heating, refrigeration, and street railways. The chapter addresses the construction and...

73

An Integrated Approach to Evaluating the Technical and Commercial Options for Cogeneration Facilities in the Process Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration under the PURPA law is providing opportunity to the Process Industry not only to conserve fuel and electric costs associated with commercial process production, but effectively to share in the revenue from the sale of consumer power. The law permits release of fuel energy significantly in excess of that required for the process, expressly for the production of export electric power, with only a small required fraction contributing to sequential production of useful heat. The low required thermal energy fraction ostensibly allows systems which are hardly integrated at all with the processes involved, subject to evolving agency/legal interpretations. However, greater degrees of process/power system integration can produce increased conservation, not only of energy but of financial resources. This paper describes an integrated approach wherein technical and economic criteria are applied to size and select candidate cogeneration systems. The approach is integrated with regard to technical, economic and financial considerations, as well as to the determination of the appropriate degree of thermal integration of the power and process subsystems. An overview of steam and gas turbine cycle options for process/power integration typical of the refinery, olefins, and other industry complexes is presented. The cycles described include hot gas and steam heat recovery, going beyond the currently popular gas-turbine/ heat-recovery-steam-generator combination.

Cooke, D. H.; McCue, R. H.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is dependent on the confidence that DOE has in the long term mission for T Plant, is proposed: (1) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is high, then the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) would continue to implement the path forward previously described in the Alternatives Report (HNF-39744). Risks to the sludge project can be minimized through the establishment of an Interface Control Document (ICD) defining agreed upon responsibilities for both the STP and T Plant Operations regarding the transfer and storage of sludge and ensuring that the T Plant upgrade and operational schedule is well integrated with the sludge storage activities. (2) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is uncertain, then the ASF conceptual design should be pursued on a parallel path with preparation of T Plant for sludge storage until those uncertainties are resolved. (3) Finally, if the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is low, then the ASF design should be selected to provide independence from the T Plant mission risk.

RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On-Road Mobile Sources Project for the Houston-Galveston Area Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On-Road Mobile Sources ­ Project for the Houston-Galveston Area Council This project addresses greenhouse gas

76

GAS MIXING ANALYSIS IN A LARGE-SCALED SALTSTONE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns mainly driven by temperature gradients inside vapor space in a large-scaled Saltstone vault facility at Savannah River site (SRS). The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations by taking a three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the potential operating conditions. The baseline model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference nominal case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

Lee, S

2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are Making a Difference From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are Making a Difference December 16, 2013 - 2:46pm Addthis The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado enables partners to test conversion technologies on up to one ton of biomass material a day. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado enables partners to test conversion technologies on up to one ton of biomass material a day. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leslie Pezzullo

78

From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are Making a Difference From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are Making a Difference December 16, 2013 - 2:46pm Addthis The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado enables partners to test conversion technologies on up to one ton of biomass material a day. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado enables partners to test conversion technologies on up to one ton of biomass material a day. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leslie Pezzullo

79

Greenhouse gas emission impacts of alternative-fueled vehicles: Near-term vs. long-term technology options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alternative-fueled vehicle technologies have been promoted and used for reducing petroleum use, urban air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, greenhouse gas emission impacts of near-term and long-term light-duty alternative-fueled vehicle technologies are evaluated. Near-term technologies, available now, include vehicles fueled with M85 (85% methanol and 15% gasoline by volume), E85 (85% ethanol that is produced from corn and 15% gasoline by volume), compressed natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. Long-term technologies, assumed to be available around the year 2010, include battery-powered electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, vehicles fueled with E85 (ethanol produced from biomass), and fuel-cell vehicles fueled with hydrogen or methanol. The near-term technologies are found to have small to moderate effects on vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. On the other hand, the long-term technologies, especially those using renewable energy (such as biomass and solar energy), have great potential for reducing vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. In order to realize this greenhouse gas emission reduction potential, R and D efforts must continue on the long-term technology options so that they can compete successfully with conventional vehicle technology.

Wang, M.Q.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cogeneration System Design Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The commercial or industrial firm contemplating cogeneration at its facilities faces numerous basic design choices. The possibilities exist for fueling the system with waste materials, gas, oil, coal, or other combustibles. The choice of boiler, engine, turbine, generator, switchgear, and balance of plant can be bewildering. This paper presents an overview and a systematic approach to the basic system alternatives and attributes. The presentation illustrates how these options match the electrical and thermal needs of a firm, and what kind of operating economics and system paybacks have been achieved. Several cogeneration options are also illustrated to eliminate the problems and uncertainties of dealing with uninterested or non-cooperative utilities, as well as to minimize system costs.

Gilbert, J. S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Robust Offshore Networks for Oil and Gas Facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Offshore Communication Networks utilize multiple of communication technologies to eradicate any possibilities of failures, when the network is operational. Offshore Oil and Gas platforms and… (more)

Maheshwari, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Operational Excellence Facilities Facilities...

83

Fire protection considerations for the design and operation of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) storage facilities  

SciTech Connect

This standard addresses the design, operation, and maintenance of LPG storage facilities from the standpoint of prevention and control of releases, fire-protection design, and fire-control measures, as well as the history of LPG storage facility failure, facility design philosophy, operating and maintenance procedures, and various fire-protection and firefighting approaches and presentations. The storage facilities covered are LPG installations (storage vessels and associated loading/unloading/transfer systems) at marine and pipeline terminals, natural gas processing plants, refineries, petrochemical plants, and tank farms.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, October--December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs. Substantial progress in underground construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. MWK equipment at the grade level and the first tier are being set in the structure.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Location of Natural Gas Production Facilities in the Gulf of Mexico  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Location of Natural Gas Production Location of Natural Gas Production Facilities in the Gulf of Mexico 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual 102 1,423,239 5.9 Gulf of Mexico - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Dry Production: Federal Offshore Production trillion cubic feet 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Table S12. Summary statistics for natural gas - Gulf of Mexico, 2008-2012 Gulf of Mexico - Table S12 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual 103 Table S12. Summary statistics for natural gas - Gulf of Mexico, 2008-2012 - continued

86

Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

BC's Electricity Options: Multi-Attribute Trade-Off and Risk Analysis of the Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the region as baseload power. In particular, High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission technology makes" l a HVDC line to the East. Electricity would be generated from the associated gas to fill in when and wind power for export from the Tarim Basin via HVDC transmission lines. (Electricity production might

88

Natural gas repowering creates new capacity and efficiency options for utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repowering of aging electrical generation units in the U.S. is becoming increasingly accepted as a key technology for meeting future electrical demands. Repowering of steam electric generating capacity can be broadly defined as the replacement of existing equipment with new, more efficient systems that also offer lower emissions and substantially increased capacity. The feasibility of repowering units has been largely established. The basic equipment needed for gas-based repowering, including state-of-the-art gas turbines and heat recovery steam generators, are considered established and mature technologies by the utility industry. Nevertheless, important questions exist about the future of the repowering market. GRI had addressed these issues through three different projects in the last year: A technology-based, bottom-up study of repowering issues and markets; A top-down, capacity growth/demographic study of repowering markets; and A workshop with gas equipment and electric utility representative to discuss the future of gas repowering. These studies are summarized.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Seventh Quarter of the First Budget Period, April 1 through June 30, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion will include the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. Combustion Gas Turbine; Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment; and Externally Fired Gas Turbine/Water Augmented Gas Turbine. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Demonstration of Natural Gas Engine Driven Air Compressor Technology at Department of Defense Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent downsizing and consolidation of Department of Defense (DOD) facilities provides an opportunity to upgrade remaining facilities with more efficient and less polluting equipment. Use of air compressors by the DOD is widespread and the variety of tools and machinery that operate on compressed air is increasing. The energy cost of operating a natural gas engine-driven air compressor (NGEDAC) is usually lower than the cost of operating an electric-driven air compressor. Initial capital costs are offset by differences in prevailing utility rates, efficiencies of partial load operation, reductions in peak demand, heat recovery, and avoiding the cost of back-up generators. Natural gas, a clean-burning fuel, is abundant and readily available. In an effort to reduce its over-all environmental impact and energy consumption, the U.S. Army plans to apply NGEDAC technology in support of fixed facilities compressed air systems. Site assessment and demonstration results are presented in this paper.

Lin, M.; Aylor, S. W.; Van Ormer, H.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Preliminary design for hot dirty-gas control-valve test facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a preliminary design and cost estimating effort for a facility for the testing of control valves in Hot Dirty Gas (HDGCV) service. This design was performed by Mittelhauser Corporation for the United States Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The objective of this effort was to provide METC with a feasible preliminary design for a test facility which could be used to evaluate valve designs under simulated service conditions and provide a technology data base for DOE and industry. In addition to the actual preliminary design of the test facility, final design/construction/operating schedules and a facility cost estimate were prepared to provide METC sufficient information with which to evaluate this design. The bases, assumptions, and limitations of this study effort are given. The tasks carried out were as follows: METC Facility Review, Environmental Control Study, Gas Generation Study, Metallurgy Review, Safety Review, Facility Process Design, Facility Conceptual Layout, Instrumentation Design, Cost Estimates, and Schedules. The report provides information regarding the methods of approach used in the various tasks involved in the completion of this study. Section 5.0 of this report presents the results of the study effort. The results obtained from the above-defined tasks are described briefly. The turnkey cost of the test facility is estimated to be $9,774,700 in fourth quarter 1979 dollars, and the annual operating cost is estimated to be $960,000 plus utilities costs which are not included because unit costs per utility were not available from METC.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petroleum gases, and compressed natural gas, but their totalNatural Gas (LNG) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Liquefied

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Design and operation of the coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel utilizes a combination of two technologies which had never been used together. These two technologies had proven effective separately and now in combination. However, it brought unique operational considerations which has never been considered previously. The front end of the facility is a Sulfiban process. This monoethanolamine (MEA) process effectively absorbs hydrogen sulfide and other acid gases from coke-oven gas. The final step in sulfur removal uses a Lo-Cat II. The Lo-Cat process absorbs and subsequently oxidizes H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. These two processes have been effective in reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from coke-oven gas by 95%. Since the end of the start-up and optimization phase, emission rate has stayed below the 104.5 lb/hr limit of equivalent SO{sub 2} (based on a 24-hr average). In Jan. 1995, the emission rate from the sulfur removal facility averaged 86.7 lb/hr with less than 20 lb/hr from the Econobator exhaust. The challenges yet to be met are decreasing the operating expenses of the sulfur removal facility, notably chemical costs, and minimizing the impact of the heating system on unit reliability.

Havili, M.U.; Fraser-Smyth, L.L.; Wood, B.W. [Geneva Steel, Provo, UT (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

96

Determining the Cause of a Header Failure in a Natural Gas Production Facility  

SciTech Connect

An investigation was made into the premature failure of a gas-header at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) natural gas production facility. A wide variety of possible failure mechanisms were considered: design of the header, deviation from normal pipe alloy composition, physical orientation of the header, gas composition and flow rate, type of corrosion, protectiveness of the interior oxide film, time of wetness, and erosion-corrosion. The failed header was examined using metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, and microanalysis. A comparison of the failure site and an analogous site that had not failed, but exhibited similar metal thinning was also performed. From these studies it was concluded that failure resulted from erosion-corrosion, and that design elements of the header and orientation with respect to gas flow contributed to the mass loss at the failure point.

Matthes, S.A.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Materials exposure test facilities for varying low-Btu coal-derived gas  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the United States Department of Energy's High Temperature Turbine Technology Readiness Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is participating in the Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Materials Study. The objective is to create a technology base for ceramic materials which could be used by stationary gas power turbines operating in a high-temperature, coal-derived, low-Btu gas products of combustion environment. Two METC facilities have been designed, fabricated and will be operated simultaneously exposing ceramic materials dynamically and statically to products of combustion of a coal-derived gas. The current studies will identify the degradation of ceramics due to their exposure to a coal-derived gas combustion environment.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Carpenter, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

99

Engineering study - alternatives for SHMS high temperature/moisture gas sample conditioners for the aging waste facility  

SciTech Connect

The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems have been experiencing high temperature/moisture problems with gas samples from the Aging Waste Tanks. These moist hot gas samples have stopped the operation of the SHMS units on tanks AZ-101, AZ-102, and AY-102. This study looks at alternatives for gas sample conditioners for the Aging Waste Facility.

THOMPSON, J.F.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

100

Stochastic Programming Approaches for the Placement of Gas Detectors in Process Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The release of flammable and toxic chemicals in petrochemical facilities is a major concern when designing modern process safety systems. While the proper selection of the necessary types of gas detectors needed is important, appropriate placement of these detectors is required in order to have a well-functioning gas detection system. However, the uncertainty in leak locations, gas composition, process and weather conditions, and process geometries must all be considered when attempting to determine the appropriate number and placement of the gas detectors. Because traditional approaches are typically based on heuristics, there exists the need to develop more rigorous optimization based approaches to handling this problem. This work presents several mixed-integer programming formulations to address this need. First, a general mixed-integer linear programming problem is presented. This formulation takes advantage of precomputed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to determine a gas detector placement that minimizes the expected detection time across all scenarios. An extension to this formulation is added that considers the overall coverage in a facility in order to improve the detector placement when enough scenarios may not be available. Additionally, a formulation considering the Conditional-Value-at-Risk is also presented. This formulation provides some control over the shape of the tail of the distribution, not only minimizing the expected detection time across all scenarios, but also improving the tail behavior. In addition to improved formulations, procedures are introduced to determine confidence in the placement generated and to determine if enough scenarios have been used in determining the gas detector placement. First, a procedure is introduced to analyze the performance of the proposed gas detector placement in the face of “unforeseen” scenarios, or scenarios that were not necessarily included in the original formulation. Additionally, a procedure for determine the confidence interval on the optimality gap between a placement generated with a sample of scenarios and its estimated performance on the entire uncertainty space. Finally, a method for determining if enough scenarios have been used and how much additional benefit is expected by adding more scenarios to the optimization is proposed. Results are presented for each of the formulations and methods presented using three data sets from an actual process facility. The use of an off-the-shelf toolkit for the placement of detectors in municipal water networks from the EPA, known as TEVA-SPOT, is explored. Because this toolkit was not designed for placing gas detectors, some adaptation of the files is necessary, and the procedure for doing so is presented.

Legg, Sean W

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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101

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and A. Schafer, Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S.Marintek, Study of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Ships .Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Small-scale Facilities for Gas Clean Up and Carbon Capture Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Henry W. Pennline Henry W. Pennline Chemical Engineer National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6013 henry.pennline@netl.doe.gov Diane (DeeDee) Newlon Technology Transfer Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4086 r.diane.newlon@netl.doe.gov Small-Scale FacilitieS For GaS clean Up and carbon captUre reSearch Capabilities The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is conducting research on the cleanup of gas produced either by the combustion or gasification of fossil fuels. This effort directly supports the goal of various DOE technology programs (i.e., Carbon Sequestration, Gasification, etc.) to ensure the continued utilization of coal in an environmentally and economically

103

THE COMPONENT TEST FACILITY – A NATIONAL USER FACILITY FOR TESTING OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR) COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and other High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Projects require research, development, design, construction, and operation of a nuclear plant intended for both high-efficiency electricity production and high-temperature industrial applications, including hydrogen production. During the life cycle stages of an HTGR, plant systems, structures and components (SSCs) will be developed to support this reactor technology. To mitigate technical, schedule, and project risk associated with development of these SSCs, a large-scale test facility is required to support design verification and qualification prior to operational implementation. As a full-scale helium test facility, the Component Test facility (CTF) will provide prototype testing and qualification of heat transfer system components (e.g., Intermediate Heat Exchanger, valves, hot gas ducts), reactor internals, and hydrogen generation processing. It will perform confirmation tests for large-scale effects, validate component performance requirements, perform transient effects tests, and provide production demonstration of hydrogen and other high-temperature applications. Sponsored wholly or in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, the CTF will support NGNP and will also act as a National User Facility to support worldwide development of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor technologies.

David S. Duncan; Vondell J. Balls; Stephanie L. Austad

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service. Second topical report  

SciTech Connect

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled ``An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems`` [Ref.1.1], identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service  

SciTech Connect

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems'' (Ref.1.1), identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during the initial period of the project “Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems.” The specific region that is within the scope of this study is the Fayetteville Shale Play. This is an unconventional, tight formation, natural gas play that currently has approximately 1.5 million acres under lease, primarily to Southwestern Energy Incorporated and Chesapeake Energy Incorporated. The currently active play encompasses a region from approximately Fort Smith, AR east to Little Rock, AR approximately 50 miles wide (from North to South). The initial estimates for this field put it almost on par with the Barnett Shale play in Texas. It is anticipated that thousands of wells will be drilled during the next several years; this will entail installation of massive support infrastructure of roads and pipelines, as well as drilling fluid disposal pits and infrastructure to handle millions of gallons of fracturing fluids. This project focuses on gas production in Arkansas as the test bed for application of proactive risk management decision support system for natural gas exploration and production. The activities covered in this report include meetings with representative stakeholders, development of initial content and design for an educational web site, and development and preliminary testing of an interactive mapping utility designed to provide users with information that will allow avoidance of sensitive areas during the development of the Fayetteville Shale Play. These tools have been presented to both regulatory and industrial stakeholder groups, and their feedback has been incorporated into the project.

Thoma, Greg; Veil, John; Limp, Fred; Cothren, Jackson; Gorham, Bruce; Williamson, Malcolm; Smith, Peter; Sullivan, Bob

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

107

Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during the initial period of the project 'Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems.' The specific region that is within the scope of this study is the Fayetteville Shale Play. This is an unconventional, tight formation, natural gas play that currently has approximately 1.5 million acres under lease, primarily to Southwestern Energy Incorporated and Chesapeake Energy Incorporated. The currently active play encompasses a region from approximately Fort Smith, AR east to Little Rock, AR approximately 50 miles wide (from North to South). The initial estimates for this field put it almost on par with the Barnett Shale play in Texas. It is anticipated that thousands of wells will be drilled during the next several years; this will entail installation of massive support infrastructure of roads and pipelines, as well as drilling fluid disposal pits and infrastructure to handle millions of gallons of fracturing fluids. This project focuses on gas production in Arkansas as the test bed for application of proactive risk management decision support system for natural gas exploration and production. The activities covered in this report include meetings with representative stakeholders, development of initial content and design for an educational web site, and development and preliminary testing of an interactive mapping utility designed to provide users with information that will allow avoidance of sensitive areas during the development of the Fayetteville Shale Play. These tools have been presented to both regulatory and industrial stakeholder groups, and their feedback has been incorporated into the project.

Greg Thoma; John Veil; Fred Limp; Jackson Cothren; Bruce Gorham; Malcolm Williamson; Peter Smith; Bob Sullivan

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Fuel Processing Research Facility - A Platform for the Conduct of Synthesis Gas Technology R&D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vision 21 is the U. S. Department of Energy's initiative to deploy high efficiency, ultraclean co-production coal conversion power plants in the twenty-first century. These plants will consist of power and co-production modules, which are integrated to meet specific power and chemical markets. A variety of fuel gas processing technology issues involving gas separations, cleanup, gas-to-liquid fuels production and chemical synthesis, to mention a few, will be addressed by the program. The overall goal is to effectively eliminate, at competitive costs, environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for producing electricity and transportation fuels. The Fuel Processing Research Facility (FPRF) was developed as a fuel-flexible platform to address many of these technology needs. The facility utilizes a simplified syngas generator that is capable of producing 2,000 standard cubic feet per hour of 900 degree Celsius and 30 atmosphere synthesis gas that can be tailored to the gas composition of interest. It was built on a ''mid-scale'' level in an attempt to successfully branch the traditionally difficult scale-up from laboratory to pilot scale. When completed, the facility will provide a multi-faceted R&D area for the testing of fuel cells, gas separation technologies, and other gas processing unit operations.

Monahan, Michael J.; Berry, David A.; Gardner, Todd H.; Lyons, K. David

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant

Pei, Y J; Dong, X; Feng, G Y; Fu, S; Gao, H; Hong, Y; Li, G; Li, Y X; Shang, L; Sheng, L S; Tian, Y C; Wang, X Q; Wang, Y; Wei, W; Zhang, Y W; Zhou, H J

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrolysis/fermentation, gasification, catalytic synthesis)biomass-to-liquids (BTL) gasification of cellulosic biomass20% from biomass gasification, and 40% from natural gas

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity (Natural Gas Combined Cycle) Electricity (Coal,efficiency enabled by combined cycle systems at stationarybut also using combined cycle and fuel cell-based power

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Analysis and optimization of gas pipeline networks and surface production facilities for the Waskom Field--Harrison County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research has developed a computer simulation of the production facilities model of the Waskom Field in order to analyze existing and future production methods. The Waskom Field, located in East Texas, is a redeveloped reservoir sequence that produces primarily natural gas with minor amounts of oil and gas-condensate from the Upper and Lower Cotton Valley Sands as well as Sands in the Travis Peak sequence. The present gas production at Waskom Field averages about 12,000 Mcf/D. We have used data and the current production history to create a model of the surface production facilities, and we will simulate field performance by using a computer simulation package. In particular, all of the field facilities as well as the production history are included in these simulation Surface facilities for the Waskom field include pipelines of varying, sizes, separators, compressors, valves, and production manifolds. After creating and verifying the field model, we determined that the field possesses greater compressor capabilities than it requires. A simulation was performed where by the rental compressor in the Reuben Pierce lease was removed. The computer simulation showed that we can lower the last line pressure to 200 psig from 450 psig (which the operator was eventually able to negotiate) and the remaining compressors can sufficiently compress all of the gas currently produced in the field. Our few additional recommendations are to clean the separators, remove dual separator layouts, and remove several constricting valves that were identified from the simulation.

Pang, Jason Ui-Yong

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Techno-economic analysis of water management options for unconventional natural gas developments in the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of large-scale hydrocarbon production from shale reservoirs has revolutionized the oil and gas sector, and hydraulic fracturing has been the key enabler of this advancement. As a result, the need for water ...

Karapataki, Christina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

LANCE HAYS

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

117

Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year  

SciTech Connect

This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year.

Silviera, D.J.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cushing, C.E.; Marshall, A.; Scott, M.J.; Sewart, G.H.; Strenge, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Handling System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report Site Visit Report Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Handling System INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW This report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of a safety system oversight (SSO) assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) tritium gas handling system (TGHS). The assessment evaluated the TGHS's ability to perform as required by safety bases and other applicable requirements. The assessment was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) and was conducted October 25 - November 5, 2010. LASO was the overall lead organization for the evaluation, which included independent

119

The hydrogen hybrid option  

SciTech Connect

The energy efficiency of various piston engine options for series hybrid automobiles are compared with conventional, battery powered electric, and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell hybrid automobiles. Gasoline, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen are considered for these hybrids. The engine and fuel comparisons are done on a basis of equal vehicle weight, drag, and rolling resistance. The relative emissions of these various fueled vehicle options are also presented. It is concluded that a highly optimized, hydrogen fueled, piston engine, series electric hybrid automobile will have efficiency comparable to a similar fuel cell hybrid automobile and will have fewer total emissions than the battery powered vehicle, even without a catalyst.

Smith, J.R.

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Containment Vital Safety System, January 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Containment Vital Safety System January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose............................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background...................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................ 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fleet servicing facilities for servicing, maintaining, and testing rail and truck radioactive waste transport systems: functional requirements, technical design concepts and options cost estimates and comparisons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a resource document which examines feasibility design concepts and feasibility studies of a Fleet Servicing Facility (FSF). Such a facility is intended to be used for routine servicing, preventive maintenance, and for performing requalification license compliance tests and inspections, minor repairs, and decontamination of both the transportation casks and their associated rail cars or tractor-trailers. None of the United States' waste handling plants presently receiving radioactive wastes have an on-site FSF, nor is there an existing third party facility providing these services. This situation has caused the General Accounting Office to express concern regarding the quality of waste transport system maintenance once the system is placed into service. Thus, a need is indicated for FSF's, or their equivalent, at various radioactive materials receiving sites. In this report, three forms of FSF's solely for spent fuel transport systems were examined: independent, integrated, and colocated. The independent concept was already the subject of a detailed report and is extensively referenced in this document so that capital cost comparisons of the three concepts could be made. These facilities probably could service high-level, intermediate-level, low-level, or other waste transportation systems with minor modification, but this study did not include any system other than spent fuel. Both the Integrated and Colocated concepts were assumed to be associated with some radioactive materials handling facility such as an AFR repository.

Watson, C.D.; Hudson, B.J.; Keith, D.A.; Preston, M.K. Jr.; McCreery, P.N.; Knox, W.; Easterling, E.M.; Lamprey, A.S.; Wiedemann, G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage facility study Fort Gordon, Georgia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Fort Gordon currently purchases natural gas from Atlanta Gas Light Company under a rate schedule for Large Commercial Interruptible Service. This offers a very favorable rate for `interruptible` gas service, however, Fort Gordon must maintain a base level of `firm gas`, purchased at a significantly higher cost, to assure adequate natural gas supplies during periods of curtailment to support family housing requirements and other single fuel users. It is desirable to provide a standby fuel source to meet the needs of family housing and other single fuel users and eliminate the extra costs for the firm gas commitment to Atlanta Gas Light Company. Therefore, a propane-air standby fuel system is proposed to be installed at Fort Gordon.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Energy infrastructure of the United States and projected siting needs: Scoping ideas, identifying issues and options. Documentation report for Chapter 2: Draft report of the Working Group on Energy Facility Siting to the Secretary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the sources and derivation of the energy demand and infrastructure estimates found in Chapter 2 of ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE OF THE UNITED STATES AND PROJECTED SITING NEEDS: SCOPING IDEAS, IDENTIFYING ISSUES AND OPTIONS Draft Report of the Department of Energy Working Group on Energy Facility Siting to the Secretary. The first part of this report provides an explanation in narrative form of each table, figure, or infrastructure estimate in Chapter 2, including a complete list of references and personal contacts. Appendix A contains a print out of the calculations used to derive the figures, including references to data sources. Appendix B contains the results of a sensitivity analysis that uses an alternative energy use forecast as its basis. This report should only be used in conjunction with the full contents of Chapter 2.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Location of Natural Gas Production Facilities in the Gulf of Mexico  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

? 2011 ? 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual 100 1,812,328 7.9 Gulf of Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Dry Production: Table S12. Summary statistics for natural gas - Gulf of Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 Gulf of Mexico - Table S12 Federal Offshore Production trillion cubic feet 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells 2011

125

Coke oven gas desulfurization: at Republic Steel's New Coking Facility, Warren, OH  

SciTech Connect

Our performance test indicates that the Sulfiban process is an effective method for removing H/sub 2/S from coke-oven gas. The process is able to handle variations in coke-oven gas flow and composition. Continuing efforts are underway to maintain optimum desulfurization conditions while trying to reduce waste production and MEA consumption. The problems which have prevented us from operating continuously have given us a better understanding of the process. This has contributed to better plant operations and greater equipment reliability for us to obtain continuous coke-oven gas desulfurization. 2 figures, 1 table.

Boak, S.C.; Prucha, D.G.; Turic, H.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Design and component integration of a T63-A-700 gas turbine engine test facility ; .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A gas turbine engine test cell was developed integrating an Allison T63-A-700 helicopter engine with a superflow water brake dynamometer power absorber. Design specifications were… (more)

Eckerle, Brian P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

STM Stirling Engine-Generator at a Hog Manure Digester Gas Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stirling engines have recently been introduced to the distributed generation market. This report summarizes the results of three projects that used Stirling engine-generators from one manufacturer in applications where they were fueled with digester gas.

2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Conceptual Design for a High-Temperature Gas Loop Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an early-stage conceptual design for a high-temperature gas test loop. The objectives accomplished by the study include, (1) investigation of existing gas test loops to determine ther capabilities and how the proposed system might best complement them, (2) development of a preliminary test plan to help identify the performance characteristics required of the test unit, (3) development of test loop requirements, (4) development of a conceptual design including process flow sheet, mechanical layout, and equipment specifications and costs, and (5) development of a preliminary test loop safety plan.

James B. Kesseli

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The safeguards options study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safeguards Options Study was initiated to aid the International Safeguards Division (ISD) of the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation in developing its programs in enhanced international safeguards. The goal was to provide a technical basis for the ISD program in this area. The Safeguards Options Study has been a cooperative effort among ten organizations. These are Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mound Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Sandia National Laboratories, and Special Technologies Laboratory. Much of the Motivation for the Safeguards Options Study is the recognition after the Iraq experience that there are deficiencies in the present approach to international safeguards. While under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards at their declared facilities, Iraq was able to develop a significant weapons program without being noticed. This is because negotiated safeguards only applied at declared sites. Even so, their nuclear weapons program clearly conflicted with Iraq`s obligations under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) as a nonnuclear weapon state.

Hakkila, E.A.; Mullen, M.F.; Olinger, C.T.; Stanbro, W.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Olsen, A.P.; Roche, C.T.; Rudolph, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bieber, A.M.; Lemley, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Filby, E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Investigation of Neptunium Precipitator Cleanout Options  

SciTech Connect

Oxalate precipitation followed by filtration is used to prepare plutonium oxalate. Historically, plutonium oxalate has tended to accumulate in the precipitation tanks. These solids are periodically removed by flushing with concentrated (64 percent) nitric acid. The same precipitation tanks will now be used in the processing of neptunium. Literature values indicate that neptunium oxalate may not be as soluble as plutonium oxalate in nitric acid. Although a wide variety of options is available to improve neptunium oxalate solubility for precipitator flushing, most of these options are not practical for use. Many of these options require the use of incompatible or difficult to handle chemicals. Other options would require expensive equipment modifications or are likely to lead to product contamination. Based on review of literature and experimental results, the two best options for flushing the precipitator are (1) 64 percent nitric acid and (2) addition of sodium permanganate follow ed by sodium nitrite. Nitric acid is the easiest option to implement. It is already used in the facility and will not lead to product contamination. Experimental results indicate that neptunium oxalate can be dissolved in concentrated nitric acid (64 percent) at 60 degree C to a concentration of 2.6 to 5.6 grams of Np/liter after at least three hours of heating. A lower concentration (1.1 grams of Np/liter) was measured at 60 degree C after less than two hours of heating. These concentrations are acceptable for flushing if precipitator holdup is low (approximately 100-250 grams), but a second method is required for effective flushing if precipitator holdup is high (approximately 2 kilograms). The most effective method for obtaining higher neptunium concentrations is the use of sodium permanganate followed by the addition of sodium nitrite. There is concern that residual manganese from these flushes could impact product purity. Gas generation during permanganate addition is also a concern. Experimental results indicate that a solubility of at least 40 grams of Np/liter can be obtained using permanganate at ambient temperature, although it is expected that even higher neptunium concentrations can be achieved.

Hill, B.C.

2003-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Shale Gas, Nuraral Gas, Coal,Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas, ENvr_. Ries. LTRs. , Aug.acknowledge, "Marcellus shale gas production is still in its

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Versatile 0. 5 TW electron beam facility for power conditioning studies of large rare-gas/halide lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rare-gas/halide lasers which are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion will require large area, low impedance electron beam drivers. A wide range of electron beam parameters are being considered for future systems in an effort to optimize the overall system design. A number of power conditioning issues must be investigated in order to obtain a better understanding of the various trade-offs involved in making such optimizations. The RAYITO electron beam accelerator is being designed and built at Sandia National Laboratories and will be used for such investigations. It will be capable of operating in either a 2 or 4 ohm configuration at 1 MV, 50 ns or 0.8 MV, 200 ns. Design details for RAYITO are presented in this paper. Experiments planned for this facility are also discussed.

Ramirez, J. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

FEMO, A FLOW AND ENRICHMENT MONITOR FOR VERIFYING COMPLIANCE WITH INTERNATIONAL SAFEGUARDS REQUIREMENTS AT A GAS CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A number of countries have received construction licenses or are contemplating the construction of large-capacity gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The capability to independently verify nuclear material flows is a key component of international safeguards approaches, and the IAEA does not currently have an approved method to continuously monitor the mass flow of 235U in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) gas streams. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating the development of a flow and enrichment monitor, or FEMO, based on an existing blend-down monitoring system (BDMS). The BDMS was designed to continuously monitor both 235U mass flow and enrichment of UF6 streams at the low pressures similar to those which exists at GCEPs. BDMSs have been installed at three sites-the first unit has operated successfully in an unattended environment for approximately 10 years. To be acceptable to GCEP operators, it is essential that the instrument be installed and maintained without interrupting operations. A means to continuously verify flow as is proposed by FEMO will likely be needed to monitor safeguards at large-capacity plants. This will enable the safeguards effectiveness that currently exists at smaller plants to be maintained at the larger facilities and also has the potential to reduce labor costs associated with inspections at current and future plants. This paper describes the FEMO design requirements, operating capabilities, and development work required before field demonstration.

Gunning, John E [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

135

Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of a Reduced Scale High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Test Facility and its Prototype with MELCOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pursuant to the energy policy act of 2005, the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) has been selected as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) that will become the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Although plans to build a demonstration plant at Idaho National Laboratories (INL) are currently on hold, a cooperative agreement on HTGR research between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and several academic investigators remains in place. One component of this agreement relates to validation of systems-level computer code modeling capabilities in anticipation of the eventual need to perform HTGR licensing analyses. Because the NRC has used MELCOR for LWR licensing in the past and because MELCOR was recently updated to include gas-cooled reactor physics models, MELCOR is among the system codes of interest in the cooperative agreement. The impetus for this thesis was a code-to-experiment validation study wherein MELCOR computer code predictions were to be benchmarked against experimental data from a reduced-scale HTGR testing apparatus called the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF). For various reasons, HTTF data is not yet available from facility designers at Oregon State University, and hence the scope of this thesis was narrowed to include only computational studies of the HTTF and its prototype, General Atomics’ Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). Using the most complete literature references available for MHTGR design and using preliminary design information on the HTTF, MELCOR input decks for both systems were developed. Normal and off-normal system operating conditions were modeled via implementation of appropriate boundary and inititial conditions. MELCOR Predictions of system response for steady-state, pressurized conduction cool-down (PCC), and depressurized conduction cool-down (DCC) conditions were checked against nominal design parameters, physical intuition, and some computational results available from previous RELAP5-3D analyses at INL. All MELCOR input decks were successfully built and all scenarios were successfully modeled under certain assumptions. Given that the HTTF input deck is preliminary and was based on dated references, the results were altogether imperfect but encouraging since no indications of as yet unknown deficiencies in MELCOR modeling capability were observed. Researchers at TAMU are in a good position to revise the MELCOR models upon receipt of new information and to move forward with MELCOR-to-HTTF benchmarking when and if test data becomes available.

Beeny, Bradley 1988-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Development of stripper options for FRIB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University includes a heavy ion superconducting linac capable of accelerating all ions up to uranium with energies higher than 200 MeV/u and beam power up to 400 kW. To achieve these goals with present ion source performance it is necessary to accelerate simultaneously two charge states of uranium from the ion source in the first section of the linac. At an energy of approximately 16.5 MeV/u it is planned to strip the uranium beam to reduce the voltage needed in the rest of the linac to achieve the final energy. Up to five different charge states are planned to be accelerated simultaneously after the stripper. The design of the stripper is a challenging problem due to the high power deposited (approximately 0.7 kW) in the stripper media by the beam in a small spot. To assure success of the project we have established a research and development program that includes several options: carbon or diamond foils, liquid lithium films, gas strippers and plasma strippers. We present in this paper the status of the different options.

Marti, F.; Hershcovitch, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Thieberger, P.

2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

137

FLNG compared to LNG carriers - Requirements and recommendations for LNG production facilities and re-gas units.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An increasing price and demand for natural gas has made it possible to explore remote gas fields. Traditional offshore production platforms for natural gas have… (more)

Aronsson, Erik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility - Advanced Tokamak Option  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant, Demo, and FNSF / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

C. P. C. Wong; V. S. Chan; A. M. Garofalo; J. A. Leuer; M. E. Sawan; J. P. Smith; R. D. Stambaugh

139

Local Option - Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate Locally Determined Program Information Utah Program Type State Bond Program Rebate Amount Locally Determined Under the Utah...

140

Local Option - Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Commercial, Industrial, Institutional, Local Government Eligible Technologies Boilers, Building Insulation, CaulkingWeather-stripping, Central Air conditioners, Chillers,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acknowledge, "Marcellus shale gas production is still in itsof Marcellus shale gas production may not be fully

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP DISPOSITION - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSIS FOR THE COLD VACUUM DRYING FACILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to present conceptual design phase thermal process calculations that support the process design and process safety basis for the cold vacuum drying of K Basin KOP material. This document is intended to demonstrate that the conceptual approach: (1) Represents a workable process design that is suitable for development in preliminary design; and (2) Will support formal safety documentation to be prepared during the definitive design phase to establish an acceptable safety basis. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of Knock Out Pot (KOP) sludge within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. KOP sludge consists of size segregated material (primarily canister particulate) from the fuel and scrap cleaning process used in the Spent Nuclear Fuel process at K Basin. The KOP sludge will be pre-treated to remove fines and some of the constituents containing chemically bound water, after which it is referred to as KOP material. The KOP material will then be loaded into a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO), dried at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and stored in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This process is patterned after the successful drying of 2100 metric tons of spent fuel, and uses the same facilities and much of the same equipment that was used for drying fuel and scrap. Table ES-l present similarities and differences between KOP material and fuel and between MCOs loaded with these materials. The potential content of bound water bearing constituents limits the mass ofKOP material in an MCO load to a fraction of that in an MCO containing fuel and scrap; however, the small particle size of the KOP material causes the surface area to be significantly higher. This relatively large reactive surface area represents an input to the KOP thermal calculations that is significantly different from the calculations for fuel MCOs. The conceptual design provides for a copper insert block that limits the volume available to receive KOP material, enhances heat conduction, and functions as a heat source and sink during drying operations. This use of the copper insert represents a significant change to the thermal model compared to that used for the fuel calculations. A number of cases were run representing a spectrum of normal and upset conditions for the drying process. Dozens of cases have been run on cold vacuum drying of fuel MCOs. Analysis of these previous calculations identified four cases that provide a solid basis for judgments on the behavior of MCO in drying operations. These four cases are: (1) Normal Process; (2) Degraded vacuum pumping; (3) Open MCO with loss of annulus water; and (4) Cool down after vacuum drying. The four cases were run for two sets of input parameters for KOP MCOs: (1) a set of parameters drawn from safety basis values from the technical data book and (2) a sensitivity set using parameters selected to evaluate the impact of lower void volume and smaller particle size on MCO behavior. Results of the calculations for the drying phase cases are shown in Table ES-2. Cases using data book safety basis values showed dry out in 9.7 hours and heat rejection sufficient to hold temperature rise to less than 25 C. Sensitivity cases which included unrealistically small particle sizes and corresponding high reactive surface area showed higher temperature increases that were limited by water consumption. In this document and in the attachment (Apthorpe, R. and M.G. Plys, 2010) cases using Technical Databook safety basis values are referred to as nominal cases. In future calculations such cases will be called safety basis cases. Also in these documents cases using parameters that are less favorable to acceptable performance than databook safety values are referred to as safety cases. In future calculations such cases will be called sensitivity cases or sensitivity evaluations Calculations to be performed in support of the detailed design and formal safety basis documentation will expand the calculations presented in this document to include: additional features of th

SWENSON JA; CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; PLYS MG

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

143

OPTIONS FOR ABATING GREENHOUSE GASES FROM EXHAUST STREAMS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines different alternatives for replacing, treating, and recycling greenhouse gases. It is concluded that treatment (abatement) is the only viable short-term option. Three options for abatement that were tested for use in semiconductor facilities are reviewed, and their performance and costs compared. This study shows that effective abatement options are available to the photovoltaic (PV) industry, at reasonable cost.

FTHENAKIS,V.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Brookside Dairy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Facility Brookside Dairy Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Indiana County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.6850762, -79.1096901 Loading map......

145

Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

Jeffrey Savidge

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Des Plaines Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

147

Rodefeld Landfill Ga Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rodefeld Landfill Ga Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rodefeld Landfill Ga Biomass Facility Facility Rodefeld Landfill Ga Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

148

Energy Options for the Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options Options for the Future * John Sheffield, 1 Stephen Obenschain, 2,12 David Conover, 3 Rita Bajura, 4 David Greene, 5 Marilyn Brown, 6 Eldon Boes, 7 Kathyrn McCarthy, 8 David Christian, 9 Stephen Dean, 10 Gerald Kulcinski, 11 and P.L. Denholm 11 This paper summarizes the presentations and discussion at the Energy Options for the Future meeting held at the Naval Research Laboratory in March of 2004. The presentations covered the present status and future potential for coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, wind, solar, geo- thermal, and biomass energy sources and the effect of measures for energy conservation. The longevity of current major energy sources, means for resolving or mitigating environmental issues, and the role to be played by yet to be deployed sources, like fusion, were major topics of presentation and discussion. KEY WORDS: Energy; fuels; nuclear; fusion; efficiency; renewables.

149

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from coal- or natural gas-fired power plants occur "up-of natural gas is lost before reaching the power plant." 30power plant. Yet, when it comes to upstream emissions, the lifecycle for natural gas

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to close the gap on unregulated greenhouse gas emissions.a higher lifecycle greenhouse gas content than conventionalIN- FORMATION ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONs AssocIATEIDn wrri

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure – Optimizing Transitionseconomies and lower infrastructure costs. REFERENCES 1. NRC,a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Energy Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Natural Gas November 20, 2013 Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S. Projects Will Determine Whether methane Hydrates Are an Economically and Environmentally Viable Option for America's Energy Future November 15, 2013 Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas The Department of Energy announced the conditional authorization for Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC to export liquefied natural gas to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement with the U.S. This is the fifth conditional authorization the Department has announced. October 31, 2013 Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project

153

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

instruments and equipment, as well as local facilities such as hospitals, groceries, and gas stations. Next steps will involve such items as securing access to power from nearby...

155

A Plant-Level Simulation Model for Evaluating CO2 Capture Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C-, SC-, USC-PC) Dry feed gasifier and sulfur capture system (Shell) Added gas turbine option for IGCC

156

OPTIONS for ENERGY EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPTIONS for ENERGY EFFICIENCY in EXISTING BUILDINGS December 2005 CEC-400-2005-039-CMF;OPTIONS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY in EXISTING BUILDINGS COMMISSION REPORT TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................iii California's Successful Energy Efficiency Programs

157

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

158

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of Policy Options and Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minnesota Methane owns a landfill gas facility located infor example, that wind or landfill gas energy was conveyed,

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ance for new stationary source in the oil and gas industry.standards for new oil-burning stationary sources. 123 Cong.See Oil and Natural Gas Sector: New Source Performance

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas  

SciTech Connect

It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (~ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a "gas shield" may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering metmethods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

C.A.Gentile, W.R.Blanchard, T.Kozub, C.Priniski, I.Zatz, S.Obenschain

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Northeast Natural Gas Market in 2030 - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: Energy Information Administration, GasTran Gas Transportation System. = Underground Natural Gas Storage Facilities = LNG Facilities

162

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Facility Harrisburg Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dauphin County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.2734277°, -76.7336521° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2734277,"lon":-76.7336521,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

163

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Facility Brookhaven Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

164

Greenhouse gas emissions and the developing countries: Strategic options and the U. S. A. I. D. response. Report to the Congress  

SciTech Connect

The report responds to the Fiscal Year 1990 Foreign Assistance Appropriations Act, which requested the Agency for International Development (A.I.D.) to prepare a report that (1) examines the potential contributions of developing countries to future global emissions of greenhouse gases under different economic growth scenarios, (2) estimates the relative contributions of those countries to global greenhouse gas emissions, and (3) identifies specific key countries that stand to contribute significantly to global greenhouse gas emissions, and in which actions to promote energy efficiency, reliance on renewable resources, and conservation of forest resources could significantly reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. The report presents ongoing programs and new initiatives being considered by A.I.D. to promote sustained economic growth in developing countries while minimizing greenhouse gas emissions. Estimates of present and projected emissions, including emissions from A.I.D.-designated key countries, are based on the work of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Despite the uncertainties regarding the timing, magnitude, and impacts of global climate change, the issue has dramatized the daunting problems faced by developing countries in achieving sustained economic and social development. Responding to the policy imperative of managing the global commons while accelerating development in individual countries is one of the significant challenges of our time.

Jhirad, D.; Padmanabhan, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Bringing Alaska North Slope Natural Gas to Market (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

At least three alternatives have been proposed over the years for bringing sizable volumes of natural gas from Alaskas remote North Slope to market in the lower 48 States: a pipeline interconnecting with the existing pipeline system in central Alberta, Canada; a GTL plant on the North Slope; and a large LNG export facility at Valdez, Alaska. NEMS explicitly models the pipeline and GTL options [63]. The what if LNG option is not modeled in NEMS.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Study of the processes resulting from the use of alkaline seed in natural gas-fired MHD facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various ways of ionizing seed injection and recovery, applicable to open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation facilities, operating on sulfur-free gaseous fossil fuel, are discussed and experimentally verified. The physical and chemical changes of the seed and the heat and mass transfer processes resulting from seed application are investigated using the U-02 experimental MHD facility and laboratory test facilities. Engineering methods for calculating the processes of seed droplet vaporization, condensation and the precipitation of submicron particles of K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ on the heat exchange surface are also included.

Styrikovich, M.A.; Mostinskii, I.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Transporting Natural Gas in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8 LNG (liquefied natural gas) import facilities and 100 LNG peaking facilities (see map). Learn more about the natural gas pipeline network:

168

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar April 30, 2014 11:00AM MDT Attendees will understand the components of identifying energy project potential and options. Presenters will discuss market considerations, initial site considerations, project savings or rate-of-return estimates, production potential, final site selection, tribal options, finance, partnerships, and participation processes. Attendees will also become familiar with data gathering and analysis procedures such as tribal facility electric cost data, regulations, and interconnection requirements; paths to market for project power; and renewable sales, risks; and utility rules. By following the steps outlined in the webinar, Tribes can determine

169

Energy infrastructure of the United States and projected siting needs: Scoping ideas, identifying issues and options. Draft report of the Department of Energy Working Group on Energy Facility Siting to the Secretary  

SciTech Connect

A Department of Energy (DOE) Working Group on Energy Facility Siting, chaired by the Policy Office with membership from the major program and staff offices of the Department, reviewed data regarding energy service needs, infrastructure requirements, and constraints to siting. The Working Group found that the expeditious siting of energy facilities has important economic, energy, and environmental implications for key Administration priorities.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

High-Power Options for LANSCE  

SciTech Connect

The LANSCE linear accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory has a long history of successful beam operations at 800 kW. We have recently studied options for restoration of high-power operations including approaches for increasing the performance to multi-MW levels. In this paper we will discuss the results of this study including the present limitations of the existing accelerating structures at LANSCE, and the high-voltage and RF systems that drive them. Several options will be discussed and a preferred option will be presented that will enable the first in a new generation of scientific facilities for the materials community. The emphasis of this new facility is 'Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes' (MaRIE) which will be used to discover and design the advanced materials needed to meet 21st century national security and energy security challenges.

Garnett, Robert W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electric retail market options: The customer perspective  

SciTech Connect

This report describes various options that are now available for retail electric customers, or that may become available during the next few years as the electric utility industry restructures. These options include different ways of meeting demand for energy services, different providers of service or points of contact with providers, and different pricing structures for purchased services. Purpose of this document is to examine these options from the customer`s perspective: how might being a retail electric customer in 5--10 years differ from now? Seizing opportunities to reduce cost of electric service is likely to entail working with different service providers; thus, transaction costs are involved. Some of the options considered are speculative. Some transitional options include relocation, customer-built/operated transmission lines, municipalization, self-generation, and long-term contracts with suppliers. All these may change or diminish in a restructured industry. Brokers seem likely to become more common unless restructuring takes the form of mandatory poolcos (wholesale). Some options appear robust, ie, they are likely to become more common regardless of how restructuring is accomplished: increased competition among energy carriers (gas vs electric), real-time pricing, etc. This report identified some of the qualitative differences among the various options. For customers using large amounts of electricity, different alternatives are likely to affect greatly service price, transaction costs, tailoring service to customer preferences, and risks for customer. For retail customers using small amounts of electricity, there may be little difference among the options except service price.

Hadley, S.W.; Hillsman, E.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Prepayment Funding Option  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prepayment Funding Option December 5, 2012 Prepayment Funding Meeting Prepayment Funding Presentation December 7, 2011 Prepayment Funding Meeting Prepayment Funding Process...

173

Optional Tour Program - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Optional Tour Program  ...

174

Demonstration Development Project: Assessment of Biomass Repowering Options for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to help organizations with fossil-fired generation assets better understand their options for taking advantage of biomass-derived fuels at existing facilities. It considers plant conversions that completely replace fossil fuels through repowering as well as options that focus on high-percentage cofiring of biomass along with fossil fuels. Drawing on the experiences of operating facilities that have converted to biomass and from prior work, the analysis underlying this report...

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

175

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Electricity Real Options Valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper a real option approach for the valuation of real assets is presented. Two continuous time models used for valuation are described: geometric Brownian motion model and interest rate model. The valuation for electricity spread option under Vasicek interest model is placed and the formulas for parameter estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market.

Broszkiewicz-Suwaj, E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electricity Real Options Valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper a real option approach for the valuation of real assets is presented. Two continuous time models used for valuation are described: geometric Brownian motion model and interest rate model. The valuation for electricity spread option under Vasicek interest model is placed and the formulas for parameter estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market.

Ewa Broszkiewicz-Suwaj

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

178

Educational Facilities Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Guidebook provides utility marketing staff with a basic guide to 29 electric solutions for typical problems in educational facilities, including options for improved energy service quality, reduced energy costs, enhanced environmental protection, and increased electrification. In an era of aging educational facilities and tight budgets, the Guidebook suggests practical measures for applying 1990s electric technology to 1950s buildings as well as new buildings. It also highlights efficient electric t...

1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

NREL: More Search Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

More Search Options More Search Options Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version The following options help you find information on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory site, locate NREL staff, browse publication and photograph collections, and see what hot topics other site visitors are looking for. Search the NREL Web Site Search Tip: use quotes to find exact phrases Example: "renewable energy" Tip: use plus signs to find results that contain all your search terms Example: +biodiesel +buses Search Help Find NREL Staff in the Employee Locator Search by first or last name: Search Select a search type Select your criteria Enter your search term Look at Recent Hot Topics Biomass HOMER (computer model) Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Jobs PVWATTS (software)

180

METC Combustion Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) high pressure combustion facility is to provide a mid-scale facility for combustion and cleanup research to support DOE`s advanced gas turbine, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion, and hot gas cleanup programs. The facility is intended to fill a gap between lab scale facilities typical of universities and large scale combustion/turbine test facilities typical of turbine manufacturers. The facility is now available to industry and university partners through cooperative programs with METC. High pressure combustion research is also important to other DOE programs. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems and second-generation, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) systems use gas turbines/electric generators as primary power generators. The turbine combustors play an important role in achieving high efficiency and low emissions in these novel systems. These systems use a coal-derived fuel gas as fuel for the turbine combustor. The METC facility is designed to support coal fuel gas-fired combustors as well as the natural gas fired combustor used in the advanced turbine program.

Halow, J.S.; Maloney, D.J.; Richards, G.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nevada Transportatoion Options Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study performs a cost and schedule analysis of three Nevada Transportation options that support waste receipt at the repository. Based on the U.S. Department of Energy preference for rail transportation in Nevada (given in the Final Environmental Impact Statement), it has been assumed that a branch rail line would be constructed to support waste receipt at the repository. However, due to potential funding constraints, it is uncertain when rail will be available. The three Nevada Transportation options have been developed to meet a varying degree of requirements for transportation and to provide cost variations used in meeting the funding constraints given in the Technical Direction Letter guidelines for this study. The options include combinations of legal-weight truck, heavy-haul truck, and rail. Option 1 uses a branch rail line that would support initial waste receipt at the repository in 2010. Rail transportation would be the primary mode, supplemented by legal weight trucks. This option provides the highest level of confidence in cost and schedule, lowest public visibility, greatest public acceptability, lowest public dose, and is the recommended option for support of waste receipt. The completion of rail by 2010 will require spending approximately $800 million prior to 2010. Option 2 uses a phased rail approach to address a constrained funding scenario. To meet funding constraints, Option 2 uses a phased approach to delay high cost activities (final design and construction) until after initial waste receipt in 2010. By doing this, approximately 95 percent of the cost associated with completion of a branch rail line is deferred until after 2010. To support waste receipt until a branch rail line is constructed in Nevada, additional legal-weight truck shipments and heavy-haul truck shipments (on a limited basis for naval spent nuclear fuel) would be used to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as in Option 1. Use of heavy-haul shipments in the absence of rail is restricted to approximately twelve, without upgrading public highways. There is high uncertainty as to what road upgrades and security/escorts the Nevada Department of Transportation would require to obtain an overweight/overdimensional permit. In addition, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program has indicated that a larger cask weight than that analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement may be required for naval shipments, resulting in additional costs for heavy-haul transport. These uncertainties result in a high cost and schedule risk. Option 3 assumes that the start of rail construction will be delayed until after construction authorization is received from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Similar to Option 2, Option 3 uses legal-weight truck shipments and limited heavy haul truck shipments to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as Option 1, until rail becomes available. By using heavy-haul truck for two years, Option 3 contains the same uncertainties and resultant high cost and schedule risk as Option 2. The cost and schedule of legal-weight truck transport are not included in this report as that will be evaluated in the report on national transportation.

P. GEHNER; E.M. WEAVER; L. FOSSUM

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

Options Study - Phase II  

SciTech Connect

The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evaluation of mitigation strategies in Facility Group 1 double-shell flammable-gas tanks at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive nuclear waste at the Hanford Site is stored in underground waste storage tanks at the site. The tanks fall into two main categories: single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). There are a total of 149 SSTs and 28 DSTs. The wastes stored in the tanks are chemically complex. They basically involve various sodium salts (mainly nitrite, nitrate, carbonates, aluminates, and hydroxides), organic compounds, heavy metals, and various radionuclides, including cesium, strontium, plutonium, and uranium. The waste is known to generate flammable gas (FG) [hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, hydrocarbons] by complex chemical reactions. The process of gas generation, retention, and release is transient. Some tanks reach a quasi-steady stage where gas generation is balanced by the release rate. Other tanks show continuous cycles of retention followed by episodic release. There currently are 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL). The objective of this report is to evaluate possible mitigation strategies to eliminate the FG hazard. The evaluation is an engineering study of mitigation concepts for FG generation, retention, and release behavior in Tanks SY-101, AN-103, AN 104, An-105, and Aw-101. Where possible, limited quantification of the effects of mitigation strategies on the FG hazard also is considered. The results obtained from quantification efforts discussed in this report should be considered as best-estimate values. Results and conclusions of this work are intended to help in establishing methodologies in the contractor`s controls selection analysis to develop necessary safety controls for closing the FG unreviewed safety question. The general performance requirements of any mitigation scheme are discussed first.

Unal, C.; Sadasivan, P.; Kubic, W.L.; White, J.R.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

rifsimp_options.html - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are three options for specification of pivot cleaning: nopiv perform ... fullclean. This is a shortcut specification for the clean options for rifsimp (see above).

185

NIPSCO (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Indiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NIPSCO (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Indiana) NIPSCO (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Indiana) NIPSCO (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Construction Commercial Weatherization Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies NIPSCO, in partnership with Franklin Energy Services, LLC, provides a range of incentive options for its business, government and non-profit customers. Both prescriptive and custom rebates are available to customers who undertake eligible energy efficiency projects at facilities. Retrofit projects consist of the retrofit or replacement of existing equipment or

186

A Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO 2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants Edward S. Rubin (rubin@cmu.edu; 412-268-5897) Anand B. Rao (abr@andrew.cmu.edu; 412-268-5605) Michael B. Berkenpas (mikeb@cmu.edu; 412-268-1088) Carnegie Mellon University EPP Department, Baker Hall 128A Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract As part of DOE/NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program, we are developing an integrated, multi-pollutant modeling framework to evaluate the costs and performance of alternative carbon capture and sequestration technologies for fossil-fueled power plants. The model calculates emissions, costs, and efficiency on a systematic basis at the level of an individual plant or facility. Both new and existing facilities can be modeled, including coal-based or natural gas-based combustion or gasification systems using air or oxygen.

187

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: New Report Analyzes Options...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Report Analyzes Options for Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipelines Mar 14, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office has issued a new report...

188

Gas Turbines Increase the Energy Efficiency of Industrial Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is a well known fact that the gas turbine in a combined cycle has a higher inherent Carnot efficiency than the steam cycle which has been more generally accepted by industry. Unlike steam turbines, gas turbines do not require large boiler feed water, condensate and cooling water facilities. The benefits of the high efficiency of combined cycle gas turbines can only be realized if the energy in the hot exhaust can be utilized. Data for several plants, in various stages of engineering, in which clean fuel gas for the gas turbine is produced by gasification of coal, are presented. Waste heat from the gasifier and the gas turbine exhaust is converted to high pressure steam for steam turbines. Gas turbines may find application in other industrial processes, namely in the production of ammonia, LNG, and olefins. These options are briefly discussed.

Banchik, I. N.; Bohannan, W. R.; Stork, K.; McGovern, L. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Edit Test Options Page 1 Edit Test Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edit Test Options Page 1 Edit Test Options Format Test Information 1. Enter a Name for the Test. 2. Choose a color for the title text of the Test. (Optional) 3. Enter a Description in the Text Box. The description is visible to Students before they click on the link to take the Test. (Optional) 4. If you want

Xu, Shouhuai

190

Screen payback on cogeneration-system options  

SciTech Connect

Presented here are charts that provide a quick look at the relationship among the primary variables that affect the viability of a cogeneration project. The graphs are not intended to be complete feasibility studies, but rather screening aids for understanding the important interrelationships. Use of the charts will enable engineers to compare the predominant system options: gas turbine with heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG), diesel engine with HRSG, and fired boiler with steam turbine. The three options are presented separately because of differing capital costs and heat balances.

Wilson, F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Lighting Options for Homes.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

Baker, W.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Pemex: Problems and Policy Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Studies University of California, Berkeley Pemex: Problems and Policy Options David Shields Independent Energy

Shields, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hydrogen Production Infrastructure Options Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Infrastructure Options Analysis January 26, 2006 Brian D. James Julie Perez Peter Schmidt (703) 243 - 3383 Brian_James@DirectedTechnologies.com Directed Technologies, Inc. Page 1 of 39 26 January 2006 2006-1-26 DOE Transition Workshop Agenda 1. Project Description and Objective 2. Team Members 3. Approach 4. Model Theory, Structure and Assumptions 5. Model Description 1. Logic 2. Features 3. Cost Components (Production, Delivery & Dispensing) 6. Los Angeles Transitional Example 7. Model Flexibility Page 2 of 39 26 January 2006 2006-1-26 DOE Transition Workshop Team Members & Interactions Start: May 2005 (effective) End: Summer 2007 * Directed Technologies, Inc.- Prime * Sentech, Inc., Research Partner * Air Products, Industrial Gas Supplier * Advisory Board * Graham Moore, Chevron Technology Ventures

194

Geological and Geotechnical Site Investigation for the Design of a CO2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection and Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

With international efforts to limit anthropogenic carbon in the atmosphere, various CO{sub 2} sequestration methods have been studied by various facilities worldwide. Basalt rock in general has been referred to as potential host material for mineral carbonation by various authors, without much regard for compositional variations due to depositional environment, subsequent metamorphism, or hydrothermal alteration. Since mineral carbonation relies on the presence of certain magnesium, calcium, or iron silicates, it is necessary to study the texture, mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry of specific basalts before implying potential for mineral carbonation. The development of a methodology for the characterization of basalts with respect to their susceptibility for mineral carbonation is proposed to be developed as part of this research. The methodology will be developed based on whole rock data, petrography and microprobe analyses for samples from the Caledonia Mine in Michigan, which is the site for a proposed small-scale demonstration project on mineral carbonation in basalt. Samples from the Keweenaw Peninsula will be used to determine general compositional trends using whole rock data and petrography. Basalts in the Keweenaw Peninsula have been subjected to zeolite and prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism with concurrent native copper deposition. Alteration was likely due to the circulation of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids at slightly elevated temperatures and pressures, which is the process that is attempted to be duplicated by mineral carbonation.

Metz, Paul; Bolz, Patricia

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Heating facilities: Klamath Lutheran Church, Klamath Falls, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Klamath Lutheran Church is a masonry structure with cathedral ceiling containing approximately 5800 sq ft of floor area. This building is currently heated by two duct furnaces and a unit heater all of which are gas fired. An Educational Wing of approximately 6300 sq ft was added in 1958. This building, containing 2 assembly rooms and a number of classrooms is of uninsulated frame construction, with extensive glass area. A gas-fired boiler supplying finned tube radiators currently heats this wing. Four specific options for displacing all or part of the heating duty with geothermal were examined. These options are: case 1 - drilling a production and injection well on the property and using the resultant hot water (180/sup 0/F) to heat the entire facility; case 3 - using effluent from the Klamath Union High School to heat the entire facility; no well drilling required; case 2 - using effluent from the Klamath Union High School to heat only the church building; the present gas boiler would heat the Educational Wing; and case 4 - drilling a production and injection well on the property and using the resulting water (70/sup 0/F) to supply a water-to-water heat pump. Of the four cases examined, case 3 (heating of both the church building and educational wing with effluent from the Klamath Union High School) seems to offer the greatest potential and earliest simple payback period. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Idaho's Energy Options  

SciTech Connect

This report, developed by the Idaho National Laboratory, is provided as an introduction to and an update of the status of technologies for the generation and use of energy. Its purpose is to provide information useful for identifying and evaluating Idaho’s energy options, and for developing and implementing Idaho’s energy direction and policies.

Robert M. Neilson

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Washington State Department of Commerce In May 2001, Washington enacted legislation (EHB 2247) that requires all electric utilities serving more than 25,000 customers to offer customers the option of purchasing renewable energy. Eligible renewables include wind, solar, geothermal, landfill gas, wave or tidal action, wastewater treatment gas, certain biomass resources, and "qualified hydropower" that is fish-friendly. Beginning January 1, 2002, each electric utility must inform its customers

198

Nuclear Facilities Production Facilities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sand 2011-4582P. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) The GIF provides test cells for...

199

Remote Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remote Facilities Remote Facilities Remote Facilities October 16, 2013 - 4:55pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options for Renovations in Remote Areas Photovoltaics (PV) Small Wind Daylighting Solar Water Heating Passive Solar Design Biomass Heating When a Federal building or facility is located away from existing power lines, many renewable energy technologies including photovoltaics and wind become cost-effective options when compared to extending utilities or transporting fuel for onsite generators. Photovoltaics Photovoltaics (PV) are often cost-effective in remote power applications. In these circumstances, the system is coupled with batteries and can provide complete facility power. Proper system design is critical and must account for the building electrical loads and be sized to meet that load

200

Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) - Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Storage Report; Natural Gas Weekly Update; Thank You. We welcome your comments or suggestions (optional). EIA - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

NETL: News Release - New Projects to Investigate Smart Drilling Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 20, 2004 February 20, 2004 New Projects to Investigate "Smart Drilling" Options Promise Lower Cost, More Reliable Gas Drilling Two additional projects have been selected under a Department of Energy solicitation designed to advance performance when drilling for natural gas. The projects are a key component of the Department's gas exploration and production research program, and support the President's National Energy Policy, which calls for boosting domestic production of natural gas to ensure an adequate future supply at reasonable prices. With shallow and conventional natural gas resources in the United States being depleted, drillers must reach for gas miles below the earth's surface, where temperatures run up to 450 EF and pressures are hundreds of times greater than atmospheric pressure. "Smart drilling" options can increase productivity, improve drilling safety, and lower costs when drilling for these hard-to-reach deep gas supplies.

203

Power Supply Options for Data Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Supply Options for Data Centers Power Supply Options for Data Centers Title Power Supply Options for Data Centers Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-63339 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Tschudi, William F., and Charles H. Williams Call Number LBNL-63339 Abstract For many federal facilities, the fastest growing end-use of electric energy is found in concentrations of computing capacity commonly known as data centers. For these users, the critical importance of information processing to their agency mission will present a serious challenge to meeting the aggressive new energy efficiency goals in Executive Order 13423. Federal energy managers can find a variety of methods for reducing energy intensity, in both design and operations, for these high-technology facilities . This report summarizes a recent demonstration of one such technique ? configuring power supply systems for data centers so that they use DC (direct current) power throughout, eliminating the conventional practice of multiple conversions from utility-supplied AC (alternating current) to DC and back again at every stage of the power supply system. This eliminates both the power loss and heat generated by each such conversion (which drives air conditioning energy use).

204

Canastota Renewable Energy Facility Project  

SciTech Connect

The project was implemented at the Madison County Landfill located in the Town of Lincoln, Madison County, New York. Madison County has owned and operated the solid waste and recycling facilities at the Buyea Road site since 1974. At the onset of the project, the County owned and operated facilities there to include three separate landfills, a residential solid waste disposal and recycled material drop-off facility, a recycling facility and associated administrative, support and environmental control facilities. This putrescible waste undergoes anaerobic decomposition within the waste mass and generates landfill gas, which is approximately 50% methane. In order to recover this gas, the landfill was equipped with gas collection systems on both the east and west sides of Buyea Road which bring the gas to a central point for destruction. In order to derive a beneficial use from the collected landfill gases, the County decided to issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the future use of the generated gas.

Blake, Jillian; Hunt, Allen

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

205

SOME OPTIONS FOR THE EAST CHINA SEA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: 1 This paper analyzes the critical analytical and policy issues relating to the management of seabed hydrocarbon exploitation in transboundary and disputed areas. First, I examine various domestic and external factors that either promote or prevent the Sino-Japanese joint/cooperative development of seabed oil/gas deposits in the East China Sea. I will then define some principles and rules of cross-border petroleum exploitation and classify into five development models existing international agreements and treaties relating to seabed oil/gas exploitation in various disputed areas throughout the world. On the basis of the simplified spatial cost-benefit analysis of seabed oil/gas exploitation, different development models are suggested to fit in with the various zones of the East China Sea. Finally, I put forward several policy options for bilateral or multilateral cooperation on the exploration, exploitation, and transportation of the seabed oil/gas deposits in the East China Sea. 1.

Guo Rongxing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

None

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis Option Analysis DOE and FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop January 25, 2005 Washington DC This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information Tan-Ping Chen Nexant Jim Campbell Bhadra Grover Air Liquide Stefan Unnasch TIAX Glyn Hazelden GTI Graham Moore Chevron Matt Ringer NREL Ray Hobbs Pinnacle West 2 Presentation Outline Project Background Knowledge Collected and Preliminary Results for Each Delivery Option Summary of Observations Next Step Project Background Project Background 4 Delivery Options Option 1* GH delivery by new pipelines Option 2 Converting NG/oil pipelines for GH delivery Option 3 Blending GH into NG pipelines Option 4* GH tube trailers

208

Bounds for Asian basket options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper ... Keywords: 60E15, 60J65, 91B28, Asian basket option, Non-comonotonic sum, Sum of non-independent random variables

Griselda Deelstra; Ibrahima Diallo; Michèle Vanmaele

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Construction Home Options Builder Option Package 1: $50 (single family), $50 (multifamily) Builder Option Package 2: $100 (single family), $100 (multifamily) Energy Star 3.0: $300 (single family), $200 (multifamily) High Performance Home: $500 (single family), $300 (multifamily)

210

MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM - PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that come in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter off-gas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

211

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a one-factor regime-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model on the valuation and optimal operation of natural gas storage facilities. We calibrate the model parameters to both market futures and options on futures. Calibration results indicate that the regime-switching model is a better fit to market data compared to a one-factor mean-reverting model similar to those used by other authors to value gas storage. We extend a semi-Lagrangian timestepping scheme from Chen and Forsyth (2007) to solve the gas storage pricing problem, essentially a stochastic control problem, and conduct a convergence analysis of the scheme. Numerical results also indicate that the regime-switching model can generate operational strategies for gas storage facilities that reflect the existence of multiple regimes in the market as well as the regime shifts due to various exogenous events.

Zhuliang Chen; Peter A. Forsyth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply contracts and natural gas storage. Lacking sufficientsupply contracts and natural gas storage facilities. Since,

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Facility automation for retail facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article will focus on retail chain stores with areas of 22,000 to 75,000 sq ft, but much of the article will apply to all retail stores independent of size. Typically, a store is serviced by 5 to 15 rooftop HVAC units with a total cooling capacity of 50 to 150 tons, depending on the floor area and geographic location. The interior lighting represents a load of 80 to 300 KW with three lighting levels--retail, stocking, and security or night. Most stores are located in strip centers, and therefore, the parking lot lighting is provided by the landlord, but each store does control and service its own sign lighting. Generally, the total load controlled by an FAS represents 130 to 450 KW with corresponding annual energy costs ranging from $65,000 to $200,000 (natural gas and electricity), depending on the size of the store and the local unit costs of energy. Historical utility data, electrical and mechanical drawings, site surveys, significant analyses of data, and most importantly, discussions with corporate facilities management personnel and store operations personnel provide the source for the development theory and sequence of operation of the design of the facility automation systems for retail stores. The three main goals of an FAS are: reduce utility operating costs, maintain comfort levels during occupied hours, reduce HVAC maintenance costs.

Ameduri, G. (Roth Bros., Inc., Youngstown, OH (United States). Facilities Automation Division)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Overview of geologic storage of natural gas with an emphasis on assessing the feasibility of storing hydrogen.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many regions across the nation geologic formations are currently being used to store natural gas underground. Storage options are dictated by the regional geology and the operational need. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in understanding theses various geologic storage options, the advantages and disadvantages, in the hopes of developing an underground facility for the storage of hydrogen as a low cost storage option, as part of the hydrogen delivery infrastructure. Currently, depleted gas/oil reservoirs, aquifers, and salt caverns are the three main types of underground natural gas storage in use today. The other storage options available currently and in the near future, such as abandoned coal mines, lined hard rock caverns, and refrigerated mined caverns, will become more popular as the demand for natural gas storage grows, especially in regions were depleted reservoirs, aquifers, and salt deposits are not available. The storage of hydrogen within the same type of facilities, currently used for natural gas, may add new operational challenges to the existing cavern storage industry, such as the loss of hydrogen through chemical reactions and the occurrence of hydrogen embrittlement. Currently there are only three locations worldwide, two of which are in the United States, which store hydrogen. All three sites store hydrogen within salt caverns.

Lord, Anna Snider

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

216

Educational Facilities Guidebook, Second Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Guidebook provides both utility staff and educational facility managers with a basic guide to electric solutions for typical problems in schools and colleges, including options for improved energy service, reduced energy costs, enhanced environmental quality, and increased electrification. In an era of aging educational facilities and tight budgets, the Guidebook suggests practical measures for applying 21st century electric technology to old and new buildings alike. It also highlights new efficient...

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Retrieval options study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Retrieval Options Study is part of the systems analysis activities of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation to develop the scientific and technological bases for radioactive waste repositories in various geologic media. The study considers two waste forms, high level waste and spent fuel, and defines various classes of waste retrieval and recovery. A methodology and data base are developed which allow the relative evaluation of retrieval and recovery costs and the following technical criteria: safety; technical feasibility; ease of retrieval; probable intact retrieval time; safeguards; monitoring; criticality; and licensability. A total of 505 repository options are defined and the cost and technical criteria evaluated utilizing a combination of facts and engineering judgments. The repositories evaluated are selected combinations of the following parameters: Geologic Media (salt, granite, basalt, shale); Retrieval Time after Emplacement (5 and 25 years); Emplacement Design (nominal hole, large hole, carbon steel canister, corrosion resistant canister, backfill in hole, nominal sleeves, thick wall sleeves); Emplacement Configuration (single vertical, multiple vertical, single horizontal, multiple horizontal, vaults; Thermal Considerations; (normal design, reduced density, once-through ventilation, recirculated ventilation); Room Backfill; (none, run-of-mine, early, 5 year delay, 25 year delay, decommissioned); and Rate of Retrieval; (same as emplacement, variably slower depending on repository/canister condition).

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Policy options for stabilizing global climate  

SciTech Connect

The structure of this paper is designed to answer the following questions in turn: What is the greenhouse effect What evidence i there that the greenhouse effect is increasing How will the Earth's climate respond to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations What activities are responsible for the greenhouse gas emissions How might emissions and climate change in the future What technologies are available for limiting greenhouse gas emissions And what domestic and international policy options, if implemented, would help to stabilize global climate This chapter provides a general introduction to the climate change issue and reviews selected previous studies. Chapter II discusses the greenhouse gases, their sources and sinks, chemical properties, current atmospheric concentrations and distributions, and related uncertainties. Chapter III relates the greenhouse gases to the process of climatic change. Once this link is made, Chapter IV examines those human activities that affect trace-gas emissions and ultimately influence climate change. Chapter V discusses the scenarios developed for this report to assist us in thinking about possible future emissions and climate change. Chapter VI then presents sensitivity analyses of the modeling results. Chapter VII gives a detailed description of existing and emerging technologies that should be considered in the formation of a comprehensive strategy for mitigating global warming. Chapter VIII outlines domestic policy options, and the concluding chapter (Chapter IX) discusses international mechanisms for responding to climate change.

Lashof, D.A.; Tirpak, D.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Automated Surface Observing System: Standby Power Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Automated Surface Observing System Standby Options Power Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) General System Description * Self contained group of sensors and data gathering equipment that produces an automated weather observation * Weather observations support aviation, climate data, non government weather operations, public consumption, etc. * Initial deployment began in 1991 and continued through 1997 * Located at 884 sites nationwide, normally at airports * System has two distinct subsystems: Field installed equipment (DCP & Sensor Group) and an indoor processor (ACU) with peripherals * Separate facility power for DCP & Sensors and ACU 1 * measure and collect data * Located on the airport * back up group for 10 minutes * Currently pl

220

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Analyze Technology Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyze Technology Options Analyze Technology Options An effective climate action plan follows a portfolio approach and addresses each energy sector on campus. This section outlines how various technology options would fit into a campus climate action plan and provides examples of how others have used these technologies. Links to definitions, technology basics, and references are also provided. Use the Climate Action Planning Tool to identify which options will lead to the most significant reductions in consumption of fossil fuels and in turn meet campus greenhouse gas reduction goals. People and Policy People and Policy Formulate policies that have a long-term effect on energy consumption and identify human behaviors that lower energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Energy Conservation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that comes in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter offgas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

222

North City Cogen Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City Cogen Facility Biomass Facility City Cogen Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name North City Cogen Facility Biomass Facility Facility North City Cogen Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Diego County, California Coordinates 33.0933809°, -116.6081653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0933809,"lon":-116.6081653,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

223

Metro Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Facility Metro Methane Recovery Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Polk County, Iowa Coordinates 41.6278423°, -93.5003454° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6278423,"lon":-93.5003454,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

OPTIONAL I-""... ..o SD  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OPTIONAL I-""... ..o SD , * ' y)IP-lW ' a * UNITED S T A T E S COVEKNMENT TO : Files DATE: September 25, 1962 M o m 4' Materials Branch; Division of Licensing & Regulation SUBJECT: PRE-LICENSING VISIT TO THE CONTEMPORARY METALS CORPORATION PROPOSED FACILITY AT HAZELWOOD, M ISSOURI, AND RESIDUE STOCKPILES AT ROBERTSON, M ISSOURI, DOCKET NO, 40-6811 The Contemporary Metals Corporation was awarded a contract by the AEC for the removal of uranium -bearing residues from stock- pile areas at Robertson, M issouri. These residues were generated by the Commission at its Destrehan Street Plant, St; Louis, M issouri. The applicant intends to process these residues at its Hazelwocd facility which is about three (3) m iles from the stock- pile site, Attempts will be made to extract the associated

225

Facility Microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Transportation technology energy options  

SciTech Connect

New transportation technologies and their potential contribution to the solution of the energy problem are discussed. DOE transportation technologies briefly discussed are: Stirling and gas-turbine engines; constant-speed accessory-drive system; heavy-duty diesel-truck bottoming cycle; continuously variable transmission; turbocompound diesel engine; gas-turbine bus; new hydrocarbons (broad-cut petroleum fuels); alcohol fuels; synthetic fuels; advanced fuels (hydrogen); electric and hybrid vehicles; marine-diesel bottoming cycle; coal/oil-slurry marine steam turbines; pipeline bottoming cycle; and medium-speed diesel alternative fuels.

Bernard, M.J. III

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Nuclear electricity is the least-cost option  

SciTech Connect

The use of integrated resource planning (IRP) as a tool for selecting the means to satisfy the need for new electricity heavily favors those options that are evaluated to have the least cost. The least-cost option these days, generally combined cycle burning natural gas, can generate electricity for between 3.5 to 4.0 {cents}/kW {times} h. The average generating cost of nuclear electricity, by comparison, is {approximately} 7.0 {cents}/kW {times} h, indicative of the economic challenge facing the nuclear industry. The future for the nuclear option may be better, if you believe that natural gas prices will increase. Studies by General Electric (GE) show that if these prices escalate at 3.5% above inflation, as DRI and others forecast, advanced nuclear plants will be in an economic dead heat with coal and combined-cycle/natural-gas plants, the primary baseload options. The use of environmental externalities can also change the evaluation of these competing technology options. When the cost of pollution emissions from fossil plants are factored in, studies show that nuclear electricity generation is the best economic option.

Redding, J.R. [GE, San Jose, CA (United States); Yates, R. [GE, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Peak load management: Potential options  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews options that may be alternatives to transmission construction (ATT) applicable both generally and at specific locations in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Some of these options have potential as specific alternatives to the Shelton-Fairmount 230-kV Reinforcement Project, which is the focus of this study. A listing of 31 peak load management (PLM) options is included. Estimated costs and normalized hourly load shapes, corresponding to the respective base load and controlled load cases, are considered for 15 of the above options. A summary page is presented for each of these options, grouped with respect to its applicability in the residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors. The report contains comments on PLM measures for which load shape management characteristics are not yet available. These comments address the potential relevance of the options and the possible difficulty that may be encountered in characterizing their value should be of interest in this investigation. The report also identifies options that could improve the efficiency of the three customer utility distribution systems supplied by the Shelton-Fairmount Reinforcement Project. Potential cogeneration options in the Olympic Peninsula are also discussed. These discussions focus on the options that appear to be most promising on the Olympic Peninsula. Finally, a short list of options is recommended for investigation in the next phase of this study. 9 refs., 24 tabs.

Englin, J.E.; De Steese, J.G.; Schultz, R.W.; Kellogg, M.A.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

TRITIUM EXTRACTION FACILITY ALARA  

SciTech Connect

The primary mission of the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) is to extract tritium from tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) that have been irradiated in a commercial light water reactor and to deliver tritium-containing gas to the Savannah River Site Facility 233-H. The tritium extraction segment provides the capability to deliver three (3) kilograms per year to the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The TEF includes processes, equipment and facilities capable of production-scale extraction of tritium while minimizing personnel radiation exposure, environmental releases, and waste generation.

Joye, BROTHERTON

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

230

NSA Barrow Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barrow Facility Barrow Facility NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Barrow Facility Location: 71° 19' 23.73" N, 156° 36' 56.70" W Altitude: 8 meters The Barrow facility was dedicated in July 1997 and chosen because the Arctic is particularly sensitive to climate changes. Barrow is located at the northernmost point in the United States, 330 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Also known as the Top of the World, Barrow is Alaska's largest Eskimo village (home to 4,581 people). Tax revenue from the Slope's oil fields pay for services borough wide, and natural gas is used to heat homes and generate electricity in Barrow. Many residents, however, maintain

231

ARM - NSA Barrow Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barrow Facility Barrow Facility NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Barrow Facility Location: 71° 19' 23.73" N, 156° 36' 56.70" W Altitude: 8 meters The Barrow facility was dedicated in July 1997 and chosen because the Arctic is particularly sensitive to climate changes. Barrow is located at the northernmost point in the United States, 330 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Also known as the Top of the World, Barrow is Alaska's largest Eskimo village (home to 4,581 people). Tax revenue from the Slope's oil fields pay for services borough wide, and natural gas is used to heat homes and generate electricity in Barrow. Many residents, however, maintain

232

Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Power of Experience The Power of Experience Final Report Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis DOE Award Number: DE-FG36-05GO15032 Project director/principal investigator: Tan-Ping Chen Consortium/teaming Partners: Air Liquide, Chevron Technology Venture, Gas Technology Institute, NREL, Tiax, ANL Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis ii TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................... 1-1 1.1 HOW THE RESEARCH ADDS TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE AREA INVESTIGATED. 1-1 1.2 TECHNICAL EFFECTIVENESS AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY OF THE METHODS OR TECHNIQUES INVESTIGATED OR DEMONSTRATED .................................................... 1-1 1.3 HOW THE PROJECT IS OF BENEFIT TO THE PUBLIC..................................................... 1-1

233

Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse Gas Profile Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 1:52pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 After establishing an employee commuting behavior baseline for evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, analyze the specific characteristics of the agency's major worksites to help determine which alternative commute methods and work arrangements are viable and what types of strategies may be most effective for promoting those alternatives. It is recommended that worksite-level data collection focus on worksites with the: Largest number of employees, or clusters of worksites with large employee populations in an area with diverse commuting infrastructure

234

Cementitious waste option scoping study report  

SciTech Connect

A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This study investigates the nonseparations Cementitious Waste Option (CWO) as a means to achieve this goal. Under this option all liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and existing HLW calcine would be recalcined with sucrose, grouted, canisterized, and interim stored as a mixed-HLW for eventual preparation and shipment off-Site for disposal. The CWO waste would be transported to a Greater Confinement Disposal Facility (GCDF) located in the southwestern desert of the US on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All transport preparation, shipment, and disposal facility activities are beyond the scope of this study. CWO waste processing, packaging, and interim storage would occur over a 5-year period between 2013 and 2017. Waste transport and disposal would occur during the same time period.

Lee, A.E.; Taylor, D.D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Sustainable Energy: Choosing Among Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Sustainable Energy: Choosing Among Options Byand William A. Peters. Sustainable Energy: Choosing AmongAll the authors of Sustainable Energy are associated with

Mirza, Umar Karim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In Montana, regulated electric utilities are required to offer customers the option of purchasing electricity generated by certified, environmentally-preferred resources that include, but are not...

237

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility - Advanced Tokamak Option (A26932)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 19th Technology Of Fusion Energy, Las Vegas, Nevada, 2010; To Be Published In Fusion Science And Technology19th Topical Meeting on Technology Fusion Energy Las Vegas Nevada, US, 2010999618795

Wong, C.P.C.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

238

AFCI Options Study  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the background and framework for both organizing the discussion and providing information on the potential for nuclear energy R&D to develop alternative nuclear fuel cycles that would address the issues with the current implementations of nuclear power, including nuclear waste disposal, proliferation risk, safety, security, economics, and sustainability. The disposition of used fuel is the cause of many of the concerns, and the possible approaches to used fuel management identify a number of basic technology areas that need to be considered. The basic science in each of the technology areas is discussed, emphasizing what science is currently available, where scientific knowledge may be insufficient, and especially to identify specific areas where transformational discoveries may allow achievement of performance goals not currently attainable. These discussions lead to the wide range of technical options that have been the basis for past and current research and development on advanced nuclear fuel cycles in the United States. The results of this work are then briefly reviewed to show the extent to which such approaches are capable of addressing the issues with nuclear power, the potential for moving further, and the inherent limitations.

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply contracts and natural gas storage. Lacking sufficientsupply contracts and natural gas storage facilities. Since,

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Fuel-cycle facilities: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VII  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning the mining and milling of uranium and thorium; uranium hexafluoride conversion; enrichment; fuel fabrication; reprocessing; storage options; waste disposal options; transportation; heavy-water-production facilities; and international fuel service centers.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Window Strategy with Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The window strategy is one of several marketing strategies using futures and options to establish a floor price and allow for upside price potential. It also reduces option premium costs. This publication discusses how the window strategy works and when to use it.

McCorkle, Dean; Amosson, Stephen H.; Fausett, Marvin

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

Residential Fuel Cell Performance Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Currently, the test facility is setup to deliver natural gas as the fuel, but ... A turbine and magnetic flow meter measure the flow of water for the domestic ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

U.S. Weekly Natural Gas Storage Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Production and Net Imports Natural Gas Storage Storage Reservoirs by Type Underground Natural Gas Storage Facilities in the ... (written copies ...

244

Natural Gas - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The process of separating interstate pipeline gas sales from transportation service has been completed and has resulted in greater gas procurement options for LDCs.

245

Monetizing stranded gas : economic valuation of GTL and LNG projects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Globally, there are significant quantities of natural gas reserves that lie economically or physically stranded from markets. Options to monetize such reserves include Gas to… (more)

Black, Brodie Gene, 1986-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

storage facilities. Other Market Trends: EIA Releases Report on Underground Natural Gas Storage Developments: The Energy Information Administration (EIA) released a special...

247

Opportunities for LNG supply infrastructure and demand growth in US and International markets; Opportunities for liquefied natural gas supply infrastructure and demand growth in United States and International markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Countries are looking beyond their borders for options to satiate a forecasted increase in natural gas consumption. A strong option for importing natural gas is… (more)

Connell, Richard Perry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Transport Reactor Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is currently evaluating hot gas desulfurization (HGD)in its on-site transport reactor facility (TRF). This facility was originally constructed in the early 1980s to explore advanced gasification processes with an entrained reactor, and has recently been modified to incorporate a transport riser reactor. The TRF supports Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power systems, one of METC`s advanced power generation systems. The HGD subsystem is a key developmental item in reducing the cost and increasing the efficiency of the IGCC concept. The TRF is a unique facility with high-temperature, high-pressure, and multiple reactant gas composition capability. The TRF can be configured for reacting a single flow pass of gas and solids using a variety of gases. The gas input system allows six different gas inputs to be mixed and heated before entering the reaction zones. Current configurations allow the use of air, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, methane, nitrogen, oxygen, steam, or any mixture of these gases. Construction plans include the addition of a coal gas input line. This line will bring hot coal gas from the existing Fluidized-Bed Gasifier (FBG) via the Modular Gas Cleanup Rig (MGCR) after filtering out particulates with ceramic candle filters. Solids can be fed either by a rotary pocket feeder or a screw feeder. Particle sizes may range from 70 to 150 micrometers. Both feeders have a hopper that can hold enough solid for fairly lengthy tests at the higher feed rates, thus eliminating the need for lockhopper transfers during operation.

Berry, D.A.; Shoemaker, S.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Local Option - Property Tax Exemption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Tax Exemption Property Tax Exemption Local Option - Property Tax Exemption < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Home Weatherization Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Property Tax Incentive Provider Vermont Department of Taxes Vermont allows municipalities the option of offering an exemption from the municipal real and personal property taxes for certain renewable energy systems (Note: state property taxes would still apply). Eligible systems include, but are not limited to, "windmills, facilities for the collection of solar energy or the conversion of organic matter to methane, net-metered

250

Design Options for Enhancing IGCC Flexible Operations Performance and Economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the cycling experience of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants, and the characteristics of IGCC and its component technologies that can make it particularly responsive to renewables-driven, flexible operation and cycling requirements. It also identifies a number of design options for optimizing IGCC cycling performance, and economics for such requirements to nearly meet natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) ramping ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

251

Pricing and hedging Asian basket spread options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Asian options, basket options and spread options have been extensively studied in the literature. However, few papers deal with the problem of pricing general Asian basket spread options. This paper aims to fill this gap. In order to obtain prices and ... Keywords: 91G20, Asian basket spread option, Moment matching, Non-comonotonic sum, Shifted log-extended skew normal law

Griselda Deelstra; Alexandre Petkovic; Michèle Vanmaele

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth analysis of seven hydrogen delivery options to identify the most cost-effective hydrogen infrastructure for the transition and long term. The pro

253

IAAP. However, Pantex Plant Option 2  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

p,./qj ' . p,./qj ' . ,! Fdera~ Regbter / Vol. 4Q, No. 210 / Mot&lap, October 29, 3984 1 Notices 43493 be the optimal choice. However, for eignificantly lower caste, a major upgrade of existing facilitiee, including new constr@ion. will provide improved operational reliability and protection. Consequently, an all new facility at any of the three alternative locations was eliminated due to cost considerations. From the standpoint of environmental impact from normal operations (including offsite transportation end the risk of an accident-producing release of radioactive materials, there is little difference between existing operations at Pantex and partial relocation to IAAP. However, Pantex Plant Option 2 provided a greater degree of operational reliability and protection than the

254

User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's National User Facilities are available for cooperative research with institutions and the private sector worldwide. The Environmental...

255

Friedemann Mller and Alex Riechel (Eds.) Options for Future Climate Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unconventional oil and gas reserves will be tapped for extraction and clean generating technologies mature. Coal and unconventional oil and gas. The presently known reserves of these resources (coal, crude oil, natural gas) amountFriedemann Müller and Alex Riechel (Eds.) Options for Future Climate Policy: Transatlantic

Calov, Reinhard

256

CHARACTERIZATION OF SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FOR DISPOSITION OPTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) has identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Except for materials that remain in use for programs outside of national defense, including programs for nuclear-energy development, the surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. Some items will be disposed as transuranic waste, low-level waste, or spent fuel. The remaining surplus plutonium will be managed through: (1) the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (FFF), to be constructed at the Savannah River Site (SRS), where the plutonium will be converted to fuel that will be irradiated in civilian power reactors and later disposed to a high-level waste (HLW) repository as spent fuel; (2) the SRS H-Area facilities, by dissolving and transfer to HLW systems, also for disposal to the repository; or (3) alternative immobilization techniques that would provide durable and secure disposal. From the beginning of the U.S. program for surplus plutonium disposition, DOE has sponsored research to characterize the surplus materials and to judge their suitability for planned disposition options. Because many of the items are stored without extensive analyses of their current chemical content, the characterization involves three interacting components: laboratory sample analysis, if available; non-destructive assay data; and rigorous evaluation of records for the processing history for items and inventory groups. This information is collected from subject-matter experts at inventory sites and from materials stabilization and surveillance programs, in cooperation with the design agencies for the disposition facilities. This report describes the operation and status of the characterization program.

Allender, J; Edwin Moore, E; Scott Davies, S

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

The 'Supply-of-Storage' for Natural Gas in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

95616 Abstract: Do natural gas storage decisions inCHARACTERISTICS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE FACILITIES Apart fromofficial seasons in natural gas storage, one for injection

Uria, Rocio; Williams, Jeffrey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-02GO12024 and DE-FC36-03GO13175) to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods required to reliably and continuously obtain accurate and representative on-line syngas compositional data. These objectives were proven through a stepwise series of field tests of biomass and coal gasification process streams. GTI developed the methods and hardware for extractive syngas sample stream delivery and distribution, necessary to make use of state-of-the-art on-line analyzers to evaluate and optimize syngas cleanup and conditioning. The primary objectives of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-02GO12024 were the selection, acquisition, and application of a suite of gas analyzers capable of providing near real-time gas analyses to suitably conditioned syngas streams. A review was conducted of sampling options, available analysis technologies, and commercially available analyzers, that could be successfully applied to the challenging task of on-line syngas characterization. The majority of thermochemical process streams comprise multicomponent gas mixtures that, prior to crucial, sequential cleanup procedures, include high concentrations of condensable species, multiple contaminants, and are often produced at high temperatures and pressures. Consequently, GTI engaged in a concurrent effort under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-03GO13175 to develop the means to deliver suitably prepared, continuous streams of extracted syngas to a variety of on-line gas analyzers. The review of candidate analysis technology also addressed safety concerns associated with thermochemical process operation that constrain the location and configuration of potential gas analysis equipment. Initial analyzer costs, reliability, accuracy, and operating and maintenance costs were also considered prior to the assembly of suitable analyzers for this work. Initial tests at GTI’s Flex-Fuel Test Facility (FFTF) in late 2004 and early 2005 successfully demonstrated the transport and subsequent analysis of a single depressurized, heat-traced syngas stream to a single analyzer (an Industrial Machine and Control Corporation (IMACC) Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR)) provided by GTI. In March 2005, our sampling approach was significantly expanded when this project participated in the U.S. DOE’s Novel Gas Cleaning (NGC) project. Syngas sample streams from three process locations were transported to a distribution manifold for selectable analysis by the IMACC FT-IR, a Stanford Research Systems QMS300 Mass Spectrometer (SRS MS) obtained under this Cooperative Agreement, and a Varian micro gas chromatograph with thermal conductivity detector (?GC) provided by GTI. A syngas stream from a fourth process location was transported to an Agilent Model 5890 Series II gas chromatograph for highly sensitive gas analyses. The on-line analyses made possible by this sampling system verified the syngas cleaning achieved by the NGC process. In June 2005, GTI collaborated with Weyerhaeuser to characterize the ChemrecTM black liquor gasifier at Weyerhaeuser’s New Bern, North Carolina pulp mill. Over a ten-day period, a broad range of process operating conditions were characterized with the IMACC FT-IR, the SRS MS, the Varian ?GC, and an integrated Gas Chromatograph, Mass Selective Detector, Flame Ionization Detector and Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detector (GC/MSD/FID/SCD) system acquired under this Cooperative Agreement from Wasson-ECE. In this field application, a single sample stream was extracted from this low-pressure, low-temperature process and successfully analyzed by these devices. In late 2005,

Snyder, Todd R.; Bush, Vann; Felix, Larry G.; Farthing, William E.; Irvin, James H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) development  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will produce as average of 150 gallons per day of a benzene rich organic steam as a byproduct of precipitate hydrolysis. The organic product is separated and decontaminated by two stages of batch distillation and discharged from the canyon facility. Originally the product was to be stored in a 150,000 gallon storage tank and disposed of by combustion in the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF). However, recent delays in design completion and RCRA permitting for the CIF have resulted in an estimated 18 month delay in the facility startup. On-site destruction of the contaminated material is prudent since there is no EPA (or other government agency) deminimus to allow unrestricted use of the material. This report details a preliminary review of four technologies suitable to destroy the organic steams. These include: A silver catalyzed dissolver, A super critical water reactor, the Westinghouse Electric Pyrolyzer, and the Synthetica Detoxifier. Each option is discussed.

Carter, J.T.; Morrison, J.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Technical Options to Address Cyber Security, Interoperability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Options to Address Cyber Security, Interoperability and Other Issues with ZigBee SEP Title Technical Options to Address Cyber Security, Interoperability and Other Issues...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17 3.3.1 Distributed Generation Options17 3.3.2 Distributed Generation Modeling18 3.3.3 Distributed Generation Option Results and

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Energy Options Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Options & Solutions Place Ann Arbor, Michigan Zip 48103 Product Michigan-based alternative energy consultant. References Energy Options & Solutions1 LinkedIn...

263

1999 Oil & Gas Conference Proceedings - Contents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center and National Petroleum Technology Office 1999 Oil & Gas Technology Options Conference Proceedings for Producer Survival Contents This...

264

Immobilized low-level waste disposal options configuration study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles information that supports the eventual conceptual and definitive design of a disposal facility for immobilized low-level waste. The report includes the results of a joint Westinghouse/Fluor Daniel Inc. evaluation of trade-offs for glass manufacturing and product (waste form) disposal. Though recommendations for the preferred manufacturing and disposal option for low-level waste are outside the scope of this document, relative ranking as applied to facility complexity, safety, remote operation concepts and ease of retrieval are addressed.

Mitchell, D.E.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Mobile Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

266

Option valuation of flexible investments : the case of a coal gasifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the use of contingent claim analysis to evaluate the option of retrofitting a coal gasifier on an existing gas-fired power plant in order to take advantage of changes in the relative prices of natural ...

Herbelot, Olivier

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Design and operation of a counter-rotating aspirated compressor blowdown test facility; Counter-rotating aspirated compressor blowdown test facility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A unique counter-rotating aspirated compressor was tested in a blowdown facility at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at MIT. The facility expanded on experience from previous… (more)

Parker, David V. (David Vickery)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, 2011 [Facility News] , 2011 [Facility News] Methane Monitor Joins Surface Flux Instruments at North Slope Bookmark and Share The new ECOR/SEBS Tower at the NSA site in Barrow includes greenhouse gas flux instruments. At the top of the tower, left to right, are the methane sensor, sonic anemometer, and carbon dioxide and water vapor sensor. The horizontal arm below and to the left of these instruments is a net radiometer. The new ECOR/SEBS Tower at the NSA site in Barrow includes greenhouse gas flux instruments. At the top of the tower, left to right, are the methane sensor, sonic anemometer, and carbon dioxide and water vapor sensor. The horizontal arm below and to the left of these instruments is a net radiometer. In October 2011, the ARM North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow welcomed a

269

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Demonstrated maximum working gas volume is the sum of the highest storage inventory levels of working gas observed in each facility over the previous 5-year ...

270

Big storage facilities eyed in Texas, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

Two large oil natural gas storage facilities are planned in U.S. Gulf Coast states. This paper reports that two Houston companies propose to construct a storage facility in Louisiana with more than 50 bcf of working gas capacity. And units of ARCO and Plains Resources have signed a letter of intent expected to lead to construction of a 600,000 bbl crude oil storage facility on the Houston ship channel.

Not Available

1992-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

271

ANALYSES OF ENERGY SUPPLY OPTIONS AND SECURITY OF ENERGY SUPPLY IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOREWORD In its broadest meaning “energy security ” is the ability of a nation to muster the energy resources needed to ensure its welfare. In a narrower meaning it refers to territorial energy autonomy. Consequently, energy supply security is a matter of both domestic policy and international relations. Perceived and real threats may be economic or logistic, politically motivated or the result of war or natural causes. They may be source, technology or transport related, specific to a facility or a function of system structure, due to sabotage or to inadequate investment or maintenance, or result from pricing or regulatory policies. Energy security has become a growing concern in the Baltic States of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania since regaining independence in 1991. As their national energy systems depend on essentially one single foreign supplier for most of their oil and all of their natural gas supplies, a comprehensive analysis of potential measures to improve security including alternative supply options becomes vital. Such an analysis needs to consider, for example, the availability of domestic energy reserves and resources, the vintage of existing energy infrastructures (including regional and interregional interconnections), storage facilities, as well as future

In The Baltic States; In The Baltic States; Wagramer Strasse

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fixed-price gas supply contracts and natural gas storage. Asnatural gas prices, rather than on prices that can be locked in through futures, swap, or fixed- price physical supplySupply, Renewable Energy Gas Options, Gas Storage Option Premium or Storage Cost Gas Price Falls Gas Price Rises Natural

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Emission Cuts Realities – Electricity Generation Cost and CO2 emissions projections for different electricity generation options for Australia to 2050 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five options for cutting CO2 emissions from electricity generation in Australia are compared with a „Business as Usual ? option over the period 2010 to 2050. The six options comprise combinations of coal, gas, nuclear, wind and solar thermal technologies. The conclusions: The nuclear option reduces CO2 emissions the most, is the only option that can be built quickly enough to make the deep emissions cuts required, and is the least cost of the options that can cut emissions sustainably. Solar thermal and wind power are the highest cost of the options considered. The cost of avoiding emissions is lowest with nuclear and highest with solar and wind power.

Peter Lang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Evaluating home heating options in Krakow  

SciTech Connect

The city of Krakow, Poland, has poor air quality due, in part, to widespread use of coal for heating. Engineering analyses have been conducted to determine the technical feasibility and capital costs for a number of options for reducing pollution from home heating sources. Capital costs range from $90 per kilowatt (kW) to connect local boiler-houses to the district heating system to $227/kW to upgrade the electrical system and convert coal stoves to electric heat. Air quality analyses have estimated the reduction in pollutant emissions as well as in pollutant concentrations that would result from implementing the options under consideration. Significant reductions can be obtained at a lower cost by using briquettes instead of coal in home stoves than by converting the stoves to electricity or gas. Finally, incentives analyses are examining the cost-effectiveness of the various alternatives and identifying possible incentives that the city could provide to encourage adoption of less-polluting technologies and practices.

Bleda, J.; Nedoma, J.; Bardel, J.; Pierce, B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply contracts and natural gas storage. As shown below insupply contracts and natural gas storage. As shown below inWe find that natural gas options and storage are not

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Option pricing, maturity randomization and distributed computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We price discretely monitored options when the underlying evolves according to different exponential Levy processes. By geometric randomization of the option maturity, we transform the n-steps backward recursion that arises in option pricing into an ... Keywords: Discrete monitoring, Grid computing, Integral equations, Lévy processes, Option pricing

Gianluca Fusai; Daniele Marazzina; Marina Marena

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Generating Profit Using Option Selling Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, option selling strategy is discussed which is different from traditional equity and commodity trading strategies. Option selling strategies can achieve various non-linear Profit & Loss (P&L) graphs instead of traditional linear P&L graph. ... Keywords: Option, trading strategy, option selling, straddle

Stanley Choi; Dong Gang; Kin Keung Lai

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Pemex: Problems and Policy Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for exploration and about US$15 billion for oil and gasas “exploration and production” of oil or gas, activities

Shields, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

State of the art and emerging trends in operations and maintenance of offshore oil and gas production facilities: Some experiences and observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plant maintenance has been a discipline that has gradually evolved with the industrial revolution. For quite some time, it has been a "necessary evil" in production, manufacturing, and process settings. The changing business needs and industrial conditions ... Keywords: Maintenance, asset management, oil and gas operations, risk, technical integrity

Jayantha P. Liyanage

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Future neutrino oscillation facilities: physics priorities and open issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent discovery that neutrinos have mass opens a wide new field of experimentation. Accelerator-made neutrinos are essential. Ideas for future facilities include superbeams beta-beams and neutrino factories, each associated with one or several options for detector systems. A summary of the perceived virtues and shortcomings of these options, and a number of open questions, are presented.

Alain Blondel

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Valuation of Storage at a Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The valuation of the real option to store liquefied natural gas (LNG) at the downstream terminal of an LNG value chain is an important problem in practice. Because the exact valuation of this real option is computationally intractable, we develop a novel ... Keywords: Markov, asset pricing, dynamic programming, finance, heuristics, industries, petroleum/natural gas, real options, storage valuation, upper bounds

Guoming Lai; Mulan X. Wang; Sunder Kekre; Alan Scheller-Wolf; Nicola Secomandi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Environmental Assessment for the Leasing of Facilities and Equipment to USEC Inc.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the lease of facilities and equipment to USEC Inc. (USEC), which would be used in its Gas Centrifuge Research and Development (R&D) Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) [hereinafter referred to as the USEC EA]. The USEC EA analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE leasing facility K-101 and portions of K-1600, K-1220 and K-1037 at the ETTP to USEC for a minimum 3-year period, with additional option periods consistent with the Oak Ridge Accelerated Clean-up Plan (ACP) Agreement. In July 2002, USEC notified DOE that it intends to use certain leased equipment at an off-site facility at the Centrifuge Technology Center (CTC) on the Boeing Property. The purpose of the USEC Gas Centrifuge R&D Project is to develop an economically attractive gas centrifuge machine and process using DOE's centrifuge technology.

N /A

2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

Implications of Disruption to Natural Gas Deliverability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was sponsored by Department of Energy/Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. The primary purpose of the project was to analyze the capability of the natural gas production, transmission and supply systems to continue to provide service in the event of a major disruption in capacity of one or more natural gas transmission pipelines. The project was specifically designed to detail the ability of natural gas market to absorb facility losses and efficiently reallocate gas supplies during a significant pipeline capacity disruption in terms that allowed federal and state agencies and interests to develop effective policies and action plans to prioritize natural gas deliveries from a regional and national perspective. The analyses for each regional study were based on four primary considerations: (1) operating conditions (pipeline capacity, storage capacity, local production, power dispatch decision making and end user options); (2) weather; (3) magnitude and location of the disruption; and, (4) normal versus emergency situation. The detailed information contained in the region reports as generated from this project are Unclassified Controlled Information; and as such are subject to disclosure in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act. Therefore, this report defines the regions that were analyzed and the basic methodologies and assumptions used to completing the analysis.

Science Applications International

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Iodine and NO sub x behavior in the dissolver off-gas and IODOX (Iodine Oxidation) systems in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Integrated Equipment Test facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the most recent in a series of experiments evaluating the behavior of iodine and NO{sub x} in the Integrated Equipment Test (IET) Dissolver Off-Gas (DOG) System. This work was performed as part of a joint collaborative program between the US Department of Energy and the Power and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. The DOG system consists of two shell-and-tube heat exchangers in which water and nitric acid are removed from the dissolver off-gas by condensation, followed by a packed tower in which NO{sub x} is removed by absorption into a dilute nitric acid solution. The paper also describes the results of the operation of the Iodine Oxidation (IODOX) System. This system serves to remove iodine from the DOG system effluent by absorption into hyperazeotropic nitric acid. 7 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

Birdwell, J.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Use of Laboratory Drag Measurements in Evaluating Hot-Gas Filtration of Char from the Transport Gasifier at the Power Systems Development Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial objective of this study was to better understand the reasons for the substantial increase in filter DP that was observed after the gasifier recycle loop modifications. Beyond this specific objective, a secondary goal was to develop a meaningful method of evaluating the effect of particle size and other particle properties on dustcake drag and filter DP. As mentioned earlier, the effect of particle size on dustcake drag and filter DP can be a very important consideration in the selection and specification of a precleaner cyclone for use upstream of the hot-gas filter. Installing a cyclone ahead of a hot-gas filter will reduce the transient areal loading of dust to the filter, but the beneficial effect of the reduced areal loading may be offset by an increase in drag associated with a finer particle-size distribution. The overall goal of this study was to better understand these tradeoffs and to ultimately develop a procedure that would be useful in analyzing the performance of hot-gas filters and in sizing new hot-gas filters. In addition to the obvious effects of a cyclone on dust loading and particle size, other indirect effects on particulate properties and flow resistance may occur when the cyclone is incorporated into the gasifier recycle loop as was the case at the PSDF. To better understand the importance of these other effects, this study sought to separate the particle-size effect from these other effects by measuring the drag of size-fractionated char samples collected before and after the recycle loop modifications.

Dahlin, R.S.; Landham, E.C.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigation options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and sequester carbon in land use sectors are describe in some detail. The paper highlights those options in the forestry sector, which are more relevant to different parts of Africa. It briefly outlines a bottom-up methodological framework for comprehensively assessing mitigation options in land use sectors. This method emphasizes the application of end-use demand projections to construct a baseline and mitigation scenarios and explicitly addresses the carbon storage potential on land and in wood products, as well as use of wood to substitute for fossil fuels. Cost-effectiveness indicators for ranking mitigation options are proposed, including those, which account for non-carbon monetary benefits such as those derived from forest products, as well as opportunity cost of pursuing specific mitigation option. The paper finally surveys the likely policies, barriers and incentives to implement such mitigation options in African countries .

Makundi, Willy R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Based on the request of Pawnee Nation’s Energy Task Force the research team, consisting Tribal personnel and Summit Blue Consulting, focused on a review of renewable energy resource development potential, funding sources and utility organizational along with energy savings options. Elements of the energy demand forecasting and characterization and demand side options review remained in the scope of work, but were only addressed at a high level. Description of Activities Performed Renewable Energy Resource Development Potential The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Energy Efficiency Options While this was not a major focus of the project, the research team highlighted common strategies for reducing energy use in buildings. The team also discussed the benefits of adopting a building energy code and introduced two model energy codes Pawnee Nation should consider for adoption. Summary of Current and Expected Future Electricity Usage The research team provided a summary overview of electricity usage patterns in current buildings and included discussion of known plans for new construction. Utility Options Review Pawnee Nation electric utility options were analyzed through a four-phase process, which included: 1) summarizing the relevant utility background information; 2) gathering relevant utility assessment data; 3) developing a set of realistic Pawnee electric utility service options, and 4) analyzing the various Pawnee electric utility service options for the Pawnee Energy Team’s consideration. III. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site.

Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003a. Balancing Natural Gas Policy – Fueling the Demands of2003b. Balancing Natural Gas Policy – Fueling the Demands ofand Policy Options of California’s Reliance on Natural Gas.

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Financial options for neighborhood energy efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major problems facing the residents of Kansas City is the increasing cost of heating their homes. Approximately 95% of Kansas Citians heat their homes with natural gas. With the price of natural gas doubling every two to three years, it has become increasingly important to decrease consumption while increasing efficiency. Compounding this situation for low and moderate income residents is the shrinking availability of public funds for weatherization. If any progress is going to be made on this problem, alternative funding mechanisms will have to be developed. A potential solution to the problem is through development of the Kansas City Home Energy Assistance and Training Program (HEAT). This program addresses the problem on three levels: (1) using neighborhood groups and organizations as a catalyst to reach individual households through community development strategies; (2) providing education and training resources to assist neighborhood groups in the implementation of identified strategies; and (3) developing financial resources and delivery systems to provide financial options for energy efficiency.

Dreyfuss, P.; Miranti, K.E.; Peterson, J.E.; Payton, J.; Shechter, G.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Energy policy options for Illinois. Proceedings. [26 papers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-six papers presented at the Fifth Annual Oil Illinois Energy Conference are categorized into five sections, namely: An overview of U.S. and Illinois Energy Policy; Energy Policy; Conservation--Solar--Biomass and Solid Wastes; Energy Policy; Petroleum and Natural Gas; Energy Policy; Coal and Electric Utilities; and Economic and Consumer Concerns. One paper, A Perspective on Long-Range Nuclear Energy Options, by William O. Harms has previously appeared in EAPA 4: 1364. (MCW)

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Economic Evaluation of CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancement Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO2 in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of the carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MWe integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study w...

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hydrogen Delivery Options and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options and Issues Options and Issues Mark Paster DOE August, 2006 Scope * From the end point of central or distributed production (300 psi H2) to and including the dispenser at a refueling station or stationary power site - GH2 Pipelines and Trucks, LH2 Trucks, Carriers <$1.00/kg of Hydrogen by 2017 Hydrogen Delivery H2 Delivery Current Status * Technology - GH2 Tube Trailers: ~340 kg, ~2600 psi - LH2 Trucks: ~3900 kg - Pipelines: up to 1500 psi (~630 miles in the U.S.) - Refueling Site Operations (compression, storage dispensing): Demonstration projects * Cost (Does NOT include refueling Site Operations) - Trucks: $4-$12/kg - Pipeline: <$2/kg H2A Analysis * Consistent, comparable, transparent approach to hydrogen production and delivery cost analysis * Excel spreadsheet tools with common economic

293

Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Updated Costs for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This update of 1978 NRC cost estimates--in 1984 dollars--also estimates the costs of several special manpower and licensing options for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. The fully developed methodology offers utilities a sound basis on which to estimate the costs of decommissioning specific plants.

1985-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

295

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 Figure 2. Natural Gas Price Forward4. Gas-Daily Natural Gas Price Index (New York Transco ZoneGas Prices . 19

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Air emissions from residential heating: The wood heating option put into environmental perspective. Report for June 1997--July 1998  

SciTech Connect

The paper compares the national scale (rather than local) air quality impacts of the various residential space heating options. Specifically, it compares the relative contributions of the space heating options to fine particulate emissions, greenhouse gas emissions, and acid precipitation impacts. The major space heating energy options are natural gas, fuel oil, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), electricity, coal, and wood. Residential wood combustion (RWC) meets 9% of the Nation`s space heating energy needs and utilizes a renewable resource. Wood is burned regularly in about 30 million homes. Residential wood combustion is often perceived as environmentally dirty due to emissions from older wood burners.

Houck, J.E.; Tiegs, P.E.; McCrillis, R.C.; Keithley, C.; Crouch, J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Exotic options under Lévy models: An overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we overview the pricing of several so-called exotic options in the nowadays quite popular exponential Levy models. Keywords: Exotic options, Financial derivatives, Lèvy processes

Wim Schoutens

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The new option view of investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides a simple introduction to the new option view of investment. We explain the shortcomings of the orthodox theory, and then outline the basic ideas behind the option framework. Several industry examples ...

Dixit, Avinash K.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Standards Applicability to Honeywell Metropolis Works Uranium Conversion Facility and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to provide the Commission options and a staff recommendation for regulating chemical security at U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated facilities that are exempt from the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS). SUMMARY:

R. W. Borchardt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 28, 2013 [Facility News] June 28, 2013 [Facility News] What's a Little Helium Among Friends? Bookmark and Share In early June, this 38-cylinder helium storage system arrived at the ARM Southern Great Plains site with nearly 18,000 standard cubic feet of helium left in it-enough to launch about 400 weather balloons. In early June, this 38-cylinder helium storage system arrived at the ARM Southern Great Plains site with nearly 18,000 standard cubic feet of helium left in it-enough to launch about 400 weather balloons. What is white and blue, can hold 55,000 standard cubic feet (scf) of gas, and looks like it could attach to the International Space Station? A helium storage system, of course. This impressive contraption arrived at the ARM Southern Great Plains site in early June, along with 18,000 scf of helium inside-valuable stuff,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Baldrige, Six Sigma, & ISO:? Understanding Your Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baldrige, Six Sigma, & ISO: Understanding Your Options. CEO Issue Sheet. How do you choose among the performance ...

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

302

Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota) Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota) < Back...

303

ANNUAL UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE REPORT FORM EIA-191A ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Page 2 For Type of Facility, enter one of the following: depleted gas well, aquifer, salt dome, or other facility. If “other” is reported, please provide ...

304

Energy Conservation Options in Distillation Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a survey of energy conservation options applicable to distillation processes. Over twenty such options were identified, and eight of these were selected for detailed presentation. These options were chosen on the basis of good economics, applicability to retrofit situations, and/or the use of novel technology.

Harris, G. E.; Hearn, W. R.; Blythe, G. M.; Stuart, J. M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses  

SciTech Connect

Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma Energy Option Analyses In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Description of Activities Performed The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site. Financial incentives for project development are generally structured to provide tribes with access to conventional financing mechanisms. Grant funding for project construction is currently difficult to obtain. Substantial new opportunities for bio-fuel development may exist in the next few years with passage of the 2007 Farm Bill, and through opportunities made available through Oklahoma’s new Bio-energy Center. A review of potential alternatives to Pawnee Nation’s current electricity supply scenario revealed that a range of options could be viable. These include the following scenarios: business as usual, alternative supply, negotiate lower rates with City of Pawnee, focus on reducing energy usage, develop electric utility organization. Under any circumstances, Pawnee Nation should purse strategies to reduce energy usage, as this is the simplest means of reducing electric costs and environmental impacts. The research team also recommends that Pawnee Nation initiate some focused discussions with the City of Pawnee, with GRDA, and with IEC to discuss its wholesale supply purchase options. These discussions will better inform the Pawnee Energy Team of the specific pros and cons of its wholesale power supply options, and will assist the Team’s broader decision-making on utility-related issues. The ultimate path chosen by Pawnee Nation will depend on further consideration of priorities and potential barriers by Pawnee Nation’s Energy Team.

Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

306

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operating costs, long-term fixed-price renewable energyRenewable Energy Gas Options, Gas Storage Option Premium or Storage Costrenewable power is more cost- competitive than previously believed’, Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

RCS program evaluation plan options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential Conservation Service (RCS) Program evaluation plan is designed to provide an ongoing evaluation during the RCS Program's active period as well as a measurement of the RCS Program's cumulative effect after the program's termination. The study options described include utility case studies, random survey sampling, directed survey sampling, and remote data collection. Survey techniques are described and appropriate questions are suggested. Several sample selection criteria are included as background for a DOE policy decision on this issue. Present and anticipated data sources are listed and discussed. Statistical data analysis plans include a preliminary determination of required sample sizes.

Stovall, T.K.; Bayne, C.K.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Best Practice Guidelines for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide: Geologic Storage Options, Site Evaluation, and Monitoring/Mitigatio n  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to set forth a set of "best practices" that support long-term, secure storage of captured carbon dioxide (CO2). For each of a suite of geologic storage options, the report establishes background and basic concepts, defines site selection criteria and procedures, and sets forth monitoring and mitigation options. The initial suite of geologic CO2 storage options to be addressed includes saline aquifers, depleted oil fields, depleted natural gas fields, and deep unmineable coal...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

2H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results - Interim Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results DE-FG36-05GO15032 Interim Report Nexant, Inc., Air Liquide, Argonne National Laboratory, Chevron Technology Venture, Gas Technology Institute, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and TIAX LLC May 2008 Contents Section Page Executive Summary ................................................................................................................... 1-9 Delivery Options ...................................................................................................................... 1-9 Evaluation of Options 2 and 3 ................................................................................................. 1-9

310

Optimal operating strategy for a storage facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the thesis, I derive the optimal operating strategy to maximize the value of a storage facility by exploiting the properties in the underlying natural gas spot price. To achieve the objective, I investigate the optimal ...

Zhai, Ning

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

National Cemetery Administration (NCA) Facilities Design ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For relatively larger facilities, evaluate the use of a hot water heating system (with natural gas and/or No. 2 oil as the fuel) and a chilled water ...

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

312

Climate Financing Options | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing Options Financing Options Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Financing Options Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), World Bank Sector: Climate Focus Area: People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Topics: Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.climatefinanceoptions.org/cfo/ Language: English References: Climate Finance Options[1] New climate finance tool for developing countries[2] "This Platform aims at providing comprehensive guidance on financial

313

The Caterpillar Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a review of one of America's premier coal gasification installations. The caterpillar coal gasification facility located in York, Pennsylvania is an award winning facility. The plant was recognized as the 'pace setter plant of the year' in 1981 and won the 'energy conservation award' for 1983. The decision to install and operate a coal gasification plant was based on severe natural gas curtailments at York with continuing supply interruptions. This paper will present a detailed description of the equipment used in the coal gasification system and the process itself. It also includes operating and gas production information along with an economic analysis. The characteristics of producer gas and its use in the various plant applications will be reviewed and compared with natural gas. In summary, this paper deals with caterpillar's experience with coal gasification to date. Caterpillar concludes that the coal gas system has the potential to favorably affect the corporation's commitment to stimulate coal utilization. The three years' operating experience at the York plant has demonstrated the practical use of coal gas as well as the economics associated with producing gas from coal.

Welsh, J.; Coffeen, W. G., III

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

New Energy Options | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Options Options Jump to: navigation, search Name New Energy Options Place Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil Sector Wind energy Product Belo Horizonte-based wind farm developer and independent electric energy producer. References New Energy Options[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. New Energy Options is a company located in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil . References ↑ "New Energy Options" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=New_Energy_Options&oldid=349161" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

315

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Other Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Research Facilities Other Research Facilities In addition to the laboratories dedicated to hydrogen and fuel cell research, other facilities at NREL provide space for scientists developing hydrogen and fuel cell technologies along with other renewable energy technologies. Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility NREL's Distributed Energy Resources (DER) Test Facility is a working laboratory to test and improve interconnections among renewable energy generation technologies, energy storage systems, and electrical conversion equipment. Research being conducted includes improving the system efficiency of hydrogen production by electrolysis using wind or other renewable energy. This research highlights a promising option for encouraging higher penetrations of renewable energy generation as well as

316

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply contracts and natural gas storage. Lacking sufficientsupply contracts and natural gas storage facilities. Since,natural gas utilities, Xcel Energy noted that the cost of seasonal storage

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

319

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2004 Facility News ARM Climate Research Facility Achieves User Milestone Three Months Ahead of Schedule Bookmark and Share Summary of the ARM Climate Research Facility User...

320

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News Future of User Facility Discussed at Fall Workshop As a national user facility, ARM is accessible to scientists around the globe for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ARM - SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

322

Choose best option for enhancing combined-cycle output  

SciTech Connect

This article describes several methods available for boosting the output of gas-turbine-based combined-cycle plants during warm-weather operation. The technology comparisons help choose the option that is most appropriate. Amidst the many advantages of gas-turbine (GT) combined cycles (CC), one drawback is that their achievable output decreases significantly as ambient temperature increases. Reason: The lower density of warm air reduces mass flow through the GT. Unfortunately, hot weather typically corresponds to peak power loads in many areas. Thus, the need to meet peak-load and power-sales contract requirements causes many plant developers to compensate for ambient-temperature-related output loss. The three most common methods of increasing output include: (1) injecting water or steam into the GT, (2) precooling GT inlet air, and/or (3) supplementary firing of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG). All of these options require significant capital outlays and affect other performance parameters. In addition, they may uniquely impact the operation and/or selection of other components, including boiler feedwater and condensate pumps, valves, steam turbine/generators, condensers, cooling towers, and emissions control systems. Although plant-specific issues will have a significant effect on selecting an option, comparing the performance of different systems based on a theoretical reference plant can be helpful. The comparisons here illustrate the characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of the major power augmentation technologies now in use.

Boswell, M.; Tawney, R.; Narula, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

EIS-0214 - North Regional Power Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPEND~ APPEND~ A POTEN~L E~OmNTAL I~ACTS AND PREWOUSLY E~LOYED ~TIGATION OPTIONS FOR NA~L GAS TMS~SSION P~ELINES Potential Environmental Impacts and Previously Employed Mitigation Options for Natural Gas Transmission Pipelines Introduction The Federd Energy Regulatory Commission@ERC) has recently prepared numerousNEPA analyses for natural gas pipelineprojects in the West, and has refined its andyticd methods and mitigation requirementswith each succeeding project. The following summarydraws from this extensive body of itiormation in attempting to characterize the generrdrange of impacts associated with natural gas pipelineprojects. The summary represents the types of impacts likely to receive more detailed attention in a subsequentNEPA analysisfor the ~F pipeline, and identifies a reasonable array of mitigation measuresthat have been employed on other projects,

324

Power systems development facility. Quarterly report, January 1995--March 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: (1) Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. (2) Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. (3) Combustion Gas Turbine. (4) Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these options. Conclusions Natural gas utilization as the primary heat source for district heat production implies environmental complications beyond just the global warming impacts. Diffusing renewable energy sources for generating the base load district heat would reduce human toxicity, ecosystem quality degradation, global warming, and resource depletion compared to the case of natural gas. Reducing fossil fuel dependency in various stages of wood pellet production can remarkably reduce the upstream global warming impact of using wood pellets for district heat generation.

Ghafghazi, Saeed [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Forecasting future volatility from option prices, Working  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weisbach are gratefully acknowledged. I bear full responsibility for all remaining errors. Forecasting Future Volatility from Option Prices Evidence exists that option prices produce biased forecasts of future volatility across a wide variety of options markets. This paper presents two main results. First, approximately half of the forecasting bias in the S&P 500 index (SPX) options market is eliminated by constructing measures of realized volatility from five minute observations on SPX futures rather than from daily closing SPX levels. Second, much of the remaining forecasting bias is eliminated by employing an option pricing model that permits a non-zero market price of volatility risk. It is widely believed that option prices provide the best forecasts of the future volatility of the assets which underlie them. One reason for this belief is that option prices have the ability to impound all publicly available information – including all information contained in the history of past prices – about the future volatility of the underlying assets. A second related reason is that option pricing theory maintains that if an option prices fails to embody optimal forecasts of the future volatility of the underlying asset, a profitable trading strategy should be available whose implementation would push the option price to the level that reflects the best possible forecast of future volatility.

Allen M. Poteshman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

329

User Facility Science Highlights | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Facility Science User Facility Science Highlights User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities BER User Facilities FES User Facilities HEP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 User Facility Science Highlights Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Filter by Program Or press Esc Key to close. close Select all that apply. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) [+] Options « BES Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division (CSGB) Materials Sciences and Engineering Division (MSE) Scientific User Facilities Division (SUF)

330

Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investments in new technologies must reflect a core business need: > Reduce risks (e.g. LNG investments), or > Mobilize underutilized assets, or > Serve as "platform" for other...

331

Applications for Certificates for Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas Transmission Facilities (Ohio) Applications for Certificates for Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas Transmission Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider The Ohio Power Siting Board An applicant for a certificate to site a major electric power, gas, or natural gas transmission facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a reference for state and local governments and for the public. The applicant shall provide a statement explaining the need for the

332

Pipelines and Underground Gas Storage (Iowa) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

These rules apply to intrastate transport of natural gas and other substances via pipeline, as well as underground gas storage facilities. The construction and operation of...

333

Natural Gas Year-in-Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

12 'Demonstrated peak working gas capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period ...

334

Forecourt Storage and Compression Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure, capacity ­ Compressor output, power, electric demand ­ Station and dispenser load profiles Pro > Station demand profiles > Operational analysis results ­ Compressor-storage relationships and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop DOE Headquarters 25 January 2006 Mark E. Richards Gas Technology

335

Existing Facilities Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Existing Facilities Program Existing Facilities Program Existing Facilities Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Construction Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Pre-Qualified Measures (General): $30,000 (electric and gas) Electric Efficiency and Energy Storage: 50% of cost or $2 million Natural Gas Efficiency: 50% of cost or $200,000 Demand Response: 75% of cost or $2 million (limit also applies to combined performance based efficiency and demand response measures) Industrial Process Efficiency: 50% of cost or $5 million

336

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ryder Opens Natural Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on AddThis.com... June 28, 2011 Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility

337

Research Facilities and Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCES: Magnesium Research Facilities and Programs ... to universities, corporations, and other facilities involved in magnesium research, 0, 1025 ...

338

Californium Neutron Irradiation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Californium Neutron Irradiation Facility. Summary: ... Cf irradiation facility (Photograph by: Neutron Physics Group). Lead Organizational Unit: pml. Staff: ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

339

Mobile Solar Tracker Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile Solar Tracker Facility. ... NIST's mobile solar tracking facility is used to characterize the electrical performance of photovoltaic panels. ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Policy Options of California’s Reliance on Natural Gas. ”policy is often formulated with ratepayers in mind. 2) Second, long-term fixed-price natural gas

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should

342

Facility Type!  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ITY: ITY: --&L~ ----------- srct-r~ -----------~------~------- if yee, date contacted ------------- cl Facility Type! i I 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis ] Production 1 Diepasal/Storage 'YPE OF CONTRACT .--------------- 1 Prime J Subcontract&- 1 Purchase Order rl i '1 ! Other information (i.e., ---------~---~--~-------- :ontrait/Pirchaee Order # , I C -qXlJ- --~-------~~-------~~~~~~ I I ~~~---~~~~~~~T~~~ FONTRACTING PERIODi IWNERSHIP: ,I 1 AECIMED AECMED GOVT GOUT &NTtiAC+OR GUN-I OWNED ----- LEEE!? M!s LE!Ps2 -LdJG?- ---L .ANDS ILJILDINGS X2UIPilENT IRE OR RAW HA-I-L :INAL PRODUCT IASTE Z. RESIDUE I I kility l pt I ,-- 7- ,+- &!d,, ' IN&"E~:EW AT SITE -' ---------------- , . Control 0 AEC/tlED managed operations

343

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

063-2011 063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations,

344

Research Facility,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collecting and Delivering the Data Collecting and Delivering the Data As a general condition for use of the ARM Climate Research Facility, users are required to include their data in the ARM Data Archive. All data acquired must be of sufficient quality to be useful and must be documented such that users will be able to clearly understand the meaning and organization of the data. Final, quality-assured data sets are stored in the Data Archive and are freely accessible to the general scientific community. Preliminary data may be shared among field campaign participants during and shortly following the campaign. To facilitate sharing of preliminary data, the ARM Data Archive establishes restricted access capability, limited to participants and data managers.

345

News Release: Energy Department Signs Option and Lease for Durango Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Signs Option and Lease for Durango Signs Option and Lease for Durango Solar Project News Release: Energy Department Signs Option and Lease for Durango Solar Project September 12, 2012 - 2:18pm Addthis News Contact: DOE, Jalena Dayvault, Durango Site Manager (970) 248-6016 jalena.dayvault@lm.doe.gov DOE, Deborah Barr, Reuse Program Manager (970) 248-6550 deborah.barr@lm.doe.gov Contractor, Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs (970) 248-6363 judy.miller@lm.doe.gov GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced completion of initial steps toward developing a solar energy facility on a uranium mill tailings disposal site in southwestern Colorado. The DOE Office of Legacy Management and American Capital Energy have agreed to a three-year option on a lease of up to 25 years on the surface of the

346

X-231B oil biodegradation plot: Closure Options Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Closure Option Study (COS) is to satisfy the environmental documentation requirements for the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA). The documentation is required to proceed with closure of the X-231B Oil Biodegradation Plot (X-231B), at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio. The concept for performance of a COS was set forth in the closure plan for the site. The Closure Plan states that the final closure action at X-231B shall be determined by the Closure Option Study. This closure Option Study is not intended to be a Feasibility Study as defined in the National Contingency Plan, nor is it a Corrective Measures Study as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. Performance of this study fulfills the requirements mandated by OEPA for completion of the closure plan for X-231B. This study was conducted prior to the initiation of the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) for Quadrant I of the site. Information generated during the RFI could modify the analysis and recommendations presented in this report.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ecological and Economical efficient Heating and Cooling by innovative Gas Motor Heat Pump Systems and Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

options ·Universal application as an Air-Air System (VRF), Air-Water System or combined as a Mixed System application options · Option 1: Air-Air System (VRF) #12;· Option 2: Air-Air System (HVAC System) Gas Heat

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

348

Partnership Agreement Options | Partnerships | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agreement For Commercializing Technology (ACT) CRADA Work For Others Agreement User Agreement Sample Sponsored Research Agreement SBIR-STTR Support Partnerships Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry | Partnerships | Sponsored Research | Partnering Mechanism SHARE Partnering Mechanisms Exact Measurements Private companies, universities, non-profit agencies, and other non-federal entities seeking technology solutions or research and development partnerships have a number of mechanisms available for engaging ORNL in partnerships. These mechanisms are embodied in various types of partnering agreements that permit non-federal entities access to technologies, unique facilities, and cutting-edge expertise resident at ORNL. Different partnership agreements exist based on specific needs of the

349

Real options valuation in energy markets .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Real options have been widely applied to analyze investment planning and asset valuation under uncertainty in many industries, especially energy markets. Because of their close… (more)

Zhou, Jieyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Microsoft Word - Accommodates All Generation Storage Options...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13 v 3.0 Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The smart grid is defined by its seven principal characteristics. One of those characteristics...

351

Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 50 MT of plutonium sharing existing facilities at Hanford with pit disassembly {ampersand} conversion facility: alternative 11  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 50 metric tons (nominal) of plutonium as a ceramic in an existing facility at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF), which is being costed in a separate report by LANL, will also be located in the FMEF in this co-location option.

DiSabatino, A., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Technological Options to Address Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydro and Other 8% Coal 22% Coal 22% Gas 23% Gas 23% Coal 19% Coal 19% Gas 28% Gas 28% Fossil Fuels Will Continue as Key to World Economy 1999 data from International Energy...

353

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 Figure 2. Natural Gas Price Forward7 Figure 4. Gas-Daily Natural Gas Price Index (New Yorkand off-peak) and natural gas prices, the volatility term

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Temperature High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test Facilities for Metal Dusting Test Facilities for Metal Dusting Overview Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test Facilities for Metal Dusting Six corrosion test facilities and two thermogravimetric systems for conducting corrosion tests in complex mixed gas environments, in steam and in the presence of deposits, and five facilities for metal dusting degradation Bookmark and Share The High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test Facilities for Metal Dusting include: High Pressure Test Facility for Metal Dusting Resistance:

355

Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&D ·Plasma Material Interface Fusion Nuclear Facility Component test facility (CTF)* Pilot plant&D ·Plasma Material Interface Fusion Nuclear Facility Component test facility (CTF)* Pilot plant for a Nuclear Next Step ITER Demo Fusion S&T Research & Development ·High performance, steady state ·Materials R

356

Property:FacilityType | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FacilityType FacilityType Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "FacilityType" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 3-D Metals + Small Scale Wind + A AB Tehachapi Wind Farm + Commercial Scale Wind + AFCEE MMR Turbines + Commercial Scale Wind + AG Land 1 + Community Wind + AG Land 2 + Community Wind + AG Land 3 + Community Wind + AG Land 4 + Community Wind + AG Land 5 + Community Wind + AG Land 6 + Community Wind + AV Solar Ranch I Solar Power Plant + Photovoltaics + AVTEC + Small Scale Wind + Acme Landfill Biomass Facility + Landfill Gas + Adair Wind Farm I + Commercial Scale Wind + Adair Wind Farm II + Commercial Scale Wind + Adams Wind Project + Commercial Scale Wind + Adrian Energy Associates LLC Biomass Facility + Landfill Gas +

357

Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Information (Iowa) Facilities Information (Iowa) Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Residential Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board This section applies to any excavation which may impact underground facilities, including those used for the conveyance of electricity or the transportation of hazardous liquids or natural gas. Excavation is prohibited unless notification takes place, as described in this chapter

358

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Explosive Components Facility Explosive Components Facility The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis capabilities for energetic materials and explosive components: advanced design of energetic devices and subsystems optical ordnance energetic materials testing of explosives and explosive components and subsystems advanced explosives diagnostics reliability analyses failure modes evaluation safety evaluation The ECF has the full-range of capabilities necessary to support the understanding of energetic materials and components: Optical and Semiconductor Bridge (SCB) Initiation Laboratories Characterization Laboratories thermal properties gas analyses powder characterization

359

Gas turbine plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

Many cogeneration facilities use gas turbines combined with heat recovery boilers, and the number is increasing. At the start of 1986, over 75% of filings for new cogeneration plants included plans to burn natural gas. Depending on the geographic region, gas turbines are still one of the most popular prime movers. Emissions of pollutants from these turbines pose potential risks to the environment, particularly in geographical areas that already have high concentrations of cogeneration facilities. Although environmental regulations have concentrated on nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) in the past, it is now necessary to evaluate emission controls for other pollutants as well.

Davidson, L.N.; Gullett, D.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND SINK ENHANCEMENT OPTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO{sub 2} in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MW{sub e} integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study were combined with the storage costs from this study to allow comparison among capture and storage approaches as well as sink enhancements.

Bert Bock; Richard Rhudy; Howard Herzog; Michael Klett; John Davison; Danial G. De La Torre Ugarte; Dale Simbeck

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Real options "in" projects and systems design : identification of options and solutions for path dependency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research develops a comprehensive approach to identify and deal with real options in" projects, that is, those real options (flexibility) that are integral parts of the technical design. It represents a first attempt ...

Wang, Tao, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Calcined solids storage facility closure study  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Designating required vs. optional input fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a study comparing different techniques for visually distingishing required from optional input fields in a form-filling application. Seven techniques were studied: no indication, bold field labels, chevrons in front of the labels, ... Keywords: data input, optional fields, required fields, visual design

Thomas S. Tullis; Ana Pons

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Combining Financial Double Call Options with Real Options for Early Curtailment of Electricity Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining Financial Double Call Options with Real Options for Early Curtailment of Electricity@IEOR.Berkeley.edu Abstract In a competitive electricity market traditional demand side management options offering customers curtailable service at reduced rates are replaced by voluntary customer responses to electricity spot prices

365

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 5 (2011) 10551064 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 5 (2011) 1055­1064 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control journal homepage: www option in the portfolio of mitigation actions for stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas

Prevost, Jean-Herve

366

Climate Finance Options Platform | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Finance Options Platform Climate Finance Options Platform Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Finance Options Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, World Bank Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Finance, Implementation Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.climatefinanceoptions.org/cfo/ Climate Finance Options Screenshot References: CFO[1] "This Platform aims at providing comprehensive guidance on financial options available for climate action in developing countries. Here you can find information on where to access the wide range of funds available from multilateral and bilateral institution, as well as public and private sources. Learn more on how these funds are governed and whether your project is eligible. Users are invited to be a resource to share their

367

Landfill Gas to Energy for Federal Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

micro- turbines, and other technologies can use LFG to produce electricity; and most boilers can be reconfigured to burn LFG to produce hot water or steam. LFG usually consists...

368

Flowmeter Calibration Facility for Heated Gas Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... water condenses back to the liquid phase. ... the carbon dioxide goes through two stages of ... degree turn, a low pressure-drop flow conditioner, and ...

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply contracts and natural gas storage. Lacking sufficientsupply contracts and natural gas storage facilities. Since,natural gas utilities, Xcel Energy noted that the cost of seasonal storage

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

High level waste facilities -- Continuing operation or orderly shutdown  

SciTech Connect

Two options for Environmental Impact Statement No action alternatives describe operation of the radioactive liquid waste facilities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The first alternative describes continued operation of all facilities as planned and budgeted through 2020. Institutional control for 100 years would follow shutdown of operational facilities. Alternatively, the facilities would be shut down in an orderly fashion without completing planned activities. The facilities and associated operations are described. Remaining sodium bearing liquid waste will be converted to solid calcine in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) or will be left in the waste tanks. The calcine solids will be stored in the existing Calcine Solids Storage Facilities (CSSF). Regulatory and cost impacts are discussed.

Decker, L.A.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

DOE/NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Management Contracts Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor Award Date End Date Options/Award Term Ultimate Potential Expiration Date Contract FY Competed Parent Companies/ LLC Partners DOE Site Procurement Director DOE Contracting Officer SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) SC Stanford University DE-AC03-76SF00515 1/25/1981 9/30/2017 9/30/2017 M&O 1981 Stanford University Barbara Jackson 865-576-0976 Kyong H. Watson 650-926-5203 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) SC Battelle Memorial Institute DE-AC05-76RL01830 12/30/2002 9/30/2017 9/30/2017 M&O 1965 Battelle Memorial Institute Barbara Jackson 865-576-0976 Ryan Kilbury 509-372-4030 Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) SC Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC DE-AC02-98CH10886 1/5/1998 1/4/2015 1/4/2015 M&O 1998 Battelle Memorial Institute

372

DOE/NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Management Contracts Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor Award Date End Date Options/Award Term Ultimate Potential Expiration Date Contract FY Competed Parent Companies/ LLC Partners DOE Site Procurement Director DOE Contracting Officer SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) SC Stanford University DE-AC03-76SF00515 1/25/1981 9/30/2017 9/30/2017 M&O 1981 Stanford University Barbara Jackson 865-576-0976 Kyong H. Watson 650-926-5203 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) SC Battelle Memorial Institute DE-AC05-76RL01830 12/30/2002 9/30/2017 9/30/2017 M&O 1965 Battelle Memorial Institute Barbara Jackson 865-576-0976 Ryan Kilbury 509-372-4030 Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) SC Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC DE-AC02-98CH10886 1/5/1998 1/4/2015 1/4/2015 M&O 1998 Battelle Memorial Institute

373

Hydrogen Delivery: An Option to Ease the Transition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delivery: Delivery: An Option to Ease the Transition Presentation at: The DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting Washington, D.C. June 3, 2003 John C. Winslow, Product Manager, Coal Fuels & Hydrogen National Energy Technology Laboratory Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Hydrogen Delivery Today * Hydrogen infrastructure exists only for small merchant hydrogen markets in the chemical and refining industries * Current natural gas infrastructure consists of: - Pipelines - intermediate product storage - import terminals - rail, barge, and truck delivery U.S. Pipeline Mileage 0.7 2000 279 0 1000 2000 3000 Oil Nat Gas Hydrogen thousand miles Source: APCI, EIA, NEP Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Comparison of Alternative Delivery Pathways Central H 2 production (coal)

374

International Facility Management Association Strategic Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Management Association Facility Management Association Strategic Facility Planning: A WhIte PAPer Strategic Facility Planning: A White Paper on Strategic Facility Planning © 2009 | International Facility Management Association For additional information, contact: 1 e. Greenway Plaza, Suite 1100 houston, tX 77046-0104 USA P: + 1-713-623-4362 F: + 1-713-623-6124 www.ifma.org taBle OF cOntentS PreFace ......................................................... 2 executive Summary .................................... 3 Overview ....................................................... 4 DeFinitiOn OF Strategic Facility Planning within the Overall cOntext OF Facility Planning ................. 5 SPecializeD analySeS ................................ 9 OrganizatiOnal aPPrOacheS tO SFP ... 10 the SFP PrOceSS .......................................

375

Office of Nuclear Facility Basis & Facility Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design(HS-31) Reports to the Office of Nuclear Safety About Us The Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design establishes safety...

376

Energy, Product, and Economic Implications of Environmental Compliance Options- A Southern California Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial plants that are faced with regulated emissions constraints may also have a complex array of compliance options from which to choose. Technology options may include a number of pollution control alternatives: retrofits with more efficient equipment, fuel switching and/or process change to electrotechnologies, or advanced gas-fueled technologies. In some cases, a plant may be able to purchase emissions reduction credits (ERCs) in lieu of changing equipment, as would be the case in Southern California if the proposed RECLAIM regulations are adopted. In such cases, ERCs could also be sold by plants that achieve emissions reductions, offsetting the costs of their technology investments. This paper explores an exhaustive list of compliance options for a single industry, describing how to collect data and compare options in terms of costs, commercial availability, and impacts on energy use, emissions, plant throughput or productivity, product quality control, and other characteristics relevant to selecting an option to implement. We discuss how the options are assembled into an array of coping strategies for environmental compliance. This work is part of an ongoing project to develop a database of regulations and technology options. (A major Southern California industry, in terms of energy use and emissions, will be selected in October and the work completed in December, in preparation for a broadened scope to the entire industrial sector.)

Kyricopoulos, P. F.; Dennison, W. J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Qualified Projects of Natural Gas Utilities (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Permits a natural gas utility to construct the necessary facilities of a qualifying project and to recover the eligible infrastructure development costs necessary to develop the eligible...

378

Interim Report on Methods for Systematic Evaluation of Emission Reduction Options: Meeting Risks and Climate Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report introduces a fundamental framework to systematically assess the financial value of greenhouse gas reduction options, both individually and as part of a portfolio. It illustrates some of the variety of instruments that can be used to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions, highlights the importance of consistent evaluation, and provides a starting point for in-depth case study applications of the new framework.

2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

379

Nicor Gas- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy efficient products are eligible for Nicor Gas rebates. Applications must be postmarked no later than 90 days after installation. Customers can also choose the Instant Discount Option, which...

380

Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. The fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. This volume of the report contains the appendices: (A) abbreviations and definitions, glossary; (B) 4.5 MWe utility demonstrator power plant study information; (C) rejected heat utilization; (D) availability; (E) conceptual design specifications; (F) details of the economic analysis; (G) detailed description of the selected configuration; and (H) fuel cell power plant penetration analysis. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. In this particular application, the fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. The displacement of oil and coal resulting from the Bergen County Utilities Authority application was determined. A demonstration program based on the selected configuration was prepared to describe the scope of work, organization, schedules, and costs from preliminary design through actual tests and operation. The potential market for nationwide application of the concept was projected, along with the equivalent oil displacement resulting from estimated commercial application.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

than any other quarter on record-961 The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report facility use by total visitor days and facility to track actual...

383

Local Option - Special Districts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Special Districts Local Option - Special Districts Local Option - Special Districts < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Bioenergy Solar Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type PACE Financing '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been

384

Pricing and hedging a barrier option  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barrier options are options where the payoff depends on whether the underlying asset's price reaches a certain level during a certain period of time. This path-dependency makes these options difficult to manage in practice. In this work, general methods of pricing and hedging are proposed. General properties of the Black - Scholes model are studied. Three methods of pricing are discussed and compared. Hedging issues are analyzed. Finally an improvement of the Black - Scholes model for the stock's price is proposed to take into account the stochastic aspect of the stock price volatility.

Bogossian, Alan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Renewable energy options in Saudi Arabia: the economic viability of solar photovoltaics within the residential sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renewable energy options, including solar power, are becoming progressively more viable and thus increasingly pose challenges to conventional sources of energy, such as oil, coal and natural gas. Solar Photovoltaic technology is one type of solar energy ... Keywords: Saudi Arabia, feasibility study, renewable energy, residential buildings, solar photovoltaics

Yasser Al-Saleh; Hanan Taleb

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

DOE Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7292008 9302013 one 5 Yr Option Avaialble 9302018 M&O 2008 http:www.eere.energy.govgoldenNRELPrime.aspx Carol Battershell 303-275- 1438 Steve Scott 303-275-4724...

387

DOE Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Susan E. Bechtol 509-376-3388 Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (INEEL) EM Idaho Treatment Group, LLC DE-AC07-091D-14813 5272011 9302015 No options 9302015...

388

DOE Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

865- 576-0976 Heather Houk 865-576-1894 Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (INEEL) EM Idaho Treatment Group, LLC 5272011 9302015 No options 9302015 Site Clean upfacility...

389

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Note: 1) 'Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period as...

390

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility News Data Collection from Mobile Facility on Gan Island Suspended Local weather balloon launch volunteers pose with the AMF team on Gan Island after completing their...

391

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

392

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

approximately 22,500 square kilometers, or the approximate area of a modern climate model grid cell. Centered around the SGP Central Facility, these extended facilities are...

393

Chemistry Dept. Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities As a research organization within a National Laboratory, the Chemistry Department operates research facilities that are available to other researchers as...

394

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process RA Bari SJ Johnson J Hockert R Wigeland EF Wonder MD Zentner August 2012 PNNL- 21698 Overview of the Facility...

395

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

facilities or research facilities that involve previously unused processes or technologies, comparison with previously required safeguard design features may not be...

396

Fuel Fabrication Facility  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

397

User Facility Agreement Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5. Which Argonne user facility will be hosting you? * Advanced Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Argonne Tandem Linear...

398

NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

399

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 15, 2008 Facility News National User Facility Organization Meets to Discuss Progress and Ideas In late April, the ARM Technical Director attended an annual meeting of the...

400

Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

processed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site or other appropriate disposal facility. Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) operated...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News ARM Mobile Facility Completes Field Campaign in Germany Researchers will study severe precipitation events that occurred in August and October...

402

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

403

NREL: Research Facilities - Test and User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities NREL has test and user facilities available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here you'll find an alphabetical listing and brief descriptions of NREL's test and user facilities. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Advanced Research Turbines At our wind testing facilities, we have turbines available to test new control schemes and equipment for reducing loads on wind turbine components. Learn more about the Advanced Research Turbines on our Wind Research website. Back to Top D Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility This facility was designed to assist the distributed power industry in the

404

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Facility Representative Workshop 0 Facility Representative Workshop May 16-18, 2000 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Tuesday, May 16, 2000 Theme for Day 1: Sustaining the Success of the Facility Representative Program 8:00 a.m. - Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:05 a.m. - Welcome - Kenneth Powers, Deputy Manager Nevada Operations Office 8:15 a.m. - Deputy Secretary Remarks - T. J. Glauthier, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Jerry Lyle, Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, Idaho Operations Office 9:00 a.m. - Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Departmental Representative 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Results and Goals - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager

405

The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Facility Energy Checklist | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Energy Checklist Facility Energy Checklist Facility Energy Checklist October 7, 2013 - 4:45pm Addthis This checklist outlines actions that conserve energy within facilities. For Your Buildings Checkbox Lower thermostat settings. Checkbox Match HVAC schedules to occupancy schedules. Checkbox Lower setback temperatures. Checkbox Optimize morning warmup and night setback controls. Checkbox Reduce/eliminate major sources of infiltration. Checkbox Install a desiccant dehumidification system. Checkbox Minimize use of outside air for process ventilation. Checkbox Educate employees on building systems and energy efficiency measures. Checkbox Check/adjust combustion efficiency of gas-fired equipment. Checkbox Minimize the use of gas-fired refrigeration equipment. Checkbox Check for ways to control solar gain to reduce the cooling load on buildings, including cool roofs or solar shading on windows

407

Options for Handling Noncombustion Waste: Third Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities produce a wide variety of noncombustion wastes from generating and distributing electricity as well as from associated support operations. This manual addresses the management of 23 utility noncombustion wastes and describes options for managing these wastes.

1995-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4. Option Value of a Thermal Energy Storage System for 5counter Real-time Prices Thermal Energy Storage vii Abstractfor the day, operating thermal energy storage overnight for

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Transportation Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation SLAC and Stanford can be reached by a variety of transportation options. There are many resources to help you plan your trip to and around SLAC and Stanford. The...

410

New England Wind Forum: More Search Options  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT More Search Options New England Wind Forum Site...

411

Adaptive genetic programming for option pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genetic Programming (GP) is an automated computational programming methodology, inspired by the workings of natural evolution techniques. It has been applied to solve complex problems in multiple domains including finance. This paper illustrates the ... Keywords: enetic programming, options pricing

Zheng Yin; Anthony Brabazon; Conall O'Sullivan

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Optimization Online - Option - Alloction funds- Transaction costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 18, 2009 ... Tests on portfolio efficiency concern, at first time, a long-term investor with Out- The-Country options and strike prices are approximate by a ...

413

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

gas capacity, which is the sum of the highest observed working natural gas storage inventory level in each facility over the prior 5-year period; and working gas design...

414

Guide to research facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Feasibility Study for the Ivano-Frankivsk District Heating Repowering: Analysis of Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part of the U.S. Initiative on Joint Implementation with the Ukraine Inter-Ministerial Commission on Climate Change, financed by the US Department of Energy. The project was implemented by a team consisting of the US company SenTech, Inc. and the Ukrainian company Esco-West. The main objective of the effort was to assess available alternatives of Ivano-Frankivsk (I-F) District Heating repowering and provide information for I-F's investment decision process. This study provides information on positive and negative technical and economic aspects of available options. Three options were analyzed for technical merit and economic performance: 1. Installation of cogeneration system based on Gas Turbine (GT) and Heat Recovery Heat Exchanger with thermal capacity of 30 MW and electrical capacity of 13.5 MW. This Option assumes utilization of five existing boilers with total capacity of 221 MW. Existing boilers will be equipped with modern controls. Equipment in this Option was sized for longest operating hours, about 8000 based on the available summer baseload. 2. Installation of Gas Turbine Combined Cycle (GTCC) and Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) with thermal capacity 45 MW and electrical capacity of 58.7 MW. This Option assumes utilization of five existing boilers with total capacity of 221 MW. Existing boilers will be equipped with modern controls. The equipment was sized for medium, shoulder season thermal load, and some cooling was assumed during the summer operation for extension of operating hours for electricity production. 3. Retrofit of six existing boilers (NGB) with total thermal capacity of 255.9 MW by installation of modern control system and minor upgrades. This option assumes only heat production with minimum investment. The best economic performance and the largest investment cost would result from alternative GTCC. This alternative has positive Net Present Value (NPV) with discount rate lower than about 12%, and has IRR slightly above 12%. The lowest economic results, and the lowest required investment, would result from alternative NGB. This Option's NPV is negative even at 0% discount rate, and would not become positive even by improving some parameters within a reasonable range. The Option with Gas Turbine displays relatively modest results and the NPV is positive for low discount rate, higher price of sold electricity and lower cost of natural gas. The IRR of this alternative is 9.75%, which is not very attractive. The largest influences on the investment are from the cost of electricity sold to the grid, the heat tariff, and the cost of natural gas. Assuming the implementation of the GTCC alternative, the benefit of the project is also reflected in lower Green House Emissions.

Markel, L.; Popelka, A.; Laskarevsky, V.

2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

416

Environmental review of options for managing radioactively contaminated carbon steel  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to develop a strategy for the management of radioactively contaminated carbon steel (RCCS). Currently, most of this material either is placed in special containers and disposed of by shallow land burial in facilities designed for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or is stored indefinitely pending sufficient funding to support alternative disposition. The growing amount of RCCS with which DOE will have to deal in the foreseeable future, coupled with the continued need to protect the human and natural environment, has led the Department to evaluate other approaches for managing this material. This environmental review (ER) describes the options that could be used for RCCS management and examines the potential environmental consequences of implementing each. Because much of the analysis underlying this document is available from previous studies, wherever possible the ER relies on incorporating the conclusions of those studies as summaries or by reference.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

PRICING A CLASS OF EXOTIC OPTIONS VIA MOMENTS AND SDP ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which have been considered in the interest rate and the real option theories. In fact, any ... Here, T > 0 is the option's maturity time, K is the option's strike price,.

418

An Approximate Dynamic Programming Approach to Benchmark Practice-Based Heuristics for Natural Gas Storage Valuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The valuation of the real option to store natural gas is a practically important problem that entails dynamic optimization of inventory trading decisions with capacity constraints in the face of uncertain natural gas price dynamics. Stochastic dynamic ... Keywords: Markov, asset pricing, dynamic programming, finance, heuristics, industries, petroleum/natural gas, real options, storage valuation, upper bounds

Guoming Lai; François Margot; Nicola Secomandi

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Final Report - Assessment of Testing Options for the NTR at the INL  

SciTech Connect

One of the main technologies that can be developed to dramatically enhance the human exploration of space is the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR). Several studies over the past thirty years have shown that the NTR can reduce the cost of a lunar outpost, reduce the risk of a human mission to Mars, enable fast transits for most missions throughout the solar system, and reduce the cost and time for robotic probes to deep space. Three separate committees of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences have recommended that NASA develop the NTR. One of the primary issues in development of the NTR is the ability to verify a flight ready unit. Three main methods can be used to validate safe operation of a NTR: 1) Full power, full duration test in an above ground facility that scrubs the rocket exhaust clean of any fission products; 2) Full power , full duration test using the Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) technique to capture the exhaust in subsurface strata; 3) Test of the reactor fuel at temperature and power density in a driver reactor with subsequent first test of the fully integrated NTR in space. The first method, the above ground facility, has been studied in the past. The second method, SAFE, has been examined for application at the Nevada Test Site. The third method relies on the fact that the Nuclear Furnace series of tests in 1971 showed that the radioactive exhaust coming from graphite based fuel for the NTR could be completely scrubbed of fission products and the clean hydrogen flared into the atmosphere. Under funding from the MSFC, the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) at the Idaho National laboratory (INL) has completed a reexamination of Methods 2 and 3 for implementation at the INL site. In short, the effort performed the following: 1) Assess the geology of the INL site and determine a location suitable SAFE testing; 2) Perform calculations of gas transport throughout the geology; 3) Produce a cost estimate of a non-nuclear , sub-scale test using gas injection to validate the computational models; 4) Produce a preliminary cost estimate to build a nuclear furnace equivalent facility to test NTR fuel on a green field location on the INL site. The results show that the INL geology is substantially better suited to the SAFE testing method than the NTS site. The existence of impermeable interbeds just above the sub-surface aquifer ensure that no material from the test, radioactive or not, can enter the water table. Similar beds located just below the surface will prevent any gaseous products from reaching the surface for dispersion. The extremely high permeability of the strata between the interbeds allows rapid dispersion of the rocket exhaust. In addition, the high permeability suggests that a lower back-pressure may develop in the hole against the rocket thrust, which increases safety of operations. Finally, the cost of performing a sub-scale, non-nuclear verification experiment was determined to be $3M. The third method was assessed through discussions with INL staff resident at the site. In essence, any new Category I facility on any DOE site will cost in excess of $250M. Based on the results of this study, a cost estimate for testing a nuclear rocket at the INL site appears to be warranted. Given the fact that a new nuclear fuel may be possible that does not release any fission products, the SAFE testing option appears to be the most affordable.

Howe, Steven D; McLing, Travis L; McCurry, Michael; Plummer, Mitchell A

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Company Name Tax Credit* Manufacturing Facility's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Company Company Name Tax Credit* Manufacturing Facility's City & State Project Description Carrier Corporation $5.1 million Indianapolis, IN Carrier, a part of UTC Building & Industrial Systems and a subsidiary of United Technologies Corporation, was selected for a $5.1 million dollar 48C Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit to expand production at its Indianapolis facility to meet increasing demand for its eco-friendly condensing gas furnace product line. The new line includes the most energy efficient gas furnaces on the market-all with at least 92% annual fuel utilization efficiency-and exemplifies Carrier's commitment to economical and environmentally sustainable solutions for achieving improved energy efficiency and performance.

422

A Review of HOV Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Review of HOV Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States - A Review of HOV Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States - Final Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: A Review of HOV Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States - Final Report Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration Focus Area: Public Transit & Infrastructure Topics: Analysis Tools, Best Practices Website: ops.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/fhwahop09029/index.htm This report provides an assessment of performance of existing high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane facilities in the United States and explores policy alternatives and effects related to conversion of existing HOV lanes to high occupancy toll lane operations. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

423

Facilities/Staff Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. FACILITIES and STAFF. The Thermophysical Properties Division is the Nation's ...

424

BC gas takes new approach to gas supply optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide-ranging changes have taken place in the US and Canada since the mid-1980s in the way that local gas distribution utilities and large industrial customers contract for their gas supplies. This paper reports that these changes have been brought about by open-access policies, the intent of which was to allow customers more latitude to make their gas purchase and transportation arrangements and to improve the access of shippers to available gas transmission capacity. The effects of the new open-access regime have been profound on both sides of the border. More than 70% of North American gas supplies are now sold under unbundled arrangements in which gas supply is contracted under separate commodity and transportation agreements. For local distribution utilities, the numbers of potential supply options have become extremely large. Analysis of these options has become increasingly complex with the need to take account of complicated contract provisions, a wider range of storage options and swap arrangements with other utilities, opportunities for some customers to purchase gas directly and uncertainty about future demand, prices and supplier reliability.

Cawdery, J.; Swoveland, C. (Quantalytics Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia (CA))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract to Operate WIPP DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract to Operate WIPP January 18, 2005 -...

426

Report on HVAC Option Selections for a Relocatable Classroom...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report on HVAC Option Selections for a Relocatable Classroom Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Field Study Title Report on HVAC Option Selections for a Relocatable Classroom...

427

Energy Efficiency Policy Rules: Options and Alternatives for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Rules: Options and Alternatives for Illinois Energy Efficiency Policy Rules: Options and Alternatives for Illinois Chuck Goldman (LBNL) & Rich Sedano (RAP). ICC Staff...

428

State Policy Options for Renewable Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Policy Options for Renewable Energy State Policy Options for Renewable Energy Matthew H. Brown Energy Program Director National Conference of State Legislatures. September...

429

State Policy Options for Renewable Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Options for Renewable Energy State Policy Options for Renewable Energy Matthew H. Brown Energy Program Director National Conference of State Legislatures. September 2003...

430

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry Title Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in...

431

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and...

432

Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications Title Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications Publication Type Report...

433

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

challenge. Hydrogen energy storage density has been steadilya Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and Systema Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Payback Analysis of Design Options for Residential Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Payback Analysis of Design Options for Residential Water Heaters Title Payback Analysis of Design Options for Residential Water Heaters Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number...

435

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary This...

436

Solar Easements and Local Option Solar Rights Laws | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Easements and Local Option Solar Rights Laws Solar Easements and Local Option Solar Rights Laws < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government...

437

Solar and Wind Easements & Rights Laws & Local Option Solar Rights...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Wind Easements & Rights Laws & Local Option Solar Rights Law Solar and Wind Easements & Rights Laws & Local Option Solar Rights Law Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed....

438

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a key challenge. Hydrogen energy storage density has beena Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and Systema Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Facility Representative Program: 2001 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Facility Representative Workshop 1 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2001 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. - Logistics Announcements & Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. - Welcome - Debbie Monette, Assistant Manager for National Security, Nevada Operations Office 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Ralph Erickson, National Nuclear Security Administration 9:00 a.m.- DOE Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Summary - Joe Arango 10:10 a.m. - Management Panel/Questions and Answers

440

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas facility options" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Facility Representative Program: 2007 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Facility Representative Workshop 7 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2007 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks Joanne Lorence, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office Gerald Talbot, Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:45 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight Perspective and Expectations Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Office of Health, Safety and Security 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board,

442

Mechanistic facility safety and source term analysis  

SciTech Connect

A PC-based computer program was created for facility safety and source term analysis at Hanford The program has been successfully applied to mechanistic prediction of source terms from chemical reactions in underground storage tanks, hydrogen combustion in double contained receiver tanks, and proccss evaluation including the potential for runaway reactions in spent nuclear fuel processing. Model features include user-defined facility room, flow path geometry, and heat conductors, user-defined non-ideal vapor and aerosol species, pressure- and density-driven gas flows, aerosol transport and deposition, and structure to accommodate facility-specific source terms. Example applications are presented here.

PLYS, M.G.

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

443

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probabilistic, Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems DE-FC26-06NT42930 Goal The project goal is the development...

444

Halifax Electric Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Biomass Facility Electric Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Halifax Electric Biomass Facility Facility Halifax Electric Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Plymouth County, Massachusetts Coordinates 41.9120406°, -70.7168469° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9120406,"lon":-70.7168469,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

445

Randolph Electric Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Randolph Electric Biomass Facility Randolph Electric Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Randolph Electric Biomass Facility Facility Randolph Electric Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Norfolk County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.17668°, -71.1448516° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.17668,"lon":-71.1448516,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

446

Otay Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Otay Biomass Facility Otay Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Otay Biomass Facility Facility Otay Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Diego County, California Coordinates 33.0933809°, -116.6081653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0933809,"lon":-116.6081653,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

447

Tri Cities Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tri Cities Biomass Facility Tri Cities Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tri Cities Biomass Facility Facility Tri Cities Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Maricopa County, Arizona Coordinates 33.2917968°, -112.4291464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.2917968,"lon":-112.4291464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

448

Gude Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gude Biomass Facility Gude Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gude Biomass Facility Facility Gude Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Montgomery County, Maryland Coordinates 39.1547426°, -77.2405153° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1547426,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

Biodyne Lyons Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biodyne Lyons Biomass Facility Biodyne Lyons Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biodyne Lyons Biomass Facility Facility Biodyne Lyons Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

450

Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Westchester Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

451

Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Kiefer Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Sacramento County, California Coordinates 38.47467°, -121.3541631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.47467,"lon":-121.3541631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

452

Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Milliken Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

453

Colton Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Colton Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

454

Bavarian LFGTE Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bavarian LFGTE Biomass Facility Bavarian LFGTE Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bavarian LFGTE Biomass Facility Facility Bavarian LFGTE Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Boone County, Kentucky Coordinates 38.9940572°, -84.7315563° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9940572,"lon":-84.7315563,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

455

Bradley Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bradley Biomass Facility Bradley Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bradley Biomass Facility Facility Bradley Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

Grayson Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grayson Biomass Facility Grayson Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Grayson Biomass Facility Facility Grayson Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}