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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

2

Louisiana Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Louisiana (Million...

3

Alabama Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

4

California Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production Extracted in California (Million Cubic Feet) California Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in California (Million Cubic Feet) Decade...

5

California Onshore Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted in California...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Liquids Extracted in California (Thousand Barrels) California Onshore Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted in California (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

6

California Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) California Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

7

No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A no loss liquid natural gas (LNG) delivery system is described comprising: (a) means for storing LNG and natural gas at low pressure; (b) means for delivering LNG from the means for storing to a use device including means for sub-cooling the LNG; (c) means for pre-cooling the means for sub-cooling before the LNG is delivered to the use device to substantially reduce vaporization of the initial LNG delivered to the use device; and (d) means for delivering a selectable quantity of the natural gas in said storing means to said use device with the LNG.

Gustafson, K.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

8

No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a no loss fueling station for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a use device such as a motor vehicle. It comprises: a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and gas head; means for delivering LNG to the pressure building tank; means for selectively building the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for selectively reducing the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for controlling the pressure building and pressure reducing means to maintain a desired pressure in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and means for delivering the LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

Cieslukowski, R.E.

1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Natural Gas Extraction & Delivery in the United Statesy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

delivery to large end-users? 6. How does natural gas power generation compare to coal-fired powerLife Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Natural Gas Extraction & Delivery in the United Statesy of natural gas in the United States? 3. Who uses natural gas in the U.S.? 4 Wh d t l f ?4. Where does natural

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

10

California Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in California (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's NA -...

11

The Extraction of Gasoline from Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the quantitative estimation of the condensable gasoline consti- tuents of so-called rtwetn natural gas» Three general lines of experimentation suggested themselves after a preliminary study of the problem. These were the separation of a liqui- fied sample... fractionation of a mixture of natural gases are, however, not available in the ordinary laboratory, so this method altho successful and accurate is hardly practical. Even after the fractionation of the gas has ^lebeau and Damiens in Chen. Abstr. 7, 1356...

Schroeder, J. P.

1914-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

U.S. Natural Gas Extraction Loss (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 79 79 77 73 77 74 76 77 74 76 75 78 1974 79 72 78 73 76 71 75 74 72 73 71 74 1975 77 71 75 73 73 71 73 73 70 71 70 75 1976 75 71 73 69 72 70 72 70 67 70 70 75 1977 75 72 75 71 73 71 72 71 69 70 69 74 1978 74 70 75 71 71 69 72 71 67 70 69 73 1979 70 65 69 67 68 65 66 67 65 67 68 72 1980 70 66 70 64 65 61 62 61 61 63 64 69 1981 68 61 67 65 66 63 65 66 61 64 61 67 1982 71 65 69 65 64 62 63 61 59 60 61 62 1983 72 64 66 62 62 60 63 66 64 68 68 75 1984 79 69 71 69 69 67 69 68 65 69 68 74 1985 77 70 71 66 66 63 65 65 64 66 66 75 1986 76 67 71 64 65 63 64 67 63 64 62 70

13

Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from respiratory surfaces.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3477 Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from of gas exchange, both within and among species (Lighton, 1998; Shelton and Appel, 2001; Chown, 2002). The classical pattern is that of discontinuous gas exchange, or discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC; Lighton

Franz, Nico M.

14

Shale-gas extraction faces growing public and regulatory challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two federal agencies are scrutinizing the shale-gas industry and its use of “fracking ” but gas producers insist that state regulators provide sufficient environmental oversight.

David Kramer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Modeling of Gas Extraction from Closed Coal Mines C. Lagny & Z. Pokryszka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of Gas Extraction from Closed Coal Mines C. Lagny & Z. Pokryszka Direction des risques du gas flow rate. Validations were made for several years. This model is able to evaluate firedamp of indus- trial gas drainage from the surface. In this aim, a specific mathematical model has been

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

16

Supercritical Fluid Extraction as a Cleanup Technique for Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Pesticides in Wool Wax  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical Fluid Extraction as a Cleanup Technique for Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Pesticides in Wool Wax ... Wool wax is the lipid secreted by the sebaceous glands of sheep and is recovered during the scouring of raw wool. ...

F. William Jones

1997-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

17

Characterization of Solidified Gas Thin Film Targets via Alpha Particle Energy Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is reported for measuring the thickness and uniformity of thin films of solidified gas targets. The energy of alpha particles traversing the film is measured and the energy loss is converted to thickness using the stopping power. The uniformity is determined by measuring the thickness at different positions with an array of sources. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to study the film deposition mechanism. Thickness calibrations for a TRIUMF solid hydrogen target system are presented.

MUH collaboration; M. C. Fujiwara; G. A. Beer; J. L. Beveridge; J. L. Douglas; T. M. Huber; R. Jacot-Guillarmod; S. K. Kim; P. E. Knowles; A. R. Kunselman; M. Maier; G. M. Marshall; G. R. Mason; F. Mulhauser; A. Olin; C. Petitjean; T. A. Porcelli; J. Zmeskal

1996-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

18

A study of natural gas extraction in Marcellus shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the dramatic increases in crude oil prices there has been a need to find reliable energy substitutions. One substitution that has been used in the United States is natural gas. However, with the increased use of natural ...

Boswell, Zachary (Zachary Karol)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Report Title: The Economic Impact of Oil and Gas Extraction in New Mexico Type of Report: Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Title: The Economic Impact of Oil and Gas Extraction in New Mexico Type of Report: Technical of oil and gas extraction in New Mexico are presented in terms of output, value added, employment presented. Historical oil and gas production, reserves, and price data are also presented and discussed. #12

Johnson, Eric E.

20

Offshore gas conservation utilizing a turbo-expander based refrigeration extraction cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas associated with the crude produced from Occidental's Piper Field is conserved by drying it and condensing out the heavier components. This renders the gas with water and hydrocarbon dew points acceptable for transfer to St. Fergus via Total's Frigg Field Pipeline. A process which includes a turbo expander/compressor is used to extract the condensate which is spiked into the crude pipeline for eventual recovery as liquid product and fuel gas at Flotta. The turbo expander can extract 30% more condensate than a simple Joule-Thompson expansion. Gas transferred to St. Fergus is 80% methane with a net calorific value of 1000 btu/scf and a water dew point of -20 F at 1700 psig.

Ross, I.; Robinson, T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Mass-loss rates and dust-to-gas ratios for obscured Asymptotic Giant Branch stars of different metallicities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mass-loss rates and dust-to-gas ratios of obscured Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are investigated for samples with different initial metallicities: in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC & LMC) and in the Milky Way. The properties of their circumstellar envelopes can be explained in a consistent way if, both for obscured M-type AGB stars and for obscured carbon stars, the total (gas+dust) mass-loss rate depends only weakly on initial metallicity whilst the dust-to-gas ratio depends approximately linearly on initial metallicity.

Jacco Th. van Loon

1999-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364 ): 271...13 Boyer EW ( 2012 ) The Impact of Marcellus Gas Drilling on Rural Drinking Water Supplies...the Nicholas School of the Environment and Center on Global Change...derived from depositional environments that ranged from proposed...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Pseudophakic glaucoma and vision loss after clear lens extraction for high myopia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A myopic 44-year-old man was treated with bilateral clear lens extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. A year later, the patient noted decreased vision in the right eye and was diagnose...

John S. King MD; W. Brad Priester MD; Peter A. Netland MD; PhD

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The dependence of extracted current on discharge gas pressure in neutral beam ion sources on HL-2A tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discharge gas pressure is a key factor to influence the extracted current of ion source. In this paper, the dependence of extracted current on discharge gas pressure was investigated in detail at different arc discharge currents. The discharge gas pressure with a very broad range (0.1 Pa-2.7 Pa) was scanned for the first time. It is turned out that, with the increasing of discharge gas pressure, the extracted current increases and the arc voltage decreases at different arc currents; however, when the discharge gas pressure exceeds a certain value, the extracted current decreases. For the same discharge gas pressure, the higher the arc current, the higher the arc voltage and the extracted current are. The arc efficiency was also calculated, and its dependence on gas pressure was almost the same with the dependence of extracted current on gas pressure, but at the same discharge gas pressure, the lower the arc current, the higher the arc efficiency is and the lower the extracted current is.

Wei, H. L.; Cao, J. Y.; Rao, J.; Lei, G. J.; Jiang, S. F.; Liu, H.; Yu, L. M.; Xie, W. M.; Li, M.; Yang, X. F.; Zou, G. Q.; Lu, D. L.; Duan, X. R. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 ( 30...hydraulically fractured shale to aquifers . Ground Water 50...constitute the two primary aquifer li- thologies in northeastern...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Pennsylvania, Texas, and North Dakota. In addition to predrilling...Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Middle Devonian of eastern North America . Palaeogeogr Palaeoclimatol...Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Kerr RA ( 2010 ) Energy. Natural gas from...1626 . 3 US Energy Information Administration...March 2013 (US Energy Information Administration...Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk...isotopes in Icelandic geothermal systems. 1. He-3...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Social impacts of earthquakes caused by gas extraction in the Province of Groningen, The Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas extraction from the Groningen gasfield in the northern Netherlands has led to localised earthquakes which are projected to become more severe. The social impacts experienced by local residents include: damage to property; declining house prices; concerns about the chance of dykes breaking; feelings of anxiety and insecurity; health issues; and anger. These social and emotional impacts are exacerbated by the increasing distrust Groningen people have towards the national government and the gas company, NAM, a partnership between Shell and ExxonMobil. The earthquakes have reopened discussions about the distribution of benefits from gas production and the extent to which benefits are retained locally. Mitigation of the impacts is attempted, but the lack of trust decreases the effectiveness of the mitigation measures. The extent of this experience of previously-unforeseen, unanticipated impacts suggests that a new social and environmental impact assessment needs to be undertaken, and a new Social Impact Management Plan (SIMP) and Impacts and Benefits Agreement (IBA) developed, so that the project can regain its legitimacy and social licence to operate. In addition to conventional gas, this paper has wider relevance for unconventional gas developments, for example shale gas extraction by hydraulic fracturing methods (fracking).

Nick van der Voort; Frank Vanclay

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Conversion of lean oil absorption process to extraction process for conditioning natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an absorption process for the removal of C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from a natural gas stream by absorbing the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons with a lean oil to produce a residue gas stream of pipeline quality and a rich oil from which the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons are recovered, this patent describes the improvement which comprises providing the capability, of selectively extracting the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from the gas stream with a lean preferential physical solvent according to the maximum recoveries and to the selected degrees of (a) ethane in amounts ranging up to 95%, (b) propane in amounts ranging up to 100%, (c) butane in amounts ranging up to 100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100% by: A. selecting an absorber plant, which is used for recovering maximum quantities of the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from the gas stream while using lean oils as solvent for the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons; B. selecting a preferential physical solvent which is selective for ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components of the gas stream ; C. replacing the oils in the selected absorber plant with a selected volume of the selected preferential physical solvent; and D. while using the equipment in extraction mode, contacting the gas stream with the lean preferential physical solvent at a selected flow rate within the range of 0.001-0.5 gallon of lean solvent per standard cubic foot of the gas stream to produce a residue gas stream of pipeline specifications and a rich solvent stream containing the ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components.

Mehra, Y.R.

1987-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

30

The extraction of nuclear sea quark distribution and energy loss effect in Drell-Yan experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The next-to-leading order and leading order analysis are performed on the differential cross section ratio from Drell-Yan process. It is found that the effect of next-to-leading order corrections can be negligible on the differential cross section ratios as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and the target nuclei for the current Fermilab and future lower beam proton energy. The nuclear Drell-Yan reaction is an ideal tool to study the energy loss of the fast quark moving through cold nuclei. In the leading order analysis, the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the Fermilab E866 experimental data on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios as a function of the momentum fraction of the target parton. It is shown that the quark energy loss effect has significant impact on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios. The nuclear Drell-Yan experiment at current Fermilab and future lower energy proton beam can not provide us with more information on the nuclear sea quark distribution.

Chun-Gui Duan; Na Liu; Zhan-Yuan Yan

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

Gas Spring Losses in Linear Clearance Seal Compressors P.B. Bailey, M.W. Dadd, J.S. Reed*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Gas Spring Losses in Linear Clearance Seal Compressors P.B. Bailey, M.W. Dadd, J.S. Reed* , C. Stevenage, U.K. Thomas M. Davis Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB, New Mexico, U.S.A ABSTRACT investigations on conventional crank driven reciprocating compressors, where the use of normal sliding seals

32

Heat loss reduction and hydrocarbon combustion in ultra-micro combustors for ultra-micro gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the development of ultra-micro combustors for Ultra-Micro Gas Turbines (UMGT), heat loss reduction and hydrocarbon fuel use are the key issues. An approach for reducing the effect of heat loss in ultra-micro combustors was proposed. The heat loss ratio (HLR), which was defined as the ratio of heat loss rate from a combustor to heat release rate in the combustor, was related to the space heating rate (SHR), and experiments using some flat-flame ultra-micro combustors with hydrogen/air premixture exhibited the relation of HLR ? SHR?0.92/? (?, characteristic length of combustor). From the viewpoint of heat loss reduction, burning at high SHR in compact ultra-micro combustors is essential for a practical UMGT combustor. As for hydrocarbon combustion, the flat-flame burning method with and without catalyst was applied to propane fuel. The flat-flame combustor, having an inner diameter of 18.5 mm, a height of 3.5 mm, and a volume of 0.806 cm3, could form a propane flame successfully in the chamber without a catalyst and achieved an extremely high SHR of 3370 MW/(MPa m3). Flame stable region was wide enough, and the combustion efficiency achieved was more than 99.4% between the equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 0.7 at m ? a = 0.06 g / s . The flat-flame combustor using a Pt-impregnated porous plate showed catalytic combustion, but did not improve the combustion characteristic. On the other hand, the flat-flame combustor using a nozzle whose surface was covered with Pt showed a combination of catalytic and gas-phase combustion with improved combustion efficiency for a wider range of equivalence ratios, due to CO oxidation in the burned gas after gas-phase combustion in the chamber.

Takashi Sakurai; Saburo Yuasa; Taku Honda; Shoko Shimotori

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Autonomous gas chromatograph system for Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES) proof of concept demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An autonomous gas chromatograph system was designed and built to support the Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES) demonstration. TEVES is a remediation demonstration that seeks to enhance an existing technology (vacuum extraction) by adding a new technology (soil heating). A pilot scale unit was set up at one of the organic waste disposal pits at the Sandia National Laboratories Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) in Tech Area 3. The responsibility for engineering a major part of the process instrumentation for TEVES belonged to the Manufacturing Control Subsystems Department. The primary mission of the one-of-a-kind hardware/software system is to perform on-site gas sampling and analysis to quantify a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from various sources during TEVES operations. The secondary mission is to monitor a variety of TEVES process physical parameters such as extraction manifold temperature, pressure, humidity, and flow rate, and various subsurface pressures. The system began operation in September 1994 and was still in use on follow-on projects when this report was published.

Peter, F.J.; Laguna, G.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Manufacturing Control Subsystems Dept.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

NO gas loss from biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This is an important quantity, especially if one wants to compare SID using various surfaces with gas-phase collisional- internal energy (T-V) conversion was 17% for the octadecanethiolate monolayer and 28% for the 2 projectiles, though they indicate somewhat higher energy conversion. In addition, excitation of the projectile

Barger, Nichole

35

Method and apparatus for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

Farthing, William Earl (Pinson, AL) [Pinson, AL; Felix, Larry Gordon (Pelham, AL) [Pelham, AL; Snyder, Todd Robert (Birmingham, AL) [Birmingham, AL

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

36

Method and apparatus maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

Farthing, William Earl (Pinson, AL); Felix, Larry Gordon (Pelham, AL); Snyder, Todd Robert (Birmingham, AL)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Organic substances in produced and formation water from unconventional natural gas extraction in coal and shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic substances in produced and formation water from coalbed methane (CBM) and gas shale plays from across the USA were examined in this study. Disposal of produced waters from gas extraction in coal and shale is an important environmental issue because of the large volumes of water involved and the variable quality of this water. Organic substances in produced water may be environmentally relevant as pollutants, but have been little studied. Results from five CBM plays and two gas shale plays (including the Marcellus Shale) show a myriad of organic chemicals present in the produced and formation water. Organic compound classes present in produced and formation water in CBM plays include: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic compounds, alkyl phenols, aromatic amines, alkyl aromatics (alkyl benzenes, alkyl biphenyls), long-chain fatty acids, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Concentrations of individual compounds range from CBM samples) range from 50 to 100 ?g/L. Total dissolved organic carbon (TOC) in CBM produced water is generally in the 1–4 mg/L range. Excursions from this general pattern in produced waters from individual wells arise from contaminants introduced by production activities (oils, grease, adhesives, etc.). Organic substances in produced and formation water from gas shale unimpacted by production chemicals have a similar range of compound classes as CBM produced water, and TOC levels of about 8 mg/L. However, produced water from the Marcellus Shale using hydraulic fracturing has TOC levels as high as 5500 mg/L and a range of added organic chemicals including, solvents, biocides, scale inhibitors, and other organic chemicals at levels of 1000 s of ?g/L for individual compounds. Levels of these hydraulic fracturing chemicals and TOC decrease rapidly over the first 20 days of water recovery and some level of residual organic contaminants remain up to 250 days after hydraulic fracturing. Although the environmental impacts of the organics in produced water are not well defined, results suggest that care should be exercised in the disposal and release of produced waters containing these organic substances into the environment because of the potential toxicity of many of these substances.

William Orem; Calin Tatu; Matthew Varonka; Harry Lerch; Anne Bates; Mark Engle; Lynn Crosby; Jennifer McIntosh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Impact of using high-density polyethylene geomembrane layer as landfill intermediate cover on landfill gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Clay is widely used as a traditional cover material for landfills. As clay becomes increasingly costly and scarce, and it also reduces the storage capacity of landfills, alternative materials with low hydraulic conductivity are employed. In developing countries such as China, landfill gas (LFG) is usually extracted for utilization during filling stage, therefore, the intermediate covering system is an important part in a landfill. In this study, a field test of LFG extraction was implemented under the condition of using high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane layer as the only intermediate cover on the landfill. Results showed that after welding the HDPE geomembranes together to form a whole airtight layer upon a larger area of landfill, the gas flow in the general pipe increased 25% comparing with the design that the HDPE geomembranes were not welded together, which means that the gas extraction ability improved. However as the heat isolation capacity of the HDPE geomembrane layer is low, the gas generation ability of a shallow landfill is likely to be weakened in cold weather. Although using HDPE geomembrane layer as intermediate cover is acceptable in practice, the management and maintenance of it needs to be investigated in order to guarantee its effective operation for a long term.

Zezhi Chen; Huijuan Gong; Mengqun Zhang; Weili Wu; Yu Liu; Jin Feng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The influence of quark energy loss on extracting nuclear sea quark distribution from nuclear Drell-Yan experimental data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By means of two typical kinds of quark energy loss parametrization and the nuclear parton distributions determined only with lepton-nuclear deep inelastic scattering experimental data, a leading order analysis are performed on the proton-induced Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios of tungsten versus deuterium as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and target nuclei. It is found that the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the experimental data. The quark energy loss effect produce approximately 3% to 11% suppression on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios $R_{W/D}$ in the range $0.05\\leq x_2\\leq0.3$. The application of nuclear Drell-Yan data with heavy targets is remarkably subject to difficulty in the constraints of the nuclear sea-quark distribution.

Duan Chun-Gui; Liu Na

2008-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

40

Determination of O6-Butylguanine in DNA by Immunoaffinity Extraction/Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high resolution gas chromatography...chromatography; GC. gas chromatography...30 min under a dry nitrogen atmosphere. After...10 ml of distilled water, which was pooled...possible concentration. gas chromatography...their very low buffer solubility, O6MeG, guanosine...

Marina Bonfanti; Cinzia Magagnotti; Alessandra Galli; Renzo Bagnati; Massimo Moret; Pierluigi Gariboldi; Roberto Fanelli; and Luisa Airoldi

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Screening of Pesticides via Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......concentration is carried out with gas chromatography. Two columns...in the agricultural production of the province of Tucum...Bellefonte, PA). An HP 5890 gas chromatograph equipped...important for safety and cost in this kind of analysis...capil- lary-column gas chromatography/mass......

Atilio Sosa; Argelia Lenardón; Maria Liliana Mattassini

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Automation of Solid-Phase Microextraction-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Extraction of Eucalyptus Volatiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Eucalyptus metabolism Gas Chromatography-Mass...SPME) coupled with gas chromatography (GC...processes involved in the production, emission, and effects...Solid-Phase Microextraction Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry...significant savings in time and cost could be realized. In......

Cláudia A. Zini; III; Heather Lord; Eva Christensen; Teotônio F. de Assis; Elina B. Caramão; Janusz Pawliszyn

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A3. Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Natural Gas Processed and Liquids Extracted at Natural Gas Processing Plants by State, 1996 Table Plant Location Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants a (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted b (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss (million cubic feet) State Production Out of State Production Natural Gas Processed Alabama..................................... 111,656 1,212 112,868 4,009 5,361 Alaska ........................................ 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 Arkansas.................................... 214,868 4,609 219,477 383 479 California.................................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 Colorado .................................... 493,748 215 493,963 16,735 23,362 Florida........................................ 5,900 2,614 8,514 1,630 1,649 Illinois.........................................

44

A comparative analysis of Shale Gas Extraction Policy : potential lessons for South Africa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Since its arrival onto the U.S. energy scene in the early 2000s, shale gas has had a significant impact on the global energy… (more)

Roberts, Judith Ashleigh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Gas chromatographic studies of the solvent extraction systems—III: Tris-butoxyethyl phosphate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic data at infinite dilution is evaluated from gas chromatography measurements using the theories of the athermal, thermal and associated solutions. A number of binary tris-butoxyethyl phosphate-diluent systems are analysed. The diluents include hexane, cyclohexane, benzene, toluene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, acetone, dioxane, methanol, ethanol and water.

A. Apelblat

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Barium Ion Extraction and Identification from Laser Induced Fluorescence in Gas for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is increasingly interested in neutrinoless double beta decay. A potential measurement of the decay rate would neutrinoless double beta decay experiments, especially if the neutrino mass is low. This thesis describes three of a gas phase detector for a neutrinoless double beta decay measurement. It has been determined

Wechsler, Risa H.

47

Improving engine efficiency by extracting laser energy from hot exhaust gas RID A-1272-2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the mth cycle is determined by populations pb 3 and pc 3 , the final state is determined by populations @pb31k(pb31pc3)#/2 and (1 2k)(pb31pc3) ~see Fig. 6!. The weight parameter k is deter- mined by the Boltzmann distribution k 12k5e 2ebc /kT3... . ~8! The steady-state conditions are pb 3 5 1 2 @pb31k~pb31pc3!# , ~9! where g is the atom-field coupling constant, t is the interac- tion time of the atom with the cavity field, C is the cavity loss parameter, and n? th is the average number...

Rostovtsev, Y. V.; Matsko, A. B.; Nayak, N.; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Scully, Marlan O.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Influence of the gap-target configuration on the measured energy loss of C-ions in Ar-gas and -plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma targets for measuring energy loss and charge state distribution of heavy ions in non-ideal Ar-plasmas ( ? -parameters 0.55–1.5) have been developed and the interaction with several ion species, C, Ar, Xe at 5.9 MeV / u , was studied. Here the results for 5.9 MeV / u C-ions are presented which have been understood just recently by considering the gas dynamics in the target due to the special configuration with the gap interaction zone for the plasma, which can be also simulated by the VarJet code.

K. Weyrich; H. Wahl; A. Golubev; A. Kantsyrev; M. Kulish; S. Dudin; D.H.H. Hoffmann; B. Sharkov; V. Mintsev

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Microbial Community Changes in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Produced Water from Shale Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial communities associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing are not well understood, and their deleterious activity can lead to significant increases in production costs and adverse environmental impacts. In this study, we compared the microbial ecology in prefracturing fluids (fracturing source water and fracturing fluid) and produced water at multiple time points from a natural gas well in southwestern Pennsylvania using 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and quantitative PCR. The majority of the bacterial community in prefracturing fluids constituted aerobic species affiliated with the class Alphaproteobacteria. However, their relative abundance decreased in produced water with an increase in halotolerant, anaerobic/facultative anaerobic species affiliated with the classes Clostridia, Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Bacteroidia, and Fusobacteria. Produced water collected at the last time point (day 187) consisted almost entirely of sequences similar to Clostridia and showed a decrease in bacterial abundance by 3 orders of magnitude compared to the prefracturing fluids and produced water samplesfrom earlier time points. Geochemical analysis showed that produced water contained higher concentrations of salts and total radioactivity compared to prefracturing fluids. This study provides evidence of long-term subsurface selection of the microbial community introduced through hydraulic fracturing, which may include significant implications for disinfection as well as reuse of produced water in future fracturing operations.

Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Bibby, Kyle J.; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

Multi-scale approach to the modeling of fission gas discharge during hypothetical loss-of-flow accident in gen-IV sodium fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The required technological and safety standards for future Gen IV Reactors can only be achieved if advanced simulation capabilities become available, which combine high performance computing with the necessary level of modeling detail and high accuracy of predictions. The purpose of this paper is to present new results of multi-scale three-dimensional (3D) simulations of the inter-related phenomena, which occur as a result of fuel element heat-up and cladding failure, including the injection of a jet of gaseous fission products into a partially blocked Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) coolant channel, and gas/molten sodium transport along the coolant channels. The computational approach to the analysis of the overall accident scenario is based on using two different inter-communicating computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) codes: a CFD code, PHASTA, and a RANS code, NPHASE-CMFD. Using the geometry and time history of cladding failure and the gas injection rate, direct numerical simulations (DNS), combined with the Level Set method, of two-phase turbulent flow have been performed by the PHASTA code. The model allows one to track the evolution of gas/liquid interfaces at a centimeter scale. The simulated phenomena include the formation and breakup of the jet of fission products injected into the liquid sodium coolant. The PHASTA outflow has been averaged over time to obtain mean phasic velocities and volumetric concentrations, as well as the liquid turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence dissipation rate, all of which have served as the input to the core-scale simulations using the NPHASE-CMFD code. A sliding window time averaging has been used to capture mean flow parameters for transient cases. The results presented in the paper include testing and validation of the proposed models, as well the predictions of fission-gas/liquid-sodium transport along a multi-rod fuel assembly of SFR during a partial loss-of-flow accident. (authors)

Behafarid, F.; Shaver, D. R. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Bolotnov, I. A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Jansen, K. E. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Antal, S. P.; Podowski, M. Z. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Natural Gas Annual 2010 (NGA) - With Data for 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Natural Gas Annual With Data for 2010 | Release Date: December 29, 2011 | Next Release: December 29, 2012 | full report Data Tablesall tables Overview 1 Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States PDF CSV 2 Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State PDF CSV Supplies 3 Gross Withdrawals and Marketed Production of Natural Gas by State and the Gulf of Mexico PDF CSV 4 Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas by State and the Gulf of Mexico PDF CSV 5 Number of Producing Gas Wells by State and the Gulf of Mexico PDF CSV 6 Wellhead Value and Marketed Production of Natural Gas, and by State PDF CSV 7 Natural Gas Processed, Liquids Extracted, and Estimated Extraction Loss by State PDF CSV

52

Determination of Pentachlorophenol Residue in Meat and Fish by Gas Chromatography–Electron Capture Detection and Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry with Accelerated Solvent Extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......soil (3-4), water (5-7), fish...determined by gas-liquid chromatography...the increasing solubility of analytes at...chromatographically pure grade. Water used in all experiments...methanol (3 mL) and water (3 mL). All...under a stream of nitrogen at 45C. Derivatization...Shimadzu-2010 gas chromatograph......

Dongmei Zhao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Analysis of Unknown Organic Pollutants in Sewage by Solid-Phase Extraction Combined with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......used. The carrier gas was nitrogen with a flow rate...of ultrapurified water solutions containing...gentle stream of nitrogen to 50 L for GCMS...Helium was the carrier gas at a flow rate of...that it has a better solubility for a wider range......

Hong Gao; Ting Zhao; Qin Kong; Xingguo Chen; Zhide Hu

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Independents' group posts loss  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low oil gas prices and special charges caused the group of 50 U.S. independent producers Oil and Gas Journal tracks to post a combined loss in first half 1992. The group logged a net loss of $53 million in the first half compared with net earnings of $354 million in first half 1991, when higher oil prices during the Persian Gulf crisis buoyed earnings in spite of crude oil and natural gas production declines. The combined loss in the first half follows a 45% drop in the group's earnings in 1991 and compares with the OGJ group of integrated oil companies whose first half 1992 income fell 47% from the prior year. Special charges, generally related to asset writedowns, accounted for most of the almost $560 million in losses posted by about the third of the group. Nerco Oil and Gas Inc., Vancouver, Wash., alone accounted for almost half that total with charges related to an asset writedown of $238 million in the first quarter. Despite the poor first half performance, the outlook is bright for sharply improved group earnings in the second half, assuming reasonably healthy oil and gas prices and increased production resulting from acquisitions and in response to those prices.

Sanders, V.; Price, R.B.

1992-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100’s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

56

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

57

Optical remote monitoring of CH/sub 4/ gas using low-loss optical fiber link and InGaAsP light-emitting diode in 1. 33-. mu. m region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purely optical remote monitoring of low-level CH/sub 4/ gas is realized for the first time by the method employing a 2-km long-distance, low-loss silica optical fiber link and a compact absorption cell in conjunction with a high radiant InGaAsP light-emitting diode (LED) at 1.33 ..mu..m. Based on the present experiment, the detection limit of CH/sub 4/ in air was confirmed to be approximately 2000 ppm, i.e., 4% of the lower explosion limit of CH/sub 4/. This result supports the conclusion that the fully optical remote sensing system incorporating ultralow loss optical fiber networks and near infrared LEDs or laser diodes can be extensively used for the detection and surveillance of various inflammable and/or explosive gases in industrial and mining complexes as well as in residential areas.

Chan, K.; Ito, H.; Inaba, H.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Isolation and Recovery of 2-Aminoethanol, N-Methyl-2-Aminoethanol, and N,N-Dimethyl-2-Aminoethanol from a Copper Amine Aqueous Matrix and from Amine-Treated Sawdust Using Liquid—Liquid Extraction and Liquid—Solid Extraction Combined with Capillary Gas Chromatography—Ion-Trap Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......LLE of the spiked water and aqueous copper...resulted from loss of a water molecule and the...ence of oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide...impurities in our carrier gas. Given this mass...AE dissolved in water, the following base...Polarity Density* Solubility in water Solvent......

Paul R. Loconto; Yanlyang Pan; Donatien-Pa Kamdem

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Dispersive micro-solid phase extraction combined with gas chromatography–chemical ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of N-nitrosamines in swimming pool water samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple sample pretreatment technique, dispersive micro-solid phase extraction, was applied for the extraction of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and other four N-nitrosamines (NAs) from samples of swimming pool w...

Ssu-Chieh Fu; Shin-Hwa Tzing; Hsin-Chang Chen…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evaluating Transformer Losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and replacing them with low loss units. Today few industrials evaluate losses on either power or distribution transformers. TRANSFORMER LOSSES Transformer losses are divided 'nto load losses and no-load losses. Load losses are due to the winding resista... therefore are a function of the load squared. No-load losses occur from energizing the transformer steel and fore are continuous regardless of the transformer load. TRANSFORMER DESIGN Both types of losses are a fun ce here ion of design. If losses...

Grun, R. L. Jr.

62

Reduction of Hydrocarbon Losses to Flare Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

merit consideration because the losses and associated economic penalties are assumed to be small. Flare gas flow is not easily measured and as a result, most plants are unaware of how much product they are actually losing during normal operation...

Page, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 5 5 4 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 5 5 5 5 4 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 5 5 5 5 4 Extraction Loss...............................................

64

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 96  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Iowa, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

65

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

66

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

67

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

68

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

69

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

70

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

71

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 6 5 5 5 5 Total............................................................... 6 5 5 5 5 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 6 5 5 5 5 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

72

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 132  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Carolina, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

73

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

74

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

75

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 70  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year . 9 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 443 331 233 611 654 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * * Total.............................................................. 443 331 233 611 655 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production...................................... 443 331 233 611 655 Extraction Loss .............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

76

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 124  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

77

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

78

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

79

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 104  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 46. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

80

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 92  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Illinois, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 240 251 316 316 316 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 169 165 E 161 E 165 E 164 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 Total............................................................... 174 170 E 166 E 170 E 169 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 174 E 170 E 166 E 170 E 169 Extraction Loss...............................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 164  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year..... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0

82

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 106  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 7 7 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 48 34 46 48 35 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 48 34 46 48 35 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 48 34 46 48 35 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

83

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 144  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

84

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

85

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 15 15 15 14 18 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 731 467 454 621 409 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 731 467 454 621 409 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 731 467 454 621 409 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0

86

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 164  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year..... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss..................................................

87

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

88

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 82  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

89

Handling Food and Supplies during Power Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ER-017 6-06 Loss of electricity or gas commonly occurs during storms or other natural disasters. However, power loss may continue for weeks after the storm has passed, especially if an area has been damaged by floods or high winds. If you...

Anding, Jenna

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Oil and Gas Conservation (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Parts 1 and 2 of this chapter contain a broad range of regulations pertaining to oil and gas conservation, including requirements for the regulation of oil and gas exploration and extraction by the...

91

Influence assessment of landfill gas pumping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Changes in CH4 gas concentrations arising in a landfill as a consequence of a number of gas extraction pumping rates, are characterized. The field-monitored results indicate a fairly free flow of gas through the ...

Edward A. McBean; Anthony J. Crutcher; Frank A. Rovers

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Loan Loss Reserve Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Loan Loss Reserve Agreement, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

93

Memory Loss Chapter 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II Memory Loss 129 #12;#12;Chapter 6 Generalized Conditionalization Up to this point we have to help CLF model two types of certainty-loss stories: stories in- volving memory loss and stories-sensitivity, (PEP) does almost no work in modeling stories involving memory loss. So we will proceed in stages: We

Fitelson, Branden

94

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal mining, petroleum extraction and refining, coking, andCoal Mining and Dressing Petroleum and Natural Gas Extraction Petroleum Processing, Coking andCoal Mining and Dressing Petroleum and Natural Gas Extraction Petroleum Processing, Coking and

Kahrl, Fredrich James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

96

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

98

Evaluation of Heat Losses in Fire Tube Boiler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract – The efficiency of oil fired fire tube boiler was calculated by evaluating the heat losses. Investigation on the performance of the boiler was conducted by examining the heat losses, identifying the reasons for losses, measuring the individual loss and developing a strategy for loss reduction. This study was carried out in Texmaco package horizontal fire tube boiler at Travancore Titanium Products Ltd (TTPL), Trivandrum, Kerala. The boiler efficiency was measured by indirect method. Heat losses in dry flue gas and due to unburned fuel were found to be the major problems. Since they were interrelated, installation of Zirconium oxygen sensor was recommended as a common remedy.

S. Krishnanunni; Josephkunju Paul C; Mathu Potti; Ernest Markose Mathew

99

DNA Extraction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DNA Extraction DNA Extraction Being able to extract deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is important for a number of reasons. By studying DNA, scientists can identify genetic disorders or diseases, and they can also possibly find cures for them by manipulating or experimenting with this DNA. At the Laboratory, researchers have studied DNA to detect biothreat agents in environmental and forensic samples. Scientists also are studying how human DNA may be destroyed by certain types of electromagnetic waves at certain frequencies. Classroom Activity: This activity is about the extraction of DNA from strawberries. Strawberries are a great fruit to use for this lesson because each student can work on his or her own. Strawberries are recommended because they yield more DNA than any other fruit. Strawberries are octoploid, which means that they have eight copies of each

100

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of particles energy loss generation of electron-ion+ pairs #12;Gas Filled Detectors Primary and Total Ionization fast charged particles ionize the atoms of a gas fraction of resulting primary electrons have enough kinetic energy to ionize other atoms #12;Gas Filled

Peletier, Reynier

102

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 4  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Algeria Nigeria Qatar Malaysia Oman Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 23.5 0.7 0.1 3.7 3.700 0.439 0.097 0.008 0.003 0.002 0.009 0.305 0.358 0.065 18.1 0.9 3.1 3.1 1.7 4.8 3.1 6.7 0.02 5.9 Egypt 0.073 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Monthly and Annual

103

Coal extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is extracted using a mixed solvent which includes a substantially aromatic component and a substantially naphthenic component, at a temperature of 400/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/C. Although neither component is an especially good solvent for coal by itself, the use of mixed solvent gives greater flexibility to the process and offers efficiency gains.

Clarke, J.W.; Kimber, G.M.; Rantell, T.D.; Snape, C.E.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

104

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

105

Hydraulic fracturing and shale gas extraction.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the past decade the technique of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has been improved so much that it has become a cost effective method… (more)

Klein, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

An Empirical Analysis of Gas Well Design and Pumping Tests for Retrofitting Landfill Gas Collection.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Retrofitting a landfill with a gas collection system is an expensive and time consuming endeavor. Such an undertaking usually consists of longer-term extraction testing programs… (more)

Stevens, Derek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Florida, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 2,000 Total............................................................... 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 2,000 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 387 402 337 304 E 222 Marketed Production ...................................... 3,087 3,123 2,616 2,540 1,778 Extraction Loss...............................................

108

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

109

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

110

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

111

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

112

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

113

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

114

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

115

Beam-Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Gas and Thermal Photon Scattering in the NLC Main Linac as a Source of Beam Halo P. Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0051 12-JAN-2001 Abstract Scattering of primary beam electrons off of residual gas molecules or blackbody radiation photons in the NLC main linac has been identified as a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated in the beam delivery system. We consider the contributions from four scat- tering mechanisms: inelastic thermal-photon scattering, elastic beam-gas (Coulomb) scattering inelastic beam-gas (Bremsstrahlung) scattering, and atomic-electron scattering. In each case we develop the formalism necessary to estimate the backgrounds generated in the main linac, and determine the expected number of off-energy or large-amplitude particles from each process, assuming a main linac injection energy of 8 GeV and extraction energy of 500 GeV. 1 Introduction The

116

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Catalogue of a Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalogue of a Loss is a collection of sixty-two prose poems written within the past year and half. The work is printed on 4x6 cards. Each poem may be read individually from a single card or the poems can be read in ...

Berger, Larisa (Larisa A.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Mixed Integer Model Predictive Control of Multiple Shale Gas Wells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Horizontal wells with multistage hydraulic fracturing are today the most important drilling technology for shale gas extraction. Considered unprofitable before, the production has now… (more)

Nordsveen, Espen T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Soil loss: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The earth's soil budget is analysed and the causes of loss and degeneration are described. The main efforts to solve the problems of soil los should be concentrated on: 1. (i) the preparation of international guidelines for conservation policy; 2. (ii) declaration of an International Soil Conservation Decade; 3. (iii) acceleration of and support for land assessment; 4. (iv) development of national planning for alternative land uses; 5. (v) research to establish ecologically sound policies for land use and conservation.

V.A. Kovda

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

122

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

DOE Gas Hydrate R&D: Shale Gas Déjà Vu?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

More than 30 years ago, DOE looked into the future and saw the potentially large benefit of developing promising but difficult-to-extract unconventional natural gas resources, particularly those from shale formations. As a result, it began sponsoring research and development (R&D), partnering with industry and academia, and, among other things, invested about $137 million in the Eastern Gas Shale Program between 1978 and 1992.

124

Axial power loss along open field lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies are underway to evaluate the linear mirror geometry as a candidate for a high-fluence, neutron irradiation facility. This steady-state, low-Q design is currently perceived to comprise a two-component plasma driven by neutral beams with mirror confinement of the hot ions and with no electrostatic axial reduction in the warm ion end losses. Warm-ion fueling and end-wall power density will require substantial cold plasma exterior to the mirror cell and neutral gas near the end wall. In this paper, we evaluate to what extent the loss power parallel to the axial magnetic field along open field lines is a function of the escaping plasma and end-wall parameters. By allowing the source power to depend directly on the plasma density and electron temperature, several new conclusions may be pertinent to closed field-line geometries with open field-line divertors.

Correll, D.L.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Wyoming-Colorado Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2012 2013 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 69,827 75,855 2012-2013 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 5,481 5,903 2012-2013 NGPL Production, Gaseous...

126

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 853,470 769,783 737,187 795,069 777,099 746,010 1967-2013 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand...

127

Natural Gas Applications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Welcome to EIA's Natural Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Welcome to EIA's Natural Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Applications What's New Publications Applications Survey Forms Sign Up for Email Updates Contact Experts Applications EIA-176 Query System The EIA-176 Query system is a Windows-based system which runs under Windows operating systems 95, 98, 2000, NT - 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later. It provides a method of extracting and using the company level data filed on the Form EIA-176, and saving the query results in various media and formats. There are pre-selected data queries, which allow the user to select and run the most often-used queries, as well as the ability to create a customized query. Self-extracting executable files with run-time versions of Access are required to set up the system. You may also download the data tables if you already have Microsoft Access on your computer.

128

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview - May 21, 2001 Somewhat warmer temperatures early in the week, especially in the South, provided a lift to natural gas spot and futures prices. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) However, a report of another large stock build and a revised forecast for normal to below-normal temperatures over a larger area of the country turned the week's gains into losses. On a week-to-week basis, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.10 to end Friday, May 18 at $4.15 per MMBtu, while the NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.013 to $4.291 per MMBtu. At 119 Bcf, net injections to storage for the week ended May 11, 2001, were the highest value for the 8-year period of weekly AGA data.

129

Natural Gas Annual, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1998 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1998. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1994 to 1998. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1998 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1998, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

130

Natural Gas Annual, 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1997 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1997. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1993 to 1997. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1997 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1997, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

131

CAB International 2007. Biodiversity Loss and Conservation in Fragmented Forest Landscapes: 370 The Forests of Montane Mexico and Temperate South America (ed. A.C. Newton)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, mining, development of infrastructure (roads, pipelines, dams), logging/fuelwood extraction, habitat fragmentation, climate change and loss of keystone species and ecological structures. The relative importance

Rey Benayas, José María

132

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

U-GAS process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has developed an advanced coal gasification process. The U-GAS process has been extensively tested in a pilot plant to firmly establish process feasibility and provide a large data base for scale-up and design of the first commercial plant. The U-GAS process is considered to be one of the more flexible, efficient, and economical coal gasification technologies developed in the US during the last decade. The U-GAS technology is presently available for licensing from GDC, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of IGT. The U-GAS process accomplishes four important functions in a single-stage, fluidized-bed gasifier: It decakes coal, devolatilizes coal, gasifies coal, and agglomerates and separates ash from char. Simultaneously with coal gasification, the ash is agglomerated into spherical particles and separated from the bed. Part of the fluidizing gas enters the gasifier through a sloping grid. The remaining gas flows upward at a high velocity through the ash agglomerating device and forms a hot zone within the fluidized bed. High-ash-content particles agglomerate under these conditions and grow into larger and heavier particles. Agglomerates grow in size until they can be selectively separated and discharged from the bed into water-filled ash hoppers where they are withdrawn as a slurry. In this manner, the fluidized bed achieves the same low level of carbon losses in the discharge ash generally associated with the ash-slagging type of gasifier. Coal fines elutriated from the fluidized bed are collected in two external cyclones. Fines from the first cyclone are returned to the bed and fines from the second cyclone are returned to the ash agglomerating zone, where they are gasified, and the ash agglomerated with bed ash. The raw product gas is virtually free of tar and oils, thus simplifying ensuing heat recovery and purification steps.

Schora, F.C.; Patel, J.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

Microbial degradation of sedimentary organic matter associated with shale gas and coalbed methane in eastern Illinois Basin (Indiana), USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular biodegradation indices for extracts from five Pennsylvanian coals and six New Albany Shale (Devonian – Mississippian) samples from the eastern part of the Illinois Basin help constrain relationships between the degradation of biomarkers and the generation of coalbed methane and shale gas. Investigation of these gas source rocks of varying thermal maturity from different depths facilitates evaluation of the association of microbial degradation with biogenic gas formation distinct from thermogenic processes. Extensive biodegradation of both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons is observed in the coal extracts, whereas in shale extracts only short-chain (C15–C19) n-alkanes from the shallowest depth appear to be microbially altered with minimal evidence for losses of acyclic isoprenoid alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons. By contrast, biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons, specifically alkylated naphthalenes and phenanthrenes, occurs in coal extracts in concert with losses of n-alkanes attributable to microbial activity. Thus, the progress of hydrocarbon biodegradation in coals differs from the sequence recognized in petroleum where the effects of microbial alteration of aromatic constituents only appear after extensive losses of aliphatic compounds. The extent of hydrocarbon biodegradation in these coals also decreases with depth, as recorded by the ?(nC25–nC30) index (i.e. abundance relative to 17?(H), 21?(H)-hopane) among the aliphatic constituents and several aromatic compounds (methyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethylnaphthalenes, phenanthrene, and trimethyl- and tetramethylphananthrenes). However, the depth variations in the distributions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in the shale extracts primarily reflect the effects of thermal maturity rather than biodegradation. Overall, variations in the extent and patterns of biomarker biodegradation among coals and shales likely reflect their distinct microbial consortia that can be attributed to differences in (i) surviving microorganisms and inoculations from meteoric water, (ii) the characteristics of the sedimentary organic matter, especially the preponderance of aromatic constituents in coals, and (iii) the accessibility to that substrate through pores and cleats. These results help constrain the processes involved in biodegradation and controls on its extent, which, in turn, assist in recognizing sites favorable for methanogenesis and improved estimates of biogenic gas resources in the Illinois Basin.

Ling Gao; Simon C. Brassell; Maria Mastalerz; Arndt Schimmelmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 1,029,641 1,233,260 1,434,003 1,507,467 1,464,261 1,373,046 1967-2013 Total Liquids Extracted...

137

An RF-only ion-funnel for extraction from high-pressure gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An RF ion-funnel technique has been developed to extract ions from a high-pressure (10 bar) noble-gas environment into vacuum ($10^{-6}$ mbar). Detailed simulations have been performed and a prototype has been developed for the purpose of extracting $^{136}$Ba ions from Xe gas with high efficiency. With this prototype, ions have been extracted for the first time from high-pressure xenon gas and argon gas. Systematic studies have been carried out and compared to the simulations. This demonstration of extraction of ions with mass comparable to that of the gas generating the high-pressure into vacuum has applications to Ba tagging from a Xe-gas time-projection chamber (TPC) for double beta decay as well as to the general problem of recovering trace amounts of an ionized element in a heavy (m$>40$ u) carrier gas.

Thomas Brunner; Daniel Fudenberg; Victor Varentsov; Amanda Sabourov; Giorgio Gratta; Jens Dilling; Ralph DeVoe; David Sinclair; William Fairbank Jr.; Joshua B Albert; David J Auty; Phil S Barbeau; Douglas Beck; Cesar Benitez-Medina; Martin Breidenbach; Guofu F Cao; Christopher Chambers; Bruce Cleveland; Matthew Coon; Adam Craycraft; Timothy Daniels; Sean J Daugherty; Tamar Didberidze; Michelle J Dolinski; Matthew Dunford; Lorenzo Fabris; Jacques Farine; Wolfhart Feldmeier; Peter Fierlinger; Razvan Gornea; Kevin Graham; Mike Heffner; Mitchell Hughes; Michael Jewell; Xiaoshan S Jiang; Tessa N Johnson; Sereres Johnston; Alexander Karelin; Lisa J Kaufman; Ryan Killick; Thomas Koffas; Scott Kravitz; Reiner Kruecken; Alexey Kuchenkov; Krishna S Kumar; Douglas S Leonard; Francois Leonard; Caio Licciardi; Yi-Hsuan H Lin; Jiajie Ling; Ryan MacLellan; Michael G Marino; Brian Mong; David Moore; Allen Odian; Igor Ostrovskiy; Christian Ouellet; Andreas Piepke; Andrea Pocar; Fabrice Retiere; Peter C Rowson; Maria P Rozo; Alexis Schubert; Erica Smith; Victor Stekhanov; Michal Tarka; Tamer Tolba; Delia Tosi; Karl Twelker; Jean-Luc L Vuilleumier; Josiah Walton; Timothy Walton; Manuel Weber; Liangjian J Wen; Ubi Wichoski; Liang Yang; Yung-Ruey Yen

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

138

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

139

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

140

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

142

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

143

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

144

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

145

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

146

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

147

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

148

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

149

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

150

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

151

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

152

Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1999 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1999. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1999. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1999. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

153

An efficient algorithm for blade loss simulations applied to a high-order rotor dynamics problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, a novel approach is presented for blade loss simulation of an aircraft gas turbine rotor mounted on rolling element bearings with squeeze film dampers, seal rub and enclosed in a flexible housing. The modal truncation augmentation...

Parthasarathy, Nikhil Kaushik

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

Bibliography and Index to the Literature on Gas Chromatography—1965 November 1, 1964 to November 1, 1965  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......DETERMINATION OF THE SOLUBILITY OF NITROUS OXIDE IN WATER BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY...OXYGEN, AND NITROGEN ON MODIFIED...English) 813 GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY...DETERMINATION OF THE SOLUBILITY OF NITROGEN IN WATER AND EXTRACTED...Kenneth G., J. Gas Chromatog......

Seaton T. Preston; Jr.; Mignon Gill

1965-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Bibliography and Index to the Literature on Gas Chromatography—1966 November 1, 1965 to November 1, 1966  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......SEPARATION BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY...Mayo K., J. Gas Chromatog. 4...DETERMINATION OF THE SOLUBILITY OF NEON IN WATER AND EXTRACTED HUMAN...Feb. 1964) 798 GAS CHROMATOGRAPH IC...SMALL VOLUMES OF NITROGEN DISSOLVED IN BLOOD......

Seaton T. Preston; Jr.; Mignon Gill

1966-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

157

Loan Loss Reserve Funds Webinars  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provides a listing of past L loan loss reserve fund webinars and associated files. Author: U. S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

158

Evaluation of air injection and extraction tests in a landfill site in Korea: implications for landfill management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air extraction and injection were evaluated for extracting hazardous landfill gas and enhancing degradation of organic materials in a landfill in Korea. From the pilot and full ... pressure radius of influence wa...

J. Lee; C. Lee; K. Lee

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or Extraction of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Leasing for Production or Leasing for Production or Extraction of Oil, Gas and Other Minerals From Onshore State-Owned Lands (Mississippi) Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or Extraction of Oil, Gas and Other Minerals From Onshore State-Owned Lands (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Retail Supplier Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Development Authority The Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or Extraction of Oil, Gas and Other Minerals From Onshore State-Owned Lands is applicable to the natural gas sector. This law delegates the power to lease, for mineral

160

World offshore energy loss statistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore operations present a unique set of environmental conditions and adverse exposure not observed in a land environment taking place in a confined space in a hostile environment under the constant danger of catastrophe and loss. It is possible to engineer some risks to a very low threshold of probability, but losses and unforeseen events can never be entirely eliminated because of cost considerations, the human factor, and environmental uncertainty. Risk events occur infrequently but have the potential of generating large losses, as evident by the 2005 hurricane season in the Gulf of Mexico, which was the most destructive and costliest natural disaster in the history of offshore production. The purpose of this paper is to provide a statistical assessment of energy losses in offshore basins using the Willis Energy Loss database. A description of the loss categories and causes of property damage are provided, followed by a statistical assessment of damage and loss broken out by region, cause, and loss category for the time horizon 1970–2004. The impact of the 2004–2005 hurricane season in the Gulf of Mexico is summarized.

Mark J. Kaiser

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: December 18, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, December 3, to Wednesday, December 10, 2008) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, with all trading regions registering losses with the exception of the Rocky Mountains. On the week, the spot prices at each market location outside the Rockies fell between 2 and 93 cents per MMBtu, with the Henry Hub registering a decrease of 80 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract declined each day for the first 3 days of the report and increased on Tuesday and Wednesday (December 9-10), resulting in a

162

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 20, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 12, 2011) Natural gas prices posted net losses at most market locations across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price fell from $3.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, October 5, to $3.54 per MMBtu yesterday, October 12. Despite overall decreases, intraweek trading showed some rallies, particularly near the end of the report week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (November 2011) fell about 8 cents on the week from $3.570 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.489 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,521 billion cubic feet

163

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: February 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices decreased in half of the trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week. Generally, areas east of the Rockies and particularly those that experienced frigid temperatures posted weekly price increases. However, there were some exceptions, including the Midcontinent and East Texas. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures trading for the near-month contract was fairly volatile, with daily price changes ranging between a 16-cent loss and a 16-cent increase. The March 2009 contract ended trading yesterday 18 cents higher than on the previous Wednesday.

164

Average Price of Natural Gas Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Quantity and Average Price of Natural Gas Production in the United States, 1930-1996 (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet, Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Table Year Gross Withdrawals Used for Repressuring Nonhydro- carbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Extraction Loss Dry Production Average Wellhead Price of Marketed Production 1930 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,978,911 75,140 1,903,771 0.08 1931 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,721,902 62,288 1,659,614 0.07 1932 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,593,798 51,816 1,541,982 0.06 1933 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,596,673 48,280 1,548,393 0.06 1934 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,815,796 52,190 1,763,606 0.06 1935 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,968,963 55,488 1,913,475 0.06 1936 ....................... 2,691,512 73,507 NA 392,528 2,225,477

165

Extraction and direct detection of metals in contaminated soils using supercritical fluid extraction - atomic emission spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes the determination of metal complexes that are directly extracted from sedimentary material using Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MIP) for direct elemental determination. The metal complexes studied are: tris (1,1,1 triofluoro 2,4-pentanediono) Iron (III), Cobalt (II) Acetylacetonate, Copper (II) Acetylacetonate, Zinc (II) Acetylacetonate, and Ni (II) Acetylacetonate. These complexes were spiked directly onto cleaned sea sand. Static extractions were performed using SO-CO{sub 2} modified with 5% methanol. The SFE was interfaced to the MIP by integrating the restrictor into the plasma torch assembly. A 100 W Ar plasma was sustained in a highly efficient TM{sub 010} cavity with the atomic emission signal being viewed in an axial manner. Results of these direct determinations herald the possibility of the extraction and determination of surface bound contaminants in one unified procedure, thereby reducing the risk of sample loss, sample contamination, and sample analysis time.

Lancaster, E.D.; Long, G.L.; Ducatte, G.R. [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

167

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

168

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1) Host institution: University of Oxford in extracting gas from these low-permeability rocks is hydraulic fracture. This involves injecting large of water and gas during hydraulic fracturing and subsequent gas recovery. This is essential in order

Henderson, Gideon

169

GRIEF AND LOSS COUNSELLING AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEARN TO UNDERSTAND GRIEF AND LOSS COUNSELLING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES (CAPS) #12;The death be tired with no energy or feel sick in the stomach and have headaches. People experiencing grief after

Viglas, Anastasios

170

Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Turbine tip clearance loss mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-dimensional numerical simulations (RANS and URANS) were used to assess the impact of two specific design features, and of aspects of the actual turbine environment, on turbine blade tip loss. The calculations were ...

Mazur, Steven (Steven Andrew)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Loss-Free Pricing Rules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter provides an application of the pricing rule approach to the analysis of unregulated market economies with non-convex production sets. Loss-free pricing rules provide a natural framework for this a...

Prof. Dr. Antonio Villar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

174

Coal extraction process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sub-divided coal is extracted under non-thermally destructive conditions with a solvent liquid containing a compound having the general formula:

Hammack, R. W.; Sears, J. T.; Stiller, A. H.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

175

Fission Product Extraction Process  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A new INL technology can simultaneously extract cesium and strontium for reuse. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fission Product Extraction Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new INL technology can simultaneously extract cesium and strontium for reuse. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced underground gas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mulder1 Summary: where all current underground activities take place except for oil and gas extraction and mining... with reluctant public perception still hamper such underground...

178

Heat waste recovery system from exhaust gas of diesel engine to a reciprocal steam engine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research project was about the combined organic Rankine cycle which extracted energy from the exhaust gas of a diesel engine. There was a study… (more)

Duong, Tai Anh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

180

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

182

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

183

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

184

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

185

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

186

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

187

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

188

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

189

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

190

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

191

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

192

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

193

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

194

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

196

Supercritical fluid extraction of Chinese Maoming oil shale with water and toluene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chinese Maoming (Guangdong Province) oil shale was subjected to supercritical fluid extraction with ... water, although the weight losses of the oil shale with toluene and water were almost the...n-alkanes were a...

T Funazukuri; N Wakao

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Photocurrent extraction efficiency in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficiency of photocurrent extraction was studied directly inside operating Colloidal Quantum Dot (CQD) photovoltaic devices. A model was derived from first principles for a thin film p-n junction with a linearly spatially dependent electric field. Using this model, we were able to clarify the origins of recent improvement in CQD solar cell performance. From current-voltage diode characteristics under 1 sun conditions, we extracted transport lengths ranging from 39 nm to 86 nm for these materials. Characterization of the intensity dependence of photocurrent extraction revealed that the dominant loss mechanism limiting the transport length is trap-mediated recombination.

Kemp, K. W.; Wong, C. T. O.; Hoogland, S. H.; Sargent, E. H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

198

Enhancing landfill gas recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The landfilling of municipal solid waste (MSW) may cause potential environmental impacts like global warming (GW), soil contaminations, and groundwater pollution. The degradation of MSW in anaerobic circumstances generates methane emissions, and can hence contribute the GW. As the GW is nowadays considered as one of the most serious environmental threats, the mitigation of methane emissions should obviously be aimed at on every landfill site where methane generation occurs. In this study, the treatment and utilization options for the generated LFG at case landfills which are located next to each other are examined. The yearly GHG emission balances are estimated for three different gas management scenarios. The first scenario is the combined heat and power (CHP) production with a gas engine. The second scenario is the combination of heat generation for the asphalt production process in the summer and district heat production by a water boiler in the winter. The third scenario is the LFG upgrading to biomethane. The estimation results illustrate that the LFG collection efficiency affects strongly on the magnitudes of GHG emissions. According to the results, the CHP production gives the highest GHG emission savings and is hence recommended as a gas utilization option for case landfills. Furthermore, aspects related to the case landfills' extraction are discussed.

Antti Niskanen; Hanna Värri; Jouni Havukainen; Ville Uusitalo; Mika Horttanainen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Air Impacts of Increased Natural Gas Acquisition, Processing, and Use: A Critical Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Impacts of Increased Natural Gas Acquisition, Processing, and Use: A Critical Review to rapid and intensive development of many unconventional natural gas plays (e.g., shale gas, tight sand understanding of local and regional air quality impacts of natural gas extraction, production, and use. Air

Jackson, Robert B.

200

Gas Source Localisation by Constructing Concentration Gridmaps with a Mobile Robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Source Localisation by Constructing Concentration Gridmaps with a Mobile Robot Achim Lilienthal of a gas distribution by creating concentration gridmaps with a mobile robot equipped with a gas-sensitive system ("mobile nose"). By contrast to metric gridmaps extracted from sonar or laser range scans, a gas

Duckett, Tom

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Efficiency loss in resource allocation games  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overarching goals of this thesis are to quantify the efficiency loss due to market participant strategic behavior, and to design proper pricing mechanisms that reduce the efficiency loss. The concept of efficiency loss ...

Xu, Yunjian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Tax aspects of casualty losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Commissioner, P-H. h?emo. T. C. , ?ar. 50, 221. Termites. Termite damages have been allowed by some Courts as a casualty loss deduction, but the Internal Revenue Service prior to 1959 generally did not grant such deductions. However, in a recent Revenue... ruling the Internal Revenue: ervice indicated that it will follow 39 the decision of Buist v. United States. In the Revenue ruling the Service states that termite damage can be sudden and if sudden, it can result in a casualty loss. Also, the Service...

Lehmann, August Herman

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

204

Exergy Loss: A Basis for Energy Taxing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper introduces exergy loss or entropy added as a basis for energy taxing. Exergy loss will be shown to account objectively...

Gerard Hirs

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Vehicle Technologies Office: Parasitic Loss Reduction | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

losses can account for an approximate 45% decrease in efficiency. Other sources of energy loss include: friction and wear in the power train, thermal (heat) loads, operation of...

206

Mineral and Fuel Extraction: Health Consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Activities associated with mining and fuel extraction may present a range of potential health risks for nearby communities. The environmental legacy of mining and fuel extraction is extensive, with millions of active and abandoned mines globally. Evaluation of community risks from mineral and fuel extraction is often a complex task, given the variety of products produced, multiple potential exposure contexts, routes of contact, and health impacts. Adverse health outcomes that may arise from mineral-related processes include release of toxicants such as metals, metalloids, and mineral dusts, and indirect effects such as the increased potential of vectorborne disease. The ongoing processing and end-use of minerals also produce gas emissions (such as carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide), often on a large scale. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are substances of particular concern arising from conventional crude oil and coal extraction, oil sands/shales wastes, and tailings water, and are classified as either proven or suspected carcinogens. The geotechnical and structural aspects of mine sites must also be considered, including the risk of major hazardous events such as release of tailings dam contents. Indirect or delayed effects of mineral and fuel extraction include those that act to affect community health through contamination or disruption of water supplies and food sources (e.g., crops). As with many industries, the balance between risks and benefits of mining must be carefully calibrated.

A. Cook; R.B. Finkelman; A. Fourie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

208

Methods Development for On-Line Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......contractual specifications. Used to determine value and sale price of product. Monitors liquid or gas effluent wastes for loss...vinyl chloride on dioctylsebacate and Car- bowax 550. (A) ethylene, (B) propane, (C) propylene, (D) isobutane, (E......

Richard Villalobos

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Impact of Shale Gas Development on Regional Water Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...human health and environmental impacts associated with the release...inadequately treated wastewater to the environment (66). In addition, spills...assess potential water quality impacts in the northeast (78, 79...shale gas extraction (54). Impacts from casing leakage, well...

R. D. Vidic; S. L. Brantley; J. M. Vandenbossche; D. Yoxtheimer; J. D. Abad

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

210

Louisiana Offshore-Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2012 2013 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 151,301 99,910 2012-2013 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 3,378 2,694 2012-2013 NGPL Production,...

211

Alabama Offshore-Alabama Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2012 2013 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 53,348 53,771 2012-2013 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 2,695 2,767 2012-2013 NGPL Production, Gaseous...

212

Energy Loss by Breaking waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of the frequency of wind wave breaking in deep water are combined with laboratory estimates of the rate of energy loss a from single breaking wave to infer the net rate of energy transfer to the mixed layer from breaking waves, as a ...

S. A. Thorpe

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Why is Shale Gas Important?  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Why is Shale Gas Important? Why is Shale Gas Important? With the advance of extraction technology, shale gas production has led to a new abundance of natural gas supply in the United States over the past decade, and is expected to continue to do so for the foreseeable future. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the unproved technically recoverable U.S. shale gas resource is estimated at 482 trillion cubic feet. 1 Estimated proved and unproved shale gas resources amount to a combined 542 trillion cubic feet (or 25 percent) out of a total U.S. resource of 2,203 trillion cubic feet. 2 U.S. shale gas production has increased 12-fold over the last

214

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates focused to improve existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation validate any software update prior to its release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

215

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into the Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates primarily focused to improve the existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation site validate all software updates prior to release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

216

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

217

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

219

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

220

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

222

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

223

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

224

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

225

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

226

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

227

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

228

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

229

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

230

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

231

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

232

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

233

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

236

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

237

Solvent extraction studies of holmium with acidic extractants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid-liquid extraction studies of holmium with 2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester, naphthenic, and Versatic 10 acids have been carried out. The nature of the extracted species and the extraction equilibrium constants of these systems have been determined from aqueous nitrate solution. The extraction mechanism and complexation models have been proposed. 11 refs., 8 figs.

Gaikwad, A.G.; Damodaran, A.D. (CSIR, Trivandrum (India))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

239

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

240

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Analysis of Ecgonine and Other Cocaine Biotransformation Products in Postmortem Whole Blood by Protein Precipitation-Extractive Alkylation and GC-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......polarity and water solubility make its isolation...extracts is performed by gas chromatography-mass...blood Esterification Gas Chromatography-Mass...polarity and associated water solubility make it verydifficultto...a stream ofair or nitrogen at 75~ Derivatization......

David Smirnow; Barry K. Logan

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

243

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

244

Optimization of quantum interferometric metrological sensors in the presence of photon loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We optimize two-mode, entangled, number states of light in the presence of loss in order to maximize the extraction of the available phase information in an interferometer. Our approach optimizes over the entire available input Hilbert space with no constraints, other than fixed total initial photon number. We optimize to maximize the Fisher information, which is equivalent to minimizing the phase uncertainty. We find that in the limit of zero loss the optimal state is the so-called N00N state, for small loss, the optimal state gradually deviates from the N00N state, and in the limit of large loss the optimal state converges to a generalized two-mode coherent state, with a finite total number of photons. The results provide a general protocol for optimizing the performance of a quantum optical interferometer in the presence of photon loss, with applications to quantum imaging, metrology, sensing, and information processing.

Tae-Woo Lee; Sean D. Huver; Hwang Lee; Lev Kaplan; Steven B. McCracken; Changjun Min; Dmitry B. Uskov; Christoph F. Wildfeuer; Georgios Veronis; Jonathan P. Dowling

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 3) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 3) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 19-26), as a large volume of production continued to be shut in from the recent major hurricanes and cool temperatures added space-heating demand in many regions of the country. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.15 per MMBtu, or about 8.5 percent, to $14.67. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 49 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, October 26) at $14.04. A steady pace of injections into underground storage has continued despite offshore production shut-ins of almost 5.6 billion cubic feet (Bcf) a day, indicating substantial demand loss in the wake of the hurricanes and amid the high-price environment. The volume of natural gas in storage was 3,139 Bcf as of Friday, October 21, which is 2.8 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.26 per barrel or about 2 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $60.85, or $10.49 per MMBtu.

246

Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous extract test is a laboratory technique commonly used to measure the amount of soluble salts of a soil sample after adding a known mass of distilled water. Measured aqueous extract data have to be re-interpreted in order to infer porewater chemical composition of the sample because porewater chemistry changes significantly due to dilution and chemical reactions which take place during extraction. Here we present an inverse hydrochemical model to estimate porewater chemical composition from measured water content, aqueous extract, and mineralogical data. The model accounts for acid-base, redox, aqueous complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/ex-solution, cation exchange and surface complexation reactions, of which are assumed to take place at local equilibrium. It has been solved with INVERSE-CORE{sup 2D} and been tested with bentonite samples taken from FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test. The inverse model reproduces most of the measured aqueous data except bicarbonate and provides an effective, flexible and comprehensive method to estimate porewater chemical composition of clays. Main uncertainties are related to kinetic calcite dissolution and variations in CO2(g) pressure.

Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

247

Le Bail Intensity Extraction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Le Bail Intensity Extraction Le Bail Intensity Extraction Presentation Goal Introduce the concepts behind LeBail fitting; why it is useful and how to perform a Le Bail fit with GSAS. Format: PDF slides or a RealPlayer video of the slides with accompanying audio and a demo video that shows how a Le Bail fit is performed. Presentation Outline What is the Le Bail method? Other approaches Why use the Le Bail method? Parameter fitting with Le Bail intensity extraction Le Bail refinement strategies Avoiding problems with background fitting: BKGEDIT Demo: an example Le Bail fit Links Le Bail lecture Slides (as PDF file) FlashMovie presentation with index (best viewed with 1024x768 or better screen resolution) FlashMovie file (800x600 pixels) Le Bail demo FlashMovie presentation with index (best viewed with 1024x768 or

248

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Extracting the Eliashberg Extracting the Eliashberg Function Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print Wednesday, 23 February 2005 00:00 A multitude of important chemical, physical, and biological phenomena are driven by violations of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), which decouples electronic from nuclear motion in quantum calculations of solids. Recent advances in experimental techniques combined with ever-growing theoretical capabilities now hold the promise of presenting an unprecedented picture of these violations. By means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission at the ALS and theoretical calculations, a multi-institutional collaboration that includes researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee, Stanford University, and the ALS has obtained the first high-resolution spectroscopic images of the specific vibrational modes that couple to a given electronic state.

249

A study of natural gas extraction in Marcellus shale .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With the dramatic increases in crude oil prices there has been a need to find reliable energy substitutions. One substitution that has been used in… (more)

Boswell, Zachary (Zachary Karol)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Portable MRI and 129Xe Signal Amplification by Gas Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by nuclear magnetic resonance. Science, [24] E. Danieli, J.magnetic resonance hyperpolarized biosensor. Science, 314(Magnetic Reso- nance Imaging in a Fraction of a Second. Science,

Graziani, Dominic Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Natural Gas Annual, 1999 (HISTORICAL)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 The Natural Gas Annual, 1999 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1999. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1995 to 1999. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1999 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1999, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1995-1999 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1999 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

252

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2001 23, 2001 Another mid-summer week of relatively mild temperatures in many of the nation's major gas consuming market regions and a large estimate of net injections of working gas into storage put downward pressure on spot and futures prices. Some parts of New England saw high temperatures only in the 70s for several days last week, while highs in the 80s stretched down the mid-Atlantic region as far as northern Georgia and well into the Midwest. On the West Coast, highs rarely exceeded 80 degrees, with a number of locations reporting highs in the 60s. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Spot prices declined for the week in nearly all markets, with spot gas at the Henry Hub trading at $2.95 per MMBtu on Friday, down $0.21 from the previous Friday. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery fell even more, ending the week down $0.295 per MMBtu at $2.955-the first sub-$3 settlement for a near-month contract since April 11 of last year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell four days in a row and traded on Wednesday and Thursday below $25 per barrel before recovering Friday to $25.60 per barrel, or $4.41 per MMBtu. This, too, is the first time since last April that WTI has fallen below $25 per barrel, and is the second week in a row of losses of $1 or more per barrel.

253

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

255

Effects of radiative emission and absorption on the propagation and extinction of premixed gas flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2 losses are eliminated by employing large combustion vessels at microgravity, heat loss via gaseous when CO2, a strong absorber, is present in the unburned gas. Two heat loss mechanisms that lead to flammability limits even with reabsorption were identified. One is that for dry hydrocarbon-air mixtures

256

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

is shale gas? is shale gas? Basically, it is natural gas - primarily methane - found in shale formations, some of which were formed 300-million-to-400-million years ago during the Devonian period of Earth's history. The shales were deposited as fine silt and clay particles at the bottom of relatively enclosed bodies of water. At roughly the same time, primitive plants were forming forests on land and the first amphibians were making an appearance. Some of the methane that formed from the organic matter buried with the sediments escaped into sandy rock layers adjacent to the shales, forming conventional accumulations of natural gas which are relatively easy to extract. But some of it remained locked in the tight, low permeability shale layers, becoming shale gas.

257

Loss of Interferon-? Inducibility of TAP1 and LMP2 in a Renal Cell Carcinoma Cell Line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...well as the putative GAS site with extracts...T lymphocytes and natural killer cells, and...The transcription factor binding sites are...12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612...IRF-E, IFN response factor element; IRF-1...inducible element; GAS, IFN--activated...

Susan E. Dovhey; Nilanjan S. Ghosh; and Kenneth L. Wright

2000-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Method for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

Rau, Gregory H. (Castro Valley, CA); Caldeira, Kenneth G. (Livermore, CA)

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

Magnetic Solid-Phase Extraction Based on Modified Magnetic Nanoparticles for the Determination of Phthalate Diesters in Water Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......However, the low solubility of PDMS in aqueous...fluoroquinolones, from water samples followed...Instrumentation Agilent gas chromatograph...analysis. The gas chromatograph...310C. As carrier gas, helium (99...extraction of PAEs from water samples was conducted...gentle stream of nitrogen followed by reconstituting......

Maryam Zare Jeddi; Reza Ahmadkhaniha; Masud Yunesian; Noushin Rastkari

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

262

Phase behavior of CO{sub 2}/crude oil mixtures in supercritical fluid extraction system: Experimental data and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous multiple-contact extractions of a crude oil were carried out with supercritical CO{sub 2} in order to assess the effect of the density and critical point of a solvent on the extraction performance as a function of process variables. Most of the extraction performance was solvent density dependent. In the vicinity of the critical point of CO{sub 2}, however, the solvent density was not the only parameter that governed extraction yields. The results of simulated distillation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of extracts represented that the earlier extracts contained lighter compounds and the latter extracts contained progressively heavier compounds. As the extraction proceeded, relatively greater amounts of paraffinic compounds and lesser amounts of naphthenic and aromatic compounds were extracted. This compositional change occurring during a dynamic extraction was also ascertained by phase equilibrium calculations using the Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation of state and a component-lumping procedure.

Hwang, J. [Kyung In Energy Co., Inchon (Korea, Republic of). R and D Center; Park, S.J. [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Extracting Correlations Yuval Ishai #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, an equipment grant from Intel, and an Okawa Research award. Keywords­randomness extractors secure computationExtracting Correlations Yuval Ishai # Computer Science Dept. Technion and UCLA yuvali@cs.technion.ac.il Eyal Kushilevitz + Computer Science Dept. Technion and UCLA eyalk@cs.technion.ac.il Rafail Ostrovsky

Ostrovsky, Rafail

264

Extracting Correlations Yuval Ishai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, an equipment grant from Intel, and an Okawa Research award. Keywords-randomness extractors; secure computationExtracting Correlations Yuval Ishai Computer Science Dept. Technion and UCLA yuvali@cs.technion.ac.il Eyal Kushilevitz Computer Science Dept. Technion and UCLA eyalk@cs.technion.ac.il Rafail Ostrovsky CS

Sahai, Amit

265

A Parametric Study of Electron Extraction from a Low Frequency Inductively Coupled RF-Plasma Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The electron extraction from a low-frequency (2 MHz) inductively-coupled rf-plasma cathode is characterizedA Parametric Study of Electron Extraction from a Low Frequency Inductively Coupled RF-Plasma Source and rf-plasma source, rf-power and xenon gas flow. The results demonstrate that the electron supply from

266

Surviving Biodiversity Loss in the Amazon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surviving Biodiversity Loss in the Amazon You are what you eat, right down to the isotope ratios in your food April 1, 2014 Surviving Biodiversity Loss in the Amazon A Pipra...

267

Loss mechanisms in turbine tip clearance flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulations of tip clearance ow have been carried out to dene the loss generation mechanisms associated with tip leakage in unshrouded axial turbines. Mix- ing loss between the leakage, which takes the form of a ...

Huang, Arthur (Arthur C.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Chapter 7 - Gas Turbine Fuel Systems and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The basics of a gas turbine fuel system are similar for all turbines. The most common fuels are natural gas, LNG (liquid natural gas), and light diesel. With appropriate design changes, the gas turbine has proved to be capable of handling residual oil, pulverized coal, syngas from coal and various low BTU fluids, both liquid and gas, that may be waste streams of petrochemical processes or, for instance, gas from a steel (or other industry) blast furnace. Handling low BTU fuel can be a tricky operation, requiring long test periods and a willingness to trade the savings in fuel costs with the loss of turbine availability during initial prototype full load tests. This chapter covers gas turbine fuel systems and includes a case study (Case 5) on blast furnace gas in a combined cycle power plant (CCPP). “All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered, the point is to discover them.” —Plato

Claire Soares

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Tight sands gain as U.S. gas source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, the last of a four part series assessing unconventional gas development in the US, examines the state of the tight gas sands industry following the 1992 expiration of the qualification period for the Sec. 29 Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit. Because tight gas sands were the most mature of the unconventional gas sources and received only a modest tax credit, one would not expect much change when the tax credit qualification period ended, and post-1992 drilling and production data confirm this. What the overall statistics do not show, and thus the main substance of this article, is how rediscovered tight gas plays and the evolution in tight gas exploration and extraction technology have shifted the outlook for tight gas drilling and its economics from a low productivity, marginally economic resource to a low cost source of gas supply.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hoak, T.E.; Kuuskraa, J.A. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Hansen, J. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Kicker Systems for the PS Multi-turn Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A five-turn continuous extraction has up to now been used to transfer the proton beam from the CERN PS to the SPS. This extraction uses an electrostatic septum to cut the filament beam into five slices, causing losses of about 15 %. These losses would be an even greater drawback when the beam intensity is increased for the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) facility. To overcome this Multi-Turn Extraction (MTE) has been implemented, in which the beam is separated, prior to extraction, into a central beam core and four islands. Each beamlet is extracted using a set of kickers and a magnetic septum. For the kickers two new pulse generators have been built, each containing a lumped element Pulse Forming Network (PFN) of 12.5 W, 80 kV and 10.5 ms. For cost reasons existing 15 W transmission line kicker magnets are reused. The PFN characteristic impedance deliberately mismatches that of the magnets to allow a higher maximum kick. The PFN design has been optimised such that undesirable side-effects of the impedanc...

Sermeus, L; Fowler, T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Induction machine stray loss from inter-bar currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stray load loss refers generally to the sources of induction machine loss not accounted for by typical calculations of primary or secondary copper loss, no load core loss, or friction and windage loss. Harmonic rotor bar ...

Englebretson, Steven Carl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Structural analysis of extracts from spent hydroprocessing catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvent extracts from spent commercial naphtha and gas oil hydrotreating catalysts were examined in order to elucidate the structure of adsorbed poisons. Amides were identified in the extracts and made up 20-30% of the basic compounds. The oxygen content of the extracts was as high as 28% by weight. Some of this oxygen may be associated with metal complexes or present as inorganic material. Infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed very strong absorptions due to carbonyls, suggesting that compounds such as ketones and carboxylic acids were present. The extracted compounds consisted of saturated (paraffinic and naphthenic) structures and aromatic groups, with >50% boiling at +343/sup 0/c. These results suggest polymerization of species on the surface of the catalyst, rather than condensation of aromatic structures to form coke.

Choi, J.H.K.; Gray, M.R.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Side extraction duoPIGatron-type ion source.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have designed and constructed a compact duoPIGatron-type ion source, for possible use in ion implanters, in such the ion can be extracted from side aperture in contrast to conventional duoPIGatron sources with axial ion extraction. The size of the side extraction aperture is 1x40 mm. The ion source was developed to study physical and technological aspects relevant to an industrial ion source. The side extraction duoPIGatron has stable arc, uniformly bright illumination, and dense plasma. The present work describes some of preliminary operating parameters of the ion source using Argon, BF3. The total unanalyzed beam currents are 23 mA using Ar at an arc current 5 A and 13 mA using BF3 gas at an arc current 6 A.

GUSHENETS,V.I.; OKS, E.M.; HERSCHOVITCH, A.; JOHNSON, B.M.

2007-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

274

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 31, 2012 August 31, 2012 Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Descriptions for Energy Department Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects, August 31, 2012 August 23, 2012 Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy study. August 15, 2012 Alex-andra "Ale" Hakala is an award-winning geoscientist at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory. | Photo from the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Energy Department Lab Researcher Wins HENAAC Award for Outstanding

275

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Extracting Hydrogen Electricity from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the United States, energy security motivates the de- velopment of previously untapped sources of oil as well & TECHNOLOGY 161A C oncerns about climate change, in- creased global demand for finite oil and natural gas reserves, and national en- ergy security, among other factors, are driving the search for alternatives

277

Effects of Magnet Errors in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ILC baseline extraction line is designed for 14 mrad horizontal crossing angle between e{sup +} and e{sup -} colliding beams at Interaction Point (IP). The extraction optics in the Interaction Region (IR) includes a detector integrated dipole field (anti-DID) to reduce orbit perturbation caused by the detector solenoid and minimize detector background. This paper presents a study of random field and alignment errors in the extraction magnets, compensation of the induced orbit perturbation, and effects of errors on extraction beam power loss. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

Toprek, Dragan; /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

The integrity of oil and gas wells Robert B. Jacksona,b,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMENTARY The integrity of oil and gas wells Robert B. Jacksona,b,1 a Department of Environmental concerns about oil and natural gas extraction these days inevitably turn to hydraulic fracturing, where--nearer the surface--emphasizing risks from spills, wastewater disposal, and the integrity of oil and natural gas

Jackson, Robert B.

279

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Extraction Extraction Utility Design Specification May 13, 2013 Document Version 1.10 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All Eric Morgan, Dekker, Ltd. Initial Draft Document January 19, 2010 1.1 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Document update with EM team review notes January 20, 2010 1.2 2.1.1 EM Project Team Document Review January 27, 2010 1.3 All Bruce Bartells Final Draft Review May 10, 2010 1.4.1 2.8 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Section Update May 14, 2010 1.4.2 2.3.1 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. System Tables Added May 17, 2010 1.4.3 2.3 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Enhancements Update June 29, 2010 1.5 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Revised for Version

280

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print A multitude of important chemical, physical, and biological phenomena are driven by violations of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), which decouples electronic from nuclear motion in quantum calculations of solids. Recent advances in experimental techniques combined with ever-growing theoretical capabilities now hold the promise of presenting an unprecedented picture of these violations. By means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission at the ALS and theoretical calculations, a multi-institutional collaboration that includes researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee, Stanford University, and the ALS has obtained the first high-resolution spectroscopic images of the specific vibrational modes that couple to a given electronic state.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Information extraction from broadcast news  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Royal Society and the British Academy Information extraction from broadcast news Yoshihiko...presented: the first represents name class information as a word attribute; the second represents...American broadcast news. Named entity|Information extraction|Language modelling| Information...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

RCS pressure under reduced inventory conditions following a loss of residual heat removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal-hydraulic response of a closed-reactor coolant system to loss of residual heat removal (RHR) cooling is investigated. The processes examined include: core coolant boiling and steam generator reflux condensation, pressure increase on the primary side, heat transfer mechanisms on the steam generator primary and secondary sides, and effects of noncondensible gas on heat transfer processes.

Palmrose, D.E.; Hughes, E.D.; Johnsen, G.W.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Determining plasma-fueling sources with an end-loss ion spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help identify the major sources of fueling gas in Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), we mounted a mass-sensitive, E parallel to B, end-loss ion spectrometer (ELIS) near the machine's centerline. We set the electric field in the ELIS to simultaneously measure the axial loss currents of both hydrogen and deuterium. We then initiated plasma discharges, where we injected either hydrogen or deuterium gas into the central cell. We also selected and deselected the central-cell neutral beams that were fueled with hydrogen gas. The end-cell neutral beams were always selected and fueled with deuterium. By taking the ratio of the hydrogen end-loss current to the deuterium end-loss current (with a known deuterium-gas feed rate), we were able to infer the effective fueling rates that were due to wall reflux, central-cell beams, and end-cell beams. The results were the following: wall reflux, 6 Torr.l/s; central-cell beams, 15 Torr.l/s; and end-cell beams 1 Torr.l/s. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Grubb, D.P.; Foote, J.H.

1986-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

284

Determining plasma-fueling sources with an end-loss ion spectrometer. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help identify the major sources of fueling gas in Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), we mounted a mass-sensitive, E parallel B, end-loss ion spectrometer (ELIS) near the machine's centerline. We set the electric field in the ELIS to simultaneously measure the axial loss currents of both hydrogen and deuterium. We then initiated plasma discharges, where we injected either hydrogen or deuterium gas into the central cell. We also selected and deselected the central-cell neutral beams that were fueled with hydrogen gas. The end-cell neutral beams were always selected and fueled with deuterium. By taking the ratio of the hydrogen end-loss current to the deuterium end-loss current (with a known deuterium-gas feed rate), we were able to infer the effective fueling rates that were due to wall reflux, central-cell beams, and end-cell beams. The results were the following: wall reflux, 6 Torr x 1/s; central-cell beams, 15 Torr x 1/s; and end-cell beams 1 Torr x 1/s.

Grubb, D.P.; Foote, J.H.

1986-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

285

Reducing Data Loss and Saving Money by Acquiring Data Loss Prevention Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing Data Loss and Saving Money by Acquiring Data Loss Prevention Software Master of Art data loss and saving money by acquiring DLP software Patarika Tipwong Acknowledgements This thesisPaul University. #12;Reducing data loss and saving money by acquiring DLP software Patarika Tipwong Table

Schaefer, Marcus

286

Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

287

Solvent Extraction of Chemical Attribution Signature Compounds from Painted Wall Board: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work that developed a robust solvent extraction procedure for recovery of chemical attribution signature (CAS) compound dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) (as well as diethyl methyl phosphonate (DEMP), diethyl methyl phosphonothioate (DEMPT), and diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP)) from painted wall board (PWB), which was selected previously as the exposed media by the chemical attribution scientific working group (CASWG). An accelerated solvent extraction approach was examined to determine the most effective method of extraction from PWB. Three different solvent systems were examined, which varied in solvent strength and polarity (i.e., 1:1 dichloromethane : acetone,100% methanol, and 1% isopropanol in pentane) with a 1:1 methylene chloride : acetone mixture having the most robust and consistent extraction for four original target organophosphorus compounds. The optimum extraction solvent was determined based on the extraction efficiency of the target analytes from spiked painted wallboard as determined by gas chromatography x gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) analysis of the extract. An average extraction efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained for these four compounds. The extraction approach was further demonstrated by extracting and detecting the chemical impurities present in neat DMMP that was vapor-deposited onto painted wallboard tickets.

Wahl, Jon H.; Colburn, Heather A.

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

288

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Propane Prices Influenced by Crude Oil and Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Propane prices have been high this year for several reasons. Propane usually follows crude oil prices more closely than natural gas prices. As crude oil prices rose beginning in 1999, propane has followed. In addition, some early cold weather this year put extra pressure on prices. However, more recently, the highly unusual surge in natural gas prices affected propane supply and drove propane prices up. Propane comes from two sources of supply: refineries and natural gas processing plants. The very high natural gas prices made it more economic for refineries to use the propane they normally produce and sell than to buy natural gas. The gas processing plants found it more economic to leave propane in the natural gas streams than to extract it for sale separately.

291

Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

292

Vehicle Technologies Office: Parasitic Loss Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Parasitic Loss Reduction Parasitic Loss Reduction Heavy vehicles lose a tremendous amount of energy to wind resistance and drag, braking, and rolling resistance. Such non-engine losses can account for an approximate 45% decrease in efficiency. Other sources of energy loss include: friction and wear in the power train, thermal (heat) loads, operation of auxiliary loads (air conditioning, heaters, refrigeration, etc.), and engine idling. The parasitic loss activity identifies methodologies that may reduce energy losses, and tests those in the laboratory. Promising technologies are then prototyped and tested onboard heavy vehicles. Once validated, technologies must be tested on-road to obtain durability, reliability, and life-cycle cost data for the developmental component and/or design strategy.

293

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

294

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

295

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

296

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

297

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

298

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

299

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Extraction Utility Extraction Utility Design Specification January 11, 2011 Document Version 1.9 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All Eric Morgan, Dekker, Ltd. Initial Draft Document January 19, 2010 1.1 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Document update with EM team review notes January 20, 2010 1.2 2.1.1 EM Project Team Document Review January 27, 2010 1.3 All Bruce Bartells Final Draft Review May 10, 2010 1.4.1 2.8 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Section Update May 14, 2010 1.4.2 2.3.1 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. System Tables Added May 17, 2010 1.4.3 2.3 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Enhancements Update June 29, 2010 1.5 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Revised for Version 8.0.20100628 July 14, 2010 1.5.1 2.8 Igor Pedan,

300

Transport coefficients of a unitarized pion gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The latest experimental results in relativistic heavy-ion collisions show that the matter there produced requires transport coefficients because of the important collective properties found. We review the theoretical calculation of these transport coefficients in the hadron side at low temperatures by computing them in a gas composed of low energy pions. The interaction of these pions is taken from an effective chiral theory and further requiring scattering unitarity. The propagation of D and D* mesons in the thermalized pion gas is also studied in order to extract the heavy quark diffusion coefficients in the system.

Juan M. Torres-Rincon

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) Removal Process, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale and pilot-scale testing - so that it could be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization. The new process, known as the IROA process, is based on U.S. patent No. 6,553,784, which if commercialized, has the potential of achieving substantial energy savings compared to currently used cryogenic technology. When successfully developed, this technology will benefit the petrochemical industry, which uses NGL as feedstocks, and will also benefit other chemical industries that utilize gas-liquid separation and distillation under similar operating conditions. Specific goals and objectives of the overall program include: (i) collecting relevant physical property and Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) data for the design and evaluation of the new technology, (ii) solving critical R&D issues including the identification of suitable dehydration and NGL absorbing solvents, inhibiting corrosion, and specifying proper packing structure and materials, (iii) designing, construction and operation of bench and pilot-scale units to verify design performance, (iv) computer simulation of the process using commercial software simulation platforms such as Aspen-Plus and HYSYS, and (v) preparation of a commercialization plan and identification of industrial partners that are interested in utilizing the new technology. NGL is a collective term for C2+ hydrocarbons present in the natural gas. Historically, the commercial value of the separated NGL components has been greater than the thermal value of these liquids in the gas. The revenue derived from extracting NGLs is crucial to ensuring the overall profitability of the domestic natural gas production industry and therefore of ensuring a secure and reliable supply in the 48 contiguous states. However, rising natural gas prices have dramatically reduced the economic incentive to extract NGLs from domestically produced natural gas. Successful gas processors will be those who adopt technologies that are less energy intensive, have lower capital and operating costs and offer the flexibility to tailor the plant performance to maximize product revenue as market conditions change, while maintaining overall system efficiency. Presently, cryogenic turbo-expander technology is the dominant NGL recovery process and it is used throughout the world. This process is known to be highly energy intensive, as substantial energy is required to recompress the processed gas back to pipeline pressure. The purpose of this project is to develop a new NGL separation process that is flexible in terms of ethane rejection and can reduce energy consumption by 20-30% from current levels, particularly for ethane recoveries of less than 70%. The new process integrates the dehydration of the raw natural gas stream and the removal of NGLs in such a way that heat recovery is maximized and pressure losses are minimized so that high-value equipment such as the compressor, turbo-expander, and a separate dehydration unit are not required. GTI completed a techno-economic evaluation of the new process based on an Aspen-HYSYS simulation model. The evaluation incorporated purchased equipment cost estimates obtained from equipment suppliers and two different commercial software packages; namely, Aspen-Icarus and Preliminary Design and Quoting Service (PDQ$). For a 100 MMscfd gas processing plant, the annualized capital cost for the new technology was found to be about 10% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery above 70% and about 40% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery below 50%. It was also found that at around 40-50% C2 recovery (which is economically justifiable at the current natural gas prices), the energy cost to recover NGL using the new technology is about 50% of that of conventional cryogenic technology.

Meyer, Howard, S.; Lu, Yingzhong

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

302

Analysis of TPV Network Losses (a Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk focuses on the theoretical analysis of electrical losses associated with electrically networking large numbers of TPV cells to produce high power TPV power generators.

DM DePoy; MW Dashiell; DD Rahner; LR Danielson; JE Oppenlander; JL Vell; RJ Wehrer

2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

303

Unsteady heat losses of underground pipelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analytic expressions are presented for the unsteady temperature distribution of the ground and heat losses of an underground pipeline for an arbitrary...

B. L. Krivoshein; V. M. Agapkin

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This tip sheet describes how to save process heating energy and costs by reducing expensive heat losses from industrial heating equipment, such as furnaces.

305

Loan Loss Reserve Fund Program Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Typically, grantees will work with interested parties or partners to develop a clean energy loan and a loan loss reserve fund program that involves the following steps:

306

High-energy irradiation and mass loss rates of hot Jupiters in the solar neighborhood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Giant gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience strong irradiation. In extreme cases photoevaporation causes a transonic, planetary wind and the persistent mass loss can possibly affect the planetary evolution. We have identified nine hot Jupiter systems in the vicinity of the Sun, in which expanded planetary atmospheres should be detectable through Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy according to predictions. We use X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton of seven of these targets to derive the high-energy irradiation level of the planetary atmospheres and the resulting mass loss rates. We further derive improved Lyman alpha luminosity estimates for the host stars including interstellar absorption. According to our estimates WASP-80 b, WASP-77 b, and WASP-43 b experience the strongest mass loss rates, exceeding the mass loss rate of HD 209458 b, where an expanded atmosphere has been confirmed. Furthermore, seven out of nine targets might be amenable to Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy...

Salz, M; Czesla, S; Schmitt, J H M M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Extraction of fossil fuel with guanadine extracting agent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subdivided coal, oil shale or tar sands is extracted under non-thermally destructive conditions with a solvent liquid containing a compound having the general formula: (R1-)2 N-C(=N-R)-N(-R2)2 Where R, R/sub 1/, and R/sub 2/ are each hydrogen atoms, lower alkyl (C/sub 1/-C/sub 4/) groups, or phenyl groups; provided that the compound has a decomposition temperature higher than the temperature of the extraction, and the extraction temperature is below the softening or decomposition temperature of the material being extracted.

Case, G.D.; Bekowies, P.J.; Panson, A.G.; Stiller, A.H.

1984-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

308

Raman gas analyzer for determining the composition of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a prototype of a Raman gas analyzer designed for measuring the composition of natural gas. Operation of the gas analyzer was tested on a real natural gas. We show that our Raman gas analyzer prototype...

M. A. Buldakov; B. V. Korolev; I. I. Matrosov…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

311

Effect of plasmonic losses on light emission enhancement in quantum-wells coupled to metallic gratings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experimental work has shown significant luminescence enhancement from near-surface quantum-well (QW) structures using metallic grating to convert surface plasmon (SP) modes into radiative modes. This work introduces a detailed theoretical study of plasmonic losses and the role of SPs in improving light extraction from grated light-emitting QW structures, using the fluctuational electrodynamics method. The method explains experimental results demonstrating emission enhancement, light scattering, and plasmonic coupling in the structures. We study these effects in angle-resolved reflectometry and luminescence setups in InGaN QW structures with silver grating. In contrast to experiments, our model allows direct calculation of the optical losses. The model predicts that the plasmonic coupling and scattering increases light emission by a factor of up to three compared to a flat semiconductor structure. This corresponds to reducing the absorption losses from approximately 93% in the ungrated metallic structure to 75% in the grated structure. Lower losses are associated with a significant emission enhancement enabled by the SPs of silver/GaN interfaces, which are present in the blue/green wavelength range, and can be optimized by carefully nanostructuring the metal layer and by the positioning of the QW. In general, the enhancement results from the interplay of mode scattering, conversion of SP energy directly into light, and losses in the metallic grating. The reported losses are very high when compared to the losses present in modern light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Albeit, our work provides tools needed for further optimization of plasmonic light extraction, eventually leading to highly efficient LEDs.

Sadi, Toufik; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Sciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

312

MANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-hunting strategy. Put time and energy into planning actions that will lead to your next job such as preparingMANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS a Personal and Family Guide CENTER ON THE FAMILY #12;2 Managing Job Loss and Financial Stress The issues associated with losing one's job or having hours cut

313

Chapter 8 - Radial-Flow Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The various types of radial-flow gas turbine are described. A Mollier diagram with the changes in enthalpy of the component parts is shown for the turbine. Loss coefficients are defined and numerous calculation methods are outlined. The calculation of the all-important total-to-static efficiency is made and discussed. Some discussion of the losses in the inlet scroll and nozzle blades with an important expression for their calculation is given. The criterion for the minimum number of blades is explained. The design of the rotor exit is considered and some details of the effects of vane solidity are calculated. Details of the optimum design using the concept of specific speed are included. A brief discussion of the clearance and windage losses is given. Numerous examples and problems are included.

S.L. Dixon; C.A. Hall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Definition: Reduced Electricity Losses | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Losses Losses Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Losses Functions that provide this benefit could help manage peak feeder loads, reduced electricity throughput, locate electricity production closer to the load and ensure that voltages remain within service tolerances, while minimizing the amount of reactive power provided. These actions can reduce electricity losses by making the system more efficient for a given load served or by actually reducing the overall load on the system.[1] Related Terms load, electricity generation, reactive power, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Electricity_Losses&oldid=502644

315

Determining the economic consequences of natural gas substitution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Resource depletion is a key aspect of sustainability, because the consumption of finite resources impacts on their availability for future generations. There are many proposed methods for accounting for the depletion of a particular resource, amongst which include the proportion of the resource depleted, the rate of resource depletion, and the energy, exergy, or monetary cost of extraction as the resource becomes harder to find or extract. This paper is part of a wider study to measure resource depletion using its environmental and economic impacts for the case of natural gas, where depletion of natural gas requires substitution by black coal or coal seam gas. The capital and operating costs are estimated both for upstream fuel extraction and purification and downstream use of the fuel to produce electricity, hydrogen and ammonia. These costs are based on a commercial scale of operation, using the same basis for economic modelling in each case. Black coal was found to have the lowest transfer price from upstream to downstream processing among the three feedstocks, but the highest capital and operating costs in the downstream processes. Conventional gas produced slightly higher transfer prices and downstream processing costs compared to coal seam gas. The favourable economic and environmental indicators for natural gas and coal seam gas are expected to lead to increased demand for these resources over coal, running the risk of a gas shortage. The economic consequence of a scarcity of either gas resource will be a penalty in capital and operating costs to produce the three products should gas be substituted with black coal.

Shaun Rimos; Andrew F.A. Hoadley; David J. Brennan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

317

Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Reserves Project at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Reserves Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Reserves Key Challenges: Seismic imaging methods, vital in our continuing search for deep offshore oil and gas fields, have a long and established history in hydrocarbon reservoir exploration but the technology has encountered difficulty in discriminating different types of reservoir fluids, such as brines, oil, and gas. Why it Matters: Imaging methods that improve locating and extracting petroleum and gas from the earth by even a few percent can yield enormous payoffs. Geophysical realizations of hydrocarbon reservoirs at unprecedented levels of detail will afford new detection abilities, new efficiencies and new exploration savings by revealing where hydrocarbon deposits reside. Can also be used for improved understanding of potential

318

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

319

U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2012 The report ranks the energy use, energy losses, and energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 15 sectors. These sectors collectively account for 94% of all energy use...

320

Natural Gas: Dry Wells Yield Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two ... Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two natural ...

1969-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sulfur geochemistry of thermogenic gas hydrate and associated sediment from the Texas-Louisiana continental slope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total reduced sulfide (TRS), acid volatile sulfide, and citrate-dithionate and HCl extractable iron. Pore-fluid measurements included []H?S, chloride, sulfate, ammonia and total dissolved inorganic carbon. Gas hydrate hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide...

Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Parameter extraction from I-V characteristics of PV devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Device parameters such as series and shunt resistances, saturation current and diode ideality factor influence the behaviour of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of solar cells and photovoltaic modules. It is necessary to determine these parameters since performance parameters are derived from the I-V curve and information provided by the device parameters are useful in analyzing performance losses. This contribution presents device parameters of CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells, as well as, CuInSe{sub 2}, mono- and multicrystalline silicon modules determined using a parameter extraction routine that employs Particle Swarm Optimization. The device parameters of the CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells show that the contribution of recombination mechanisms exhibited by high saturation current when coupled with the effects of parasitic resistances result in lower maximum power and conversion efficiency. Device parameters of photovoltaic modules extracted from I-V characteristics obtained at higher temperature show increased saturation current. The extracted values also reflect the adverse effect of temperature on parasitic resistances. The parameters extracted from I-V curves offer an understanding of the different mechanisms involved in the operation of the devices. The parameter extraction routine utilized in this study is a useful tool in determining the device parameters which reveal the mechanisms affecting device performance. (author)

Macabebe, Erees Queen B. [Department of Electronics, Computer and Communications Engineering, Ateneo de Manila University, Loyola Heights, Quezon City 1108 (Philippines); Department of Physics and Centre for Energy Research, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Sheppard, Charles J. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Dyk, E. Ernest van [Department of Physics and Centre for Energy Research, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Sulfolane-Cross-Polybenzimidazole Membrane For Gas Separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cross-linked, supported polybenzimidazole membrane for gas separation is prepared by reacting polybenzimidazole (PBI) with the sulfone-containing crosslinking agent 3,4-dichloro-tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1-dioxide. The cross-linked reaction product exhibits enhanced gas permeability to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and methane as compared to the unmodified analog, without significant loss of selectivity, at temperatures from about 20 degrees Celsius to about 400 degrees Celsius.

Young, Jennifer S. (Los Alamos, NM); Long, Gregory S. (Los Alamos, NM); Espinoza, Brent F. (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

324

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

325

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

326

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

327

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

328

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

329

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

330

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

331

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

332

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

333

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

334

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

335

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

336

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

337

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

338

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

339

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

340

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural gas from shale formation – The evolution, evidences and challenges of shale gas revolution in United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extraction of natural gas from shale rock in the United States (US) is one of the landmark events in the 21st century. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing can extract huge quantities of natural gas from impermeable shale formations, which were previously thought to be either impossible or uneconomic to produce. This review offers a comprehensive insight into US shale gas opportunities, appraising the evolution, evidence and the challenges of shale gas production in the US. The history of US shale gas in this article is divided into three periods and based on the change of oil price (i.e., the period before the 1970s oil crisis, the period from 1970s to 2000, and the period since 2000), the US has moved from being one of the world's biggest importers of gas to being self-sufficient in less than a decade, with the shale gas production increasing 12-fold (from 2000 to 2010). The US domestic natural gas price hit a 10-year low in 2012. The US domestic natural gas price in the first half of 2012 was about $2 per million British Thermal Unit (BTU), compared with Brent crude, the world benchmark price for oil, now about $ 80–100/barrel, or $14–17 per million BTU. Partly due to an increase in gas-fired power generation in response to low gas prices, US carbon emissions from fossil-fuel combustion fell by 430 million ton CO2 – more than any other country – between 2006 and 2011. Shale gas also stimulated economic growth, creating 600,000 new jobs in the US by 2010. However, the US shale gas revolution would be curbed, if the environmental risks posed by hydraulic fracturing are not managed effectively. The hydraulic fracturing is water intensive, and can cause pollution in the marine environment, with implications for long-term environmental sustainability in several ways. Also, large amounts of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, can be emitted during the shale gas exploration and production. Hydraulic fracturing also may induce earthquakes. These environmental risks need to be managed by good practices which is not being applied by all the producers in all the locations. Enforcing stronger regulations are necessary to minimize risk to the environment and on human health. Robust regulatory oversight can however increase the cost of extraction, but stringent regulations can foster an historic opportunity to provide cheaper and cleaner gas to meet the consumer demand, as well as to usher in the future growth of the industry.

Qiang Wang; Xi Chen; Awadhesh N. Jha; Howard Rogers

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Chapter Nine - Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins by reviewing the processing of natural gas to meet gas sales contract specifications. It then describes acid gas limitations for pipelines and gas plants, before detailing the most common acid gas removal processes, such as solid-bed, chemical solvent processes, physical solvent processes, direct conversion processes, distillation process, and gas permeation processes. The chapter discusses the selection of the appropriate removal process for a given situation, and it provides a detailed design procedure for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process. The chapter ends by supplying a sample design for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Heat Loss Measurement Using Infrared Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in various applications. Examples of two applications are presented. The first describes the development of heat balance data for a solvent refined coal processing unit. The second describes the measurement of heat loss and thermal resistance in a double...

Seeber, S. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem related to the prediction of corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines has been solved, in the past, by means of semi-empirical monomial formulae. However, the proposed formulae that are simpler to use do not always give adequate calculation precision, while the formulae that provide the closest results require implicit functions of different complexity, which are difficult to apply; moreover, it is not possible to understand clearly what influence the variations of the different line parameters have on the losses themselves. The new monomial semi-empirical relationship, proposed to predict the corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines, is very simple to use; it highlights the dependence of power losses due to the corona effect by the different line parameters. The formula has been developed by elaborating a considerable amount of available experimental data.

Corbellini, U.; Pelacchi, P. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy). Dept. of Electric Systems and Automation] [Univ. of Pisa (Italy). Dept. of Electric Systems and Automation

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

346

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 12, 2011 August 12, 2011 Statement from National Security Council Spokesman Tommy Vietor on U.S.-Brazil Strategic Energy Dialogue Launch THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary August 1, 2011 DOE Selects Projects Totaling $12.4 Million Aimed at Increasing Domestic Energy Production While Enhancing Environmental Protection A total of 11 research projects that will help find ways to extract more energy from unconventional oil and gas resources while reducing environmental risks have been selected totaling $12.4 million by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy. July 27, 2011 Fossil Energy R&D Returns Significant National Benefit in More Than Three Decades of Achievement Research and development activities at DOE's Office of Fossil Energy have helped increase domestic energy supplies and security, lowered costs,

347

Enhanced membrane gas separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

Prasad, R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

348

Reducing pressure loss of large diameter check valves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transcend Inc., a consulting firm that specializes in the use of computer simulation to optimize existing equipment and system designs, was approached by Mannesmann Demag AG, Moenchengladbach, Germany to optimize the design of its DRV-B check valve. In one of the first applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology to valve design, the pressure loss coefficient (K) of the DRV-B valve was lowered to 0.40--0.50 for valve sizes NPS48--NPS12, the lowest possible level for this type of valve. The flow efficiency is three times better than that of the earlier design. As a result, the optimized Mannesmann Demag DRV-B check valve provides a dramatic reduction in operating cost, particularly in transmission service where natural gas is transported over long distances. The reduced pressure loss saves compressor fuel cost. For the optimized valve, the incremental compressor fuel cost is reduced to 1.5-times the capital cost of the valve calculated over a 20-year Life Cycle Cost (LCC) period.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

350

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

351

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Gas Turbine Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a cycle process of a gas turbine, the compressor load, as well as ... from the expansion of the hot pressurized flue gas. Either turbine, compressor and driven assembly are joined by ... shaft is thus divided,...

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Gas-Turbine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This book focuses on the design of regenerators for high-performance regenerative gas turbines. The ways in which gas-turbine regenerators can be designed for high system performance can be understood by studying...

Douglas Stephen Beck; David Gordon Wilson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

357

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

358

Natural Gas in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a recent meeting of the Institution of Gas Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe ... Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe Gas Council, stated that an intensive, large-scale search for ...

1953-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

359

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

360

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage rack, a wall mounted cylinder rack, anchored to a fixed bench top, vented gas cabinet, or other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

362

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Natural Gas Reforming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

366

Fuel: Bargain Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council has done well to agree on low prices for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The ... for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The price finally agreed is both much less than the two companies wanted and much less than ...

1968-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Gas Cylinders: Proper Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

368

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

369

Static gas expansion cooler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

371

Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

372

SPUF - a simple polyurethane foam mass loss and response model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Simple PolyUrethane Foam (SPUF) mass loss and response model has been developed to predict the behavior of unconfined, rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foam-filled systems exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. The model, developed for the B61 and W80-0/1 fireset foam, is based on a simple two-step mass loss mechanism using distributed reaction rates. The initial reaction step assumes that the foam degrades into a primary gas and a reactive solid. The reactive solid subsequently degrades into a secondary gas. The SPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE [1] and CALORE [2], which support chemical kinetics and dynamic enclosure radiation using 'element death.' A discretization bias correction model was parameterized using elements with characteristic lengths ranging from 1-mm to 1-cm. Bias corrected solutions using the SPUF response model with large elements gave essentially the same results as grid independent solutions using 100-{micro}m elements. The SPUF discretization bias correction model can be used with 2D regular quadrilateral elements, 2D paved quadrilateral elements, 2D triangular elements, 3D regular hexahedral elements, 3D paved hexahedral elements, and 3D tetrahedron elements. Various effects to efficiently recalculate view factors were studied -- the element aspect ratio, the element death criterion, and a 'zombie' criterion. Most of the solutions using irregular, large elements were in agreement with the 100-{micro}m grid-independent solutions. The discretization bias correction model did not perform as well when the element aspect ratio exceeded 5:1 and the heated surface was on the shorter side of the element. For validation, SPUF predictions using various sizes and types of elements were compared to component-scale experiments of foam cylinders that were heated with lamps. The SPUF predictions of the decomposition front locations were compared to the front locations determined from real-time X-rays. SPUF predictions of the 19 radiant heat experiments were also compared to a more complex chemistry model (CPUF) predictions made with 1-mm elements. The SPUF predictions of the front locations were closer to the measured front locations than the CPUF predictions, reflecting the more accurate SPUF prediction of mass loss. Furthermore, the computational time for the SPUF predictions was an order of magnitude less than for the CPUF predictions.

Hobbs, Michael L.; Lemmon, Gordon H.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Food Losses and Waste in China and Their Implication for Water and Land  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Such losses also imply that 26 ± 11 million hectares of land were used in vain, equivalent to the total arable land of Mexico. ... The fact remains that all food produced, regardless if it is eaten, lost, wasted, and converted, has consumed water, energy, occupied land, and contributed to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. ... Following rapid economic development new policies and reforms to open China to the global market, living standards have improved in recent years. ...

Junguo Liu; Jan Lundqvist; Josh Weinberg; Josephine Gustafsson

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

374

Application of a low pressure economizer for waste heat recovery from the exhaust flue gas in a 600 MW power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of recovering the waste heat of the exhaust flue gas before entering a flue gas desulphurizer (FGD) in a 600 MW power plant. This waste heat can be recovered by installing a low pressure economizer (LPE) to heat the condensed water which can save the steam extracted from the steam turbine for heating the condensed water and then extra work can be obtained. The energy and water savings and the reduction of CO2 emission resulted from the LPE installation are assessed for three cases in a 600 MW coal-fired power plant with wet stack. Serpentine pipes with quadrate finned extensions are selected for the LPE heat exchanger which has an overall coefficient of heat transfer of 37 W/m2·K and the static pressure loss of 781 Pa in the optimized case. Analysis results show that it is feasible to install \\{LPEs\\} in the exhaust flue gas system between the pressurizing fan and the FGD, which has little negative impacts on the unit. The benefits generated include saving of standard coal equivalent (SCE) at 2–4 g/(kW·h) and saving of water at 25–35 t/h under full load operation with corresponding reduction of CO2 emission.

Chaojun Wang; Boshu He; Shaoyang Sun; Ying Wu; Na Yan; Linbo Yan; Xiaohui Pei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

376

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

377

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

378

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

379

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

380

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

382

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

383

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

384

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

385

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

386

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

387

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

388

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

389

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

390

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

391

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

392

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

393

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

394

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

395

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

396

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

397

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

398

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

399

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

400

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

402

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

403

Determination of Organophosphorus Pesticides in Soil by Dispersive Liquid–Liquid Microextraction and Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and 60 mL/min of nitrogen (99.999%) as the auxiliary gas. Nitrogen was used as the carrier gas at a flow rate of 1...aliquot of deionized water was placed into a 10-mL...density than water, a low solubility in water, a high extraction......

Zhonghua Yang; Yu Liu; Donghui Liu; Zhiqiang Zhou

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary comparison of conventional and potential HTGR-integrated processesa in several common industrial areas: ? Producing electricity via a traditional power cycle ? Producing hydrogen ? Producing ammonia and ammonia-derived products, such as fertilizer ? Producing gasoline and diesel from natural gas or coal ? Producing substitute natural gas from coal, and ? Steam-assisted gravity drainage (extracting oil from tar sands).

Lee Nelson

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

406

Hydrodynamic solutions for a sonoluminescing gas bubble  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analytic solutions for a sonoluminescing gas bubble have been obtained which provide density pressure and temperature distributions for the gas inside a bubble oscillating under the ultrasonic field. The solutions have revealed that sonoluminescence should occur just prior to the bubble collapse and its duration is less than 300 ps and that increase and subsequent decrease in the bubble wall acceleration induces the quenching of gas followed by the substantial temperature rise up to 100?000 K which can be regarded as a thermal spike. The gas temperature inside the bubble near collapse is determined primarily by the amount of radiation heat loss. Shock formation during the bubble collapse is questionable because gas density as well as pressure at the bubble center are much greater than those at the bubble wall during this stage. It also turns out that the number of electrons ionized the ion species and the kinetic energy of electrons affect the spectrum of light emission crucially. The spectralradiance calculated is in good agreement with the observed data qualitatively which suggests that the origin of sonoluminescences is bremsstrahlung rather than thermal blackbody radiation. [Work supported by Korea Science and Engineering Foundation.

Ho?Young Kwak; Jung?Hee Na

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Implications of Disruption to Natural Gas Deliverability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was sponsored by Department of Energy/Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. The primary purpose of the project was to analyze the capability of the natural gas production, transmission and supply systems to continue to provide service in the event of a major disruption in capacity of one or more natural gas transmission pipelines. The project was specifically designed to detail the ability of natural gas market to absorb facility losses and efficiently reallocate gas supplies during a significant pipeline capacity disruption in terms that allowed federal and state agencies and interests to develop effective policies and action plans to prioritize natural gas deliveries from a regional and national perspective. The analyses for each regional study were based on four primary considerations: (1) operating conditions (pipeline capacity, storage capacity, local production, power dispatch decision making and end user options); (2) weather; (3) magnitude and location of the disruption; and, (4) normal versus emergency situation. The detailed information contained in the region reports as generated from this project are Unclassified Controlled Information; and as such are subject to disclosure in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act. Therefore, this report defines the regions that were analyzed and the basic methodologies and assumptions used to completing the analysis.

Science Applications International

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

nature geoscience | VOL 2 | NOVEMBER 2009 | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience 737 CO2 emissions from forest loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions from forest loss G. R. van der Werf,D. C. Morton, R. S. DeFries, J. G. J. Olivier, P. S as a notable carbon dioxide source. P rogrammes that aim to reduce the emissions from deforestation and forest degradation are being considered as a cost-effective way to mitigate anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions1

Jackson, Robert B.

409

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...

410

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:29am Addthis Energy use in buildings represents the single largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the Federal sector. Buildings can contribute to Scope 1 emissions from direct stationary combustion sources; Scope 2 from indirect electricity, heat, or steam purchases; and Scope 3 emissions from transmission and distribution losses. Also see Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation. Step 1: Assess Agency Size Changes Step 2: Evaluate Emissions Profile Step 3: Evaluate Reduction Strategies Step 4: Estimate Implementation Costs Step 5: Prioritize Strategies Helpful Data and Tools See GHG planning data and tools for buildings.

412

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy in  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:23am Addthis Once Federal sites have been screened for viability of different renewable energy resources to evaluate emissions profile, the next step is to establish what renewable energy resources developed at which particular sites would have the greatest impact on the agency's overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions goals. It is important to consider that some types of renewable energy generation could impact not only Scope 1 and 2 GHG goals, but also Scope 3 goals through avoided transmission and distribution losses. Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential It is important to note that solar systems can have the greatest reduction

413

Quantitative Gas Chromatographic Analysis of [1-(4-Piperidinyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazole-2-one], the Basic Metabolite of Bezitramide (Burgodin®), in Human Urine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......high extraction recovery was achieved, and...internal standard: I. condensation between 1-benzyl-3-carb...diluting further with water to 100 mL. Standard...hydrogen gas under atmospheric pressure over I...ofthe extraction recovery at the sixcon...The extraction recovery was then calculated......

Siegrid M. De Baere; Willy E. Lambert; André P. De Leenheer

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Application of mechanical and electrical equipment in a natural gas processing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1984 the Northwest Pipeline Corporation purchased and installed equipment for their Ignacio, Colorado, gas processing plant to extract ethane and heavier hydrocarbons from the gas arriving at their pipeline system from various natural gas producing sources. In addition to the basic turbo-expander required to achieve the very low gas temperatures in the process, the equipment includes gas turbine driven compressors, heat recovery steam generators, and a steam turbine driven electric power generator. This paper reviews the process itself, the various mechanical and electrical equipment involved, and some of the control system utilized to tie it all together.

Lang, R.P.; Mc Cullough, B.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field of metamaterials is driven by fascinating and far-reaching theoretical visions, such as perfect lenses, invisibility cloaking, and enhanced optical nonlinearities. However, losses have become the major obstacle towards real world applications in the optical regime. Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials becomes necessary and extremely important. In this thesis, two approaches are taken to reduce the losses. One is to construct an indefinite medium. Indefinite media are materials where not all the principal components of the permittivity and permeability tensors have the same sign. They do not need the resonances to achieve negative permittivity, {var_epsilon}. So, the losses can be comparatively small. To obtain indefinite media, three-dimensional (3D) optical metallic nanowire media with different structures are designed. They are numerically demonstrated that they are homogeneous effective indefinite anisotropic media by showing that their dispersion relations are hyperbolic. Negative group refraction and pseudo focusing are observed. Another approach is to incorporate gain into metamaterial nanostructures. The nonlinearity of gain is included by a generic four-level atomic model. A computational scheme is presented, which allows for a self-consistent treatment of a dispersive metallic photonic metamaterial coupled to a gain material incorporated into the nanostructure using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The loss compensations with gain are done for various structures, from 2D simplified models to 3D realistic structures. Results show the losses of optical metamaterials can be effectively compensated by gain. The effective gain coefficient of the combined system can be much larger than the bulk gain counterpart, due to the strong local-field enhancement.

Fang, Anan

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Investigation of natural gas theft by magnetic remanence mapping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Natural gas theft causes major losses in the energy industry in Hungary. Among the non-technical losses occurring in natural gas networks, fraudulent residential consumption is one of the main factors. Up to 2014, gas meters that are most widely used in residential monitoring are manufactured with ferromagnetic moving components, which makes it possible to alter or disrupt the operation of the meters non-intrusively by placing permanent magnets on the casing of the meters. Magnetic remanence mapping was used to investigate a sample of 80 recalled residential meters and detect potentially fraudulent activity. 10% of the meters were found suspect by magnetic remanence measurement, of which 50% were confirmed to be potentially hijacked by further mechanical investigation. The details of the technique are described in this paper, along with experimental results and the discussion of the analysis of the real-world samples.

Zsolt Dobó; Helga Kovács; Pál Tóth; Árpád B. Palotás

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Reducing Livestock Losses To Toxic Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,Extension CommunicationsSpecialistTheTexasA&MUniversitySystem. Cover design byRhondaKappler, ExtensionCommercial Artist Reducing Livestock Losses to Toxic Plants Allan McGinty and Rick Machen* More than 100 species of toxic plants in- fest Texas rangelands. These plants... and Sons: New York, N.Y. Lane, M. A., M. H. Ralphs, J. D. Olsen, F. D. Provenza and J. A. Pfister. 1990. ?Conditioned taste aversion: potentialfor reducing cattle loss to larkspur.? Journal ofRangeManagement. 43:127-131. McGinty, Allan and Tommy G. Welch...

McGinty, Allan; Machen, Richard V.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

419

Loss modeling for pricing catastrophic bonds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Figure 3-1: DBE bc bc c k a DBE DBE a DBE SLf LSf ? ? ? == = (3.7) Thus, by following the arrows in Figure 3-1, loss can be directly related to annual frequency. Simplifying (3.7) gives d DBE DBE Lf Lf = (3.8) where the exponents are inter... in Figure 3-1: DBE bc bc c k a DBE DBE a DBE SLf LSf ? ? ? == = (3.7) Thus, by following the arrows in Figure 3-1, loss can be directly related to annual frequency. Simplifying (3.7) gives d DBE DBE Lf Lf = (3.8) where the exponents are inter...

Sircar, Jyotirmoy

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Cesium and strontium extraction using a mixed extractant solvent including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed extractant solvent including calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from an acidic solution. The DtBu18C6 may be present from approximately 0.01 M to approximately 0.4M, such as from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may form an organic phase in an extraction system that also includes an aqueous phase. Methods of extracting cesium and strontium as well as strontium alone are also disclosed.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing & Mining Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing & Mining energyuselossopportunitiesanalys...

422

Draft "Michigan Saves" Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A sample loan loss reserve agreement between a state or local government and a financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund.

423

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

424

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

425

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

426

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

427

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Authors: Robert S. Bowman, New Mexico Technological University, Socorro, NM; Enid J. Sullivan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM; and Lynn E. Katz and Kerry A. Kinney, University of Texas, Austin, TX. Venue: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society in Santa Fe, NM, June 3–7, 2007 (http://www.clays.org/home/HomeAnnualMeeting.html [external site]). Abstract: About 2.3 billion cubic meters (600 billion gallons) of wastewater (produced water) is generated each year as a byproduct of oil and gas operations in the continental United States. Disposal of this water represents about 10% of the cost of hydrocarbon production. Inexpensive treatment technologies can lower the cost of disposal and generate higher-quality water for other uses. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively sorb a variety of nonpolar organic compounds from water. SMZ was tested as a medium to remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from produced water generated during extraction of coalbed natural gas. BTEX removal is necessary prior to surface discharge of produced waters or as a pretreatment for reverse osmosis. We demonstrated in laboratory column experiments that BTEX-saturated SMZ is readily regenerated by air sparging. There was no loss in BTEX sorption capacity, and a minor decrease in hydraulic conductivity, after 50 sorption/regeneration cycles. Based upon the laboratory results, a pilot-scale produced-water treatment system was designed and tested at a reinjection facility in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico. The SMZ-based system was designed to treat up to 110 liters (30 gallons) of produced water per hour on a continuous basis by running two SMZ columns in series. The system performed as predicted, based on laboratory results, over repeated feed and regeneration cycles during the month-long operation. The BTEX-laden sparge gases were treated with a vapor-phase bioreactor system, resulting in an emissions-free process

428

RESEARCH ON CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL USING AN EXTRACTIVE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a one-year effort directed at the exploration of the use of coal as a feedstock for a variety of industrially-relevant carbon products. The work was basically divided into three focus areas. The first area dealt with the acquisition of laboratory equipment to aid in the analysis and characterization of both the raw coal and the coal-derived feedstocks. Improvements were also made on the coal-extraction pilot plant which will now allow larger quantities of feedstock to be produced. Mass and energy balances were also performed on the pilot plant in an attempt to evaluate the scale-up potential of the process. The second focus area dealt with exploring hydrogenation conditions specifically aimed at testing several less-expensive candidate hydrogen-donor solvents. Through a process of filtration and vacuum distillation, viable pitch products were produced and evaluated. Moreover, a recycle solvent was also isolated so that the overall solvent balance in the system could be maintained. The effect of variables such as gas pressure and gas atmosphere were evaluated. The pitch product was analyzed and showed low ash content, reasonable yield, good coking value and a coke with anisotropic optical texture. A unique plot of coke yield vs. pitch softening point was discovered to be independent of reaction conditions or hydrogen-donor solvent. The third area of research centered on the investigation of alternate extraction solvents and processing conditions for the solvent extraction step. A wide variety of solvents, co-solvents and enhancement additives were tested with varying degrees of success. For the extraction of raw coal, the efficacy of the alternate solvents when compared to the benchmark solvent, N-methyl pyrrolidone, was not good. However when the same coal was partially hydrogenated prior to solvent extraction, all solvents showed excellent results even for extractions performed at room temperature. Standard analyses of the extraction products indicated that they had the requisite properties of viable carbon-product precursors.

Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo; Chong Chen; Brian Bland; David Fenton

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

GC-MS determination of parabens, triclosan and methyl triclosan in water by in situ derivatisation and stir-bar sorptive extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stir-bar sorptive extraction in combination with an in situ derivatisation reaction and thermal desorption–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry was successfully applied to determine parabens (methylparaben, is...

Ana María Casas Ferreira; Monika Möder…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

ENHANCED LOSS OF FAST IONS DURING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America in a large increase in the fast ion loss rate and heats the lost particles to several megaelectronvolts. The lost ions are observed at the passing-trapped boundary and appear to be either DD fusion produced

431

Reducing food losses by intelligent food logistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1006 62 Theme Issue Intelligent food logistics: decrease waste and improve quality...Reducing food losses by intelligent food logistics Reiner Jedermann 1 Mike Nicometo 2 Ismail...Bremen Research Cluster for Dynamics in Logistics (LogDynamics), Bremen, Germany One...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Nonlinear Losses Induced in Spherical Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From Naugol'nykh's spherical sawtooth?wave solution curves are constructed which predict the nonlinear induced extra loss in fundamental amplitude. As in the plane wave case the propagation path can be split into three zones. In the first zone nonlinear effects dominate over attenuation. In the second zone a stable distorted waveform is propagated. In the third zone attenuation reduces the amplitude so that nonlinear effects are no longer important. Although the predicted losses are smaller than in the plane wave case they are not negligible. A criterion for cavitation is used in order to define depths in the ocean where cavitation will be the limiting factor on sound power level and not extra losses. By considering a specific example it is concluded that cavitation will indeed be the limiting factor down to a depth of about 2000 ft. At depths below 2000 ft extra losses can become significant for propagation from steady?state spherical sources operating below the cavitation threshold.

Boyd B. Cary

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

434

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

435

Chapter 8 - Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although natural gas is a nonrenewable resource, it is included for discussion because its sudden growth from fracking will impact the development and use of renewable fuels. Firms who are engaged in the development of processes that employ synthesis gas as an intermediate have concluded that the synthesis gas is more economically obtainable by steam reforming of natural gas than by gasification of waste cellulose. In some instances, firms have largely abandoned the effort to produce a renewable fuel as such, and in others firms are developing hybrid processes that employ natural gas in combination with a fermentation system. Moreover, natural gas itself is an attractive fuel for internal combustion engines since it can be the least expensive option on a cost per joule basis. It is also aided by its high octane number of 130.

Arthur M. Brownstein

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Gas shielding apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

Brandt, D.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

437

Extraction Route Trials on Sensitive Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on extraction routes. These routes must therefore be carefully constructed and maintained in order to safeguard

438

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Yun Soo Myung

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

439

Accurate extraction of the News  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new scheme for extracting gravitational radiation from a characteristic numerical simulation of a spacetime. This method is similar in conception to our earlier work but analytical and numerical implementation is different. The scheme is based on direct transformation to the Bondi coordinates and the gravitational waves are extracted by calculating the Bondi news function in Bondi coordinates. The entire calculation is done in a way which will make the implementation easy when we use uniform Bondi angular grid at $\\mathcal I^+$. Using uniform Bondi grid for news calculation has added advantage that we have to solve only ordinary differential equations instead of partial differential equation. For the test problems this new scheme allows us to extract gravitational radiation much more accurately than the previous schemes.

Shrirang S. Deshingkar

2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

440

Method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile comprises soaking the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution and distributing an oxygen-containing gas throughout the coal refuse pile for a time period sufficient to effect oxidation of coal contained in the coal refuse pile. The method further comprises leaching the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution to solubilize and extract the oxidized coal as alkali salts of humic acids and collecting the resulting solution containing the alkali salts of humic acids. Calcium hydroxide may be added to the solution of alkali salts of humic acid to form precipitated humates useable as a low-ash, low-sulfur solid fuel.

Yavorsky, Paul M. (Monongahela, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Characterization of the crude oil polar compound extract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research is designed to determine if there are any naturally occurring constituents in crude oils that can be chemically altered to bring about increased oil production. An extract containing only the polar organic compounds of the crude oil was obtained by using a modification of the ASTM-2007 procedure. Chemical characterization of the polar compounds were carried out using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography. The HPLC analyses indicated a range of polar organic compound content of 10 crude oils from 1.6% to 12.7%. Wettability determinations show that by adding a small amount of the polar fraction from a crude oil, to a mineral oil, a 40 to 111% change of wettability toward a more oil-wet system will occur, depending on the specific extract used.

Donaldson, E.C.; Crocker, M.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Extracting the Acoustic pressure field from Large Eddy Simulation of confined reactive flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and non-premixed open flames3,4 as well as in more complex cases such as gas turbine combustors must be large enough to include the sources of noise as well as part of the acoustic near field.6 VeryExtracting the Acoustic pressure field from Large Eddy Simulation of confined reactive flows Camilo

Nicoud, Franck

443

Gas Filter Testing Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas filtration of air in the cleanroom is carried out with HEPA (high- ... filter. The ambient air filters for the cleanroom are relatively fragile and require great care...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

445

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

446

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

447

,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

448

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

449

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1979" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

450

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",1,"Annual",2013,"6302012" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

451

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

452

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

453

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

454

,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",6,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

455

,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

456

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

457

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

458

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

459

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

460

,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

462

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

463

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

464

,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

301967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2013,"6301991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

465

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

466

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

467

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

468

,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

469

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

470

Unconventional Natural Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(NETL) Anthony Zammerilli General Engineer Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil Energy Sector Planning and Analysis (ESPA) Robert C. Murray, Thomas Davis, and James...

471

Oil and Gas Outlook  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Outlook For Independent Petroleum Association of America November 13, 2014 | Palm Beach, FL By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration Recent...

472

Natural gas annual 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Ammonia synthesis gas purification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes the purification of a reformed gas mixture following water gas shift conversion to produce a purified ammonia synthesis gas stream. The improved processing sequence consisting essentially of: (A) Selectively catalytically oxidizing the residual carbon monoxide content of the gas mixture to carbon dioxide so as to reduce the carbon monoxide content of the gas mixture to less than about 20 ppm, the selective catalytic oxidation being carried out with an excess of air, with the excess oxygen being catalytically reacted with a small amount of hydrogen so that the residual oxygen level is reduced to less than about 3 ppm; (B) removing the bulk of the carbon dioxide content of the gas mixture by liquid absorption; (C) Removing residual amounts of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water by selective adsorption on the fixed beds of a thermal swing adsorption system, a dry, purified ammonia ammonia synthesis gas stream containing less than a total of 10 ppm of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide being recovered from the thermal swing adsorption system; (D) Passing the resulting dry, purified ammonia synthesis gas stream having a low content of methane to an ammonia production operation without intermediate passage of the ammonia synthesis gas stream to a methanation unit or to a cryogenic unit for removal of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide therefrom; whereby the efficiency of the overall purification operation and the effective utilization of hydrogen are enhanced.

Fuderer, A.

1986-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

474

,"California Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312014"...

475

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data collected on Form EIA-914 (Monthly Natural Gas Production Report) for Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming, Other States...

476

The Natural Gas Advantage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental think-tank leaders and the new energy secretary are singing the praises of the ever-expanding U.S. natural gas bonanza, but at the same time, they worry about permanent dependence on this fossil fuel. ... This flood of shale-based natural gas finds has been great for U.S. chemical companies because it is a cheap feedstock and fuel source. ... Equally important, it is also revising the greenhouse gas-climate change equation because, when burned to generate electricity, natural gas produces the same electrical output as coal but emits half the amount of carbon dioxide. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

477

NETL: Natural Gas Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Significant volumes of natural gas can also be produced from tight (low permeability) sandstone reservoirs and coal seams, both unconventional reservoir rocks. NETL...

478

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

force majeure declared December 17 at its Totem storage field, Colorado Interstate Gas Pipeline (CIG) reported that it anticipates repair work to be complete around February 12,...

479

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

imbalances. Northern Natural Gas Company declared a force majeure after an unplanned repair issue at the Spearman Compressor Station in Ochiltree County, Texas, on Friday,...

480

String Gas Baryogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

G. L. Alberghi

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Home Safety: Radon Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. This publication explains the health risks, testing methods, and mitigation and reduction techniques....

Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

482

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Interstate Gas Company (CIG) declared force majeure as a result of an unforeseen mechanical outage at the Morton compressor station in Colorado on pipeline segment 118....

483

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Columbia Gas Transmission, LLC on March 16 began planned maintenance on its pipeline in Green County, Pennsylvania. The maintenance will reduce capacity at an interconnect...

484

Reversible Acid Gas Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

Dave Heldebrant

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Reversible Acid Gas Capture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

Dave Heldebrant

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

486

NETL: Oil & Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Gas Publications KMD Contacts Project Summaries EPAct 2005 Arctic Energy Office Announcements Software Stripper Wells Efficient recovery of our nation's fossil fuel resources...

487

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

488

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

489

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

490

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

491

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

492

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

493

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

494

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

495

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

496

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

497

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

498

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

499

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

500

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed