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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Extraction Loss...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Pages: Extraction Loss of Natural Gas at Processing Plants (Summary) Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Processing Extraction Loss of Natural Gas at...

2

South Dakota Natural Gas Extraction Loss (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Extraction Loss (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Extraction Loss (Million Cubic Feet) Decade...

3

Extraction Loss of Natural Gas at Processing Plants (Summary...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Extraction Loss Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area...

4

Extraction Loss of Natural Gas at Processing Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

5

Gas Water Heater Energy Losses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

non-firing, non- recovery mode, i.e. , during standby mode.The stack losses while in standby mode account for about 43%can be made by reducing standby heat losses. This paper

Biermayer, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Air extraction in gas turbines burning coal-derived gas  

SciTech Connect

In the first phase of this contracted research, a comprehensive investigation was performed. Principally, the effort was directed to identify the technical barriers which might exist in integrating the air-blown coal gasification process with a hot gas cleanup scheme and the state-of-the-art, US made, heavy-frame gas turbine. The guiding rule of the integration is to keep the compressor and the expander unchanged if possible. Because of the low-heat content of coal gas and of the need to accommodate air extraction, the combustor and perhaps, the flow region between the compressor exit and the expander inlet might need to be modified. In selecting a compressed air extraction scheme, one must consider how the scheme affects the air supply to the hot section of the turbine and the total pressure loss in the flow region. Air extraction must preserve effective cooling of the hot components, such as the transition pieces. It must also ensure proper air/fuel mixing in the combustor, hence the combustor exit pattern factor. The overall thermal efficiency of the power plant can be increased by minimizing the total pressure loss in the diffusers associated with the air extraction. Therefore, a study of airflow in the pre- and dump-diffusers with and without air extraction would provide information crucial to attaining high-thermal efficiency and to preventing hot spots. The research group at Clemson University suggested using a Griffith diffuser for the prediffuser and extracting air from the diffuser inlet. The present research establishes that the analytically identified problems in the impingement cooling flow are factual. This phase of the contracted research substantiates experimentally the advantage of using the Griffith diffuser with air extraction at the diffuser inlet.

Yang, Tah-teh; Agrawal, A.K.; Kapat, J.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

8

Mitigating greenhouse gas and nitrogen loss with improved fertilizer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

impacts on greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, N loss and economic implication are rarely analysed. A decision support system (DSS) has been developed to.

9

Gas-rich sediment and coastal wetland loss in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

High rates of wetland loss in southern Louisiana provide the impetus for examining the role that trapped, biogenic gases play in regulating subsidence of coastal areas. A significant cause for wetland loss in this region is relative sea-level rise produced by sediment-volume reduction. Dewatering, grain reorientation and packing, and oxidation of organic-rich sediments are thought to be the main processes for volume loss. It is argued that natural and anthropogenic causes for sediment degasification play a critical role in sediment-volume reduction. Compressional wave velocities were measured at 34 sites in both the abandoned (Holocene) and modern parts of the Mssissippi Delta. A low-frequency source (<200 Hz) was used to maximize sound-wave dispersion caused by interstitial gas bubbles. Compressional wave velocities measured at low frequencies relative to the gas-bubble resonant-frequency undergo maximum change from the velocity for a gas-free sediment.

Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, L.D.; Wilkey, P.L.; Miller, S.F.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

California Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) California Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

11

New Mexico Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) New Mexico Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

12

COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction and Hydraulic Fracturing" Professor Robert Jackson Duke University...

13

Air extraction and LBTU coal gas combustion in gas turbines for IGCC systems  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the cold flow experiments is to study the effects of air extraction from two sites in a heavy-frame gas turbine: (1) the engine wrapper or manholes and (2) the compressor/combustor prediffuser inlet. The experiments involve a scale model of components of a state-of-the-art, US made gas turbine between the compressor exit and the turbine inlet Specifically, the purpose is to observe and measure how air extraction affects the flow distribution around the combustor cans and the impingement cooling flow rates on transition pieces of the combustor. The experimental data should provide turbine manufacturers the information needed to determine their preferred air extraction site. The secondary objectives for the experiments are as follows: (1) to identify regions with high-pressure losses, (2) to develop a dam base which will validate computational fluid dynamic calculations, and (3) to establish an experimental facility which may be used to assist the US industry in improving the aerodynamic design of nonrotating components of a heavy-frame gas turbine.

Yang, Tah-teh; Agrawal, A.K.; Kapat, J.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a no loss fueling station for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a use device such as a motor vehicle. It comprises: a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and gas head; means for delivering LNG to the pressure building tank; means for selectively building the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for selectively reducing the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for controlling the pressure building and pressure reducing means to maintain a desired pressure in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and means for delivering the LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

Cieslukowski, R.E.

1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

EPA's Natural Gas Extraction -- Hydraulic Fracturing Website...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

enabling greater access to gas in shale formations. Responsible development of America's shale gas resources offers important economic, energy security, and environmental...

16

CONSIDERING SHALE GAS EXTRACTION IN NORTH CAROLINA: LESSONS FROM OTHER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

257 CONSIDERING SHALE GAS EXTRACTION IN NORTH CAROLINA: LESSONS FROM OTHER STATES SARAH K. ADAIR Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) announced the existence of shale gas underlying the Deep and Dan River and the state legislature began to consider policy changes that would be necessary to develop the shale gas

Jackson, Robert B.

17

Energy Loss at Propagating Jamming Fronts in Granular Gas Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the initial moments of impact between two dense granular clusters in a two-dimensional geometry. The particles are composed of solid CO$_{2}$ and are levitated on a hot surface. Upon collision, the propagation of a dynamic "jamming front" produces a distinct regime for energy dissipation in a granular gas in which the translational kinetic energy decreases by over 90%. Experiments and associated simulations show that the initial loss of kinetic energy obeys a power law in time, $\\Delta E=-Kt^{3/2}$, a form that can be predicted from kinetic arguments.

Justin C. Burton; Peter Y. Lu; Sidney R. Nagel

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

18

Extracting physically interpretable data from electron energy-loss spectra.  

SciTech Connect

Principal component analysis is routinely applied to analyze data sets in electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). We show how physically meaningful spectra can be obtained from the principal components using a knowledge of the scattering of the probe electron and the geometry of the experiment. This approach is illustrated by application to EELS data for the carbon K edge in graphite obtained using a conventional transmission electron microscope. The effect of scattering of the probe electron is accounted for, yielding spectra which are equivalent to experiments using linearly polarized X-rays. The approach is general and can also be applied to EELS in the context of scanning transmission electron microscopy.

Witte, C.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Allen, L. J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Melbourn

2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

a review of 2 Shale gas extraction in the UK: a review of hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas extraction in the UK: a review of hydraulic fracturing June 2012 #12;2 Shale gas extraction in the UK: a review of hydraulic fracturing This document can be viewed online at: royalsociety.org/policy/projects/shale-gas-extraction and raeng.org.uk/shale Shale gas extraction in the UK: a review of hydraulic fracturing Issued: June 2012

Rambaut, Andrew

20

U.S. Natural Gas Extraction Loss (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 79 79 77 73 77 74 76 77 74 76 75 78 1974 79 72 78 73 76 71 75 74 72 73 71 74 1975 77 71 75 73 73 71 73 73 70 71 70 75 1976 75 71 73 69 72 70 72 70 67 70 70 75 1977 75 72 75 71 73 71 72 71 69 70 69 74 1978 74 70 75 71 71 69 72 71 67 70 69 73 1979 70 65 69 67 68 65 66 67 65 67 68 72 1980 70 66 70 64 65 61 62 61 61 63 64 69 1981 68 61 67 65 66 63 65 66 61 64 61 67 1982 71 65 69 65 64 62 63 61 59 60 61 62 1983 72 64 66 62 62 60 63 66 64 68 68 75 1984 79 69 71 69 69 67 69 68 65 69 68 74 1985 77 70 71 66 66 63 65 65 64 66 66 75 1986 76 67 71 64 65 63 64 67 63 64 62 70

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solvent Extraction for Remediation of Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has assessed the feasibility of using a solvent extraction process to remove coal tar from the subsurface or to treat contaminated soil excavated from manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. The assessment indicates that in situ solvent extraction may recover a significant amount of tar from the subsurface within a reasonable timeframe, provided subsurface conditions are conducive to process implementation. This work will help utilities searching for cost-effective technologies to remediate MGP sites.

1993-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

22

Pulsed extraction of ionization from helium buffer gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The migration of intense ionization created in helium buffer gas under the influence of applied electric fields is considered. First the chemical evolution of the ionization created by fast heavy-ion beams is described. Straight forward estimates of the lifetimes for charge exchange indicate a clear suppression of charge exchange during ion migration in low pressure helium. Then self-consistent calculations of the migration of the ions in the electric field of a gas-filled cell at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) using a Particle-In-Cell computer code are presented. The results of the calculations are compared to measurements of the extracted ion current caused by beam pulses injected into the NSCL gas cell.

D. J. Morrissey; G. Bollen; M. Facina; S. Schwarz

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

Albany Interim Landfill gas extraction and mobile power system: Using landfill gas to produce electricity. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albany Interim Landfill Gas Extraction and Mobile Power System project served three research objectives: (1) determination of the general efficiency and radius of influence of horizontally placed landfill gas extraction conduits; (2) determination of cost and effectiveness of a hydrogen sulfide gas scrubber utilizing Enviro-Scrub{trademark} liquid reagent; and (3) construction and evaluation of a dual-fuel (landfill gas/diesel) 100 kW mobile power station. The horizontal gas extraction system was very successful; overall, gas recovery was high and the practical radius of influence of individual extractors was about 50 feet. The hydrogen sulfide scrubber was effective and its use appears feasible at typical hydrogen sulfide concentrations and gas flows. The dual-fuel mobile power station performed dependably and was able to deliver smooth power output under varying load and landfill gas fuel conditions.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

U.S. Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) U.S. Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

25

Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or adjustment. Water produced from this process should require little processing for use, depending on the end application. Test Series II water quality was not as good as that obtained in Test Series I; however, this was believed to be due to a system upset that contaminated the product water system during Test Series II. The amount of water that can be recovered from flue gas with the LDDS is a function of several variables, including desiccant temperature, L/G in the absorber, flash drum pressure, liquid-gas contact method, and desiccant concentration. Corrosion will be an issue with the use of calcium chloride as expected but can be largely mitigated through proper material selection. Integration of the LDDS with either low-grade waste heat and or ground-source heating and cooling can affect the parasitic power draw the LDDS will have on a power plant. Depending on the amount of water to be removed from the flue gas, the system can be designed with no parasitic power draw on the power plant other than pumping loads. This can be accomplished in one scenario by taking advantage of the heat of absorption and the heat of vaporization to provide the necessary temperature changes in the desiccant with the flue gas and precipitates that may form and how to handle them. These questions must be addressed in subsequent testing before scale-up of the process can be confidently completed.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Microwave-assisted solvent extraction and gas chromatography ion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 17, 2006 ... sistent organochlorine pesticides (POPs) in marine sedi- ment was ... variables microwave power, extraction time and tempera- ture, amount of ...

27

No loss single line fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A no loss fueling station is described for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a fuel tank of a use device such as a motor vehicle, comprising: (a) a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and a natural gas head; (b) first means for selectively building the pressure and temperature in the pressure building tank; (c) second means for selectively reducing the pressure and temperature in the pressure building tank; (d) means for controlling the first and second means to maintain a desired pressure and temperature in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and (e) means for delivering LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

Cieslukowski, R.E.

1993-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

28

A study of natural gas extraction in Marcellus shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the dramatic increases in crude oil prices there has been a need to find reliable energy substitutions. One substitution that has been used in the United States is natural gas. However, with the increased use of natural ...

Boswell, Zachary (Zachary Karol)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

Jackson, Robert B.

30

Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 6,146 6,200 1989-2011 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 347 356 2010-2011 Extraction Loss...

31

Platinum loss and migration in porous gas diffusion fuel cell electrodes as studied by Rutherford backscattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Long-term operation of phosphoric acid fuel cell produces severe migration of the highly dispersed electrocatalyst, Pt, from the cathode to the anode. We have examined, before and after extended operation, the porous gas diffusion electrode assemblies by conventional Rutherford backscattering spectrometry using the ion beam facility at Los Alamos. In addition, we have made computer simulations to the data that give catalyst concentration as a function of depth. The data demonstrate that after extended operation (500 to 2000 hours), Pt is lost from the cathode and is redeposited at the outermost surface layers of the anode electrode structure. This loss is significant and several factors contributing to it are discussed.

Borodovsky, L.; Beery, J.G.; Paffett, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The extraction of nuclear sea quark distribution and energy loss effect in Drell-Yan experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The next-to-leading order and leading order analysis are performed on the differential cross section ratio from Drell-Yan process. It is found that the effect of next-to-leading order corrections can be negligible on the differential cross section ratios as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and the target nuclei for the current Fermilab and future lower beam proton energy. The nuclear Drell-Yan reaction is an ideal tool to study the energy loss of the fast quark moving through cold nuclei. In the leading order analysis, the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the Fermilab E866 experimental data on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios as a function of the momentum fraction of the target parton. It is shown that the quark energy loss effect has significant impact on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios. The nuclear Drell-Yan experiment at current Fermilab and future lower energy proton beam can not provide us with more information on the nuclear sea quark distribution.

Chun-Gui Duan; Na Liu; Zhan-Yuan Yan

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

33

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed Extraction Loss Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports...

34

Experimentation and application of directional solvent extraction for desalination of seawater and shale gas 'frac' flowback water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently demonstrated directional solvent technique for desalination of water has been tested for desalting seawater and shale gas 'frac' flowback water. The premise behind directional solvent extraction is that when ...

Kleinguetl, Kevin (Kevin G.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Experimental investigation of the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense relativistic electron rings in hydrogen gas and plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an experimental study on the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense, relativistic electron rings confined in Astron-like magnetic field geometries are presented. The work is subdivided into four sections: gas trapping; average ring electron energetics; plasma trapping, and hollow-beam cusp-injection into gas and plasma. The mechanisms by which the injected beam coalesces into a current ring in the existing Cornell RECE-Berta facility are considered. To investigate the nature of ring electron energy loss mechanisms following completion of the trapping process, a diagnostic was developed utilizing multi-foil X-ray absorption spectroscopy to analyze the Bremsstrahlung generated by the electrons as they impinge upon a thin tungsten wire target suspended in the circulating current. Finally, a set of preliminary experimental results is presented in which an annular electron beam was passed through a coaxial, non-adiabatic magnetic cusp located at one end of a magnetic mirror well.

Smith, A.C. Jr.

1977-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

36

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

37

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ?375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?Sr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?Sr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Elizabeth C. Chapman,† Rosemary C. Capo,† Brian W. Stewart,*,† Carl S. Kirby,‡ Richard W. Hammack,§ Karl T. Schroeder,§ and Harry M. Edenborn

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

The influence of quark energy loss on extracting nuclear sea quark distribution from nuclear Drell-Yan experimental data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By means of two typical kinds of quark energy loss parametrization and the nuclear parton distributions determined only with lepton-nuclear deep inelastic scattering experimental data, a leading order analysis are performed on the proton-induced Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios of tungsten versus deuterium as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and target nuclei. It is found that the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the experimental data. The quark energy loss effect produce approximately 3% to 11% suppression on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios $R_{W/D}$ in the range $0.05\\leq x_2\\leq0.3$. The application of nuclear Drell-Yan data with heavy targets is remarkably subject to difficulty in the constraints of the nuclear sea-quark distribution.

Chun-Gui, Duan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The influence of quark energy loss on extracting nuclear sea quark distribution from nuclear Drell-Yan experimental data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By means of two typical kinds of quark energy loss parametrization and the nuclear parton distributions determined only with lepton-nuclear deep inelastic scattering experimental data, a leading order analysis are performed on the proton-induced Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios of tungsten versus deuterium as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and target nuclei. It is found that the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the experimental data. The quark energy loss effect produce approximately 3% to 11% suppression on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios $R_{W/D}$ in the range $0.05\\leq x_2\\leq0.3$. The application of nuclear Drell-Yan data with heavy targets is remarkably subject to difficulty in the constraints of the nuclear sea-quark distribution.

Duan Chun-Gui; Liu Na

2008-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ba-ion extraction from a high pressure Xe gas for double-beta decay studies with EXO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental setup is being developed to extract Ba ions from a high-pressure Xe gas environment. It aims to transport Ba ions from 10 bar Xe to vacuum conditions. The setup utilizes a converging-diverging nozzle in combination with a radio-frequency (RF) funnel to move Ba ions into vacuum through the pressure drop of several orders of magnitude. This technique is intended to be used in a future multi-ton detector investigating double-beta decay in $^{136}$Xe. Efficient extraction and detection of Ba ions, the decay product of Xe, would allow for a background-free measurement of the $^{136}$Xe double-beta decay.

T. Brunner; D. Fudenberg; A. Sabourov; V. L. Varentsov; G. Gratta; D. Sinclair; for the EXO collaboration

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A3. Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Natural Gas Processed and Liquids Extracted at Natural Gas Processing Plants by State, 1996 Table Plant Location Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants a (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted b (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss (million cubic feet) State Production Out of State Production Natural Gas Processed Alabama..................................... 111,656 1,212 112,868 4,009 5,361 Alaska ........................................ 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 Arkansas.................................... 214,868 4,609 219,477 383 479 California.................................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 Colorado .................................... 493,748 215 493,963 16,735 23,362 Florida........................................ 5,900 2,614 8,514 1,630 1,649 Illinois.........................................

42

Economics of tight sands gas extraction as affected by r and d. Occasional pub  

SciTech Connect

The paper examines the economics and resource potential of tight sand formations as a major near-term source of unconventional gas. The main vehicles for analyzing the issues to date are the 1980 study by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) on tight sand resources and two studies based on the NPC's work at different stages of completion for the GRI Center for Energy Systems Analysis (CESA).

Rosenberg, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

An energy equivalency analysis of trade-offs between thermal efficiency and standby loss requirements for commercial gas service water heaters  

SciTech Connect

The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) Standing Standard Project Committee 90.1 has approved an addendum (90.lb) to ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989. The addendum specifies an increase in the minimum thermal efficiency requirement (from 77% to 78%), accompanied by an easing of the standby loss requirements, for commercial gas-fired service water heaters. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed an energy equivalency analysis to assess the impact of trade-offs between the improved thermal efficiency and the less stringent standby loss requirements. The analysis objective was to estimate whether the energy savings during firing would offset the increased energy losses during standby periods. The primary focus of this report is to summarize the major results of the analysis and provide a recommendation for minimum energy-efficiency commercial gas-fired service water heaters. Limitations to the availability of detailed performance and energy-use data for these commercial water heaters are also pointed out.

Somasundaram, S.; Jarnagin, R.E.; Keller, J.M.; Schliesing, J.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

of the Oil and Gas Extraction Point Source Category to the Territorial Seas of Texas (TXG260000)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source facilities and New Source facilities in the Offshore Subcategory of the Oil and Gas Extraction Point Source Category (40 CFR Part 435, Subpart A) located in and discharging to lease blocks in the territorial seas offshore of Texas. The discharge of produced water to the Territorial Seas of Texas from Offshore Subcategory facilities located in the Outer Continental Shelf waters is proposed not to be authorized by this permit. The draft permit also proposes to add monitoring requirements for priority pollutants and radium contributed by produced water. The draft permit also proposes for zero discharge of produced water from new production wells. The permit limitations conform to Oil and Gas Offshore Subcategory Guidelines and contain additional requirements to assure that state water quality standards will be met and that there will be no unreasonable degradation of the marine environment, as required by Section 403(c) of the Clean Water Act. Specifically, the draft permit proposes to retain prohibiting the discharge of drilling fluids, drill cuttings, and produced sand to the territorial seas. Limits for oil and grease and 24-hour (end-of-pipe) acute toxicity and 7-day chronic toxicity are retained from the current permit for produced water discharges. Well treatment, completion, and workover fluids are retained to be limited for oil and grease and the discharge of priority pollutants. A prohibition on

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

46

Shale gas extraction in the UK: What the people think? Applications are invited for a three -year fully funded PhD studentship (BGS/UoN) based in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas extraction in the UK: What the people think? Applications are invited for a three -year/EU rate) and a maintenance grant (ÂŁ13,590 in 12/13). The emergence of shale gas on the energy landscape in the transition to a low carbon economy. In the US, for example, the speed at which shale gas has been developed

Nottingham, University of

47

Natural Gas Annual 2010 (NGA) - With Data for 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Natural Gas Annual With Data for 2010 | Release Date: December 29, 2011 | Next Release: December 29, 2012 | full report Data Tablesall tables Overview 1 Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States PDF CSV 2 Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State PDF CSV Supplies 3 Gross Withdrawals and Marketed Production of Natural Gas by State and the Gulf of Mexico PDF CSV 4 Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas by State and the Gulf of Mexico PDF CSV 5 Number of Producing Gas Wells by State and the Gulf of Mexico PDF CSV 6 Wellhead Value and Marketed Production of Natural Gas, and by State PDF CSV 7 Natural Gas Processed, Liquids Extracted, and Estimated Extraction Loss by State PDF CSV

48

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

49

Gas Water Heater Energy Losses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Insul. Thk. (in) 11. Supply Pipe Heat Trap (0,1,-1)* 12.Draw Pipe Heat Trap (0,1,-1)* * 0 = No heat trap 1 = Metallosses through the pipes by improving heat traps and by

Biermayer, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Gas Water Heater Energy Losses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analyses of storage-type water heaters. 2 TANK modelswater heater as part of the DOE rulemaking analysis. We used the most current version of this model--

Biermayer, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100’s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

52

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5,476 5,732 5,805 7,122 7,636 Marketed Production... 1,456 1,306 1,437 1,252 1,329 Extraction Loss ... 0...

53

Extracting the Chern number from the dynamics of a Fermi gas: Implementing a quantum Hall bar for cold atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a scheme to measure the quantized Hall conductivity of an ultracold Fermi gas initially prepared in a topological (Chern) insulating phase, and driven by a constant force. We show that the time evolution of the center of mass, after releasing the cloud, provides a direct and clear signature of the topologically invariant Chern number. We discuss the validity of this scheme, highlighting the importance of driving the system with a sufficiently strong force to displace the cloud over measurable distances while avoiding band-mixing effects. The unusual shapes of the driven atomic cloud are qualitatively discussed in terms of a semi-classical approach.

Alexandre Dauphin; Nathan Goldman

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

54

Identifying technology barriers in adapting a state-of-the-art gas turbine for IGCC applications and an experimental investigation of air extraction schemes for IGCC operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Under contracted work with Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Clemson University, the prime contractor, and General Electric (GE) and CRSS, the subcontractors, made a comprehensive study in the first phase of research to investigate the technology barriers of integrating a coal gasification process with a hot gas cleanup scheme and the state-of-the-art industrial gas turbine, the GE MS-7001F. This effort focused on (1) establishing analytical tools necessary for modeling combustion phenomenon and emissions in gas turbine combustors operating on multiple species coal gas, (2) estimates the overall performance of the GE MS-7001F combined cycle plant, (3) evaluating material issues in the hot gas path, (4) examining the flow and temperature fields when air extraction takes place at both the compressor exit and at the manhole adjacent to the combustor, and (5) examining the combustion/cooling limitations of such a gas turbine by using 3-D numerical simulation of a MS-7001F combustor operated with gasified coal. In the second phase of this contract, a 35% cool flow model was built similar to GE`s MS-7001F gas turbine for mapping the flow region between the compressor exit and the expander inlet. The model included sufficient details, such as the combustor`s transition pieces, the fuel nozzles, and the supporting struts. Four cases were studied: the first with a base line flow field of a GE 7001F without air extraction; the second with a GE 7001F with air extraction; and the third and fourth with a GE 7001F using a Griffith diffuser to replace the straight wall diffuser and operating without air extraction and with extraction, respectively.

Yang, Tah-teh; Agrawal, A.K.; Kapat, J.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Natural Gas Monthly, October 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents recent data and current estimates on the consumption, disposition, prices, storage, import, and export of natural gas in the USA for October 1984. Also included are operating and financial data for major interstate natural gas pipeline companies plus data on filings, ceiling prices and transportation under the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. Featured articles entitled Main Line Natural Gas Sales to Industrial Users, 1983, and Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers, 1983 (Preliminary) are included. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus extraction loss) during October 1984 was estimated at 1437 billion cubic feet (Bcf), 4.7% above October 1983 dry gas production. Consumption of natural gas during October 1984 was an estimated 1279 Bcf, 0.4% above the October 1983 level. Compared to the previous September, residential consumption was up 3.2%, commercial consumption down 6.8%, industrial consumption up 11.5%, and electric utility consumption down 2.7%. The volume of working gas in underground storage reservoirs at the end of October 1984 was 2.8% below the October 1983 level. The average wellhead price of natural gas in August 1984 was $2.60 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf). In August 1983, the average was $2.58 per Mcf. In October 1984, the average residential price of natural gas was $6.25 per Mcf. The comparable price in October 1983 was $6.10 per Mcf. The average wellhead (first sale) price for natural gas purchases projected for November 1984 by selected interstate pipeline companies was $2.82 per Mcf. 5 figures, 21 tables. (DMC)

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

TRITIUM EXTRACTION FACILITY ALARA  

SciTech Connect

The primary mission of the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) is to extract tritium from tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) that have been irradiated in a commercial light water reactor and to deliver tritium-containing gas to the Savannah River Site Facility 233-H. The tritium extraction segment provides the capability to deliver three (3) kilograms per year to the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The TEF includes processes, equipment and facilities capable of production-scale extraction of tritium while minimizing personnel radiation exposure, environmental releases, and waste generation.

Joye, BROTHERTON

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

57

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

58

H. R. 4564: a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to provide a deduction and special net operating loss rules with respect to certain losses on domestic crude oil, to increase tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, to require the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to be filled with stripper well oil, and to eliminate certain restrictions on the sale of natural gas and on the use of natural gas and oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 10, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Secure Energy Supply Act of 1986 amends the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. Title I provides a deduction and special net operating loss treatment for certain losses on crude oil. Title II increases tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, the revenues of which will cover authorized refunds. Title III provides that only stripper well oil or oil exchanged for stripper well oil will be used to fill the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Title IV removes wellhead price controls and repeals Natural Gas Act jurisdiction over certain first sales of natural gas. Later titles repeal certain restrictions on the use of natural gas and petroleum, repeal incremental pricing requirements, and promote flexibility in rescheduling or marking down troubled loans. The bill was referred to the House Committees on Ways and Means, Energy and Commerce, and Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Illinois Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

242 235 233 164 5,393 15,727 1967-2011 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 37 38 33 24 231 705 1983-2011 Extraction Loss (Million Cubic Feet) 47 48 42 31 345 1,043...

60

Ohio Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2,397 1,456 1981-2007 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 5 8 1983-2007 Extraction Loss (Million Cubic Feet) 5 9 0 0 0 0 1981...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Understanding landfill gas generation and migration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas research in the US Department of Energy (DOE) from Municipal Waste (EMW) Program is focusing on two major areas of investigation: (1) Landfill gas migration processes; and (2) Landfill gas generation. With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The overall purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites--a humid site with clay cover and a semiarid site with sand cover--have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the humid site indicate that: (1) concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen in soil gas vary seasonally with soil moisture; (2) based on average methane gradients in soil gas and a simple diffusion model, up to 10E5 g methane m/sup /minus /2/ yr/sup /minus/1/ are vented through the cover materials at the humid site (area of 17 ht); and (3) during prolonged wet weather, pressure gradients of more than 2 kPa may develop between the cover materials and top of refuse, indicating that pressure flow is periodically an important mechanism for gas transport. The second project is addressing landfill gas generation. The major goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examine the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being leached by three different methods to separate microbial mass and substrate. The leachates are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy of live cultures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Bogner, J.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

Anderson, D.C.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

IMPACT Loss Prevention Software - Syntex Management Systems, Inc.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Developed by Houston's Syntex Management Systems, IMPACT Loss Prevention Software is quickly becoming a standard in the oil and gas industry

64

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 5 5 4 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 5 5 5 5 4 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 5 5 5 5 4 Extraction Loss...............................................

65

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 96  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Iowa, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

66

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

67

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

68

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

69

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 70  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year . 9 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 443 331 233 611 654 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * * Total.............................................................. 443 331 233 611 655 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production...................................... 443 331 233 611 655 Extraction Loss .............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

70

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 124  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

71

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

72

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

73

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 104  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 46. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

74

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 92  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Illinois, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 240 251 316 316 316 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 169 165 E 161 E 165 E 164 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 Total............................................................... 174 170 E 166 E 170 E 169 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 174 E 170 E 166 E 170 E 169 Extraction Loss...............................................

75

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 164  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year..... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0

76

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 106  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 7 7 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 48 34 46 48 35 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 48 34 46 48 35 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 48 34 46 48 35 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

77

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 144  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

78

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

79

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 15 15 15 14 18 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 731 467 454 621 409 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 731 467 454 621 409 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 731 467 454 621 409 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0

80

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 164  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year..... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss..................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

82

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 82  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

83

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

84

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

85

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

86

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

87

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 6 5 5 5 5 Total............................................................... 6 5 5 5 5 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 6 5 5 5 5 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

88

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 132  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Carolina, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

89

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

90

Extraction Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Extraction Report Apple iPhone (Physical) Summary Connection Type Cable No. 110 Extraction start date/time 10/23/2012 3:21:58 PM ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

coastal loss | NOLA DEFENDER  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

BP Oil Doubled Wetland Loss, Study Says Posted Tuesday, ... coastal loss; Deepwater Horizon; louisiana coast; Oil; proceedings of the national academy ...

92

Natural Gas Annual, 1996  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

"Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition". 2. The EIA-176 Query System. This system provides a method of extracting and using the EIA-176 data, and...

93

Lifecycle impacts of natural gas to hydrogen pathways on urban air quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

following three natural gas to hydrogen supply pathways areHFCVs. Three natural gas-based hydrogen supply pathways areof the hy- drogen supply pathway: natural gas extraction,

Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M; Nicholas, Michael A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilot in Northern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage. Energy & Fuels,storage because of the potential to use CO 2 to extract additional oil or natural gas.

Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

When Do Losses Count?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current global and national databases that monitor losses from natural hazards suffer from a number of limitations, which in turn lead to misinterpretation and fallacies concerning the “truthfulness” of hazard loss data. These biases often go ...

Melanie Gall; Kevin A. Borden; Susan L. Cutter

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Evaluating Transformer Losses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper outlines how to determine what transformer losses cost and how to evaluate transformer bids to optimize the investment.

Grun, R. L. Jr.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

DNA Extraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA Extraction DNA Extraction Being able to extract deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is important for a number of reasons. By studying DNA, scientists can identify genetic disorders or diseases, and they can also possibly find cures for them by manipulating or experimenting with this DNA. At the Laboratory, researchers have studied DNA to detect biothreat agents in environmental and forensic samples. Scientists also are studying how human DNA may be destroyed by certain types of electromagnetic waves at certain frequencies. Classroom Activity: This activity is about the extraction of DNA from strawberries. Strawberries are a great fruit to use for this lesson because each student can work on his or her own. Strawberries are recommended because they yield more DNA than any other fruit. Strawberries are octoploid, which means that they have eight copies of each

98

Information Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automatic extraction of information from unstructured sources has opened up new avenues for querying, organizing, and analyzing data by drawing upon the clean semantics of structured databases and the abundance of unstructured data. The field of ...

Sunita Sarawagi

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

NERSC Supercomputers Help Reveal Secrets of Natural Gas Reserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Reserves New structural information could yield more efficient extraction of gas and oil from shale December 3, 2013 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Materials Science,...

100

Fluid extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NUCLEAR GAS ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary design study of the nuclear gas engine, consisting of a gas-cooled reactor directly coupled to a reciprocating engine, is presented. The principles of operation of the proposed gas engine are outlined and typical variations anre discussed. The nuclear gas engine is compared with other reciprocating engines and air compressors. A comparison between the ideal and actual cycles is made, with particular attention given to pumping, heat, and other losses to be expected. The applications and development of the nuclear gas engine are discussed. (W.D.M.)

Fraas, A.P.

1958-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

102

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- matically increasing natural-gas extraction. In aquifers overlying the Marcellus and Utica shale formations of drinking water associated with shale- gas extraction. In active gas-extraction areas (one or more gas wells methane sources such as the Marcellus and Utica shales at the active sites and matched gas geochemistry

103

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

104

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Context of '2002: Study Finds that Oil and Gas Industry ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Context of '2002: Study Finds that Oil and Gas Industry Responsible for Significant Portion of Louisiana Coastal Wetland Loss'

107

Distribution System Losses Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, there is not an industry standard on how utilities calculate and account for electrical losses and reductions in electric system losses. Computer models used to analyze power flows typically only include the primary components of the distribution system infrastructure. More detailed electric system models can benefit utilities by providing more accurate loss calculations as well as benefits for system planning and engineering. The utility industry could benefit from having a consistent and uni...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

Extraction of Titanium and Vanadium by Chloride Leach Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... extraction of vanadium from different sources such as ilmenite and oil shales. ... of Ammonium Heptamolybdate Tetrahydrate in Air and Inert Gas Atmospheres.

109

Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or Extraction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leasing for Production or Extraction of Oil, Gas and Other Minerals From Onshore State-Owned Lands (Mississippi) Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or...

110

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boilers is 80%. The maximum standby loss is specified usingrate. 8 There is no maximum standby loss specified for gas-of hot water use, standby losses are not a significant part

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy losses in switches  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors experiments show energy losses between 2 and 10 times that of the resistive time predictions. The experiments used hydrogen, helium, air, nitrogen, SF{sub 6} polyethylene, and water for the switching dielectric. Previously underestimated switch losses have caused over predicting the accelerator outputs. Accurate estimation of these losses is now necessary for new high-efficiency pulsed power devices where the switching losses constitute the major portion of the total energy loss. They found that the switch energy losses scale as (V{sub peak}I{sub peak}){sup 1.1846}. When using this scaling, the energy losses in any of the tested dielectrics are almost the same. This relationship is valid for several orders of magnitude and suggested a theoretical basis for these results. Currents up to .65 MA, with voltages to 3 MV were applied to various gaps during these experiments. The authors data and the developed theory indicates that the switch power loss continues for a much longer time than the resistive time, with peak power loss generally occurring at peak current in a ranging discharge instead of the early current time. All of the experiments were circuit code modeled after developing a new switch loss version based on the theory. The circuit code predicts switch energy loss and peak currents as a function of time. During analysis of the data they noticed slight constant offsets between the theory and data that depended on the dielectric. They modified the plasma conductivity for each tested dielectric to lessen this offset.

Martin, T.H.; Seamen, J.F.; Jobe, D.O.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Modeling the Loss Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we focus on modeling and predicting the loss distribution for credit risky assets such as bonds and loans. We model the probability of default and the recovery rate given default based on shared covariates. We develop a new class of default ... Keywords: Basel II, default prediction, loss distribution, recovery rates

Sudheer Chava; Catalina Stefanescu; Stuart Turnbull

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

114

Utah Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

93,836 195,701 202,380 412,639 454,832 490,233 1967-2011 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 2,418 2,241 2,643 6,527 7,648 10,805 1983-2011 Extraction Loss (Million Cubic...

115

California Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

223,580 206,239 195,272 198,213 204,327 180,648 1967-2011 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 11,267 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 1983-2011 Extraction Loss (Million...

116

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

751,036 888,705 1,029,641 1,233,260 1,434,003 1,507,467 1967-2011 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 26,111 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 63,075 1983-2011 Extraction Loss...

117

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

33,213 29,436 30,008 23,819 22,405 21,518 1967-2011 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 2,335 2,547 2,840 2,409 2,207 2,132 1983-2011 Extraction Loss (Million Cubic Feet)...

118

Hydraulic fracturing and shale gas extraction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the past decade the technique of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has been improved so much that it has become a cost effective method… (more)

Klein, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 4  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Algeria Nigeria Qatar Malaysia Oman Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 23.5 0.7 0.1 3.7 3.700 0.439 0.097 0.008 0.003 0.002 0.009 0.305 0.358 0.065 18.1 0.9 3.1 3.1 1.7 4.8 3.1 6.7 0.02 5.9 Egypt 0.073 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Monthly and Annual

120

Landfill gas generation and migration: Review of current research II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The overall purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites--a humid site, with vegetated clay cover and a semiarid site with unvegetated sandy silt cover--have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the past year's work at the semiarid site indicates that rates of CH/sub 4/ flux out of the landfill surface may be as high as 2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ g cm/sup /minus/2/ sec/sup /minus/1/ (6.3 /times/ 10/sup 2/ Kg m/sup /minus/1/ yr/sup /minus/1/) during dry soil conditions. Such high rates represent both the loss of an energy resource and a significance factor in global warming trends since atmospheric CH/sub 4/ contributes to the greenhouse effect. An independent estimate has suggested that 8--15% of global atmospheric CH/sub 4/ is attributable to landfill sources. The second project is addressing landfill gas generation. The major goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examine the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations. Triplicate assays of unamended refuse (controls) are compared to assays with added moisture, nutrients, and bacterial seed. To date, moisture addition is the single most important variable in stimulating gas production, particularly in samples with visible soil content. 56 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Vogt, M.; Piorkowski, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in the North Slope of Alaska that was able to safely extract a steady flow of natural gas from methane hydrates - a vast, entirely untapped resource that holds enormous...

122

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

123

Landfill gas generation and migration: Review of current research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites - a humid site with clay cover and a semiarid site with sand cover - have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the humid site indicate that concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen in soil gas vary seasonally with soil moisture; up to 10E5 g methane m/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/ are vented through the cover materials at the humid site (area of 17 ht); and during prolonged wet weather, pressure gradients of more than 2 kPa may develop between the cover materials and top of refuse, indicating that pressure flow is periodically an important mechanism for gas transport. Addressing landfill gas generation, the goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examined the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being leached by three different methods to separate microbial mass and substrate. The leachates are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy of live cultures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Triplicate assays of the leachates that produce insignificant quantities of biogas after 90 days incubation are being amended with sucrose, a nutrient broth, or a bacterial seed. Response of gas production to each of the three amendments was similar across all samples, regardless of the leaching method originally employed, with nutrient addition producing the most stable long-term biogas production with the highest methane content. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Florida, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 2,000 Total............................................................... 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 2,000 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 387 402 337 304 E 222 Marketed Production ...................................... 3,087 3,123 2,616 2,540 1,778 Extraction Loss...............................................

125

EXTRACTION APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus whereby relatlvely volatile solvents may be contacted with volatile or non-volatile material without certaln attendant hazards is described. A suitable apparatus for handling relatively volatlle liqulds may be constructed comprising a tank, and a closure covering the tank and adapted to be securely attached to an external suppont. The closure is provided with a rigidly mounted motor-driven agitator. This agitator is connected from the driving motor lnto the lnterlor of the tank through a gland adapted to be cooled witb inert gas thereby eliminating possible hazard due to frictional heat. The closure is arranged so that the tank may be removed from it without materially dlsturbing the closure which, as described, carrles the motor driven agitator and other parts.

Ballard, A.E.; Brigham, H.R.

1958-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

Catalogue of a Loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalogue of a Loss is a collection of sixty-two prose poems written within the past year and half. The work is printed on 4x6 cards. Each poem may be read individually from a single card or the poems can be read in ...

Berger, Larisa (Larisa A.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

128

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

129

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

130

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

131

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

132

Beam-Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Gas and Thermal Photon Scattering in the NLC Main Linac as a Source of Beam Halo P. Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0051 12-JAN-2001 Abstract Scattering of primary beam electrons off of residual gas molecules or blackbody radiation photons in the NLC main linac has been identified as a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated in the beam delivery system. We consider the contributions from four scat- tering mechanisms: inelastic thermal-photon scattering, elastic beam-gas (Coulomb) scattering inelastic beam-gas (Bremsstrahlung) scattering, and atomic-electron scattering. In each case we develop the formalism necessary to estimate the backgrounds generated in the main linac, and determine the expected number of off-energy or large-amplitude particles from each process, assuming a main linac injection energy of 8 GeV and extraction energy of 500 GeV. 1 Introduction The

133

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

134

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

135

Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

136

Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis in Coll CardĂşs Landfill Li Yu using mechanical models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1 models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1) Analytical solution

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

137

The Rise of Shale Gas: Implications of the shale gas boom for natural gas markets, environmental protection and U.S. energy policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Through the processes of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, once overlooked deposits of natural gas in shale formations have become economically viable to extract. In… (more)

Lovejoy, Cassandra L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Louisiana Wetland Loss at Askives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Louisiana Wetland Loss? - Find Questions and Answers at Askives, the first startup that gives you an straight answer

140

Mixed Integer Model Predictive Control of Multiple Shale Gas Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Horizontal wells with multistage hydraulic fracturing are today the most important drilling technology for shale gas extraction. Considered unprofitable before, the production has now… (more)

Nordsveen, Espen T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

MULTIVARIATE PRODUCTION OPTIMIZATION OF A NATURAL GAS FIELD.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Any production well is drilled and completed for the extraction of oil or gas from itsoriginal location in the reservoir to the stock tank or… (more)

Nago, Annick

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjćr, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

144

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Low Impact Weight Loss Exercises | Fish Oil Weight Loss  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Low Impact Weight Loss Exercises. You want to lose weight, but for whatever reason, you want to or only can perform low impact exercises. No problem.

146

Unsteady Loss in a High Pressure Turbine Stage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The widespread use of the gas turbine as a means of aircraft propulsion has provided a considerable impetusUnsteady Loss in a High Pressure Turbine Stage Stephen John Payne Trinity College A thesis in a High Pressure Turbine Stage Stephen John Payne Trinity College A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment

Payne, Stephen J.

147

AGS RESONANT EXTRACTION WITH HIGH INTENSITY BEAMS.  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven AGS third integer resonant extraction system allows the AGS to provide high quality, high intensity 25.5 GeV/c proton beams simultaneously to four target stations and as many as 8 experiments. With the increasing intensities (over 7 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) and associated longer spill periods (2.4 to 3 seconds long), we continue to run with low losses and high quality low modulation continuous current beams.[1] Learning to extract and transport these higher intensity beams has required a process of careful modeling and experimentation. We have had to learn how to correct for various instabilities and how to better match extraction and the transport lines to the higher emittance beams being accelerated in the AGS. Techniques employed include ''RF'' methods to smooth out momentum distributions and fine structure. We will present results of detailed multi-particle tracking modeling studies which enabled us to develop a clear understanding of beam loss mechanisms in the transport and extraction process. We will report on our status, experiences, and the present understanding of the intensity limitations imposed by resonant extraction and transport to fixed target stations.

AHRENS,L.; BROWN,K.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; TSOUPAS,N.; VANASSELT,W.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

148

Natural Gas Applications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Welcome to EIA's Natural Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Welcome to EIA's Natural Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Applications What's New Publications Applications Survey Forms Sign Up for Email Updates Contact Experts Applications EIA-176 Query System The EIA-176 Query system is a Windows-based system which runs under Windows operating systems 95, 98, 2000, NT - 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later. It provides a method of extracting and using the company level data filed on the Form EIA-176, and saving the query results in various media and formats. There are pre-selected data queries, which allow the user to select and run the most often-used queries, as well as the ability to create a customized query. Self-extracting executable files with run-time versions of Access are required to set up the system. You may also download the data tables if you already have Microsoft Access on your computer.

149

Natural Gas Annual, 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1997 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1997. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1993 to 1997. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1997 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1997, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

150

Natural Gas Annual, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1998 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1998. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1994 to 1998. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1998 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1998, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

151

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview - May 21, 2001 Somewhat warmer temperatures early in the week, especially in the South, provided a lift to natural gas spot and futures prices. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) However, a report of another large stock build and a revised forecast for normal to below-normal temperatures over a larger area of the country turned the week's gains into losses. On a week-to-week basis, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.10 to end Friday, May 18 at $4.15 per MMBtu, while the NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.013 to $4.291 per MMBtu. At 119 Bcf, net injections to storage for the week ended May 11, 2001, were the highest value for the 8-year period of weekly AGA data.

152

Preliminary Modeling, Testing, and Analysis of a Gas Tankless Water Heater: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today's gas tankless water heaters offer significant energy savings over conventional gas storage tank water heaters, but savings depends on the draw pattern. A one-node model incorporating heat exchanger mass is used to address this and other issues. Key model parameters are determined from least-squares regression on short-term data, including burner efficiency, thermal capacitance, and thermal loss coefficient. The calibrated model agrees with data to ~5% on Qgas, with temperature RMS deviation of ~4..deg..C. Efficiency with a standard realistic draw is 71%, compared to 81% predicted from standard energy-factors. Adding a small tank controlled by the tankless heater solves issues of oscillations with solar pre-heat, low-flow and hot-water-delay issues. Future work includes model refinements and developing optimal data protocols for model parameter extraction.

Burch, J.; Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Rudd, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

METAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for extracting uranium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is presented. A difficulty encountered in solvent extraction operations using an organic extractant (e.g., tributyl phosphate dissolved in kerosene or carbon tetrachloride) is that emulsions sometimes form, and phase separation is difficult or impossible. This difficulty is overcome by dissolving the organic extractant in a molten wax which is a solid at operating temperatures. After cooling, the wax which now contains the extractant, is broken into small particles (preferably flakes) and this wax complex'' is used to contact the uranium bearing solutions and extract the metal therefrom. Microcrystalline petroleum wax and certain ethylene polymers have been found suitable for this purpose.

Lewis, G.W. Jr.; Rhodes, D.E.

1957-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

156

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

157

Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or Extraction of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leasing for Production or Leasing for Production or Extraction of Oil, Gas and Other Minerals From Onshore State-Owned Lands (Mississippi) Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or Extraction of Oil, Gas and Other Minerals From Onshore State-Owned Lands (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Retail Supplier Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Development Authority The Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or Extraction of Oil, Gas and Other Minerals From Onshore State-Owned Lands is applicable to the natural gas sector. This law delegates the power to lease, for mineral

158

Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1999 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1999. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1999. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1999. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

159

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

160

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

162

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

163

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

164

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

165

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

166

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

167

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

168

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

169

Sustainable Materials Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Phase Stability in Gasification Carbon Feedstock Slags Influenced by Extensive Vanadium Oxide Concentration · Use of the Dryer Off- gas ...

170

Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Energy-loss rate of a fast particle in graphene  

SciTech Connect

The energy-loss rate of a fast particle in graphene is studied. The energy-loss rate always increases with increasing incident particle energy, which is quite unusual when compared to electron gas in normal metal. Graphene exhibits a ''discriminating'' behavior where there exists a low energy cut-off below which the scattering process is strictly forbidden, leading to lossless traverse of an external particle in graphene. This low energy cutoff is of the order of nearest neighbor hopping bandwidth. Our results suggest that backscattering is also absent in the external particle scattering of graphene.

Ang, Yee Sin; Zhang, C. [School of Engineering Physics, University of Wollongong, 2522 NSW (Australia); Kee, Chun Yun [Department of Mathematics, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A fully coupled finite element model of coal deformation and two phase flow for coalbed methane extraction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A reservoir simulation model is usually required to represent the combined effects of gas transport, water flow, and coal swelling/shrinking on the extraction of coalbed… (more)

Chen, Dong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal central Gulf of Mexico. Volume 3. Appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. Volume 3 contains five appendices providing methodological details and data listings.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Supercritical Fluid Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In supercritical fluid extraction, many options are available for achieving and controlling the desired selectivity, which is extremely sensitive to variations in pressure, temperature, and choice of solvent. The ability of supercritical fluids to vaporize relatively nonvolatile compounds at moderate temperatures can reduce the energy requirements compared to distillation and liquid extraction.

Johnston, K. P.; Flarsheim, W. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Average Price of Natural Gas Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Quantity and Average Price of Natural Gas Production in the United States, 1930-1996 (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet, Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Table Year Gross Withdrawals Used for Repressuring Nonhydro- carbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Extraction Loss Dry Production Average Wellhead Price of Marketed Production 1930 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,978,911 75,140 1,903,771 0.08 1931 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,721,902 62,288 1,659,614 0.07 1932 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,593,798 51,816 1,541,982 0.06 1933 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,596,673 48,280 1,548,393 0.06 1934 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,815,796 52,190 1,763,606 0.06 1935 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,968,963 55,488 1,913,475 0.06 1936 ....................... 2,691,512 73,507 NA 392,528 2,225,477

176

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

177

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: December 18, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, December 3, to Wednesday, December 10, 2008) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, with all trading regions registering losses with the exception of the Rocky Mountains. On the week, the spot prices at each market location outside the Rockies fell between 2 and 93 cents per MMBtu, with the Henry Hub registering a decrease of 80 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract declined each day for the first 3 days of the report and increased on Tuesday and Wednesday (December 9-10), resulting in a

179

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 20, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 12, 2011) Natural gas prices posted net losses at most market locations across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price fell from $3.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, October 5, to $3.54 per MMBtu yesterday, October 12. Despite overall decreases, intraweek trading showed some rallies, particularly near the end of the report week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (November 2011) fell about 8 cents on the week from $3.570 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.489 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,521 billion cubic feet

180

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: February 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices decreased in half of the trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week. Generally, areas east of the Rockies and particularly those that experienced frigid temperatures posted weekly price increases. However, there were some exceptions, including the Midcontinent and East Texas. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures trading for the near-month contract was fairly volatile, with daily price changes ranging between a 16-cent loss and a 16-cent increase. The March 2009 contract ended trading yesterday 18 cents higher than on the previous Wednesday.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

182

Energy-Efficiency Options for Insurance Loss Prevention  

SciTech Connect

Energy-efficiency improvements offer the insurance industry two areas of opportunity: reducing ordinary claims and avoiding greenhouse gas emissions that could precipitate natural disaster losses resulting from global climate change. We present three vehicles for taking advantage of this opportunity, including research and development, in- house energy management, and provision of key information to insurance customers and risk managers. The complementary role for renewable energy systems is also introduced.

Mills, E. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.; Knoepfel, I. [Swiss Reinsurance Co., Zurich (Switzerland)

1997-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

Exhaust gas reactor  

SciTech Connect

A reactor for the oxidation of unburned and partially burned components in the exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine comprising a chamber which is substantially circular in cross sections perpendicular to its axis, one or more inlet pipes which pass a mixture of exhaust gas and air substantially tangentially into the chamber near to one end thereof, and an outlet pipe near to the other end of the chamber and which is so arranged that exhaust gas leaves the chamber substantially tangentially. The tangential inlet and tangential outlet of gases minimizes energy losses in the gas passing through the reactor. The ratio of the cross-sectional areas of the inlet pipe(s) to reactor chamber is preferably from 1:9 to 25:36, and similar ranges of crosssectional area ratios are preferred for the outlet pipe and chamber. The ratio of the length of the reaction chamber to diameter is preferably from 1:1 to 4:1. The chamber may be cylindrical or divergent from inlet end to outlet end and may be thermally insulated.

Camarsa, M.; Cocchiara, F.; Garcea, G.P.

1981-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

184

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

185

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

186

solvent extraction i  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycle and Reuse of Waste Silicon in Wafer Manufacturing Process [pp. 733- 744] D. Sinha. Gas Phase Reactions by Electron Beam Processing [pp. 745-755

187

Development of Energy Balances for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and gas extraction. Electricity distribution losses occurLosses Trends Electricity distribution losses are losses oftransmission and distribution of electricity to consumers.

Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Sahtaye, Jayant

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Extraction of nitrosoruthenium tributylphosphate  

SciTech Connect

Ruthenium is one of a number of elements that complicates the regeneration of processed nuclear fuel from atomic power stations. Because of its chemical properties, it often acompanies various elements in the extraction process and thus complicates the purification of uranium. In this paper, we decided to investigate the extraction chemistry of nitrosoruthenium trinitrate in order to establish the solvate number and the establish the conditions under which this compound transfers into weakly extracted forms. This is important in controlling and improving the process of purifying uranium from ruthenium.

Rozen, A.M.; Volk, V.I.; Zahkarkin, B.S. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line  

SciTech Connect

Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Energy Loss by Breaking waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the frequency of wind wave breaking in deep water are combined with laboratory estimates of the rate of energy loss a from single breaking wave to infer the net rate of energy transfer to the mixed layer from breaking waves, as a ...

S. A. Thorpe

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Well Productivity in Gas-Condensate and Volatile Oil Reservoirs:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wells in gas condensate reservoirs usually exhibit complex behaviours due to condensate deposit as the bottomhole pressure drops below the dew point. The formation of this liquid saturation can lead to a severe loss of well productivity and therefore lower gas recovery. A similar behaviour is observed in volatile oil reservoirs below the bubble point. Understanding these behaviours and extracting values of controlling parameters is necessary to evaluate well potential and design effective programmes to improve productivity. The Centre of Petroleum Studies at Imperial College London has been involved in research in these areas since 1997, sponsored mainly by consortia of oil companies. Results from this work have already greatly improved the understanding of well behaviour in gas condensate and volatile oil reservoirs and the ability to interpret well tests in such reservoirs. Work to-date has focused on vertical and horizontal wells in sandstone reservoirs. Much work remains to understand the behaviours of fractured wells and wells in naturally fractured reservoirs. The objective of this proposal is to complete the work performed to-date in sandstone reservoirs and to extend it to new well and reservoir characteristics, in order to develop a better understanding of near-wellbore effects in gas condensate and volatile oil reservoirs from well testing, and to use this understanding to develop new methods for predicting and improving well productivity in such reservoirs. The work will be performed by staff, MSc and PhD students from the Centre for Petroleum Studies at Imperial College, with input and guidance from industry partners.

Prof A. C. Gringarten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates focused to improve existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation validate any software update prior to its release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

193

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into the Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates primarily focused to improve the existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation site validate all software updates prior to release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

194

NLC Pulsed Extraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

which transports 250 GeV beams from the main linac to the parallel bypass line. The design is, at least in principle, compatible with extraction of 60 bunch trains per second...

195

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Direct gas in mud measurement at the well site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A patented process developed by Datalog provides a direct quantitative gas measurement from the drilling fluid, eliminates the gas trap (degasser) and the conversion to gas-in-air measurements associated with traditional gas detection methods. Quantitative hydrocarbon gas measurement can be performed at the wellsite through the use of this gas detection system called GasWizard. This is achieved with a passive device containing a gas permeable membrane that is immersed in the drilling fluid. The device extracts a gas sample that is directly proportional to the actual gas concentration in the drilling fluid. Through this simple process, the gas measurement is equally effective in conventional water or oil-base drilling muds or in underbalanced drilling fluids such as foam, air or nitrogen.

Hawker, D. [Datalog, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Compact, high energy gas laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically pumped gas laser amplifier unit having a disc-like configuration in which light propagation is radially outward from the axis rather than along the axis. The input optical energy is distributed over a much smaller area than the output optical energy, i.e., the amplified beam, while still preserving the simplicity of parallel electrodes for pumping the laser medium. The system may thus be driven by a comparatively low optical energy input, while at the same time, owing to the large output area, large energies may be extracted while maintaining the energy per unit area below the threshold of gas breakdown.

Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stapleton, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Stratton, Thomas F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

199

Prebaked Anode from Coal Extract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We previously reported that the coal extract prepared from non-hydrogenative extraction of thermal coals using two-ring-aromatic solvent (Hyper-coal) is suitable ...

200

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

202

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

203

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

204

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

205

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

206

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

207

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

208

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

209

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

210

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

211

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

212

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

213

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

214

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

215

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

217

Gas heat transfer in a heated vertical channel under deteriorated turbulent heat transfer regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive cooling via natural circulation of gas after a loss of coolant (LOCA) accident is one of the major goals of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). Due to its high surface heat flux and low coolant velocities under ...

Lee, Jeongik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Gas Heat Transfer in a Heated Vertical Channel under Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer Regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive cooling via natural circulation of gas after a loss of coolant (LOCA) accident is one of the major goals of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). Due to its high surface heat flux and low coolant velocities under ...

Lee, Jeongik

219

Gas centrifuge purge method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

Theurich, Gordon R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

PARS II Extraction Utility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility PARS II Extraction Utility v8020130510.zip More Documents & Publications PARS II Extraction Utility Release Notes PARS II CPP...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Sound energy loss during sonolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper gives an analysis of sound energy losses due to sonolysis — dissociation of the part of water molecules to radicals H? and ?OH. The value of the energy loss can be evaluated by using the concentration of hydrogen peroxide which appears in the water as a result of cross?recombination of radicals ?OH+?OH=H2O2. Data previously obtained by different authors were used for the present analysis. Data for fresh water and also for water with dissolved gases were considered. Data covered a sound frequency range from 1.5 kHz to 2 MHz and sound pressure amplitudes 0.6–2.5 atm for normal static pressure and a water temperature of 20?°C. It is shown that the rate of increasing hydrogen peroxide concentration is proportional to the intensity of sound. The rate is also propor? tional to the concentration of dissolved oxygen and argon in water while other gases (hydrogen

Dmitry A. Selivanovsky; Grigory A. Domrachev

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Future of natural gas supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides many data for the web reader and only some graphs will be presented at the conference.-World-production of natural gas (NG) Reliable data s very difficult to get, as very often the data does not specify if it is gross or gross minus reinjected or marketed, wet or dry values. The loss is usually hidden. Nonhydrocarbons gases are important in some fields. Production data varies from sources for what is called marketed World Production marketed 2001 2002

Jean Laherrere

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Le Bail Intensity Extraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Le Bail Intensity Extraction Le Bail Intensity Extraction Presentation Goal Introduce the concepts behind LeBail fitting; why it is useful and how to perform a Le Bail fit with GSAS. Format: PDF slides or a RealPlayer video of the slides with accompanying audio and a demo video that shows how a Le Bail fit is performed. Presentation Outline What is the Le Bail method? Other approaches Why use the Le Bail method? Parameter fitting with Le Bail intensity extraction Le Bail refinement strategies Avoiding problems with background fitting: BKGEDIT Demo: an example Le Bail fit Links Le Bail lecture Slides (as PDF file) FlashMovie presentation with index (best viewed with 1024x768 or better screen resolution) FlashMovie file (800x600 pixels) Le Bail demo FlashMovie presentation with index (best viewed with 1024x768 or

224

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extracting the Eliashberg Extracting the Eliashberg Function Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print Wednesday, 23 February 2005 00:00 A multitude of important chemical, physical, and biological phenomena are driven by violations of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), which decouples electronic from nuclear motion in quantum calculations of solids. Recent advances in experimental techniques combined with ever-growing theoretical capabilities now hold the promise of presenting an unprecedented picture of these violations. By means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission at the ALS and theoretical calculations, a multi-institutional collaboration that includes researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee, Stanford University, and the ALS has obtained the first high-resolution spectroscopic images of the specific vibrational modes that couple to a given electronic state.

225

Supercritical fluid extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Method and apparatus for preventing overspeed in a gas turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for preventing overspeed in a gas turbine in response to the rapid loss of applied load is disclosed. The method involves diverting gas from the inlet of the turbine, bypassing the same around the turbine and thereafter injecting the diverted gas at the turbine exit in a direction toward or opposing the flow of gas through the turbine. The injected gas is mixed with the gas exiting the turbine to thereby minimize the thermal shock upon equipment downstream of the turbine exit.

Walker, William E. (San Diego, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Annual Energy Outlook 2007: With Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

imports. 7 Marketed production (wet) minus extraction losses. 8 Synthetic natural gas, propane air, coke oven gas, refinery gas, biomass gas, air injected for Btu stabilization,...

228

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

229

Mechanical model for ductility loss  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mechanical model was constructed to probe into the mechanism of ductility loss. Fracture criterion based on critical localized deformation was undertaken. Two microstructure variables were considered in the model. Namely, the strength ratio of grain boundary affected area to the matrix, ..cap omega.., and the linear fraction, x, of grain boundary affected area. A parametrical study was carried out. The study shows that the ductility is very sensitive to those microstructure parameters. The functional dependence of ductility to temperature as well as strain-rate, suggested by the model, is demonstrated to be consistent with the observation.

Hu, W.L.

1980-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico, Volume 1: executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. The final report, prepared in three volumes, describes the extent of the contribution of OCS development to coastal land loss. Volume I is the Executive Summary. The report provides a detailed description of both direct and indirect impacts.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

233

Gas hydrates: Technology status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Why is Shale Gas Important?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Why is Shale Gas Important? Why is Shale Gas Important? With the advance of extraction technology, shale gas production has led to a new abundance of natural gas supply in the United States over the past decade, and is expected to continue to do so for the foreseeable future. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the unproved technically recoverable U.S. shale gas resource is estimated at 482 trillion cubic feet. 1 Estimated proved and unproved shale gas resources amount to a combined 542 trillion cubic feet (or 25 percent) out of a total U.S. resource of 2,203 trillion cubic feet. 2 U.S. shale gas production has increased 12-fold over the last

235

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

236

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

237

Method for Extracting and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO2 from a gaseous environment.

Rau, Gregory H.; Caldeira, Kenneth G.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

A study of natural gas extraction in Marcellus shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the dramatic increases in crude oil prices there has been a need to find reliable energy substitutions. One substitution that has been used in… (more)

Boswell, Zachary (Zachary Karol)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

A4. Estimated Composition of Liquids Extracted at Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1,621 243 522 559 17,893 Wyoming... 7,447 13,307 2,945 4,796 6,597 136,930 Total ... 232,281 199,557 71,808 57,674 127,654 2,607,484 a...

240

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

242

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

243

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

244

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

245

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

246

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

247

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

248

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

249

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

250

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

251

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

252

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

253

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

254

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

255

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

256

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

257

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

258

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

259

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

260

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Loss mechanisms in turbine tip clearance flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of tip clearance ow have been carried out to dene the loss generation mechanisms associated with tip leakage in unshrouded axial turbines. Mix- ing loss between the leakage, which takes the form of a ...

Huang, Arthur (Arthur C.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Louisiana Wetland Loss Fact at Askives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Louisiana Wetland Loss Fact? - Find Questions and Answers at Askives, the first startup that gives you an straight answer

263

Corona losses dependence from the conductor diameter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents possibility to decrease the corona power losses in overhead transmission lines. Corona power losses can be reduced by increasing the diameter of the conductor and used bundled conductors per phase. The objectives were to determine ... Keywords: corona model, critical disruptive voltage, electric discharge, electric field, power losses, transmission line

Isuf Krasniqi; Vjollca Komoni; Avni Alidemaj; Gazmend Kabashi

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Shield Losses in Medium-Voltage Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities can substantially reduce cable costs and circulating current losses by optimizing the design of concentric neutral conductors for underground distribution cables and by configuring installed cables to minimize energy loss. This guide shows how to design neutral conductors for maximum cost-effectiveness and includes calculations of circulating current losses and ampacities for commonly used cables.

1987-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Advanced Hot-Gas Desulfurization Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems are being advanced worldwide for generating electricity from coal due to their superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. Hot gas cleanup offers the potential for higher plant thermal efficiencies and lower cost. A key subsystem of hot-gas cleanup is hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable sorbents. Sorbents based on zinc oxide are currently the leading candidates and are being developed for moving- and fluidized- bed reactor applications. Zinc oxide sorbents can effectively reduce the H{sub 2}S in coal gas to around 10 ppm levels and can be regenerated for multicycle operation. However, all current first-generation leading sorbents undergo significant loss of reactivity with cycling, as much as 50% or greater loss in only 25-50 cycles. Stability of the hot-gas desulfurization sorbent over 100`s of cycles is essential for improved IGCC economics over conventional power plants. This project aims to develop hot-gas cleanup sorbents for relatively lower temperature applications, 343 to 538{degrees}C with emphasis on the temperature range from 400 to 500{degrees}. Recent economic evaluations have indicated that the thermal efficiency of IGCC systems increases rapidly with the temperature of hot-gas cleanup up to 350{degrees}C and then very slowly as the temperature is increased further. This suggests that the temperature severity of the hot-gas cleanup devices can be reduced without significant loss of thermal efficiency. The objective of this study is to develop attrition-resistant advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents which show stable and high sulfidation reactivity at 343{degrees}C (650{degrees}F) to 538{degrees}C(1OOO{degrees}F) and regenerability at lower temperatures than leading first generation sorbents.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Gangwal, S.K.; Gupta, R.; Turk, B.S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Extraction Utility Design Specification May 13, 2013 Document Version 1.10 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All Eric Morgan, Dekker, Ltd. Initial Draft Document January 19, 2010 1.1 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Document update with EM team review notes January 20, 2010 1.2 2.1.1 EM Project Team Document Review January 27, 2010 1.3 All Bruce Bartells Final Draft Review May 10, 2010 1.4.1 2.8 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Section Update May 14, 2010 1.4.2 2.3.1 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. System Tables Added May 17, 2010 1.4.3 2.3 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Enhancements Update June 29, 2010 1.5 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Revised for Version

267

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print A multitude of important chemical, physical, and biological phenomena are driven by violations of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), which decouples electronic from nuclear motion in quantum calculations of solids. Recent advances in experimental techniques combined with ever-growing theoretical capabilities now hold the promise of presenting an unprecedented picture of these violations. By means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission at the ALS and theoretical calculations, a multi-institutional collaboration that includes researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee, Stanford University, and the ALS has obtained the first high-resolution spectroscopic images of the specific vibrational modes that couple to a given electronic state.

268

URANIUM EXTRACTION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering uranium values from acidic aqueous solutions containing hexavalent uranium by contacting the solution with an organic solution comprised of a substantially water-immiscible organlc diluent and an organic phosphate to extract the uranlum values into the organic phase. Carbon tetrachloride and a petroleum hydrocarbon fraction, such as kerosene, are sultable diluents to be used in combination with organlc phosphates such as dibutyl butylphosphonate, trlbutyl phosphine oxide, and tributyl phosphate.

Baldwin, W.H.; Higgins, C.E.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

270

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

271

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

272

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

273

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

274

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

275

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

276

Induction machine stray loss from inter-bar currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stray load loss refers generally to the sources of induction machine loss not accounted for by typical calculations of primary or secondary copper loss, no load core loss, or friction and windage loss. Harmonic rotor bar ...

Englebretson, Steven Carl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

Figuring on energy: can gas discounts work  

SciTech Connect

A Pennsylvania lawsuit is examining the effects of price competition among gas utilities in their efforts to retain industrial customers and the extra burdens discounts place on other users. Because gas markets have not matched the fall in oil prices, gas utilities face the loss of their largest customers to residual oil unless small users are willing to accept a surcharge to cover a larger share of the utility's fixed prices. The dilemma of when to switch is causing uncertainty among dual-fuel users. (DCK)

Schaffer, P.

1983-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Ukraine hobbled by oil, gas shortfall  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that oil and gas shortages have dealt a severe economic blow to Ukraine. The former Soviet republic ranks second behind Russia in population and gross domestic product among members of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Ukraine's hydrocarbon output has fallen sharply since the 1970s, and the republic's fuel problems have been exacerbated by declining coal extraction.

Not Available

1992-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

282

Study of Heat Loss: Commercial and Residential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is much savings involved in the prevention of heat loss. Many structures exhibit such loss. Much can be done to improve or minimize the heat loss in a structure. These include interior and exterior modifications. It has been shown that heat can move by means of convection, conduction, and radiation. Problems with heat loss can be due to moisture, and poor construction techniques. There is a beneficial cost savings involved in the prevention of heat loss. Prevention techniques include insulation, caulking, weather stripping, and double pane windows. There are tables available for one to reference and calculate the return on their investment or “payback tim”

Emmett Ientilucci

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

On the Information Loss in Static Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we give a concise definition of information loss from a system-theoretic point of view. Based on this definition, we analyze the information loss in static input-output systems subject to a continuous-valued input. For a certain class of multiple-input, multiple-output systems the information loss is quantified. An interpretation of this loss is accompanied by upper bounds which are simple to evaluate. Finally, a class of systems is identified for which the information loss is necessarily infinite. Quantizers and limiters are shown to belong to this class.

Geiger, Bernhard C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 3) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 3) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 19-26), as a large volume of production continued to be shut in from the recent major hurricanes and cool temperatures added space-heating demand in many regions of the country. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.15 per MMBtu, or about 8.5 percent, to $14.67. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 49 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, October 26) at $14.04. A steady pace of injections into underground storage has continued despite offshore production shut-ins of almost 5.6 billion cubic feet (Bcf) a day, indicating substantial demand loss in the wake of the hurricanes and amid the high-price environment. The volume of natural gas in storage was 3,139 Bcf as of Friday, October 21, which is 2.8 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.26 per barrel or about 2 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $60.85, or $10.49 per MMBtu.

285

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

286

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

287

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

288

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

289

Natural Gas Annual, 1999 (HISTORICAL)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 The Natural Gas Annual, 1999 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1999. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1995 to 1999. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1999 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1999, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1995-1999 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1999 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

290

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is shale gas? is shale gas? Basically, it is natural gas - primarily methane - found in shale formations, some of which were formed 300-million-to-400-million years ago during the Devonian period of Earth's history. The shales were deposited as fine silt and clay particles at the bottom of relatively enclosed bodies of water. At roughly the same time, primitive plants were forming forests on land and the first amphibians were making an appearance. Some of the methane that formed from the organic matter buried with the sediments escaped into sandy rock layers adjacent to the shales, forming conventional accumulations of natural gas which are relatively easy to extract. But some of it remained locked in the tight, low permeability shale layers, becoming shale gas.

291

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2001 23, 2001 Another mid-summer week of relatively mild temperatures in many of the nation's major gas consuming market regions and a large estimate of net injections of working gas into storage put downward pressure on spot and futures prices. Some parts of New England saw high temperatures only in the 70s for several days last week, while highs in the 80s stretched down the mid-Atlantic region as far as northern Georgia and well into the Midwest. On the West Coast, highs rarely exceeded 80 degrees, with a number of locations reporting highs in the 60s. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Spot prices declined for the week in nearly all markets, with spot gas at the Henry Hub trading at $2.95 per MMBtu on Friday, down $0.21 from the previous Friday. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery fell even more, ending the week down $0.295 per MMBtu at $2.955-the first sub-$3 settlement for a near-month contract since April 11 of last year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell four days in a row and traded on Wednesday and Thursday below $25 per barrel before recovering Friday to $25.60 per barrel, or $4.41 per MMBtu. This, too, is the first time since last April that WTI has fallen below $25 per barrel, and is the second week in a row of losses of $1 or more per barrel.

292

Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs).

293

Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas: Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir, as in contrast to injected gas volumes. Natural Gas: A gaseous mixture...

294

Optimization of Jatropha Oil Extraction and Its By-Product Utilization by Pyrolysis Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the price of fossil fuel has increased, petroleum resources have been restricted and the environmental effects have been of great concern. Biofuel has been considered to be a good solution because it is a clean, non-pollutant and a renewable energy. Biodiesel is one alternative energy that plays a major role in the energy industry. So, the development of biofuel process is more interesting. Jatropha curcas L. is considered as an alternative energy source in order to help solve the energy crisis. The purpose of this research is to investigate the optimum condition of Jatropha seed extraction via a screw press and its by-product utilization by a pyrolysis method for achieving the maximum mass conversion and energy recovery. In this study, Jatropha seeds were first extracted by a screw press with different discharge aperture sizes, namely, number 4 (4.0 mm), 8 (7.0 mm), and 10 (10.5 mm). The by-product obtained from a screw press was then performed pyrolysis runs at the operating temperatures of 400, 500, and 600 degrees C. Results revealed that the optimum condition was achieved when using discharge aperture number 8 (7.0 mm) for a screw press and performing the pyrolysis of the by- product at 500 degrees C. The mass conversion efficiency of 35.8% refined oil, 21.8% bio-char, 14.6% bio-oil, and 11.7% syn-gas were obtained. Therefore, the utilization of by-product using a pyrolysis can enhance the effectiveness of Jatropha oil extraction with only 16% mass losses occurred. In addition, the gross heating values of the products were observed as 39.6 MJ/kg for the refined oil, 35.1 MJ/kg for the bio-oil, 27.5 MJ/kg for the bio-char, and 2.1 MJ/kg for the syn-gas. Due to a high mass conversion efficiency and energy content of Jatropha products, Jatropha has the potential to serve as an alternative energy source.

Kongkasawan, Jinjuta 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost proven U.S. gas reserves by trillions of cubic feet (see http://live.psu.edu/story/28116).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost proven U.S. gas reserves by trillions of cubic feet (see http://live.psu.edu/story/28116). A recent gas exploration and extraction. In return for lease rights, parties recovering gas customarily pay

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

296

CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with prospective refineries led to the conclusion that there were not likely prospects for the licensing of the CED process.

James Boltz

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Gas Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... automobile industry meeting more stringent … more. Audit of EPA Protocol Gas Suppliers EPA Protocol gas mixture calibration ...

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fission product solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect

Two main objectives concerning removal of fission products from high-level tank wastes will be accomplished in this project. The first objective entails the development of an acid-side Cs solvent-extraction (SX) process applicable to remediation of the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved calcine waste (DCW) at INEEL. The second objective is to develop alkaline-side SX processes for the combined removal of Tc, Cs, and possibly Sr and for individual separation of Tc (alone or together with Sr) and Cs. These alkaline-side processes apply to tank wastes stored at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge. This work exploits the useful properties of crown ethers and calixarenes and has shown that such compounds may be economically adapted to practical processing conditions. Potential benefits for both acid- and alkaline-side processing include order-of-magnitude concentration factors, high rejection of bulk sodium and potassium salts, and stripping with dilute (typically 10 mM) nitric acid. These benefits minimize the subsequent burden on the very expensive vitrification and storage of the high-activity waste. In the case of the SRTALK process for Tc extraction as pertechnetate anion from alkaline waste, such benefits have now been proven at the scale of a 12-stage flowsheet tested in 2-cm centrifugal contactors with a Hanford supernatant waste simulant. SRTALK employs a crown ether in a TBP-modified aliphatic kerosene diluent, is economically competitive with other applicable separation processes being considered, and has been successfully tested in batch extraction of actual Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF).

Moyer, B.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Sachleben, R.A. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Extracting the fundamental parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If supersymmetry is discovered at the LHC, the extraction of the fundamental parameters will be a formidable task. In such a system where measurements depend on different combinations of the parameters in a highly correlated system, the identification of the true parameter set in an efficient way necessitates the development and use of sophisticated methods. A rigorous treatment of experimental and theoretical errors is necessary to determine the precision of the measurement of the fundamental parameters. The techniques developed for this endeavor can also be applied to similar problems such as the determination of the Higgs boson couplings at the LHC.

Dirk Zerwas

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Bench-Scale Demonstration of Hot-Gas Desulfurization Technology  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs.

Jeffrey W. Portzer; Santosh K. Gangwal

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Determining plasma-fueling sources with an end-loss ion spectrometer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help identify the major sources of fueling gas in Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), we mounted a mass-sensitive, EVertical BarVertical BarB, end-loss ion spectrometer (ELIS) near the machine's centerline. We set the electric field in the ELIS to simultaneously measure the axial loss currents of both hydrogen and deuterium. We then initiated plasma discharges, where we injected either hydrogen or deuterium gas into the central cell. We also selected and deselected the central-cell neutral beams that were fueled with hydrogen gas. The end-cell neutral beams were always selected and fueled with deuterium. By taking the ratio of the hydrogen end-loss current to the deuterium end-loss current (with a known deuterium-gas feed rate), we were able to infer the effective fueling rates that were due to wall reflux, central-cell beams, and end-cell beams. The results were the following: wall reflux, 6 Torr l/s; central-cell beams, 15 Torr l/s; and end-cell beams 1 Torr l/s.

Grubb, D.P.; Foote, J.H.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Optimization and Valuation of Natural Gas Storage: or How to Get More out of the Gas Piggy Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Storage capacity can be extremely valuable in the natural gas industry. However, because gas prices are so volatile and storage is subject to multiple physical constraints, it can be difficult for managers to determine how much storage is worth and how to extract the greatest value. This report shows that natural gas storage can be viewed as a bundle of options, and it exploits this observation to develop a powerful new approach to valuation and management.

2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Extracting value from coal mine methane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging US policy to regulate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a cap-and-trade program presents mine managers with a new opportunity to explore and develop methane utilization or abatement projects that generate value from the anodization of carbon offset credits. In addition, the rising focus on US energy security and domestic energy supply is promoting mine managers and engineers to give further consideration to the importance of their methane gas by-products. The market through which coal mine methane offset projects can be developed and carbon offset credits monetized is quickly maturing. While many methane utilization projects have previously been uneconomical, the carbon offset credit market provides a new set of financing tools for mine engineers to capitalize these projects today. Currently , there are two certification programs that have approved project protocols for CMM projects. The Voluntary Carbon Standard (VCS) offers a methodology approved under the Clean Development Mechanism, the international compliance based offset market under the Kyoto Protocol. The VCS protocol is applicable to projects that combust ventilation air methane (VAM) and methane extracted from pre-and post-mine drainage systems. The Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX), which operates a voluntary yet binding cap-and-trade market, also has an approved protocol for CMM projects. CCX's protocol can be applied to projects combusting VAM, and methane extracted from pre-and-post-mine drainage systems, as well as abandoned mines. The article describes two case studies - Developing a gob gas utilization project financed by carbon offset credits and First VAM oxidation system to be commissioned at an operating mine in the US. 1 tab., 4 photos.

Liebert, B. [Verdao Group (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Solvent Extraction of Chemical Attribution Signature Compounds from Painted Wall Board: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work that developed a robust solvent extraction procedure for recovery of chemical attribution signature (CAS) compound dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) (as well as diethyl methyl phosphonate (DEMP), diethyl methyl phosphonothioate (DEMPT), and diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP)) from painted wall board (PWB), which was selected previously as the exposed media by the chemical attribution scientific working group (CASWG). An accelerated solvent extraction approach was examined to determine the most effective method of extraction from PWB. Three different solvent systems were examined, which varied in solvent strength and polarity (i.e., 1:1 dichloromethane : acetone,100% methanol, and 1% isopropanol in pentane) with a 1:1 methylene chloride : acetone mixture having the most robust and consistent extraction for four original target organophosphorus compounds. The optimum extraction solvent was determined based on the extraction efficiency of the target analytes from spiked painted wallboard as determined by gas chromatography x gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) analysis of the extract. An average extraction efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained for these four compounds. The extraction approach was further demonstrated by extracting and detecting the chemical impurities present in neat DMMP that was vapor-deposited onto painted wallboard tickets.

Wahl, Jon H.; Colburn, Heather A.

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

305

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extraction Utility Extraction Utility Design Specification January 11, 2011 Document Version 1.9 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All Eric Morgan, Dekker, Ltd. Initial Draft Document January 19, 2010 1.1 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Document update with EM team review notes January 20, 2010 1.2 2.1.1 EM Project Team Document Review January 27, 2010 1.3 All Bruce Bartells Final Draft Review May 10, 2010 1.4.1 2.8 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Section Update May 14, 2010 1.4.2 2.3.1 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. System Tables Added May 17, 2010 1.4.3 2.3 Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Enhancements Update June 29, 2010 1.5 All Igor Pedan, Dekker, Ltd. Revised for Version 8.0.20100628 July 14, 2010 1.5.1 2.8 Igor Pedan,

306

Vehicle Technologies Office: Parasitic Loss Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parasitic Loss Reduction Parasitic Loss Reduction Heavy vehicles lose a tremendous amount of energy to wind resistance and drag, braking, and rolling resistance. Such non-engine losses can account for an approximate 45% decrease in efficiency. Other sources of energy loss include: friction and wear in the power train, thermal (heat) loads, operation of auxiliary loads (air conditioning, heaters, refrigeration, etc.), and engine idling. The parasitic loss activity identifies methodologies that may reduce energy losses, and tests those in the laboratory. Promising technologies are then prototyped and tested onboard heavy vehicles. Once validated, technologies must be tested on-road to obtain durability, reliability, and life-cycle cost data for the developmental component and/or design strategy.

307

Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program tip sheet describes how to save energy and costs by reducing expensive heat losses from industrial heating equipment, such as furnaces.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Wetland loss dynamics in southwestern Barataria basin ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ABSTRACT We determined spatial associations of wetland loss rates in a 950-km2 study area in the southwestern Barataria basin of Louisiana's ...

309

Louisiana Coastal Land Loss Video Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today, the U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center is pleased to announce the release of a new Louisiana coastal land loss video, ...

310

Analysis of TPV Network Losses (a Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This talk focuses on the theoretical analysis of electrical losses associated with electrically networking large numbers of TPV cells to produce high power TPV power generators.

DM DePoy; MW Dashiell; DD Rahner; LR Danielson; JE Oppenlander; JL Vell; RJ Wehrer

2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

311

Automated Dispersive Solid Phase Extraction of Pesticide Residues in Botanicals using Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 12.5 min; hold for 3 min MS conditions Drying gas temp: 225°C Sheath gas temp: 325°C Gas flow rate: 8 L/min Sheath gas flow: 10 L/min Nebulizer pressure: 40 psi EMV: 400 V Capillary voltage: 4000 V was then centrifuged at 5,000 x rpm for 3min ·Acetonitrile (1 ml) extract was transferred to a 2 ml auto-sampler vial

Heller, Barbara

312

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 31, 2012 August 31, 2012 Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Descriptions for Energy Department Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects, August 31, 2012 August 23, 2012 Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy study. August 15, 2012 Alex-andra "Ale" Hakala is an award-winning geoscientist at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory. | Photo from the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Energy Department Lab Researcher Wins HENAAC Award for Outstanding

313

www.tyndall.ac.uk Shale gas: an updated assessment of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as oil derived from tar sands. Nevertheless, there are several routes by which shale gas extraction maywww.tyndall.ac.uk Shale gas: an updated assessment of environmental and climate change impacts Summary This report, commissioned by The Co-operative, is an update on our January report, Shale gas

Matthews, Adrian

314

What questions should we be asking about shale gas? Bob Howarth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What questions should we be asking about shale gas? Bob Howarth Department of Ecology://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/pdf/0383er(2011).pdf #12;Unconventional extraction of gas from shale formations is new, and is being/ndx_marcil.pdf Shales hold a lot of natural gas (methane), but very dispersed, not economical using traditional

Barthelat, Francois

315

Quark energy loss and shadowing in nuclear Drell-Yan process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy loss effect in nuclear matter is another nuclear effect apart from the nuclear effects on the parton distribution as in deep inelastic scattering process. The quark energy loss can be measured best by the nuclear dependence of the high energy nuclear Drell-Yan process. By means of three kinds of quark energy loss parameterizations given in literature and the nuclear parton distribution extracted only with lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering experimental data, measured Drell-Yan production cross sections are analyzed for 800GeV proton incident on a variety of nuclear targets from FNAL E866. It is shown that our results with considering the energy loss effect are much different from these of the FNAL E866 who analysis the experimental data with the nuclear parton distribution functions obtained by using the deep inelastic lA collisions and pA nuclear Drell-Yan data . Considering the existence of energy loss effect in Drell-Yan lepton pairs production,we suggest that the extraction of nuclear parton distribution functions should not include Drell-Yan experimental data.

Chun-Gui Duan; Shu-Wen Cui; Zhan-Yuan Yan; Guang-Lie Li

2004-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

INFORMATION EXTRACTION AND SPEECH RECOGNITION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Named Entity 1 In addition, the parallel MET evaluation is per- forming multilingual named entity extraction — for Japanese, Chinese, and Thai. ...

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

318

INFORMATION EXTRACTION AND SPEECH RECOGNITION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Named Entity 1 In addition, the parallel MET evaluation is pe rforming multilingual named entity extraction -- forJapanese, Chinese, and Thai. ...

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

319

Extraction chromatography: Progress and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Extraction chromatography provides a simple and effective method for the analytical and preparative-scale separation of a variety of metal ions. Recent advances in extractant design, particularly the development of extractants capable of metal ion recognition or of strong complex formation in highly acidic media, have significantly improved the utility of the technique. Advances in support design, most notably the introduction of functionalized supports to enhance metal ion retention, promise to yield further improvements. Column instability remains a significant obstacle, however, to the process-scale application of extraction chromatography. 79 refs.

Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Extracting alcohols from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon and surfactants are contacted with a solution of alcohol and water to extract the alcohol into the hydrocarbon-surfactant mixture.

Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Definition: Reduced Electricity Losses | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Losses Losses Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Losses Functions that provide this benefit could help manage peak feeder loads, reduced electricity throughput, locate electricity production closer to the load and ensure that voltages remain within service tolerances, while minimizing the amount of reactive power provided. These actions can reduce electricity losses by making the system more efficient for a given load served or by actually reducing the overall load on the system.[1] Related Terms load, electricity generation, reactive power, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Electricity_Losses&oldid=502644

322

Heat loss from an open cavity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cavity type receivers are used extensively in concentrating solar thermal energy collecting systems. The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP) in Shenandoah, Georgia is a large scale field test for the collection of solar thermal energy. The STEP experiment consists of a large field array of solar collectors used to supplement the process steam, cooling and other electrical power requirements of an adjacent knitwear manufacturing facility. The purpose of the tests, conducted for this study, was to isolate and quantify the radiative, conductive, and convective components of total heat loss, and to determine the effects of operating temperature, receiver angle, and aperture size on cavity heat loss. An analytical model for radiative heat loss was developed and compared with two other methods used to determine radiative heat loss. A proposed convective heat loss correlation, including effects of aperture size, receiver operating temperature, and receiver angle is presented. The resulting data is a source to evaluate the STEP measurements.

McDonald, C.G. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States). Coll. of Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Hot dry rock geothermal heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A man-made geothermal reservoir has been created at a depth of 2.7 km in hot, dry granite by hydraulic fracturing. The system was completed by directionally drilling a second well in close proximity with the top of the vertical fracture. In early 1978 heat was extracted from this reservoir for a period of 75 days. During this period thermal power was produced at an average rate of 4 MW(t). Theoretical analysis of th measured drawdown suggests a total fracture heat transfer area of 16,000 m/sup 2/. Viscous impedance to through-flow declined continuously so that at the end of the experiment this impedance was only one-fifth its initial value. Water losses to the surrounding rock formation also decreased continuously, and eventually this loss rate was less than 1% of the circulated flow rate. Geochemical analyses suggest that, with scale up of the heat transfer area and deeper, hotter reservoirs, hot dry rock reservoirs can ultimately produce levels of power on a commercial scale.

Murphy, H.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Gas Turbine Technology, Part A: Overview, Cycles, and Thermodynamic Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of cogeneration technology has accelerated in recent years, and it is estimated that fifty percent of the cogeneration market will involve gas turbines. To several energy engineers, gas turbine engines present a new and somewhat perplexing prime mover. This paper (Parts A & B) intends to treat the area of gas turbine technology to provide a broad overview and understanding of this subject. This paper (Part A) covers the basics of gas turbine cycles, thermodynamics and performance considerations that are important in cogeneration. Simple, regenerative and combined cycles will be discussed, along with important performance losses (inlet and exit losses and part load operation). Waste heat recovery, as it relates to gas turbine performance, will also be discussed. This paper will provide the basic equations enabling quick computations to be made. Topics such as typical efficiencies, evaporative cooling costs, emissions, etc. will be discussed. A brief discussion of advanced cycles such as the dual fluid cycle and close cycles is also made.

Meher-Homji, C. B.; Focke, A. B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Rationality of EIA Forecasts under Symmetric and Asymmetric Loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Oil Prices Natural Gas Wellhead Prices Coal Prices tooil, coal and gas prices as well as natural gas consumption,oil, coal and gas prices as well as natural gas consumption,

Auffhammer, Maximilian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Natural Gas Extraction & Delivery in the United Statesy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Produced Water Treatment Studies in Texas (13) (Dave Burnett, Texas A&M) 4:45 PM Coal Bed Methane Produced OR REUSE LEGAL, INSTITUTIONAL, AND POLICY ISSUES Barry Crutchfield, Moderator The planned format

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

328

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

329

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

330

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

331

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

332

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

333

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

334

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

335

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

336

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

337

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

338

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

339

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

340

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

342

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

343

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

344

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

345

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

346

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

347

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

348

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

349

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

350

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

351

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

352

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

353

A Rapid Loss Index for Tropical Cyclone Disasters in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disaster emergency response needs rapid estimation on disaster loss. In China it is of great importance to develop a loss index for rapidly assessing tropical cyclone (TC) disaster loss. In this paper, a new composite loss index for TC landing on China ... Keywords: Tropical Cyclone, Disaster, Loss Index, Rapid Loss Assessment

Ying Li; Weihua Fang

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

On the reliability of mass-loss-rate estimates for AGB stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the recent literature there has been some doubt as to the reliability of CO multi-transitional line observations as a mass-loss-rate estimator for AGB stars. Mass-loss rates for 10 intermediate- to high-mass-loss-rate AGB stars are derived using a detailed non-LTE, non-local radiative transfer code based on the Monte-Carlo method to model the CO radio line intensities. The circumstellar envelopes are assumed to be spherically symmetric and formed by constant mass-loss rates. The energy balance is solved self-consistently and the effects of dust on the radiation field and thermal balance are included. An independent estimate of the mass-loss rate is also obtained from the combination of dust radiative transfer modelling with a dynamical model of the gas and dust particles. We find that the CO radio line intensities and shapes are successfully reproduced for the majority of our objects assuming a constant mass-loss rate. Moreover, the CO line intensities are only weakly dependent on the adopted micro-turbulent velocity, in contrast to recent claims in the literature. The two methods used in the present work to derive mass-loss-rates are consistent within a factor of ~3 for intermediate- to high-mass-loss-rate objects, indicating that this is a lower limit to the uncertainty in present mass-loss-rate estimates. We find a tentative trend with chemistry. Mass-loss rates from the dust/dynamical model are systematically higher than those from the CO model for the carbon stars and vice versa for the M-type stars. This could be ascribed to a discrepancy in the adopted CO/H_2-abundance ratio, but we caution that the sample is small and systematic errors cannot be excluded.

Sofia Ramstedt; Fredrik L. Schoeier; Hans Olofsson; Andreas A. Lundgren

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

356

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

357

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

358

Propane Prices Influenced by Crude Oil and Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Propane prices have been high this year for several reasons. Propane usually follows crude oil prices more closely than natural gas prices. As crude oil prices rose beginning in 1999, propane has followed. In addition, some early cold weather this year put extra pressure on prices. However, more recently, the highly unusual surge in natural gas prices affected propane supply and drove propane prices up. Propane comes from two sources of supply: refineries and natural gas processing plants. The very high natural gas prices made it more economic for refineries to use the propane they normally produce and sell than to buy natural gas. The gas processing plants found it more economic to leave propane in the natural gas streams than to extract it for sale separately.

359

Quantifying the role of degasification subsidence in wetland loss -- Mississippi delta plain  

SciTech Connect

Modem and ancient delta plains in Louisiana that border the northern Gulf of Mexico are undergoing unprecedented rates of land loss. Subsidence due to compaction and loss of pore water is believed to be one of the primary land loss factors, whereas subsidence due to gas emission is generally believed to play a significant role only in the upper one or two meters of a wetland. Evidence to the contrary is presented here that suggests that degasification subsidence is a more important mechanism contributing to land loss than previously thought. In addition, potential degasification subsidence can be quantified if the depression from normal compressional and shear wave velocities is known. Velocity reductions of 30 to 75% from compressional wave velocity in water and extending to depths of tens of meters have been observed in a saltwater marsh in Louisiana. An order of magnitude reduction in velocity has been observed previously in gas-rich sediments on the adjacent continental shelf, where biogenic gas is observed to depths of 1 km or more. The ratio of normal to depressed compressional wave velocities is used to calculate potential degasification subsidence.

McGinnis, L.D.; Johnson, D.O.; Zimmerman, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Isaacson, H.R. [Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Penland, S.; Connor, P.F. [Louisiana State Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Site-specific electronic configurations of Fe 3d states by energy loss by channeled electrons  

SciTech Connect

Site-specific configurations of Fe 3d electrons in a spinel ferrite were investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy under electron channeling conditions. Site-specific spectra were extracted by applying a multivariate curve resolution (MCR) technique to the data set. An electronic difference in the Fe sites caused by ligand field splitting of trivalent Fe was probed. This demonstrated the promise of site-specific valence and spin state analysis in spintronics applications of spinel ferrites.

Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Muto, Shunsuke; Nishida, Ikuo [Department of Materials, Physics, and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Rusz, Jan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

362

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

363

Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

364

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Eligibility...

365

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

366

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

367

Parameter extraction from I-V characteristics of PV devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Device parameters such as series and shunt resistances, saturation current and diode ideality factor influence the behaviour of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of solar cells and photovoltaic modules. It is necessary to determine these parameters since performance parameters are derived from the I-V curve and information provided by the device parameters are useful in analyzing performance losses. This contribution presents device parameters of CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells, as well as, CuInSe{sub 2}, mono- and multicrystalline silicon modules determined using a parameter extraction routine that employs Particle Swarm Optimization. The device parameters of the CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells show that the contribution of recombination mechanisms exhibited by high saturation current when coupled with the effects of parasitic resistances result in lower maximum power and conversion efficiency. Device parameters of photovoltaic modules extracted from I-V characteristics obtained at higher temperature show increased saturation current. The extracted values also reflect the adverse effect of temperature on parasitic resistances. The parameters extracted from I-V curves offer an understanding of the different mechanisms involved in the operation of the devices. The parameter extraction routine utilized in this study is a useful tool in determining the device parameters which reveal the mechanisms affecting device performance. (author)

Macabebe, Erees Queen B. [Department of Electronics, Computer and Communications Engineering, Ateneo de Manila University, Loyola Heights, Quezon City 1108 (Philippines); Department of Physics and Centre for Energy Research, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Sheppard, Charles J. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Dyk, E. Ernest van [Department of Physics and Centre for Energy Research, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

369

Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) Removal Process, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale and pilot-scale testing - so that it could be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization. The new process, known as the IROA process, is based on U.S. patent No. 6,553,784, which if commercialized, has the potential of achieving substantial energy savings compared to currently used cryogenic technology. When successfully developed, this technology will benefit the petrochemical industry, which uses NGL as feedstocks, and will also benefit other chemical industries that utilize gas-liquid separation and distillation under similar operating conditions. Specific goals and objectives of the overall program include: (i) collecting relevant physical property and Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) data for the design and evaluation of the new technology, (ii) solving critical R&D issues including the identification of suitable dehydration and NGL absorbing solvents, inhibiting corrosion, and specifying proper packing structure and materials, (iii) designing, construction and operation of bench and pilot-scale units to verify design performance, (iv) computer simulation of the process using commercial software simulation platforms such as Aspen-Plus and HYSYS, and (v) preparation of a commercialization plan and identification of industrial partners that are interested in utilizing the new technology. NGL is a collective term for C2+ hydrocarbons present in the natural gas. Historically, the commercial value of the separated NGL components has been greater than the thermal value of these liquids in the gas. The revenue derived from extracting NGLs is crucial to ensuring the overall profitability of the domestic natural gas production industry and therefore of ensuring a secure and reliable supply in the 48 contiguous states. However, rising natural gas prices have dramatically reduced the economic incentive to extract NGLs from domestically produced natural gas. Successful gas processors will be those who adopt technologies that are less energy intensive, have lower capital and operating costs and offer the flexibility to tailor the plant performance to maximize product revenue as market conditions change, while maintaining overall system efficiency. Presently, cryogenic turbo-expander technology is the dominant NGL recovery process and it is used throughout the world. This process is known to be highly energy intensive, as substantial energy is required to recompress the processed gas back to pipeline pressure. The purpose of this project is to develop a new NGL separation process that is flexible in terms of ethane rejection and can reduce energy consumption by 20-30% from current levels, particularly for ethane recoveries of less than 70%. The new process integrates the dehydration of the raw natural gas stream and the removal of NGLs in such a way that heat recovery is maximized and pressure losses are minimized so that high-value equipment such as the compressor, turbo-expander, and a separate dehydration unit are not required. GTI completed a techno-economic evaluation of the new process based on an Aspen-HYSYS simulation model. The evaluation incorporated purchased equipment cost estimates obtained from equipment suppliers and two different commercial software packages; namely, Aspen-Icarus and Preliminary Design and Quoting Service (PDQ$). For a 100 MMscfd gas processing plant, the annualized capital cost for the new technology was found to be about 10% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery above 70% and about 40% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery below 50%. It was also found that at around 40-50% C2 recovery (which is economically justifiable at the current natural gas prices), the energy cost to recover NGL using the new technology is about 50% of that of conventional cryogenic technology.

Meyer, Howard, S.; Lu, Yingzhong

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

371

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

372

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas prices, successful application of horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, as well as significant investments made by natural gas companies in production...

373

Gas scrubbing liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowrie, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Natural Gas Processed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

375

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service “Evolving Estimate” in Natural Gas Monthly.

376

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and a weather snapshot. Monthly Natural Gas Monthly Natural and supplemental gas production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices in the...

377

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

378

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

379

February Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

380

November Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

January Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

382

March Natural Gas Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

383

May Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

384

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7, 2009 Next Release: May 14, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 6, 2009) Natural gas...

385

CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

386

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

387

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

388

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

389

Natural Gas Dry Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

390

Dynamic S0 Galaxies II: the Role of Diffuse Hot Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas loss is thought to be important in SF quenching and morphological transition during the evolution of S0 galaxies. In high density environments, gas loss can be achieved via many external mechanisms. However, in relatively isolated environments, where these external mechanisms cannot be efficient, gas loss must be dominated by some internal processes. We perform Chandra analysis of hot gas in five nearby isolated S0 galaxies, based on quantitative subtraction of various stellar contributions. We find that all the galaxies studied in the present work are X-ray faint, with the hot gas luminosity LXgas relation, and gas removal from S0 galaxies in isolated environments. We find that elliptical and S0 galaxies are not significantly different in LX at the low mass end (typically with LK<1e11Lsun). However, at the high mass end, S0 galax...

Li, Jiang-Tao; Li, Zhiyuan; Chen, Yang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Why Ť25?? and Y-12 mercury losses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"25"? and Y-12 mercury losses Recently I learned something new regarding the "shortcut names" or code names for uranium-235 and plutonium-239. It seems the codes used to discuss...

392

Corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines  

SciTech Connect

The problem related to the prediction of corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines has been solved, in the past, by means of semi-empirical monomial formulae. However, the proposed formulae that are simpler to use do not always give adequate calculation precision, while the formulae that provide the closest results require implicit functions of different complexity, which are difficult to apply; moreover, it is not possible to understand clearly what influence the variations of the different line parameters have on the losses themselves. The new monomial semi-empirical relationship, proposed to predict the corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines, is very simple to use; it highlights the dependence of power losses due to the corona effect by the different line parameters. The formula has been developed by elaborating a considerable amount of available experimental data.

Corbellini, U.; Pelacchi, P. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy). Dept. of Electric Systems and Automation

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Trough Receiver Heat Loss Testing (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes the design, fabrication, and qualification of an experimental capability for thermal loss testing of full-size trough receiver elements; and the testing on a variety of receivers.

Lewandowski, A.; Feik, C.; Hansen, R.; Phillips, S.; Bingham, C.; Netter, J.; Forristal, R.; Burkholder, F.; Meglan, B.; Wolfrum, E.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Starlight and Sandstorms: Mass Loss Mechanisms on the AGB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are strong observational indications that the dense slow winds of cool luminous AGB stars are driven by radiative pressure on dust grains which form in the extended atmospheres resulting from pulsation-induced shocks. For carbon stars, detailed models of outflows driven by amorphous carbon grains show good agreement with observations. Some still existing discrepancies may be due to a simplified treatment of cooling in shocks, drift of the grains relative to the gas, or effects of giant convection cells or dust-induced pattern formation. For stars with C/O alternative is scattering by Fe-free silicate grains with radii of a few tenths of a micron. In this scenario one should expect less circumstellar reddening for M- and S-type AGB stars than for C-stars with comparable stellar parameters and mass loss rates.

Höfner, Susanne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Mass-loss from Red Giants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although much is known about the nature of winds from hot stars and giants and supergiants with spectral types earlier than K, there is still much to be learned regarding the mass-loss process in cool, late-type stars. We will review the current state of research, with particular reference to observations and modelling of mass-loss from giant stars in symbiotic systems.

Brian Espey; Cian Crowley

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Collett, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Controlling annular gas flow in deep wells  

SciTech Connect

This article reports on the phenomenon of annular gas channeling. It can occur during primary cementing in wells with formations containing gas. Such channeling may lead to interzonal communication down hole, or even gas migration to the surface. Formation gas is normally contained by the cement slurry's hydrostatic pressure. Annular gas channeling usually results from volumetric changes associated with: cement hydration and fluid loss, poor cement placement techniques, high cement free water, cementing gelling properties, and excessive thickening times. Initially, the cement slurry acts as a true fluid, transmitting hydrostatic pressure to the formation gas and preventing its flow into the cement matrix. However, as the cement begins to set, changing from a fluid state to a rigid state, it gradually begins to lose its ability to transmit hydrostatic pressure. This period of change is usually referred to as the ''transition period.'' Shrinkage of the cement volume compounds the problem and eventually can lead to poor binding between the cement and formation, thereby allowing gas to flow through gaps at the formation-cement interface.

Matthews, S.M.; Copeland, J.C.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of plutonium from aqueous inorganic acid solutions by the use of a water immiscible organic extractant liquid is described. The plutonium must be in the oxidized state, and the solvents covered by the patent include nitromethane, nitroethane, nitropropane, and nitrobenzene. The use of a salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate in the case of an aqueous nitric acid solution is advantageous. After contacting the aqueous solution with the organic extractant, the resulting extract and raffinate phases are separated. The plutonium may be recovered by any suitable method.

Seaborg, G.T.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between the two liquid phases, separation will result. This is the principle upon which separation by liquid-liquid extraction is based, and there are a number of important applications of this concept in industrial processes. This paper will review the basic concepts and applications as well as present future directions for the liquid-liquid extraction process.

Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage by State About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

SciTech Connect

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as Integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air in leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

402

Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CWF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air In-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

403

Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

404

Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air in leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

405

Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

SciTech Connect

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air in-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

406

Extractive Metallurgy of Rare Earths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 24, 2006 ... The extractive metallurgy of the rare-earth elements has several features that make it unique—a variety of both input ores and final products, ...

407

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Corporate bodies and chemical bonds : an STS analysis of natural gas development in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas extraction in the United States in the early 21st century has transformed social, physical, legal and biological landscapes. The technique of hydraulic fracturing, which entails the high-pressure injection into ...

Wylie, Sara Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Support vector machines with the ramp loss and the hard margin loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 4, 2008 ... Despite the fact that training SVM with the robust loss functions requires the solution of a quadratic mixed-integer program (QMIP) and is ...

410

Capacitance measurements and k-value extractions of low-k films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review test vehicles and methods that are commonly used for capacitance measurements of low-k films and the general procedure for k-value extractions. We demonstrate that a considerable loss of accuracy may occur if metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) ... Keywords: Back contact, Capacitance, Dielectric films, Leakage, Low-k materials, Ohmic contacts, Water uptake, k-Value

Ivan Ciofi; Mikhail R. Baklanov; Zsolt Tkei; Gerald P. Beyer

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

412

Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Reserves Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Reserves Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Reserves Key Challenges: Seismic imaging methods, vital in our continuing search for deep offshore oil and gas fields, have a long and established history in hydrocarbon reservoir exploration but the technology has encountered difficulty in discriminating different types of reservoir fluids, such as brines, oil, and gas. Why it Matters: Imaging methods that improve locating and extracting petroleum and gas from the earth by even a few percent can yield enormous payoffs. Geophysical realizations of hydrocarbon reservoirs at unprecedented levels of detail will afford new detection abilities, new efficiencies and new exploration savings by revealing where hydrocarbon deposits reside. Can also be used for improved understanding of potential

413

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

414

Production and Handling Slide 11: Solvent Extraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extraction Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Solvent Extraction Refer to caption below for image description...

415

PARS II Extraction Utility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II Extraction Utility DEC1387487110111DekkerPMISExtractionUtilityv8020101217.zip More Documents & Publications Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility Release Notes for the PARS...

416

A methodology for assessing MIT's energy used and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) actions can be made to decrease losses and therefore increase plant efficiencies. As production efficiencies are maximized, fuel use and thus emissions are minimized. From fiscal year 1998 to 2003, the gas turbine ...

Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Functional design criteria for the retained gas sampler system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS) is being developed to capture and analyze waste samples from Hanford Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks to determine both the quantity and composition of gases retained in the waste. The RGSS consists of three main components: the Sampler, Extractor, and Extruder. This report describes the functional criteria for the design of the RGSS components. The RGSS Sampler is based on the WHC Universal Sampler design with modifications to eliminate gas leakage. The primary function of the Sampler is to capture a representative waste sample from a tank and transport the sample with minimal loss of gas content from the tank to the laboratory. The function of the Extruder is to transfer the waste sample from the Sampler to the Extractor. The function of the Extractor is to separate the gases from the liquids and solids, measure the relative volume of gas to determine the void fraction, and remove and analyze the gas constituents.

Wootan, D.W.

1995-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

SciTech Connect

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

419

New basins invigorate U.S. gas shales play  

SciTech Connect

While actually the first and oldest of unconventional gas plays, gas shales have lagged the other main unconventional gas resources--tight gas and coalbed methane--in production and proved reserves. Recently, however, with active drilling of the Antrim shales in Michigan and promising results from the Barnett shales of North Texas, this gas play is growing in importance. While once thought of as only an Appalachian basin Devonian-age Ohio shales play and the exclusive domain of regional independents, development of gas shales has expanded to new basins and has began to attract larger E and P firms. Companies such as Amoco, Chevron, and Shell in the Michigan basin and Mitchell Energy and Development and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in the Fort Worth basin are aggressively pursuing this gas resource. This report, the third of a four part series assessing unconventional gas development in the US, examines the state of the gas shales industry following the 1992 expiration of the Sec. 29 Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit. The main questions being addressed are first, to what extent are these gas sources viable without the tax credit, and second, what advances in understanding of these reservoirs and what progress in extraction technologies have changed the outlook for this large but complex gas resource?

Reeves, S.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Hill, D.G. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

420

Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: Australian field trial  

SciTech Connect

In Australia a significant number of landfill waste disposal sites do not incorporate measures for the collection and treatment of landfill gas. This includes many old/former landfill sites, rural landfill sites, non-putrescible solid waste and inert waste landfill sites, where landfill gas generation is low and it is not commercially viable to extract and beneficially utilize the landfill gas. Previous research has demonstrated that biofiltration has the potential to degrade methane in landfill gas, however, the microbial processes can be affected by many local conditions and factors including moisture content, temperature, nutrient supply, including the availability of oxygen and methane, and the movement of gas (oxygen and methane) to/from the micro-organisms. A field scale trial is being undertaken at a landfill site in Sydney, Australia, to investigate passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas as a means of managing landfill gas emissions at low to moderate gas generation landfill sites. The design and construction of the trial is described and the experimental results will provide in-depth knowledge on the application of passive gas drainage and landfill gas biofiltration under Sydney (Australian) conditions, including the performance of recycled materials for the management of landfill gas emissions.

Dever, S.A. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia) and GHD Pty. Ltd., 10 Bond Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 (Australia)]. E-mail: stuart_dever@ghd.com.au; Swarbrick, G.E. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: g.swarbrick@unsw.edu.au; Stuetz, R.M. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: r.stuetz@unsw.edu.au

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Method for heavy-water extraction from non-electrolytic hydrogen streams using a combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange system  

SciTech Connect

A method is disclosed for heavy-water extraction from nonelectrolytic hydrogen streams using a modified combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange-heavy water process (Cecehwp). The method comprises contacting feed water in a catalyst column with hydrogen gas originating partly from such nonelectrolytic hydrogen stream and partly from an electrolytic hydrogen stream so as to enrich the feed water with deuterium extracted from both the non-electrolytic and electrolytic hydrogen gas, and passing the deuterium enriched water to an electrolyzer wherein the electrolytic hydrogen gas is generated and then fed through the catalyst column.

Butler, J.P.; Hammerli, M.; Leroy, R.L.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

423

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

424

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

425

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

426

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

427

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

428

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

429

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

430

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

431

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

432

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

433

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

434

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

435

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

436

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

438

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

439

Atom-molecule conversion with particle losses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the mean-field approximation and the phase space analysis, we study the dynamics of an atom-molecule conversion system subject to particle loss. Starting from the many-body dynamics described by a master equation, an effective nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation is introduced. The classical phase space is then specified and classified by fixed points. The boundary, which separate different dynamical regimes have been calculated and discussed. The effect of particle loss on the conversion efficiency and the self-trapping is explored.

B. Cui; L. C. Wang; X. X. Yi

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

AC Loss Measurements with a Cryocooled Sample  

SciTech Connect

A new cryostat cooled by a closed-cycle Cryomech GB-37 cryocooler for superconductor measurements at temperatures down to 20 K is described. The sample is conductively coupled to the cold stage so as to minimize vibration and thermal stresses. AC losses have been measured calorimetrically in several HTSC coils that have been wound to simulate sub-scale transformer winding pairs. Stable temperatures down to 20 K were reached on these coils, allowing measurements at practical levels of ac current and I{sub c}. By using short ac current pulses, losses on individual turns could be resolved. Results are reported mainly to showcase the apparatus, measurement procedure and analytical approach.

Schwenterly, S.W.

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Have Disaster Losses Increased Due to Anthropogenic Climate Change?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing impact of natural disasters over recent decades has been well documented, especially the direct economic losses and losses that were insured. Claims are made by some that climate change has caused more losses, but others assert ...

Laurens M. Bouwer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

GAS COOLED NUCLEAR REACTOR STUDY. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

An investigntion was made of the performance of a gas-cooled reactor, designed to provide a source of high temperature heat to a stream of helium. This reactor, in turn, is used as a source of heat for the air stream in a gas- turbine power plant. The reactor design was predicted primarily on the requirement for transferring a large amount of heat to the helium stream with a pressure drop low enough that it will not represent a major loss of power in the power plant. The mass of uranium e uired far criticality under various circumstances was investigated by multigroup calculations, both on desk calculators and on an IBM-704 machine. The gasturbine power plant perfarmance was studied based on a Studebaker-Packard-designed gas-turbine power plant for the propulsion of destroyer-escort vessels. A small experimental program was carried out to study some effects of helium on graphite and on structural steels. (auth)

Thompson, A.S.

1956-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

PREPARATION OF ALKYL PYROPHOSPHATE EXTRACTANTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for providing superior solvent extractants for metal recovery processes is given wherein the extractant comprises an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid ester dissolved in an organic solvent diluent. Finely divided solid P/sub 2/O/ sub 5/ is slurried in an organic solvent-diluent selected from organic solvents such as kerosene, benzene, chlorobenzene, toluene, etc. An alcohol selected from the higher alcohols having 4 to 17 carbon atoms. e.g.. hexanol-1. heptanol-3, octanol-1. 2.6-dimethyl-heptanol-4, and decanol-1, is rapidly added to the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ slurry in the amount of about 2 moles of alcohol to 1 mole of P/sub 2/ O/sub 5/. The temperature is maintained below about 110 deg C during the course of the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-alcohol reaction. An alkyl pyrophosphate extractant compound is formed as a consequence of the reaction process. The alkyl pyrophosphate solvent-diluent extractant phase is useful in solvent extraction metal recovery processes.

Levine, C.A.; Skiens, W.E.; Moore, G.R.

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 12, 2011 August 12, 2011 Statement from National Security Council Spokesman Tommy Vietor on U.S.-Brazil Strategic Energy Dialogue Launch THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary August 1, 2011 DOE Selects Projects Totaling $12.4 Million Aimed at Increasing Domestic Energy Production While Enhancing Environmental Protection A total of 11 research projects that will help find ways to extract more energy from unconventional oil and gas resources while reducing environmental risks have been selected totaling $12.4 million by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy. July 27, 2011 Fossil Energy R&D Returns Significant National Benefit in More Than Three Decades of Achievement Research and development activities at DOE's Office of Fossil Energy have helped increase domestic energy supplies and security, lowered costs,

445

ORNL analysis predicts losses from extreme weather damage could...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL analysis predicts losses from extreme weather damage could double by 2050 Researcher tackles unprecedented county-by-county economic loss forecast Research in impacts,...

446

Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Blade Cascade with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Blade Cascade with 3 Blade Cascade with 3 - - D D Endwall Endwall Contouring Contouring...

447

The Research Path to Determining the Natural Gas Supply Potential of Marine Gas Hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primary goal of the U.S. National Interagency Gas Hydrates R&D program is to determine the natural gas production potential of marine gas hydrates. In pursuing this goal, four primary areas of effort are being conducted in parallel. First, are wide-ranging basic scientific investigations in both the laboratory and in the field designed to advance the understanding of the nature and behavior of gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS). This multi-disciplinary work has wide-ranging direct applications to resource recovery, including assisting the development of exploration and production technologies through better rock physics models for GHBS and also in providing key data for numerical simulations of productivity, reservoir geomechanical response, and other phenomena. In addition, fundamental science efforts are essential to developing a fuller understanding of the role gas hydrates play in the natural environment and the potential environmental implications of gas hydrate production, a critical precursor to commercial extraction. A second area of effort is the confirmation of resource presence and viability via a series of multi-well marine drilling expeditions. The collection of data in the field is essential to further clarifying what proportion of the likely immense in-place marine gas hydrate resource exists in accumulations of sufficient quality to represent potential commercial production prospects. A third research focus area is the integration of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical field data into an effective suite of exploration tools that can support the delineation and characterization commercial gas hydrate prospects prior to drilling. The fourth primary research focus is the development and testing of well-based extraction technologies (including drilling, completion, stimulation and production) that can safely deliver commercial gas production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs in a variety of settings. Initial efforts will take advantage of the relatively favorable economics of conducting production tests in Arctic gas-hydrate bearing sandstones with the intent of translating the knowledge gained to later testing in marine sandstone reservoirs. The full and concurrent pusuit of each of these research topics is essential to the determining the future production potential of naturally-occuring gas hydrates.

Boswell, R.M.; Rose, K.K.; Baker, R.C.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Mobile device protection from loss and capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile devices play a critical role in assistive environments. How to authenticate and secure communications among them has become more important especially against loss and capture of the devices. In this paper, we present an approach to protect signing ... Keywords: assistive environment, authentication, digital signature, forward security, mobile device

Zhengyi Le; Yi Ouyang; Yurong Xu; Fillia Makedon

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Management of water extracted from carbon sequestration projects  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the past decade, frequent discussions and debates have centered on the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). For sequestration to have a reasonably positive impact on atmospheric carbon levels, the anticipated volume of CO{sub 2} that would need to be injected is very large (many millions of tons per year). Many stakeholders have expressed concern about elevated formation pressure following the extended injection of CO{sub 2}. The injected CO{sub 2} plume could potentially extend for many kilometers from the injection well. If not properly managed and monitored, the increased formation pressure could stimulate new fractures or enlarge existing natural cracks or faults, so the CO{sub 2} or the brine pushed ahead of the plume could migrate vertically. One possible tool for management of formation pressure would be to extract water already residing in the formation where CO{sub 2} is being stored. The concept is that by removing water from the receiving formations (referred to as 'extracted water' to distinguish it from 'oil and gas produced water'), the pressure gradients caused by injection could be reduced, and additional pore space could be freed up to sequester CO{sub 2}. Such water extraction would occur away from the CO{sub 2} plume to avoid extracting a portion of the sequestered CO{sub 2} along with the formation water. While water extraction would not be a mandatory component of large-scale carbon storage programs, it could provide many benefits, such as reduction of pressure, increased space for CO{sub 2} storage, and potentially, 'plume steering.' Argonne National Laboratory is developing information for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to evaluate management of extracted water. If water is extracted from geological formations designated to receive injected CO{sub 2} for sequestration, the project operator will need to identify methods for managing very large volumes of water most of which will contain large quantities of salt and other dissolved minerals. Produced water from oil and gas production also typically contains large quantities of dissolved solids. Therefore, many of the same practices that are established and used for managing produced water also may be applicable for extracted water. This report describes the probable composition of the extracted water that is removed from the formations, options for managing the extracted water, the pros and cons of those options, and some opportunities for beneficial use of the water. Following the introductory material in Chapter 1, the report is divided into chapters covering the following topics: (Chapter 2) examines the formations that are likely candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration and provides a general evaluation of the geochemical characteristics of the formations; (Chapter 3) makes some preliminary estimates of the volume of water that could be extracted; (Chapter 4) provides a qualitative review of many potential technologies and practices for managing extracted water and for each technology or management practice, pros and cons are provided; (Chapter 5) explores the potential costs of water management; and (Chapter 6) presents the conclusions.

Harto, C. B.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

450

Measurements of gas permeability on crushed gas shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, more attention has been given to unconventional gas reservoirs, including tight gas shales. Accurate description of gas transport and permeability measurements… (more)

Guarnieri, R.V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Generalized Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Design Schematic Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capcity Design Schematic...

452

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

453

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corridors > Major U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates...

454

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

455

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transmission...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Transmission Path Diagram About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Transmission Path Natural...

456

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Other Heating...

457

Clustering techniques for open relation extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work investigates clustering techniques for Relation Extraction (RE). Relation Extraction is the task of extracting relationships among named entities (e.g., people, organizations and geo-political entities) from natural language text. We are particularly ... Keywords: relation extraction, text clustering

Filipe Mesquita

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

ChronoSeeker: Future Opinion Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we will propose a novel technique for Future Opinion Extraction, a new task of Information Extraction. The system we built can extract automatically future opinions, building automatic queries for the Search API. We obtained an F-Measure ... Keywords: Data Mining, Information Extraction, Machine Learning

Pierre Brun; Hideki Kawai; Kazuo Kunieda; Keiji Yamada

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Interactive out-of-core isosurface extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: interval tree, isosurface extraction, marching cubes, out-of-core computation, scientific visualization

Yi-Jen Chiang; Cláudio T. Silva; William J. Schroeder

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

RESEARCH ON CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL USING AN EXTRACTIVE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a one-year effort directed at the exploration of the use of coal as a feedstock for a variety of industrially-relevant carbon products. The work was basically divided into three focus areas. The first area dealt with the acquisition of laboratory equipment to aid in the analysis and characterization of both the raw coal and the coal-derived feedstocks. Improvements were also made on the coal-extraction pilot plant which will now allow larger quantities of feedstock to be produced. Mass and energy balances were also performed on the pilot plant in an attempt to evaluate the scale-up potential of the process. The second focus area dealt with exploring hydrogenation conditions specifically aimed at testing several less-expensive candidate hydrogen-donor solvents. Through a process of filtration and vacuum distillation, viable pitch products were produced and evaluated. Moreover, a recycle solvent was also isolated so that the overall solvent balance in the system could be maintained. The effect of variables such as gas pressure and gas atmosphere were evaluated. The pitch product was analyzed and showed low ash content, reasonable yield, good coking value and a coke with anisotropic optical texture. A unique plot of coke yield vs. pitch softening point was discovered to be independent of reaction conditions or hydrogen-donor solvent. The third area of research centered on the investigation of alternate extraction solvents and processing conditions for the solvent extraction step. A wide variety of solvents, co-solvents and enhancement additives were tested with varying degrees of success. For the extraction of raw coal, the efficacy of the alternate solvents when compared to the benchmark solvent, N-methyl pyrrolidone, was not good. However when the same coal was partially hydrogenated prior to solvent extraction, all solvents showed excellent results even for extractions performed at room temperature. Standard analyses of the extraction products indicated that they had the requisite properties of viable carbon-product precursors.

Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo; Chong Chen; Brian Bland; David Fenton

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal central Gulf of Mexico. Volume 2. Technical narrative. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. Volume II provides an introduction to the study, direct impacts of OCS activities, saltwater intrusion, subsidence and sedimentation, and landscape patterns and aerial imagery.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Utilization of natural gas in large-scale separation processes. Final report, September 1987-August 1988  

SciTech Connect

Several industrial separation processes were identified which could be operated in a cost-effective manner utilizing pipeline natural gas as a processing fluid. In one such process, natural gas stripping, hazardous materials are transferred from hazardous water to the natural gas phase. When the natural gas phase is later burned as fuel, the heating value is realized and hazardous materials are destroyed. The combination of extraction, natural gas stripping, and incineration may be used to remove and destroy hazardous material contained in soil. It is possible for this system to be portable so that it could be used for the treatment of contaminated soils at remote sites. Natural gas may also be used to flush hazardous materials from adsorbents and thus regenerate adsorption beds used to remove hazardous materials from water or gas streams. The regenerant gas stream, containing natural gas and hazardous materials, would be used as boiler fuel where the hazardous material would be destroyed.

Humphrey, J.L.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

December Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DOEEIA-0130(9712) Distribution CategoryUC-950 Natural Gas Monthly December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC...

464

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

465

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage...

466

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to withdraw natural gas from storage to meet current demand. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 2,406 Bcf as of...

467

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas futures also reversed gains made in the previous week. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased by 63 Bcf...

468

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

469

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Res., 104(B10), 22985-23003. Collett, T.S. (1992), Potential of gas hydrates outlined, Oil Gas J., 90(25), 84-87. 70 Cook, A.E., Goldberg, D., and R.L. Kleinberg (2008),...

470

Natural gas annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Southern California Gas Co  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Southern California Gas Co ... 236,147,041 98,326,527 274,565,356 690,930 139,093,560 748,823,414 Lone Star Gas Co......

472

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,451,1,35,17,,,10,3,0,48...

473

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,13889,36,837,1016,,,1129,181,...

474

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,151,-1,1,6,,,0,0,0,36...

475

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,6305,-3,226,165,,,884,391,10,...

476

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,495,-3,48,11,,,113,0,31,60...

477

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,11457,-3,122,171,,,219,21,7,7...

478

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,877,0,37,79,,,93,32,2,62...

479

Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

480

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association ConferenceMarch 12, 2004

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Gas Turbine Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...times higher than atmospheric pressure.Ref 25The gas turbine was developed generally for main propulsion and power

482

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

with active programs. More information is available at: http:www.eia.doe.govcneafelectricitypagerestructuringrestructureelect.html. Information about natural gas...

483

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 6 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ... 7 Task 6: Numerical Models for...

484

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

485

Natural gas annual 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Residual gas analysis device  

SciTech Connect

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

487

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association Conference, March 12, 2004 Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, Administrator, Energy Information Administration

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

488

Landfill Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Landfill Gas Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLandfillGas&oldid267173"...

489

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves U.S. natural gas liquids proved reserves decreased 7 percent to 7,459 million ...

490

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofreplacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for households and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Exports...

492

Treatment of biomass gasification wastewaters using liquid-liquid extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigated liquid-liquid extraction as a treatment method for biomass gasification wastewaters (BGW). Distribution coefficients for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were determined for the following solvents: methylisobutyl ketone (MIBK), n-butyl acetate, n-butanol, MIBK/n-butyl acetate (50:50 vol), MIBK/n-butanol (50:50 vol), tri-butyl phosphate, tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO)/MIBK (10:90 wt), TOPO/kerosene (10:90 wt), kerosene, and toluene. The best distribution coefficient of 1.3 was given by n-butanol. Chemical analysis of the wastewater by gas chromatography (GC) showed acetic acid and propionic acid concentrations of about 4000 mg/1. Methanol, ethanol, and acetone were identified in trace amounts. These five compounds accounted for 45% of the measured COD of 29,000 mg/1. Because of the presence of carboxylic acids, pH was expected to affect extraction of the wastewater. At low pH the acids should be in the acidic form, which increased extraction by MIBK. Extraction by n-butanol was increased at high pH, where the acids should be in the ionic form.

Bell, N.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Processing - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 33,213: 29,436: 30,008: 23,819: 22,405: 21,518: 1967-2011: Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 2,335: 2,547: 2,840 ...

494

Hydrogeochemistry and gas compositions of the Uinta Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to geothermal energy extraction and radionu- clide transport as well as conventional and un- conventional oil cracking of bitumen and oil into gas) or from a mix of thermogenic-biogenic sources. Moreover M.S. degree from Louisiana State University (1978) and her Ph.D. from the University of Miami (1983

Zhang, Ye

495

Natural gas industry directory  

SciTech Connect

This directory has information on the following: associations and organizations; exploration and production; gas compression; gas processors; gathering and transmission companies; liquefied natural gas; local distribution companies; marketing firms; regulatory agencies; service companies; suppliers and manufacturers; and regional buyer`s guide.

NONE

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ Fossil backed by a growing portfolio of assets. #12;Shale Gas Geography 5 | MARCELLUS SHALE COALITION #12;Shale Permits Price #12;Pricing Trend of Oil and Gas in the US $- $5.00 $10.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00 USDper

Lee, Dongwon

497

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

498

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, storage, and usage of compressed gas cylinders. 2.0 POLICY Colorado School of Mines ("Mines" or "the, storage, and usage requirements outlined below. This policy is applicable school-wide including all, or electrical circuits. Flammable gas cylinders must be stored in the building's gas cylinder storage cage until

499

Gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

A core engine or gas generator is described for use in a range of gas turbine engines. A multi-stage compressor and a single stage supersonic turbine are mounted on a single shaft. The compressor includes a number of stages of variable angle and the gas generator has an annular combustion chamber.

MacDonald, A.G.

1976-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

500

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly highlights of activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry are presented. Feature articles for this issue are: Natural Gas Overview for Winter 1983-1984 by Karen A. Kelley; and an Analysis of Natural Gas Sales by John H. Herbert. (PSB)

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z