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1

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Greenhouse Gas State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

2

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study By October 13, 2013, the Washington Office of Financial Management must

3

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

4

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

5

Regional GHG Emissions Stat s Greenhouse Gas and the Regional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6/5/2013 1 Regional GHG Emissions Stat s Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Symposium.6% Coal 42% Hydro, 68.0% 10 #12;6/5/2013 6 Overall GHG Emissions: PNW vs. US Total US Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Economic Sector (2011) Total PNW* Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Economic Sector (2010

6

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Buildings, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: Stationary Combustion Guidance[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for stationary combustion is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically

7

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Buildings, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: Electricity Heat, and Steam Purchase Guidance v1.2[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for purchased electricity is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically

8

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigeration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigeration The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: Refrigerant Guide[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for refrigeration is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically

9

Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6/5/2013 1 Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Symposium Natural Gas Prices 6. Potential Federal CO2 regulatory cost policy Two basic CO2 Cost 10 20 30 40 Million Generation Coal 19 % 15 % 13 % Natural Gas 10 % 10 % 14 % Wind & Other Renewables 8 % 12 % 13 % Emission

10

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport or Transport or Mobil Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or Mobil Sources Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Transportation, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for mobile combustion is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically from mobile combustion sources, including vehicles under the direct control

11

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG emissions specifically from the combustion of fuels in stationary sources such as boilers and furnaces. AgencyCompany Organization World Resources Institute, World Business...

12

UK GHG Emissions: Local and Regional Estimates for 2005 - 2008...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG Emissions: Local and Regional Estimates for 2005 - 2008 The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) published National Statistics on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in...

13

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

are available for emissions from purchased electricity, stationary combustion, refrigeration and air conditioning equipment, and several industrial sectors. References...

14

GHG emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG emissions GHG emissions Dataset Summary Description These datasets include GHG and CO2 emissions statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the European Commission. Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2 Emissions for EU (xls, 853.5 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions by Sector, all member countries (xls, 2 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions from Transport, all member countries (xls, 1.3 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by sector, all member countries (xls, 2.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by transport, all member countries (xls, 1.5 MiB)

15

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Greenhouse Gas Emission Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... climate change as a serious problem and that greenhouse gas (GHG ... models to determine the baselines of GHG emissions and the effect of GHG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

17

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20102011 Dalhousie Office of Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20102011 Dalhousie Office of Sustainability ..................................... 30 Appendix E: Canadian Default Factors for Calculating CO2 Emissions from Combustion of Natural Gas

Brownstone, Rob

18

EPA Climate Leaders Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA Climate Leaders Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) EPA Climate Leaders Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: EPA Climate Leaders Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Industry, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/climateleaders/index.html Cost: Free The EPA Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) is designed to develop an annual GHG inventory based on the EPA Climate Leaders Greenhouse Gas Inventory Protocol. Overview The EPA Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) is designed to develop

19

IGES GHG Emissions Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES GHG Emissions Data IGES GHG Emissions Data Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES GHG Emissions Data Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_kyoto.html References: IGES GHG Emissions Data[1] Summary "IGES GHG Emissions Data is aimed at providing comprehensive, organised information on the GHG emissions from Annex I countries to the UNFCCC in an easy-to-understand way. All information is extracted from the publicly available sources on the UNFCCC web-site and this data will be updated regularly. " References ↑ "IGES GHG Emissions Data" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IGES_GHG_Emissions_Data&oldid=383109"

20

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production: Experience Validating a New GHG Offset Protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project report describes in part the second phase (years four through six, 2010–2012) of a two-phase, six-year long EPRI-sponsored research project entitled “Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions.” This project investigated an innovative approach to developing large-scale, cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets that potentially can be implemented across broad geographic areas of the ...

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Frey, H.C., and P.Y. Kuo, "Potential Best Practices for Reducing Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions in Freight Transportation," Paper No. 2007-AWMA-443, Proceedings, 100th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frey, H.C., and P.Y. Kuo, "Potential Best Practices for Reducing Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions for approximately 9% of total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the United States.1-2 The individual contributions or developing potential best practices and their effectiveness at reducing greenhouse gas emissions

Frey, H. Christopher

22

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information Prior to developing the API Compendium of GHG Emissions Methodologies for the Oil and Gas Industry (PDF 14.6 MB), API reviewed a wide range of government estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from the oil and gas industry as well as existing and widely used methodologies for estimating emissions from our industry's operations. This review made it quite clear that while existing data and methods may be adequate for national-level estimates of greenhouse gas emissions, they were inadequate for developing reliable facility- and company-specific estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas operations. Download Acrobat Reader The Compendium is used by industry to assess its greenhouse gas emissions. Working with a number of other international associations as well as

23

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: GHG Inventory  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols GHG Inventory Protocols Petroleum Industry Guidelines for Reporting Greenhouse Gas Emissions (PDF 2.0 MB) Download Acrobat Reader IPIECA, as part of a joint industry task force with the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (OGP), has developed, on behalf of the petroleum industry, a voluntary industry-endorsed approach for measuring and reporting GHG emissions. The petroleum industry has recognized the need for GHG accounting and reporting guidance that is focused specifically on the industry. Current approaches vary among government reporting programs. Companies also differ in how they voluntarily report their emissions data. This variability in approaches has resulted in a lack of comparability of reported GHG

24

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement

26

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20112012 Office of Sustainability September 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20112012 Office of Sustainability ..................................... 31 Appendix E: Canadian Default Factors for Calculating CO2 Emissions from Combustion of Natural Gas

Brownstone, Rob

28

Contacting the Authors: David McCollum (dlmccollum@ucdavis.edu), Dr. Christopher Yang (ccyang@ucdavis.edu) Scientific studies suggest that annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions must be cut 50 to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@ucdavis.edu) · Scientific studies suggest that annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions must be cut 50 to 80% worldwide by 2050 Source: "Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the U.S. Transportation Sector" (EPA, 2006) and author's calculations Options for Reducing Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emissions: · Domestic includes only those

California at Davis, University of

29

Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: wbcarbonfinance.org/docs/REDD_Mosaic_Methodology.pdf Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation Screenshot References: Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation[1] Overview "This methodology is for project activities that reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) from mosaic deforestation and, where relevant and

30

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intensity of coal- 89 based corn ethanol in gCO2e/liter GHGintensity of gas- 61 based corn ethanol in gCO2e/liter PriceIf a megajoule of corn ethanol reduces GHG emissions 18%

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Review of Electricity Generation Technology Lifecycle GHG Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a selection of published cross-technology assessments and two recent meta-analyses evaluating life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from different electricity generation technologies. Differences in life-cycle GHG estimates reflect differing assessment methodologies, plant and equipment construction practices, power plant conversion efficiencies, power plant size and operating characteristics, practices in fuel preparation and transport, and system boundary as...

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

32

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Agency/Company /Organization: Northwest Power and Conservation Council Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Industry, Transportation, Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.nwcouncil.org/energy/grac/20090130_Supply%20Curves_NWPCC_FINAL.pdf Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Screenshot References: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves[1] Background "The ECL supply curve model includes data on potential emission reductions for approximately 60 separate technology options. It allows the examination of multiple scenarios involving the inclusion or exclusion of technology

33

The GHG Emissions List Analysis of Aluminum Industry in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, The GHG Emissions List Analysis of Aluminum Industry in China. Author(s), Yuanyuan Wang, Hao Bai, Guangwei Du, Yuhao Ding, Kang ...

34

Essays on the U.S Biofuel Policies: Welfare Impacts and the Potential for Reduction of GHG Emission.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation study investigates the impact of the US biofuel policies related to greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulation, tax credit and renewable fuel standard (RFS2)… (more)

Wamisho Hossiso, Kassu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

36

Reducing GHG emissions in the United States' transportation sector  

SciTech Connect

Reducing GHG emissions in the U.S. transportation sector requires both the use of highly efficient propulsion systems and low carbon fuels. This study compares reduction potentials that might be achieved in 2060 for several advanced options including biofuels, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV), assuming that technical and cost reduction targets are met and necessary fueling infrastructures are built. The study quantifies the extent of the reductions that can be achieved through increasing engine efficiency and transitioning to low-carbon fuels separately. Decarbonizing the fuels is essential for achieving large reductions in GHG emissions, and the study quantifies the reductions that can be achieved over a range of fuel carbon intensities. Although renewables will play a vital role, some combination of coal gasification with carbon capture and sequestration, and/or nuclear energy will likely be needed to enable very large reductions in carbon intensities for hydrogen and electricity. Biomass supply constraints do not allow major carbon emission reductions from biofuels alone; the value of biomass is that it can be combined with other solutions to help achieve significant results. Compared with gasoline, natural gas provides 20% reduction in GHG emissions in internal combustion engines and up to 50% reduction when used as a feedstock for producing hydrogen or electricity, making it a good transition fuel for electric propulsion drive trains. The material in this paper can be useful information to many other countries, including developing countries because of a common factor: the difficulty of finding sustainable, low-carbon, cost-competitive substitutes for petroleum fuels.

Das, Sujit [ORNL; Andress, David A [ORNL; Nguyen, Tien [U.S. DOE

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Daily Quantity Daily GhG Emissions Oil Price Price elasGas Daily Quantity Daily GhG Emissions Oil Price Price elasDaily Quantity Daily GhG Emissions Surcharge Revenues Oil

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Overview of Avista GHG Modeling NPCC Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6/5/2013 1 Overview of Avista GHG Modeling NPCC Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Natural Gas CO2 Emissions A Bridge to a Low Carbon Future, or the Future? 815 1,190 lbs/MWh Gas CCCT has ~35% of coal emissions on a per-MWh basis Gas CT has ~50% of coal emissions on a per-MWh basis 119 119

39

Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions Capturing Fugitives to Reduce DOE's GHG Emissions November 15, 2011 - 2:04pm Addthis An electrician foreman for the Western Area Power Administration checks a circuit breaker at the Ault Substation in eastern Colorado. The circuit breaker, containing 85 lbs of SF6, protects equipment in the substation against damage from excessive electrical currents | Courtesy of Western Area Power Administration. An electrician foreman for the Western Area Power Administration checks a circuit breaker at the Ault Substation in eastern Colorado. The circuit breaker, containing 85 lbs of SF6, protects equipment in the substation against damage from excessive electrical currents | Courtesy of Western Area Power Administration.

40

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Augustin J et al. Automated gas chromatographic system forof the atmospheric trace gases methane, carbon dioxide, andfuel consumption and of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Lessons Learned - The EV Project Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Avoidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Avoidance and Cost Reduction Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Award DE-EE0002194 ECOtality North America 430 S. 2 nd Avenue Phoenix, Arizona...

42

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

SciTech Connect

Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

Price, Lynn

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Green IS for GHG emission reporting on product-level? an action design research project in the meat industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emission reporting gained importance in the last years, due to societal and governmental pressure. However, this task is highly complex, especially in interdependent batch production processes and for reporting on the product-level. Green ... Keywords: GHG emissions, Green IS, PCF, action design research, design science, meat industry, product carbon footprint

Hendrik Hilpert, Christoph Beckers, Lutz M. Kolbe, Matthias Schumann

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricit...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Generation Technologies Speaker(s): Garvin Heath Date: April 11, 2011 -...

49

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

50

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

51

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Speed Redcutions on Vessel-Based Emissions for InternationalAviation-Related GHG Emissions: A Systems Analysis forthe Environment. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level

53

Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

Heath, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

"Blue Sky" Approaches to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: An Initial Assessment of Potential New Types of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an initial assessment of potential new approaches to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that might be capable of generating large-scale GHG emissions offsets at relatively low cost compared to other GHG mitigation options. The nine potential blue sky approaches assessed in this report include biochar, destruction of ozone depleting substances, control of natural fugitive methane seeps from coal seams, control of fugitive natural gas emissions associated with hydraulic fracturing...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices References: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building[1] Logo: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building "Developing greenhouse gas inventories is an important first step to managing emissions. U.S. EPA's approach for building capacity to develop GHG inventories is based on the following lessons learned from working alongside developing country experts: Technical expertise for GHG inventories already exists in developing countries.

56

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels This calculator currently focuses on electricity for a number of reasons. The public's interest in vehicles fueled by electricity is high, and as a result consumers are interested in better understanding the emissions created when electricity is produced. For vehicles that are fueled solely by electricity, tailpipe emissions are zero, so electricity production accounts for all GHG emissions associated with such vehicles. Finally, GHG emissions from electricity production vary significantly by region, which makes a calculator like this one-which uses regional data instead of national averages-particularly useful. If you want to compare total tailpipe plus fuel production GHG emissions for an electric or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle to those for a gasoline

57

Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions from geothermal electricity production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A life cycle analysis (LCA) is presented for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fossil energy use associated with geothermal electricity production with a special focus on operational GHG emissions from hydrothermal flash and dry steam plants. The analysis includes results for both the plant and fuel cycle components of the total life cycle. The impact of recent changes to California's GHG reporting protocol for GHG emissions are discussed by comparing emission rate metrics derived from post and pre revision data sets. These metrics are running capacity weighted average GHG emission rates (g/kWh) and emission rate cumulative distribution functions. To complete our life cycle analysis plant cycle results were extracted from our previous work and added to fuel cycle results. The resulting life cycle fossil energy and greenhouse gas emissions values are compared among a range of fossil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions Significant Energy Consumption - and Opportunities for Reduction Transportation is essential to our economy and quality of life, and currently accounts for 71% of the nation's total petroleum use and 33% of our total carbon emissions. Energy-efficient transportation strategies could reduce both oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examines how combining multiple strategies could reduce both GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. The project's primary objective is to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an

59

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Name Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Dataset, Technical report Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan References MICCA Website[1] The overall objective of the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

60

Water efficiency in buildings: assessment of its impact on energy efficiency and reducing GHG emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays humanity uses about 50% of existing drinking-water, but in the next 15 years this percentage will reach 75%. Consequently, hydric stress risk will rise significantly across the entire planet. Accordingly, several countries will have to apply ... Keywords: GHG emissions, efficient water devices, energy efficiency, hydric efficiency

A. Silva-Afonso; F. Rodrigues; C. Pimentel-Rodrigues

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EXTENSION OF ISO 14001 ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR THE METAL CASTING INDUSTRY TO INCLUDE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions legislation in the United States is forthcoming. Manufacturers have dealt with past emissions regulations differently, some through implementing environmental management systems… (more)

Miller, Gretchen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Controlling Fugitive Emissions to Achieve GHG Reduction Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Josh Silverman Chair, DOE Fugitive Emissions Working Group Director, Office of Sustainability Support Office of Health, Safety, and Security Presented at ISM Workshop September...

63

An Analysis of the Efficacy of US Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper provides an analysis of the efficacy of United States (US) greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction policy implemented in the mid-1990s, specifically targeting the… (more)

Meyer, Russell

64

Corporate Carbon Strategy and Procurement of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets for Compliance with Mandatory Carbon Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explores strategies that may be employed by electric companies and other industrial enterprises to reduce their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to comply with potential future mandatory GHG emissions reduction programs. It explores the opportunities, challenges and risks associated with reducing GHG emissions from within a company's own operations, as well as other approaches that may be used for compliance such as real-time coal-to-natural gas fuel switching in the regional dispatch of electr...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

65

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated using the eGRID post 2006 emission factor for all subject years (1990-2009); the CA-CP Calculator uses a different (lower) factor (eGRID pre 2006) for years 1990-2006. WUSTL deviated from the CA-CP Calculator on this emission factor because using the pre and post eGRID factors skews GHG emissions

Dobbins, Ian G.

66

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Generation Technologies Speaker(s): Garvin Heath Date: April 11, 2011 - 10:00am Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Eric Masanet One barrier to the full support and deployment of alternative energy systems and the development of a sustainable energy policy is the lack of robust conclusions about the life cycle environmental impacts of energy technologies. A significant number of life cycle assessments (LCA) of energy technologies have been published, far greater than many are aware. However, there is a view held by many decision-makers that the state of the science in LCA of energy technologies is inconclusive because of perceived and real variability and uncertainty in published estimates of life cycle

67

A Comprehensive Overview of Project-Based Mechanisms to Offset Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update provides senior managers and environmental staff of U.S. electric companies with a comprehensive understanding of the role that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets can play in their own company's future carbon emissions compliance strategy and how offsets offer a key contribution to meet global GHG emissions reduction targets faster and at comparatively low cost. So-called project-based mechanisms use the power of markets to supply cost-efficient GHG emission reductions to e...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Greenhouse Gas Emission Impacts of Carsharing in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts that result from individuals participating in carsharing organizations within North America. The authors conducted an online survey with members of major carsharing organizations and evaluated ...

Elliot W. Martin; Susan A. Shaheen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program October 7, 2013 - 10:48am Addthis When prioritizing building types and sites for evaluating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, Federal agencies should first determine which programs contribute the most to their total building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and focus their analysis on those programs. Using the total buildings energy use by program, these emissions profile can be calculated using the Federal Energy Management Program's Annual GHG and Sustainability Data Report site. In the example below, Agency ABC should focus on Programs B and C first because together they represent over 80% of building emissions. Agencies

70

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building (Redirected from US EPA GHG Inventory Capacity Building) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices References: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building[1] Logo: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building "Developing greenhouse gas inventories is an important first step to managing emissions. U.S. EPA's approach for building capacity to develop GHG inventories is based on the following lessons learned from working alongside developing country experts: Technical expertise for GHG inventories already exists in developing

71

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG Emissions Reduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supporting policies offered by the government • Energy/GHGpolicy package, and include a real threat of increased government regulation or energy/energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-

Price, Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal energy 0.0020 ($/MJ) Price of natural gas energycneaf /coal/pag 9. Price of natural gas energy - average US

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation Oak Ridge sector is believed to be responsible for 28.4% of our greenhouse gas emissions (see figure), including 33% of the carbon dioxide we produce. As such it is a leading candidate for greenhouse gas ((GHG) (CO2, NH4, HFCs

74

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric Power Plants in the Upper Colorado requires a life cycle perspective. This paper compares greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from three renewable, and natural gas power plants is estimated for four time periods after construction. The assessment

Kammen, Daniel M.

75

The effect of household consumption patterns on energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: Comparison between Spain and Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to provide a better understanding of the effect of increasing income on energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions… (more)

Cintas Sánchez, Olivia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Re-evaluating California’s greenhouse gas emission law: Is it rational under the current economic situation?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research evaluates the impact of the economic recession on the California Air Resource Board (CARB) strategy for reducing current greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from… (more)

Algadi, Hassan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the first two years of a three-year long project entitled "Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions." This EPRI-sponsored project is investigating an innovative approach to developing large-scale and potentially cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets that could be implemented across broad geographic areas of the U.S. and internationally. The tools and information developed in this project will broaden the GHG emissions offset ...

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

SciTech Connect

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Emissions Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis Federal agencies should establish planned changes in operations that could have a substantial impact on emissions for each greenhouse gas (GHG) emission source: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. Such changes could represent either an additional significant hurdle to overcome or a significant reduction in the effort required to drive emissions down-in the absence of any direct GHG mitigation reduction strategies. This will help each organization establish its "business as usual" emission profile in 2020, the year agencies are expected to meet their Scope 1 and 2 and Scope 3 GHG emission-reduction goals.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Guidance on measuring and reporting Greenhouse Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guidance on measuring and reporting Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from freight transport This guidance provides clear instructions on calculating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from freight and report your greenhouse gas emissions', by providing more specific information and examples relating

82

The Role of Hydropower Reservoirs in Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent publications of measurements and analyses of reservoir greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have sparked debate about the carbon neutrality of hydropower. This report describes the results of two initial tasks of a multiyear study to assess the importance of carbon cycling and GHG emissions from hydropower reservoirs and operations in the United States. The risks this issue presents to the U.S. hydropower industry are discussed, and a plan to resolve uncertainties is presented. Throughout this report, r...

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

The EPRI Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Policy Dialogue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, EPRI launched the EPRI Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Offset Policy Dialogue project. The goals of this project are to inform key constituencies involved in the development of U.S. climate mitigation strategies and policies about GHG emissions offset-related policies and design issues, and to provide a forum in which representatives of key sectors of the U.S. economy and communities involved in the ongoing development and debate on climate change policies can discuss these issues. This Technical...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

84

Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets October 7, 2013 - 10:24am Addthis Question to Answer What are appropriate GHG emission reduction targets for specific agency programs and sites? Not all administrative units within the agency have the same potential to contribute to agency-level targets. This step aims to help agencies establish what each major administrative unit (e.g. program site) should contribute to the agency goal based on its planned growth trajectory and estimates of its cost and potential to reduce GHG emissions. As illustrated in the figure below, two sites may have equal potential to reduce GHG emissions. But a site expecting significant mission-related growth prior to the 2020 target year may have a lower reduction target

85

Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by shifting energy demand from gasoline to electricity. GHG benefits. HEVs are optimal or near-optimal for minimum cost in most scenarios. High gas prices and low

Michalek, Jeremy J.

86

Case Studies of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects Implemented in the United Nations Clean Development Mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes case studies of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offset project activities undertaken within the United Nations Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) program. This paper is designed to communicate key lessons learned from the implementation of different types of GHG emissions offsets projects in the CDM to policy makers in the U.S. who may be interested in developing national, regional or state-based GHG offsets programs. This paper also is designed to provide important insights to entitie...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

87

Assessing the fuel Use and greenhouse gas emissions of future light-duty vehicles in Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is of great concern in Japan, as well as elsewhere, such as in the U.S. and EU. More than 20% of GHG emissions in Japan come from the transportation sector, and a more than 70% ...

Nishimura, Eriko

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward Verification of Emissions Control Compliance Speaker(s): Marc Fischer Date: April 29, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Local to international control of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will require systematic estimation of emissions and independent verification. California, the only state in the US with legislated controls on GHG emissions, is conducting research to enable emissions verification of the mandated emissions reductions (AB-32). The California Energy Commission supports the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project at LBNL. In collaboration with NOAA, CALGEM measures mixing ratios of all significant GHGs at two tall-towers and on aircraft in

89

Quantification of Regional Green House Gas Emission Impacts and Benefits for Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power generation sector contributes about one-third of all green house gas (GHG) emissions in the United States. To curb green house gas emissions, all options in the electric power value chain must be considered and evaluated. More effective use of distributed photovoltaic (PV) systems and efficient use of natural gas via use in distributed combined heat, power (CHP), and cooling systems in the end-use sector may be options to mitigating GHG emissions. This research project quantitatively e...

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

90

GHG Management Institute GHG MRV Curriculum | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG Management Institute GHG MRV Curriculum GHG Management Institute GHG MRV Curriculum Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: GHG Management Institute GHG MRV Curriculum Agency/Company /Organization: Greenhouse Gas Management Institute (GHGMI), The Climate Registry Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Training materials Website: ghginstitute.org/2010/03/16/tcr-ghgmi-partnership/ References: GHG Management Institute GHG MRV Curriculum[1] "The training courses build on GHGMI's rigorous curriculum and e-learning capabilities and incorporate The Registry's expertise in helping companies measure and report their carbon footprints. Coursework will cover the basics of GHG accounting and reporting to The Registry as well as GHG verification for inventories, ensuring that a new generation of

91

Decision-Making to Reduce Manufacturing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installed to replace hydro power, in terms of GHG emissions.coal-fired power plant or a hydro-power facility. 4. The GHG

Reich-Weiser, Corinne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies Agency/Company /Organization: Pew Center on Global Climate Change Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Technical report Website: www.pewclimate.org/docUploads/aviation-and-marine-report-2009.pdf Cost: Free References: Greenhouse Gas emissions from aviation and marine transportation: mitigation potential and policies[1] "This paper provides an overview of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from aviation and marine transportation and the various mitigation options to

93

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit Agency/Company /Organization: American Public Transportation Association Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.aptastandards.com/Portals/0/SUDS/SUDSPublished/APTA_Climate_Change This Recommended Practice provides guidance to transit agencies for quantifying their greenhouse gas emissions, including both emissions generated by transit and the potential reduction of emissions through efficiency and displacement How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes

94

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final project report describes a three-year long EPRI supplemental project entitled "Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions." This EPRI-sponsored project investigated an innovative approach to developing large-scale, cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets that potentially can be implemented across broad geographic areas of the United States and internationally.

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

95

Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Country Mexico Central America References Greenhouse Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials for Buildings[1] Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Screenshot "This report represents the first comprehensive description of the factors that determine the present and future impacts of residential and commercial

96

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Profile Emissions Profile Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile October 7, 2013 - 10:14am Addthis Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. While the data required for annual GHG reporting are sufficient to establish an agency's overall emission inventory, these data are not typically enough information for effectively managing emissions. A detailed, bottom-up assessment can provide the foundation for much more robust Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans. Because detailed analyses of all assets can be time-intensive, strategic planning helps the

97

Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic ethanol July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that may accompany land-use change (LUC) from increased biofuel feedstock production are a source of debate in the discussion of drawbacks and advantages of biofuels. Estimates of LUC GHG emissions focus mainly on corn ethanol and vary widely. Increasing the understanding of LUC GHG impacts associated with both corn and cellulosic ethanol will inform the on-going debate concerning their magnitudes and

98

A Strategy for a Global Observing System for Verification of National Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the risks of climate change becoming increasingly evident, there is growing discussion regarding international treaties and national regulations to lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Enforcement of such agreements ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

99

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis After assessing the potential for agency size changes, a Federal agency should evaluate its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile using renewable energy in buildings. When using renewable energy in buildings, the approach for evaluating GHG emissions involves evaluating the renewable energy resource potential and determining what type of renewable energy technology to use in a building. To help determine renewable energy resource potential at a site, see FEMP's information on Renewable Energy Resource Maps and Screening Tools. Also see Renewable Energy Project Planning and Implementation.

100

Aggregation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets: Benefits, Existing Methods, and Key Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is designed to develop and disseminate to members of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the public at large, and participants in the world's evolving carbon markets a set of lessons learned about the aggregation of individual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offset projects into larger, organized configurations that can yield large-scale GHG emissions offsets. Aggregation puts together geographically and/or temporally dispersed activities that reduce emissions in a similar manner to ...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting October 7, 2013 - 1:47pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 For evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile for employee commuting, data on behavior and attitudes are best collected through an agency-wide survey. The default survey methodology in the Federal GHG Accounting Guidance is designed to collect the minimum data for emissions calculations. Additional information may be necessary to determine which trip reduction strategies are best suited for specific employee populations. The optional questions in the advanced survey methodology or data gathered through an agency-defined employee commute survey can provide this understanding.

102

title Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS Model year month institution Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory address Berkeley abstract p A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas GHG and regional criteria pollutant emissions The model included representations of all GHGemitting sectors of the California economy including those outside the energy sector such as high global warming potential gases waste treatment agriculture and forestry in varying degrees of detail and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and

103

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigerati...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

stationary combustion, transport or mobile sources, purchased electricity, and several industrial sectors. References 1.0 1.1 "Refrigerant Guide" Retrieved from "http:...

104

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the reporting entity. The user must also specify the country and utility region (e.g., eGRID subregion, if applicable). For some countries, the user must specify the fuel mix...

105

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions for climate stabilization: framing regional options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has stated that stabilizing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations will require reduction of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by as much as 80% by 2050. Subnational efforts to cut emissions will inform policy development nationally and globally. We projected GHG mitigation strategies for Minnesota, which has adopted a strategic goal of 80% emissions reduction by 2050. A portfolio of conservation strategies, including electricity conservation, increased vehicle fleet fuel efficiency, and reduced vehicle miles traveled, is likely the most cost-effective option for Minnesota and could reduce emissions by 18% below 2005 levels. An 80% GHG reduction would require complete decarbonization of the electricity and transportation sectors, combined with carbon capture and sequestration at power plants, or deep cuts in other relatively more intransigent GHG-emitting sectors. In order to achieve ambitious GHG reduction goals, policymakers should promote aggressive conservation efforts, which would probably have negative net costs, while phasing in alternative fuels to replace coal and motor gasoline over the long-term. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Laura Schmitt Olabisi; Peter B. Reich; Kris A. Johnson; Anne R. Kapuscinski; Sangwon Suh; Elizabeth J. Wilson [University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN (United States). Ecosystem Science and Sustainability Initiative

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary Name: IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Cost: Free Related Tools Energy Development Index (EDI) Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model ... further results A simple spreadsheet model for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from existing waste management practices (transportation, composting, anaerobic digestion, mechanical biological treatment, recycling, landfilling) in

108

Literature Review and Sensitivity Analysis of Biopower Life-Cycle Assessments and Greenhouse Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power offers utilities a potential pathway to increase their renewable generation portfolios for compliance with renewable energy standards and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current fossil-based technologies. To date, a large body of life-cycle assessment (LCA) literature assessing biopower’s life-cycle GHG emissions has been published.Phase A of this project performed an exhaustive search of the biopower LCA literature yielding 117 references that ...

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Others wanting to learn more about greenhouse gas emissions and their reduction. About the ... based on ensuring the sustainability of finite natural resources.

110

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Climate Action Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Moving UBC Beyond Climate Neutral System Project 2009 Scenario 1: Climate Action Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions it will have on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The majority of foods served on campus originate from

111

Event:GHG Protocol Latin America and Caribbean Regional Training: How to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Protocol Latin America and Caribbean Regional Training: How to Protocol Latin America and Caribbean Regional Training: How to Establish a National Corporate Emissions Reporting Program Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png GHG Protocol Latin America and Caribbean Regional Training: How to Establish a National Corporate Emissions Reporting Program: all day on 2011/08/29 Aug 29 - Sept 2: Bogota, Colombia This regional workshop will provide training for government agencies, business/industry associations and key NGOs on how to establish and implement national- or regional-level corporate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reporting programs and trainings. The workshop will include two parts: a training of trainers of corporate GHG accounting and reporting, and a corporate GHG program design course. Members of the Brazil GHG Protocol Program, the Mexico GHG Protocol

112

Effects of Internet-based multiple-site conferences on greenhouse gas emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing consensus that ICT can contribute to the reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, both by increasing the efficiency of existing processes and by enabling substitution effects to usher in more energy efficient patterns ... Keywords: Greenhouse-gas emissions, ICT for energy efficiency, Multiple-site conference, Rebound effect, Substitution effect, Videoconferencing

Vlad C. Coroama; Lorenz M. Hilty; Martin Birtel

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Greenhouse gas emissions and the surface transport of freight in Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions and the surface transport of freight in Canada Paul Steenhof a,*, Clarence committed to reducing its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 6% below 1990 levels between 2008 and 2012 annual reduction of greenhouse gases of 6% below 1990 levels between 2008 and 2012. The transportation

114

Life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions and non-CO? combustion effects from alternative jet fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-term viability and success of a transportation fuel depends on both economic and environmental sustainability. This thesis focuses specifically on assessing the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and non-CO ...

Stratton, Russell William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type October 7, 2013 - 10:51am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Starting with the programs contributing the greatest proportion of building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the agency should next determine which building types operated by those programs use the most energy (Figure 1). Energy intensity is evaluated instead of emissions in this approach because programs may not have access to emissions data by building type. Figure 1 - An image of an organizational-type chart. A rectangle labeled 'Program 1' has lines pointing to three other rectangles below it labeled 'Building Type 1,' 'Building Type 2,' and 'Building Type 3.' Next to the building types it says, 'Step 2. Estimate emissions by building type.

116

Determine Largest Mobile Greenhouse Gas Emission Sources | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Largest Mobile Greenhouse Gas Emission Sources Largest Mobile Greenhouse Gas Emission Sources Determine Largest Mobile Greenhouse Gas Emission Sources October 7, 2013 - 11:39am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 For the purposes of portfolio planning, a Federal agency's first data analysis step is to determine which mobile emissions sources represent the largest contributors to the agency's overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Agencies can use agency-level data to determine which fleets/locations, which vehicle assets (e.g., fleet vehicles, non-fleet equipment, etc.), and which fuel types are producing the largest amounts of emissions. Based on this analysis, the agency can better define which mitigation strategies will be most effective. For instance, if a single fleet comprises over half of the agency's vehicle and equipment emissions, the

117

Event:GHG Protocol Latin America and Caribbean Regional Training...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG Protocol Latin America and Caribbean Regional Training: How to Establish a National Corporate Emissions Reporting Program Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png GHG Protocol...

118

Predicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe gases (GHG) con- tributing to net greenhouse gas balance of agro-ecosystems. Evaluating the impact to the final greenhouse gas balance. One experimental site (involving a maize-wheat-barley-mustard rotation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

119

Comparing the greenhouse gas emissions from three alternative waste combustion concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant GHG reductions are possible by efficient WtE technologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CHP and high power-to-heat ratio provide significant GHG savings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O and coal mine type are important in LCA GHG emissions of FBC co-combustion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substituting coal and fuel oil by waste is beneficial in electricity and heat production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substituting natural gas by waste may not be reasonable in CHP generation. - Abstract: Three alternative condensing mode power and combined heat and power (CHP) waste-to-energy concepts were compared in terms of their impacts on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from a heat and power generation system. The concepts included (i) grate, (ii) bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) and (iii) circulating fluidised bed (CFB) combustion of waste. The BFB and CFB take advantage of advanced combustion technology which enabled them to reach electric efficiency up to 35% and 41% in condensing mode, respectively, whereas 28% (based on the lower heating value) was applied for the grate fired unit. A simple energy system model was applied in calculating the GHG emissions in different scenarios where coal or natural gas was substituted in power generation and mix of fuel oil and natural gas in heat generation by waste combustion. Landfilling and waste transportation were not considered in the model. GHG emissions were reduced significantly in all of the considered scenarios where the waste combustion concepts substituted coal based power generation. With the exception of condensing mode grate incinerator the different waste combustion scenarios resulted approximately in 1 Mton of fossil CO{sub 2}-eq. emission reduction per 1 Mton of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated. When natural gas based power generation was substituted by electricity from the waste combustion significant GHG emission reductions were not achieved.

Vainikka, Pasi, E-mail: pasi.vainikka@vtt.fi [VTT, Koivurannantie 1, FIN 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Tsupari, Eemeli; Sipilae, Kai [VTT, Koivurannantie 1, FIN 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hupa, Mikko [Aabo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Piispankatu 8, FIN 20500 Turku (Finland)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Country South Africa UN Region Southern Africa References South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings[1] South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Screenshot "This report aims to provide: a summary quantification of the influence of buildings on climate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U national estimates of energy intensities and greenhouse gas (GHG) production are of less relevance than the ANL Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

122

Impacts of greenhouse gas mitigation policies on agricultural land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are widely acknowledged to be responsible for much of the global warming in the past century. A number of approaches have been proposed to mitigate GHG emissions. Since the burning of ...

Wang, Xiaodong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack of regulatory interest in the 'real world' test results coupled with the difficulties of gathering analogous bench test data for systems employing gas turbines with Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG) and steam injection. It appears that the agencies are getting a better grasp of emissions, but there are still problem areas, particularly CO and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. The lag in data has resulted in the imposition of a CO reactor as BACT for the gas turbine. With the renewed concern about the environment, air permits will have a high profile with offsets being the next fix beyond BACT. 'The manner in which technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry....' (1) Therefore, it becomes increasingly important that the proponents of gas turbine-based facilities establish more reliable data on their proposed emissions. This paper addresses the gas turbine emissions experiences of eight cogeneration plants utilizing: 1) steam injection for both NOx control and power augmentation, 2) CO reactors, 3) selective catalytic reduction units. It also looks at possible regulatory actions.

Frederick, J. D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Gas turbine plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

Many cogeneration facilities use gas turbines combined with heat recovery boilers, and the number is increasing. At the start of 1986, over 75% of filings for new cogeneration plants included plans to burn natural gas. Depending on the geographic region, gas turbines are still one of the most popular prime movers. Emissions of pollutants from these turbines pose potential risks to the environment, particularly in geographical areas that already have high concentrations of cogeneration facilities. Although environmental regulations have concentrated on nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) in the past, it is now necessary to evaluate emission controls for other pollutants as well.

Davidson, L.N.; Gullett, D.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Analyze Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Analyze Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:47am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Once the relevant data have been collected, the next step is to identify the biggest building energy users and their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions contribution. Ideally would be done at the program level using actual building characteristic and performance data. However, assumptions may be established about energy performance of buildings based on general location and building type. Ultimately, building efficiency measures need to be evaluated at the building level before implementing them, but facility energy managers can evaluate the relative impact of different GHG reduction approaches using assumptions about the building characteristics and estimates of efficiency

127

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a Combined Heat and Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a Combined Heat and Power Plant Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Climate Focus Area: - Central Plant, Buildings, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: CHP Guidance v1.0[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for allocation of GHG emissions from a combined heat and power (CHP) plant is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator

128

Evaluation of metrics and baselines for tracking greenhouse gas emissions trends: Recommendations for the California climate action registry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary: The California Climate Action Registry, which was initially established in 2000 and began operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for recording annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of the Registry is to assist California businesses and organizations in their efforts to inventory and document emissions in order to establish a baseline and to document early actions to increase energy efficiency and decrease GHG emissions. The State of California has committed to use its ''best efforts'' to ensure that entities that establish GHG emissions baselines and register their emissions will receive ''appropriate consideration under any future international, federal, or state regulatory scheme relating to greenhouse gas emissions.'' Reporting of GHG emissions involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and indirect emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is consider ed to be an indirect GHG emission and is required to be included in the entity's report. Registry participants include businesses, non-profit organizations, municipalities, state agencies, and other entities. Participants are required to register the GHG emissions of all operations in California, and are encouraged to report nationwide. For the first three years of participation, the Registry only requires the reporting of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, although participants are encouraged to report the remaining five Kyoto Protocol GHGs (CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, and SF6). After three years, reporting of all six Kyoto GHG emissions is required. The enabling legislation for the Registry (SB 527) requires total GHG emissions to be registered and requires reporting of ''industry-specific metrics'' once such metrics have been adopted by the Registry. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) was asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission) related to the Registry in three areas: (1) assessing the availability and usefulness of industry-specific metrics, (2) evaluating various methods for establishing baselines for calculating GHG emissions reductions related to specific actions taken by Registry participants, and (3) establishing methods for calculating electricity CO2 emission factors. The third area of research was completed in 2002 and is documented in Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for the California Electric Power Sector (Marnay et al., 2002). This report documents our findings related to the first areas of research. For the first area of research, the overall objective was to evaluate the metrics, such as emissions per economic unit or emissions per unit of production that can be used to report GHG emissions trends for potential Registry participants. This research began with an effort to identify methodologies, benchmarking programs, inventories, protocols, and registries that u se industry-specific metrics to track trends in energy use or GHG emissions in order to determine what types of metrics have already been developed. The next step in developing industry-specific metrics was to assess the availability of data needed to determine metric development priorities. Berkeley Lab also determined the relative importance of different potential Registry participant categories in order to asses s the availability of sectoral or industry-specific metrics and then identified industry-specific metrics in use around the world. While a plethora of metrics was identified, no one metric that adequately tracks trends in GHG emissions while maintaining confidentiality of data was identified. As a result of this review, Berkeley Lab recommends the development of a GHG intensity index as a new metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends.Such an index could provide an industry-specific metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends to accurately reflect year to year changes while protecting proprietary data. This GHG intensity index changes

Price, Lynn; Murtishaw, Scott; Worrell, Ernst

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Inventory  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols GHG Inventory Protocols EPA/IAI PFC Measurement Protocol (PDF 243 KB) Download Acrobat Reader EPA and the International Aluminium Institute have collaborated with the global primary aluminium industry to develop a standard facility-specific PFC emissions measurement protocol. Use of the protocol will help ensure the consistency and accuracy of measurements. International Aluminum Institute's Aluminum Sector Greenhouse Gas Protocol (PDF 161 KB) Download Acrobat Reader The International Aluminum Institute (IAI) Aluminum Sector Addendum to the WBCSD/WRI Greenhouse Gas Protocol enhances and expands for the aluminum sector the World Business Council for Sustainable Development/World Resources Institute greenhouse gas corporate accounting and reporting protocol.

130

Exploring the Interaction Between California’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cap-and-Trade Program and Complementary Emissions Reduction Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

California enacted Assembly Bill 32 (AB 32) to address climate change in 2006. It required the California Air Resources Board (ARB) to develop a plan to reduce the State’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. ARB developed a plan (i.e., the “Scoping Plan”) made up of a GHG emissions cap-and-trade program and regulatory measures known as “complementary policies” (CPs) to achieve the 2020 target. The CPs, which were designed to achieve climate policy and ...

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

131

GHG Considerations in Integrated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 11 PGE's CO2 profile Carbon intensity 12 #12;6/5/2013 7 Ongoing, forecast load growth of 1 Power System Symposium © 2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. June 4, 2013 GHG" analysis (coal -> gas -> renewables) o Include an "Oregon compliance portfolio" 2 The IRP mandate remains

132

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Business  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Business Travel Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Business Travel October 7, 2013 - 1:27pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 To evaluate a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile, most of the information required to support air travel demand management is currently available through Federal agency-level travel information systems, such as GovTrip. However, that information may not be distributed to programs, regional offices, and sites, which are in the best position to evaluate opportunities to reduce travel. Considerations that may help the agency determine the level at which data should be collected and analyzed include: Where are budgets and policies regarding travel made and modified?

133

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:45am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Strategic planning for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation in buildings requires an understanding of a Federal agency's buildings portfolio, including which programs, building types, and sites contribute the most to the agency's emissions. The data described in Table 1 below will support this type of analysis. It is recommended that this information be collected at the agency and program level. Programs refer to major operating units within the agency where there is a significant degree of autonomy in planning and decision-making. In many cases, the type of data required for portfolio planning may already

134

Assessment of Near-Term Costs of Domestic GHG Emission Reduction Proposals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: PublishedCitation: Jacoby, HD; O'Sullivan, FM; and Paltsev, S. 2012. The Influence of Shale Gas on U.S. Energy and Environmental Policy. In Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, Volume 1, Number 1, 2012, pp. 37-51.U.S. shale deposits have long been known to contain large quantities of natural gas, but it was economically unrecoverable. In the last decade, however, recovery of shale gas has become commercially ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Operational energy consumption and GHG emissions in residential sector in urban China : an empirical study in Jinan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driven by rapid urbanization and increasing household incomes, residential energy consumption in urban China has been growing steadily in the past decade, posing critical energy and greenhouse gas emission challenges. ...

Zhang, Jiyang, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Critical analysis of GHG emissions generate by the fossil fuel power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors have compared the technology using the natural gas and coal in order to produce the electricity. The objective of this paper consists in evaluation of the life cycle assessment of the natural gas and coal in order to compare ... Keywords: CO2, LCA, combustion, energy, impact analysis

Cristian Dinca; Cosmin Marculescu; Adrian Badea; Cora Gheorghe

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Jeffery Greenblatt November 2013 For decades, California has used groundbreaking tools to collect and analyze emissions data from a variety of sources to establish a scientific basis for policy making. As its scope has expanded to include greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions, it has sought out similar tools to use to achieve the goals of legislation such as the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32). To support this effort, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model funded by the California Air Resources Board (ARB), to explore the impact of combinations

138

Event:11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading 1th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading: on 2011/10/03 "The IEA-IETA-EPRI Emissions Trading Workshop has been held annually at the headquarters of the International Energy Agency since 2000. This international workshop focuses on developments in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading around the world at the international, national and sub-national level. The 2011 workshop will cover topics relevant to the development of global, national and sub-national carbon markets, including scaled-up and new market mechanisms, NAMAs and sectoral crediting policies, MRV and international GHG accounting and 2nd-best trading programmes. As in previous years, the workshop will assemble representatives from government,

139

Event:11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Day 2 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Day 2 th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Day 2 Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading: on 2011/10/04 "The IEA-IETA-EPRI Emissions Trading Workshop has been held annually at the headquarters of the International Energy Agency since 2000. This international workshop focuses on developments in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading around the world at the international, national and sub-national level. The 2011 workshop will cover topics relevant to the development of global, national and sub-national carbon markets, including scaled-up and new market mechanisms, NAMAs and sectoral crediting policies, MRV and international GHG accounting and 2nd-best trading programmes. As in previous years, the workshop will assemble representatives from government,

140

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:43am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 To identify the most cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction strategies across a Federal agency's building portfolio, a Federal agency will need an understanding of building energy performance and the building characteristics that drive performance. The data required to support current Federal GHG reporting requirements (e.g., agency-wide fuel consumption, electricity use by zip code) are typically not sufficient to fully understand where the best opportunities for improvement are located. More detailed information about the building assets being managed-much of which may already be collected for other purposes-can help to inform where to direct investments.

142

California’s first greenhouse gas emissions auction sells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... The Cap and Trade program intends to limit GHG emissions to an annual target of 427 million metric tons (mmt) ...

143

Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CALCULATORS Tables 1 and 2 list the GHG emissions calculators found by a literature search of published sources. The literature search for calculators was conducted through...

144

LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) of Parabolic Trough CSP: Materials Inventory and Embodied GHG Emissions from Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline Thermal Storage (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Burkhardt, J.; Turchi, C.; Decker, T.; Kutscher, C.

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

EU obiective of 120g CO2/km emission for new cars, a challenge for tribology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passenger cars produce about 12 % of overall EU greenhouse gas -GHG- emissions (CO2) and transport sector with about 20 % is the second biggest emitter of GHG among all sources. Since 1990, EU has reduced transport emissions by 5 % but the contribution ... Keywords: GHG emissions, friction modifiers, fuel efficiency, structured surfaces, surface treatment

Ivan Iliuc

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale CSP systems, this analysis focuses on clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emission estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough technology and 17 for power tower technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published GHG emission estimates was 83 and 20 g CO2eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively, with medians of 26 and 38 g CO2eq/kWh. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. Compared to the published estimates, IQR was reduced by 69% and median increased by 76% for troughs. IQR was reduced by 26% for towers, and median was reduced by 34%. A second level of harmonization was applied to five well-documented trough LC GHG emission estimates, harmonizing to consistent values for GHG emissions embodied in materials and from construction activities. As a result, their median was further reduced by 5%, while the range increased by 6%. In sum, harmonization clarified previous results.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Key Issues in Designing Mechanisms to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, EPRI launched the EPRI Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Offset Policy Dialogue project. The goals of this project are 1) to inform key constituencies involved in the development of U.S. climate mitigation strategies and policies about GHG emissions offset–related policies and design issues and 2) to provide a forum in which representatives of key sectors of the U.S. economy and communities involved in the ongoing development and debate on climate change policies can discuss these issues. On May 13...

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

148

State of the Science of Biopower Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power offers utilities a potential pathway to increase their renewable generation portfolio for compliance with renewable energy standards and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions relative to current fossil-based technologies. To date, a large body of life-cycle assessment (LCA) literature assessing biopower's life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions has been published. An exhaustive search of the biopower LCA literature yielded 117 references that passed quality and relevance screening criteria. ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: GHG Inventory...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols Read the CO2 Emissions Calculation Protocol for the Lime industry (PDF 229 KB) Download Acrobat Reader...

150

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles and Mobile Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:32am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 To gain a good understanding of a Federal agency's Scope 1 vehicle and mobile equipment greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the agency must first collect the necessary data to profile any emissions sources then analyze the data in a way that will clarify the most viable strategies and alternatives. Emissions cannot be managed until they are measured. Through the use of fleet/vehicle management information systems, as well as reporting to the Federal Energy Management Program and General Services Administration, agencies are increasingly collecting and documenting useful data elements at the headquarters-and sometimes at specific site -levels.

151

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

152

A fuel cycle framework for evaluating greenhouse gas emission reduction technology  

SciTech Connect

Energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions arise from a number of fossil fuels, processes and equipment types throughout the full cycle from primary fuel production to end-use. Many technology alternatives are available for reducing emissions based on efficiency improvements, fuel switching to low-emission fuels, GHG removal, and changes in end-use demand. To conduct systematic analysis of how new technologies can be used to alter current emission levels, a conceptual framework helps develop a comprehensive picture of both the primary and secondary impacts of a new technology. This paper describes a broad generic fuel cycle framework which is useful for this purpose. The framework is used for cataloging emission source technologies and for evaluating technology solutions to reduce GHG emissions. It is important to evaluate fuel mix tradeoffs when investigating various technology strategies for emission reductions. For instance, while substituting natural gas for coal or oil in end-use applications to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, natural gas emissions of methane in the production phase of the fuel cycle may increase. Example uses of the framework are given.

Ashton, W.B.; Barns, D.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Bradley, R.A. (USDOE Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Environmental Analysis)

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and module manufacturing. · System/Plant Decommissioning · Disposal · PowerPlant Decommissioning · Waste life cycle GHG emissions from solar PV systems are similar to other renewables and nuclear energy.nrel.gov/harmonization. · Life cycle GHG emissions from c-Si and TF PV technologies appear broadly similar; the small number

156

Data Sources 3. Data Sources This indicator uses data and analysis from EPA’s Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This indicator describes emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the United States and its territories between 1990 and 2011. This indicator reports emissions of GHGs according to their global warming potential, a measure of how much a given amount of the GHG is estimated to contribute to global warming over a selected period of time. For the purposes of comparison, global warming potential values are given in relation to carbon dioxide (CO2) and are expressed in terms of CO2 equivalents. Components of this indicator include: U.S. GHG emissions by gas (Figure 1) U.S. GHG emissions and sinks by economic sector (Figure 2) U.S. GHG emissions per capita and per dollar of GDP (Figure 3)

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Data Sources 3. Data Sources This indicator uses data and analysis from EPA’s Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This indicator describes emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States and its territories between 1990 and 2010. This indicator reports emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) according to their global warming potential, a measure of how much a given amount of the GHG is estimated to contribute to global warming over a selected period of time. For the purposes of comparison, global warming potential values are given in relation to carbon dioxide (CO2) and are expressed in terms of CO2 equivalents. Components of this indicator include: • U.S. GHG emissions by gas (Figure 1) • U.S. GHG emissions and sinks by economic sector (Figure 2) • U.S. GHG emissions per capita and per dollar of GDP (Figure 3)

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Estimate Impact of Strategies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact of Strategies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impact of Strategies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimate Impact of Strategies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 1:35pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 3 To estimate the GHG impact of a business travel reduction program, a Federal agency or program should quantify the number of trips that could be avoided each year. If an agency has a large proportion of international travel, the agency may estimate changes in domestic and international trips separately because the associated savings in miles can be very different. General Services Administration Resources to Support GHG Mitigation Planning TravelTrax provides agencies with several tools that can help plan for reductions in business travel. This includes a tool to help estimate the impact of videoconferencing and a tool that can help conference and event planners to identify event locations that consider where attendees are coming from in order to reduce air travel GHGs. These tools are embedded in the GSA Travel MIS database, thus enabling agencies to link their actual travel to different planning scenarios and evaluate options.

159

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview Diagram Notes [a] CO2 emissions related to petroleum consumption (includes 64 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [b] CO2 emissions related to coal consumption (includes 0.3 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [c] CO2 emissions related to natural gas consumption (includes 13 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [d] Excludes carbon sequestered in nonfuel fossil products. [e] CO2 emissions from the plastics portion of municipal solid waste (11 MMTCO2) combusted for electricity generation and very small amounts (0.4 MMTCO2) of geothermal-related emissions.

160

Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change mitigation strategies cannot be evaluated solely in terms of energy cost and greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential. Maintaining GHGs at a 'safe' level will require fundamental change in the way we approach energy production, and a number of environmental, economic, and societal factors will come into play. Water is an essential component of energy production, and water resource constraints (e.g., insufficient supplies and competing ecological and anthropogenic needs) will limit our options for producing energy and for reducing GHG emissions. This study evaluates these potential constraints from a global perspective by revisiting the 'climate wedges' proposal of Pacala and Sokolow [1], and evaluating the potential water impacts of the 'wedges' associated with energy production. Results indicate that there is a range of water impacts, with some options reducing water demand while others increase water demand. Mitigation options that improve energy conversion and end-use efficiency have the greatest potential for reducing water resources impacts. These options provide 'win-win-win' scenarios for reducing GHG emissions, lowering energy costs and reducing water demand. Thet may merit higher priority than alternative options that emphasize deploying new low-carbon energy facilities or modifying existing facilities with energy intensive GHG mitigation technologies to reduce GHG emissions. While the latter can reduce GHG emissions, they will typically increase energy costs and water impacts.

D. Craig Cooper; Gerald Sehlke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Analyze Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Vehicles and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Analyze Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:36am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 After a Federal agency has collected detailed information about its vehicle inventory, fuel consumption, usage, mission, and alternative fuel availability, it can analyze the data to determine the most cost-effective options for petroleum reduction and greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. Data can be analyzed at the agency, program, fleet (or site), or vehicle level for the following purposes: Determining the most important mobile emission sources Determining whether vehicles are performing and being utilized to minimize GHG emissions Identifying mission constraints. Next Step After analyzing data for evaluating an emissions profile, the next step in

162

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Driving your vehicle can yield both greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from your vehicle's tailpipe and GHG emissions related to the production of the fuel used to power your vehicle. For example, activities associated with fuel production such as feedstock extraction, feedstock transport to a processing plant, and conversion of feedstock to motor fuel, as well as distribution of the motor fuel, can all produce GHG emissions. The Fuel Economy and Environment Label provides a Greenhouse Gas Rating, from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), based on the vehicle's tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions only, and this rating does not reflect any GHG emissions associated with fuel production.

163

New Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Generating Technology to Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION 30 TH BIRTHDAY CONFERENCE April 7, 2008 Linda G. Stuntz Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 2 The Target * Energy related emissions of CO2 will increase by about 16% in AEO 2008 Reference Case between 2006 and 2030 (5,890 MM metric tons to 6,859 MM metric tons). (#s from Caruso Senate Energy testimony of 3/4/08). * Last year, emissions from electricity generation were 40% of total energy-related GHG emissions. * Based on projected annual electricity demand growth of 1.1%. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 3 The Target Cont'd * 16.4 GW of new nuclear + 2.7 GW Uprates of existing plants less 4.5 GW of retirements. * Coal responsible for 54% of generation in 2030.

164

Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia Jump to: navigation, search Name Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Policies/deployment programs Program End 2015 Country Tunisia Northern Africa References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview Tunisia has developed NAMA approaches; however, robust systems by which to measure, report and verify (MRV) these measures are still lacking. The project supports the establishment of a comprehensive national MRV system for mitigation measures including greenhouse gas monitoring. This will be

165

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

166

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Title Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6541E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Greenblatt, J. Date Published 10/2013 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHGemitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 μm) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

168

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Employee Commuting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Commuting Employee Commuting Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 1:44pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 To fulfill annual reporting requirements under Executive Order 13514, Federal agencies must estimate the total commute miles traveled by employees using each transportation method. While these data are rolled up to the agency level for reporting purposes, effective planning for commuter greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions requires an understanding of employee commute behavior at the worksite level. For agencies with hundreds or thousands of worksites across the country, worksite level analysis may not be feasible for all locations. It is recommended that agencies focus initial analysis on the largest worksites or clusters of worksites in major metropolitan areas with similar commuting

169

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Guidance and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance and Reporting Federal agencies are required to inventory and manage their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change. Federal...

170

Mitigating greenhouse gas and nitrogen loss with improved fertilizer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

impacts on greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, N loss and economic implication are rarely analysed. A decision support system (DSS) has been developed to.

171

Summary of Fast Pyrolysis and Upgrading GHG Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 established new renewable fuel categories and eligibility requirements (EPA 2010). A significant aspect of the National Renewable Fuel Standard 2 (RFS2) program is the requirement that the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of a qualifying renewable fuel be less than the life cycle GHG emissions of the 2005 baseline average gasoline or diesel fuel that it replaces. Four levels of reduction are required for the four renewable fuel standards. Table 1 lists these life cycle performance improvement thresholds. Table 1. Life Cycle GHG Thresholds Specified in EISA Fuel Type Percent Reduction from 2005 Baseline Renewable fuel 20% Advanced biofuel 50% Biomass-based diesel 50% Cellulosic biofuel 60% Notably, there is a specialized subset of advanced biofuels that are the cellulosic biofuels. The cellulosic biofuels are incentivized by the Cellulosic Biofuel Producer Tax Credit (26 USC 40) to stimulate market adoption of these fuels. EISA defines a cellulosic biofuel as follows (42 USC 7545(o)(1)(E)): The term “cellulosic biofuel” means renewable fuel derived from any cellulose, hemicellulose, or lignin that is derived from renewable biomass and that has lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, as determined by the Administrator, that are at least 60 percent less than the baseline lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. As indicated, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has sole responsibility for conducting the life cycle analysis (LCA) and making the final determination of whether a given fuel qualifies under these biofuel definitions. However, there appears to be a need within the LCA community to discuss and eventually reach consensus on discerning a 50–59 % GHG reduction from a ? 60% GHG reduction for policy, market, and technology development. The level of specificity and agreement will require additional development of capabilities and time for the sustainability and analysis community, as illustrated by the rich dialogue and convergence around the energy content and GHG reduction of cellulosic ethanol (an example of these discussions can be found in Wang 2011). GHG analyses of fast pyrolysis technology routes are being developed and will require significant work to reach the levels of development and maturity of cellulosic ethanol models. This summary provides some of the first fast pyrolysis analyses and clarifies some of the reasons for differing results in an effort to begin the convergence on assumptions, discussion of quality of models, and harmonization.

Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Male, Jonathan L.

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

173

Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Evaluating the Potential to Develop New Greenhouse Gas Emission Offsets on Electricity Transmission System Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a final deliverable for a research project conceived and supported by EPRI. This project explored the potential technical feasibility of developing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets by implementing enhanced Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) to enhance management of biomass vegetation growing on high-voltage electricity ...

2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Towards Standardization of Life-Cycle Metrics for Biofuels: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Mitigation and Net Energy Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite a rapid worldwide expansion of the biofuel industry, there is a lack of consensus within the scientific community about the potential of biofuels to reduce reliance on petroleum and decrease greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Although life cycle assessment provides a means to quantify Delivered by Ingenta to:

Biobased Materials; Adam J. Liska; Kenneth G. Cassman; Donna Michel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

GHG Management Institute curriculum | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GHG Management Institute curriculum Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GHG Management Institute curriculum Agency/Company /Organization: Greenhouse Gas Management Institute (GHGMI) Partner: Various Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Buildings, Buildings - Commercial, Buildings - Residential, Renewable Energy, Biomass, - Landfill Gas, - Anaerobic Digestion, Solar, Wind, Forestry, Offsets and Certificates, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics: Finance, Implementation, GHG inventory, Market analysis

177

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Tunisia-Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tunisia-Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV Tunisia-Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV Jump to: navigation, search Name Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Policies/deployment programs Program End 2015 Country Tunisia Northern Africa References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview Tunisia has developed NAMA approaches; however, robust systems by which to measure, report and verify (MRV) these measures are still lacking. The project supports the establishment of a comprehensive national MRV system

179

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fail to meet this demand, the most likely alternatives will be heavy oil, oil sands, oil shale, and liquids from natural gas and coal. These are carbon-intensive fuels that would...

180

How Smart is CEQA About Climate Change? An Evaluation of CEQA's Greenhouse Gas Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Analysis of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) is an emerging practice, which, if done correctly, could contribute significantly… (more)

KOWSHAL, PAPIA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information The magnesium industry directly emits SF6 from its primary metal production, parts casting, and recycling operations. In 2005, the industry's SF6 emissions were...

182

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: GHG Inventory...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols The Magnesium Industry Partnership's SF6 emissions tracking and reporting software tool (Excel based) can be accessed by visiting the Partnership's...

183

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Work...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

major areas of activity - Emissions Measurement and Reporting, Opportunities for GHG Inventory Protocols Reduction of GHGs, Cross-Sector Projects, and Research & Development and...

184

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hydrogen production and delivery analysis in US markets : cost, energy and greenhouse gas emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen production cost conclusions are: (1) Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) is the least-cost production option at current natural gas prices and for initial hydrogen vehicle penetration rates, at high production rates, SMR may not be the least-cost option; (2) Unlike coal and nuclear technologies, the cost of natural gas feedstock is the largest contributor to SMR production cost; (3) Coal- and nuclear-based hydrogen production have significant penalties at small production rates (and benefits at large rates); (4) Nuclear production of hydrogen is likely to have large economies of scale, but because fixed O&M costs are uncertain, the magnitude of these effects may be understated; and (5) Given H2A default assumptions for fuel prices, process efficiencies and labor costs, nuclear-based hydrogen is likely to be more expensive to produce than coal-based hydrogen. Carbon taxes and caps can narrow the gap. Hydrogen delivery cost conclusions are: (1) For smaller urban markets, compressed gas delivery appears most economic, although cost inputs for high-pressure gas trucks are uncertain; (2) For larger urban markets, pipeline delivery is least costly; (3) Distance from hydrogen production plant to city gate may change relative costs (all results shown assume 100 km); (4) Pipeline costs may be reduced with system 'rationalization', primarily reductions in service pipeline mileage; and (5) Liquefier and pipeline capital costs are a hurdle, particularly at small market sizes. Some energy and greenhouse gas Observations: (1) Energy use (per kg of H2) declines slightly with increasing production or delivery rate for most components (unless energy efficiency varies appreciably with scale, e.g., liquefaction); (2) Energy use is a strong function of production technology and delivery mode; (3) GHG emissions reflect the energy efficiency and carbon content of each component in a production-delivery pathway; (4) Coal and natural gas production pathways have high energy consumption and significant GHG emissions (in the absence of carbon caps, taxes or sequestration); (5) Nuclear pathway is most favorable from energy use and GHG emissions perspective; (6) GH2 Truck and Pipeline delivery have much lower energy use and GHG emissions than LH2 Truck delivery; and (7) For LH2 Truck delivery, the liquefier accounts for most of the energy and GHG emissions.

Mintz, M.; Gillette, J.; Elgowainy, A. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( ES)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Federal GHG Reporting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogenic CO 2 sources are a little "different" * Biofuel Combustion Example * Biomass, Biogas, and Biofuel Reporting * RECs and T&D Losses * "Crash Course" on the FEMP GHG...

187

Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development  

SciTech Connect

The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the world’s roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the world’s roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the world’s roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Interactions of Cost-Containment Measures and Linking of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cap-and-Trade Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many recent greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions cap-and-trade proposals in the United States0150including proposals in the Northeast, California, and at the national level0150include specific measures designed to contain the potential compliance costs of the proposed programs. These cost-containment measures include "new" provisions not included in existing emissions trading programs0150notably a "safety valve" that would cap the allowance price0150as well as provisions such as banking or the use of offsets t...

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

TY RPRT T1 Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS Model A1 J Greenblatt AB p A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas GHG and regional criteria pollutant emissions The model included representations of all GHGemitting sectors of the California economy including those outside the energy sector such as high global warming potential gases waste treatment agriculture and forestry in varying degrees of detail and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources Starting from basic drivers such as population numbers

190

Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Agency/Company /Organization Hiroshima University Focus Area Transportation Topics Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.j Program Start 2010 Country Bangladesh UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies"

191

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Inventory...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) Borates and Soda Ash Sections Greenhouse Gas Inventory Protocol (PDF 75 KB) Download...

192

Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

193

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iea.org/papers/2009/Mitigation_potentials.pdf References: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models[1] Summary "This paper focuses on mitigation potential to provide a comparative assessment across key economies. GHG mitigation potential is defined here to be the level of GHG emission reductions that could be realised, relative

194

China-GHG Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » China-GHG Monitoring (Redirected from GIZ-China GHG Monitoring) Jump to: navigation, search Name China - GHG Monitoring Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ), Center for Clean Air Policy Partner on behalf of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References GTZ in the People's Republic of China[1] Overview The project aims to develop capacities for a GHG-Monitoring system and an

195

Polish country study to address climate change: Strategies of the GHG`s emission reduction and adaptation of the Polish economy to the changed climate. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Polish Country Study Project was initiated in 1992 as a result of the US Country Study Initiative whose objective was to grant the countries -- signatories of the United Nations` Framework Convention on Climate Change -- assistance that will allow them to fulfill their obligations in terms of greenhouse gases (GHG`s) inventory, preparation of strategies for the reduction of their emission, and adapting their economies to the changed climatic conditions. In February 1993, in reply to the offer from the United States Government, the Polish Government expressed interest in participation in this program. The Study proposal, prepared by the Ministry of Environmental Protection, Natural Resources and Forestry was presented to the US partner. The program proposal assumed implementation of sixteen elements of the study, encompassing elaboration of scenarios for the strategy of mission reduction in energy sector, industry, municipal management, road transport, forestry, and agriculture, as well as adaptations to be introduced in agriculture, forestry, water management, and coastal management. The entire concept was incorporated in macroeconomic strategy scenarios. A complementary element was the elaboration of a proposal for economic and legal instruments to implement the proposed strategies. An additional element was proposed, namely the preparation of a scenario of adapting the society to the expected climate changes.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Emissions Offsets: The Key Role of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets in a U.S. Greenhouse Gas Cap-and-Trade Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For U.S. industries with operations that emit greenhouse gases (GHGs), climate policy is no longer a distant possibility it is being planned and, in some cases, implemented today. While debate on a federal GHG trade program continues in Congress, CO2 emission reduction requirements have been put in effect in Northeastern States (i.e., the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative RGGI), are being developed in California (to implement the state's "Global Warming Solutions Act" AB32), and are being designed in th...

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

197

A conceptual framework for the evaluation of cost-effectiveness of projects to reduce GHG emissions and sequester carbon  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a conceptual framework for evaluating the cost of projects to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs). The evaluation of cost-effectiveness should account for both the timing of carbon emissions and the damage caused by the atmospheric stock of carbon. We develop a conceptual basis to estimate the cost-effectiveness of projects in terms of the cost of reducing atmospheric carbon (CRAC) and other GHGs. CRAC accounts for the economic discount rate, alternative functional forms of the shadow price, the residence period of carbon in the atmosphere, and the multiple monetary benefits of projects. The last item is of particular importance to the developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Norgaard, R.; Makundi, W.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

199

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We estimated the effects on per-vehicle-mile fuel-cycle petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and energy use of using ethanol blended with gasoline in a mid-size passenger car, compared with the effects of using gasoline in the same car. Our analysis includes petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with chemicals manufacturing, farming of corn and biomass, ethanol production, and ethanol combustion for ethanol; and petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with petroleum recovery, petroleum refining, and gasoline combustion for gasoline. For corn-based ethanol, the key factors in determining energy and emissions impacts include energy and chemical usage intensity of corn farming, energy intensity of the ethanol plant, and the method used to estimate energy and emissions credits for co-products of corn ethanol. The key factors in determining the impacts of cellulosic ethanol are energy and chemical usage intensity of biomass farming, ethanol yield per dry ton of biomass, and electricity credits in cellulosic ethanol plants. The results of our fuel-cycle analysis for fuel ethanol are listed below. Note that, in the first half of this summary, the reductions cited are per-vehicle-mile traveled using the specified ethanol/gasoline blend instead of conventional (not reformulated) gasoline. The second half of the summary presents estimated changes per gallon of ethanol used in ethanol blends. GHG emissions are global warming potential (GWP)-weighted, carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O).

C. Saricks; D. Santini; M. Wang

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential wood consumption accounted for just over 45 percent of U.S. methane emissions from stationary combustion in 2009.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Agency/Company /Organization: European Environment Agency Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Maps Website: www.eea.europa.eu/publications/eea_report_2009_9 Country: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Ireland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

202

The US department of Energy's R&D program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through beneficial uses of carbon dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd | Greenhouse Gas Sci Technol. (2011); DOI: 10.1002/ghg Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd | Greenhouse Gas Sci Technol. (2011); DOI: 10.1002/ghg Perspective Correspondence to: Darin Damiani, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26507, USA. E-mail: darin.damiani@netl.doe.gov † This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Received June 24, 2011; revised July 26, 2011; accepted July 27, 2011 Published online at Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI: 10.1002/ghg.35 The US Department of Energy's R&D program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through benefi cial uses of carbon dioxide † Darin Damiani and John T. Litynski, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of

203

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

204

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that makes great strides in clarifying inconsistent and conflicting GHG emission estimates in the published literature while providing more precise estimates of GHG emissions from utility-scale CSP systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Agricultural greenhouse gas emissions : costs associated with farm level mitigation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Agricultural greenhouse gas emissions within New Zealand account for 48 percent of all national greenhouse gas emissions. With the introduction of the emissions trading scheme… (more)

Wolken, Antony Raymond

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 10:10am Addthis The portfolio-based planning process for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation offers an approach to: Evaluating the GHG reduction potential at the site, program, and agency level Identifying strategies for reducing those emissions Prioritizing activities to achieve both GHG reduction and cost objectives. Portfolio-based management for GHG mitigation helps agencies move from "peanut-butter-spreading" obligations for meeting GHG reduction targets evenly across all agency operating units to strategic planning of GHG reduction activities based on each operating unit's potential and cost to reduce emissions. The result of this prioritization will lay the foundation

207

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil production dropping by 28 percent from 1990 to 2009, methane emissions from petroleum exploration and production have declined by the same percentage. Residential wood...

208

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for purposes other than their energy value) create carbon dioxide emissions and also sequester carbon in nonfuel products, ...

209

Evaluation of Borrowing as a Method to Contain Costs in a Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cap-and-Trade Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the potential ability of "borrowing" to help reduce the costs and the cost volatility of cap-and-trade programs for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Borrowing allows sources to emit more than the number of current (or banked) allowances available in the current period by utilizing allowances that otherwise could not be used until future years. Borrowing may be on an individual or system basis and it may be explicit or implicit.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

210

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles offer similar emissionsimilar GHG emission levels as CNG vehicles and diesel vehi­BRT buses . The 40-foot CNG buses used in a BRT system

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Overview of Subnational Programs to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation: (REDD) as Part of the Governors' Climate and Forests Task Force  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid reductions in global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will be needed if the nations of the world are to succeed in reducing the risks of climate change. Globally, tropical deforestation and land-use change causes approximately 15% of annual GHG emissions. Many scientists, economists, and policymakers agree that reducing tropical deforestation can significantly reduce GHG emissions in a cost-effective manner. Because the development of a new international climate treaty that could take effect when the...

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

212

Estonian greenhouse gas emissions inventory report  

SciTech Connect

It is widely accepted that the increase of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere due to human activities would result in warming of the Earth`s surface. To examine this effect and better understand how the GHG increase in the atmosphere might change the climate in the future, how ecosystems and societies in different regions of the World should adapt to these changes, what must policymakers do for the mitigation of that effect, the worldwide project within the Framework Convention on Climate Change was generated by the initiative of United Nations. Estonia is one of more than 150 countries, which signed the Framework Convention on Climate Change at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. In 1994 a new project, Estonian Country Study was initiated within the US Country Studies Program. The project will help to compile the GHG inventory for Estonia, find contemporary trends to investigate the impact of climate change on the Estonian ecosystems and economy and to formulate national strategies for Estonia addressing to global climate change.

Punning, J.M.; Ilomets, M.; Karindi, A.; Mandre, M.; Reisner, V. [Inst. of Ecology, Tallinn (Estonia); Martins, A.; Pesur, A. [Inst. of Energy Research, Tallinn (Estonia); Roostalu, H.; Tullus, H. [Estonian Agricultural Univ., Tartu (Estonia)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Catalyst Paper No-Carb Strategy for GHG Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Catalyst Paper strategy to manage GHG exposure is a combination of energy reduction initiatives in manufacturing and the effective use of biomass and alternative fuels to produce mill steam and electricity from the powerhouse. The energy reduction initiative reduces waste and energy usage during both the manufacturing and consumption of their product. An example is the very thin carbon neutral “no carb” print paper targeted for magazines and other publications. For the mill, this thin paper is manufactured with minimal energy because of the low mass sheet in the forming and drying sections. For the consumer, the large sheet surface area with minimal mass permits printing onto a lighter weight low carbon document. The steam and electricity for manufacturing is generated by the powerhouse where 63% of thermal energy is now from biomass and alternative fuels. This strategy reduced gross energy usage by 22% and provided a direct reduction in Green House Gas (GHG) emissions by 71% from 1990 to 2005. This paper will address how the thermal and steam generation is optimized in the powerhouse using an Energy Management and Reporting System (EMRS). Given that virtually all the GHG generation is from fossil fuel usage, this fuel must be minimized with biomass wherever possible. The process units where the EMRS is applied are the boiler combustion systems, steam distribution, and electric generation.

McClain, C.; Robinson, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM AGROECOSYSTEMS: SIMULATING MANAGEMENT EFFECTS ON DAIRY FARM EMISSIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??How does agriculture contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and what farm management scenarios decrease net emissions from agroecosystems? The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is… (more)

Sedorovich, Dawn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Brazil's Emerging Sectoral Framework for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation and the Potential to Deliver Greenhou se Gas Emissions Reductions from Avoided Deforestation in the Amazon's Xingu River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical deforestation and forest degradation contribute approximately 17% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to the atmosphere. Because of the comparatively large role of these emissions globally, the issue of how to address them has become prominent in international negotiations to develop a post-2012 global climate treaty under the auspices of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). A mechanism designed to compensate developing nations that succeed in reducing emissio...

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

217

The Value of eGRID and eGRIDweb to GHG Inventories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this paper is to highlight the value and application of the Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) and eGRIDweb to the development of greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. Both the eGRID spreadsheet database and its user-friendly web application, eGRIDweb, which can be found at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) eGRID website,

Susy S. Rothschild; Cristina Quiroz; Manish Salhotra; E. H. Pechan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Washington,related to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsDenmark - Energy Efficiency Agreements………. …………..……. ……4

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse GasesGHG Emissions from Biofuels . in STEPS Research Symposium .NRDC, Growing Energy: How Biofuels Can Help End America's

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions for both corn ethanol and cellulosic ethanole/MJ, respectively, a 93% (corn ethanol) and 50% (cellulosicSugar Cane) Ethanol (Corn) Ethanol (Cellulosic biomass) 25

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Lynn Price,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine Seep  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007, Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine2007, Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a MarineTides and the emission of oil and gas from an abandoned oil

Leifer, Ira; Boles, J R; Luyendyk, B P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Carbon Footprint of Bioenergy Sorghum Production in Central Texas: Production Implications on Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Carbon Cycling, and Life Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhanced interest in biofuel production has renewed interest in bioenergy crop production within the United States. Agriculture’s role in biofuel production is critical because it has the potential to supply renewable energy while minimizing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, agronomic management practices influence direct and indirect GHG emissions, and both can have a significant impact on biofuel production efficiency. Our overall objective was to determine the carbon (C) footprint of bioenergy sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) production in central Texas. Specifically, we determined the impacts of crop rotation, nitrogen (N) fertilization, and residue return on direct and indirect GHG emissions, theoretical biofuel yield, C pools, and life cycle GHG emissions from bioenergy sorghum production in 2010 and 2011. An experiment established in 2008 near College Station, TX to quantify the impacts of crop management practices on bioenergy sorghum yield and soil properties was utilized, and included two crop rotations (sorghum-sorghum or corn-sorghum), two fertilization levels (0 or 280 kg N ha^(-1) annually), and two residue return rates (0 or 50% biomass residue returned) to assess management impacts on sorghum production, C cycling, and life cycle GHGs. Corn production was poor under moderate drought conditions, while bioenergy sorghum produced relatively large yields under both moderate and severe drought conditions. Nitrogen addition increased crop yields, and rotated sorghum had higher yield than monoculture sorghum. Fluxes of CO_(2) and N_(2)O were higher than those reported in literature and highest soil fluxes were frequently observed following precipitation events during the growing season. Residue return increased cumulative CO_(2) emissions and N fertilization increased N_(2)O emissions. Residue return also increased soil microbial biomass-C, an important indicator of soil quality. Continuous sorghum significantly increased soil organic C (SOC) concentrations near the soil surface and at two depths below 30 cm. Analysis of change in SOC across time to estimate net CO_(2) emissions to the atmosphere revealed bioenergy sorghum production accrued high amounts of SOC annually. Most treatments accrued more than 4 Mg C ha^(-1) yr^(-1) from 2008 to 2012, which indicated great potential for C sequestration and offsetting GHG emissions. Life cycle GHG emissions (as g CO_(2)-eq MJ^(-1)) were all negative due to high SOC increases each year and indicated all bioenergy sorghum production treatments sequestered atmospheric CO_(2) per unit of theoretical energy provided. Despite its relatively low production efficiency, rotated sorghum with N addition and residue return was selected as the ideal bioenergy sorghum production scenario due to a number of sustainability factors. Bioenergy sorghum may offer great benefit as a high-yielding biofuel feedstock with minimal impacts to net GHG emissions.

Storlien, Joseph Orgean

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Vehicles and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:34am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Data needs for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation planning related to Federal agency vehicles and mobile equipment can be described in terms of five key categories: Vehicle Inventory A detailed vehicle profile is essential to right-sizing an agency's vehicle inventory and thereby reducing fuel use, emissions, and operating costs. In combination with vehicle usage and mission data, this information can be used to develop an optimal vehicle acquisition plan and vehicle allocation methodology (VAM) to identify vehicles that may represent good candidates for reassignment or disposal. This data assists in correctly sizing a fleet

225

South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction...

226

Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...

227

Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods to Support International...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods to Support International Climate Agreements Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods...

228

Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts A fact sheet about the myths versus facts of ethanol and greenhouse...

229

Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts A fact sheet about the myth versus facts about biofuels and...

230

NETL: Fugitive Gas Emissions Detection Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fugitive Gas Emissions Detection Facilities Fugitive Gas Emissions Detection Facilities NETL uses an array of innovative laboratory techniques and field methods to detect and monitor fugitive emissions of CO2 stored in geologic formations. By providing an accurate accounting of stored CO2 and a high level of confidence that the CO2 will permanently remain in storage, these efforts can help ensure the technical soundness and economic viability of carbon sequestration, a technology that is critical to meeting the national goal of reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Successful research to establish the stability and integrity of host formations will help developers of sequestration projects secure permits and emissions reduction credits, while preventing damage to ecosystems and ensuring public health and safety.

231

Radiative Forcing Due to Reactive Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive gas emissions (CO, NOx, VOC) have indirect radiative forcing effects through their influences on tropospheric ozone and on the lifetimes of methane and hydrogenated halocarbons. These effects are quantified here for the full set of ...

T. M. L. Wigley; S. J. Smith; M. J. Prather

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Published scientific literature contains many studies estimating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of residential and utility-scale solar photovoltaics (PVs). Despite the volume of published work, variability in results hinders generalized conclusions. Most variance between studies can be attributed to differences in methods and assumptions. To clarify the published results for use in decision making and other analyses, we conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies, harmonizing key performance characteristics to produce more comparable and consistently derived results. Screening 397 life cycle assessments (LCAs) relevant to PVs yielded 13 studies on crystalline silicon (c-Si) that met minimum standards of quality, transparency, and relevance. Prior to harmonization, the median of 42 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from those 13 LCAs was 57 grams carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with an interquartile range (IQR) of 44 to 73. After harmonizing key performance characteristics, irradiation of 1,700 kilowatt-hours per square meter per year (kWh/m{sup 2}/yr); system lifetime of 30 years; module efficiency of 13.2% or 14.0%, depending on module type; and a performance ratio of 0.75 or 0.80, depending on installation, the median estimate decreased to 45 and the IQR tightened to 39 to 49. The median estimate and variability were reduced compared to published estimates mainly because of higher average assumptions for irradiation and system lifetime. For the sample of studies evaluated, harmonization effectively reduced variability, providing a clearer synopsis of the life cycle GHG emissions from c-Si PVs. The literature used in this harmonization neither covers all possible c-Si installations nor represents the distribution of deployed or manufactured c-Si PVs.

Hsu, D. D.; O'Donoughue, P.; Fthenakis, V.; Heath, G. A.; Kim, H. C.; Sawyer, P.; Choi, J. K.; Turney, D. E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

234

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The authors conclude in this report that an upstream system would ensure complete regulatory coverage of transportation sector emissions in an efficient and feasible manner, and as such represents a key component of a national least-cost GHG emissions abatement strategy. The broad coverage provided by an upstream system recommends this approach over vehicle-maker based approaches, which would not cover emissions from heavy-duty vehicles and the aviation, marine and off-road sub-sectors. The on-road fleet approach unfairly and inefficiently burdens vehicle manufacturers with responsibility for emissions that they cannot control. A new vehicles approach would exclude emissions from vehicles on the road prior to program inception. The hybrid approach faces significant technical and political complications, and it is not clear that the approach would actually change behavior among vehicle makers and users, which is its main purpose. They also note that a trading system would fail to encourage many land use and infrastructure measures that affect VMT growth and GHG emissions. They recommend that this market failure be addressed by complementing the trading system with a program specifically targeting land use- and infrastructure-related activities. A key issue that must be addressed in designing a national GHG control strategy is whether or not it is necessary to guarantee GHG reductions from the transport sector. Neither an upstream system nor a downstream approach would do so, since both would direct capital to the least-cost abatement opportunities wherever they were found. They review two reasons why it may be desirable to force transportation sector reductions: first, that the long-term response to climate change will require reductions in all sectors; and second, the many ancillary benefits associated with transportation-related, and especially VMT-related, emissions reduction activities. If policy makers find it desirable to establish transportation-specific policies, they recommend (in addition to the land use policies mentioned above), that they combine an upstream trading system with a carbon efficiency standard similar to the current CAFE standard. Under this approach a fuel price signal would be complemented by incentives for manufacturers to produce more carbon efficient vehicles. To prevent vehicle manufacturers from being forced to pay more than other sectors for reducing GHG emissions, they recommend that the vehicle makers be allowed to pay a cash penalty equal to the market price of allowances in lieu of meeting carbon efficiency requirements.

Steve Winkelman; Tim Hargrave; Christine Vanderlan

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

CO2 emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data applicationvnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2...

236

GHG Mitigation Potential, Costs and Benefits in Global Forests: A Dynamic Partial Equilibrium Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generating the commercial biomass supply. These models havewhich generates a biomass crop supply and GHG emissions fromsupply of woodfuel was determined as a residual from the harvested biomass

Sathaye, Jayant; Makundi, Willy; Dale, Larry; Chan, Peter; Andrasko, Kenneth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Information about the Greenhouse Gas Emission Calculations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources and Assumptions for the Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Sources and Assumptions for the Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Calculator To estimate your CO2 emissions rates and generate the bar graph, we used the following sources and assumptions. Your CO2 Emissions Rates Tailpipe (grams CO2/mile) This is the tailpipe CO2 emissions rate for combined city and highway driving that is shown on the fuel economy and environment label for the vehicle model you selected. It is the same regardless of where you live. Total (grams CO2/mile) This includes the vehicle's tailpipe emissions and emissions associated with the production of electricity used to charge the vehicle. For plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, it also includes emissions associated with the production of gasoline. It is estimated using the sources and assumptions below, and will vary based on where you live.

238

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net carbon dioxide sequestration in U.S. urban trees, yard trimmings, and food scraps : 35: Emissions of carbon dioxide from biofuel/bioenergy use by sector and fuel

239

ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS IN CANADA by Rose: Analysis of Measures for Reducing Transportation Sector Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Canada Project Number the problem of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Canadian transportation sector. Reductions

240

Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Profile to someone by E-mail Emissions Profile to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Basics Federal Requirements Guidance & Reporting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions to someone by E-mail Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Maintenance & Safety Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions Natural gas burns cleaner than conventional gasoline or diesel due to its

243

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction Strategies Reduction Strategies Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies October 7, 2013 - 10:16am Addthis For each major emission source identified in the previous step to evaluate greenhouse gas (GHG) emission profile, Federal agencies should review possible strategies for reducing GHG emissions and determine what assets may benefit from each strategy. This guidance describes technologies, policies, practices, and other strategies for reducing GHG emissions from each major emission source: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. It also helps users determine what strategies are applicable to their facilities, employees, or other assets, and estimate the GHG emissions that may be avoided if they are adopted. For example, a facility manager may

244

Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Minnesota) (Minnesota) Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Climate Policies This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80

245

Benchmarking Distributed Generation Cost of Electricity and Characterization of Green House Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the economic competitiveness and green house gas (GHG) footprint of all energy supply-side options has been identified by EPRI advisors as a key priority. This project benchmarks the cost of electricity and characterizes the GHG footprint of distributed generation (DG) options in various applications. DG technologies include small gas turbines, spark-ignited and diesel internal combustion engines, micro turbines, several types of fuel cells, Stirling engines, and photovoltaic systems.

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

246

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sets minimum targets for the use of bioenergy and biofuels,biofuels with low GHG intensity to meet the emission reductions target.biofuels future, is unable to meet the 80% emission reductions target

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Destruction of acid gas emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of destroying NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} in a combustion gas is disclosed. The method includes generating active species by treating stable molecules in a high temperature plasma. Ammonia, methane, steam, hydrogen, nitrogen or a combustion of these gases can be selected as the stable molecules. The gases are subjected to plasma conditions sufficient to create free radicals, ions or excited atoms such as N, NH, NH{sub 2}, OH, CH and/or CH{sub 2}. These active species are injected into a combustion gas at a location of sufficiently high temperature to maintain the species in active state and permit them to react with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x}. Typically the injection is made into the immediate post-combustion gases at temperatures of 475--950{degrees}C. 1 fig.

Mathur, M.P.; Fu, Yuan C.; Ekmann, J.M.; Boyle, J.M.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information The electric power industry reports the vast majority of their emissions (greater than 99 percent) through the use of continuous emissions monitors and fuel-use estimated data that are transmitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Energy Information Administration (EIA). EIA annually publishes data on GHG emissions and electric power generation. The "Electric Power Sector" in these publications is defined by EIA as the "energy-consuming sector that consists of electricity only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public - i.e., North American Industry Classification System 22 plants". It does not include CO2 emissions or

249

Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Electrification and Mitigation: Long-Term GHG Deep-Cut Scenario Compatible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrification and Mitigation: Long-Term GHG Deep-Cut Scenario Compatible Electrification and Mitigation: Long-Term GHG Deep-Cut Scenario Compatible with Economic Development Speaker(s): Taishi Sugiyama Date: August 6, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Lynn Price We have analyzed scenarios of Japanese energy systems in the 21st century with special focus on the electrification and climate change mitigation. We have described the causality pathway as to how the major drivers will have impacts on the structure of energy systems and found the followings: (1) Steady electrification in the building sector is expected driven by technological progresses and social change in the absence of climate change policy; (2) With strong greenhouse gas emission constraints, the combination of accelerated electrification across all sectors and

251

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts This report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, was prepared under the general direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis, and Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team. General questions concerning the content of this report may be directed to the Office of Communications at 202/586-8800. Technical information concerning the content of the report may be obtained from Perry Lindstrom at 202/586-0934 (email, perry.lindstrom@eia.gov). Without the assistance of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), this report would not have been possible. In particular we would like to thank Erin Beddingfield, Keith Forbes, Kristin Igusky, Makely Lyon, Michael Mondshine, and Richard Richards. We also wish to acknowledge the

252

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report was peer reviewed by these contributors and their comments have been incorporated. Among key findings is that, for all cases examined on a mass emission per travel mile basis, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol utilized as both E85 and E10 outperforms that of conventional (current) and of reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and greenhouse gas production. In many cases, the superiority of the energy and GHG result is quite pronounced (i.e., well outside the range of model "noise")

Michael Wang Christopher; Michael Wang; Christopher Saricks

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward Verification of Emissions Control Compliance Speaker(s): Marc Fischer Date: April 29, 2010 - 12:00pm Location:...

254

Nuclear Power PROS -`No' greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Power PROS -`No' greenhouse gas emissions -Fuel is cheep -High energy density (1 ton U = 16 abundant elements found in natural crustal rocks) Nuclear Power CONS -High capital cost due to meeting if there is a movement towards electric cars? -What if the high capital costs of a nuclear power plant were invested

Toohey, Darin W.

255

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies October 7, 2013 - 10:20am Addthis Once a Federal agency understands what greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions are feasible and at what cost, proposed GHG reduction activities may be prioritized. While it may be useful for personnel responsible for managing GHG emissions to prioritize actions within emission categories-for example, prioritizing building emission reduction measures-prioritization should also occur across all major emission Scope 1 and 2 emission sources and all Scope 3 emission sources. Guidance on prioritizing strategies for specific emission sources includes: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. Prioritizing actions across fleet, facility, and fugitive sources will

256

Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is a potential environmental disadvantage of home composting. Because of a lack of reliable GHG emission data, a comprehensive experimental home composting system was set up. The system consisted of six composting units, and a static flux chamber method was used to measure and quantify the GHG emissions for one year composting of organic household waste (OHW). The average OHW input in the six composting units was 2.6-3.5 kg week{sup -1} and the temperature inside the composting units was in all cases only a few degrees (2-10 {sup o}C) higher than the ambient temperature. The emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were quantified as 0.4-4.2 kg CH{sub 4} Mg{sup -1} input wet waste (ww) and 0.30-0.55 kg N{sub 2}O Mg{sup -1} ww, depending on the mixing frequency. This corresponds to emission factors (EFs) (including only CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions) of 100-239 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww. Composting units exposed to weekly mixing had the highest EFs, whereas the units with no mixing during the entire year had the lowest emissions. In addition to the higher emission from the frequently mixed units, there was also an instant release of CH{sub 4} during mixing which was estimated to 8-12% of the total CH{sub 4} emissions. Experiments with higher loads of OHW (up to 20 kg every fortnight) entailed a higher emission and significantly increased overall EFs (in kg substance per Mg{sup -1} ww). However, the temperature development did not change significantly. The GHG emissions (in kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww) from home composting of OHW were found to be in the same order of magnitude as for centralised composting plants.

Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H.; Scheutz, C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Ethiopia-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Ethiopia-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethiopia-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification in East Africa Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid-Tropics (ICRISAT), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

258

Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification in East Africa Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid-Tropics (ICRISAT), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

259

Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Jump to: navigation, search Name Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification in East Africa Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid-Tropics (ICRISAT), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

260

Bulk Energy Storage: Assessment of Green House Gas Impacts to the Electric Power Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities are interested in understanding the role and impacts electric energy storage systems can have on reducing the electric sector's green house gas (GHG) emissions. This research project was undertaken to better understand and quantify GHG impacts of electric storage systems. The project specifically focuses on bulk energy storage systems such as compressed air energy storage (CAES).

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Transport Canada Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng Cost: Free References: http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng The Urban Transportation Emissions Calculator (UTEC) is a user-friendly tool for estimating annual emissions from personal, commercial, and public transit vehicles. It estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air contaminant (CAC) emissions from the operation of vehicles. It also estimates upstream GHG emissions from the production, refining and

262

What GHG Concentration Targets are Reachable in this Century?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We offer simulations that help to understand the relationship between GHG emissions and concentrations, and the relative role of long-lived (e.g., CO2) and short-lived (e.g., CH4) emissions. We show that, absent technologies ...

Paltsev, Sergey

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

263

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a Combined Heat and Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation...

264

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Wisconsin Reduces Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on AddThis.com... Oct. 2, 2010 Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks

266

Direct measurements improve estimates of dairy greenhouse-gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small quantity of Greenhouse gases measured enteric nitrousSC, Pain BF. 1994. Greenhouse gas emissions from intensiveE, Brose G. 2001. Greenhouse gas emissions from animal house

Mitloehner, Frank M; Sun, Huawei; Karlik, John F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Operational and policy implications of managing uncertainty in quality and emissions of multi-feedstock biodiesel systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As an alternative transportation fuel to petrodiesel, biodiesel has been widely promoted within national energy portfolio targets across the world. Early estimations of low lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of ...

Gül?en, Ece

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Essential Role of State Enforcement in the Brave New World of Greenhouse Gas Emission Limits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Brave New World of Greenhouse Gas Emission Limits MattNATURE AND EXTENT OF THE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION REDUCTIONa similar situation with greenhouse gas emission reductions.

Bogoshian, Matt; Alex, Ken

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Assessment of fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for Fischer-Tropsch diesel from coal and cellulosic biomass.  

SciTech Connect

This study expands and uses the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model to assess the effects of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology and cellulosic biomass and coal cofeeding in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) plants on energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of FT diesel (FTD). To demonstrate the influence of the coproduct credit methods on FTD life-cycle analysis (LCA) results, two allocation methods based on the energy value and the market revenue of different products and a hybrid method are employed. With the energy-based allocation method, fossil energy use of FTD is less than that of petroleum diesel, and GHG emissions of FTD could be close to zero or even less than zero with CCS when forest residue accounts for 55% or more of the total dry mass input to FTD plants. Without CCS, GHG emissions are reduced to a level equivalent to that from petroleum diesel plants when forest residue accounts for 61% of the total dry mass input. Moreover, we show that coproduct method selection is crucial for LCA results of FTD when a large amount of coproducts is produced.

Xie, X.; Wang, M.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be

271

U.S. Agriculture's Role Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Agriculture's Role in a Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World: An Economic Perspective the IMPAC project. #12;Abstract International agreements are likely to stimulate greenhouse gas mitigation Words Agricultural Sinks, Emissions Trading, Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions, Kyoto Protocol #12

McCarl, Bruce A.

272

Guidance for Electric Companies on the Use of Forest Carbon Sequestration Projects to Offset Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The earth8217s climate is warming and the majority of scientists believe that human-caused emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are contributing significantly to the warming of our atmosphere. Mandatory limits of GHG emissions now exist in most industrialized nations and are being developed in individual states and regions within the United States. It appears increasingly likely that a national mandatory program to limit GHG emissions could be implemented in the U.S. sometime in the next few years. Fores...

2006-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Improvement of the Energy Efficiency and GHG Emissions Management Systems of an O&G Company's E&P Operated Assets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The Oil and Gas (O&G) Industry has been one of the most environmentally questioned sectors in the lastdecades, where the management of the resources… (more)

Gómez Blanco, Paula Andrea

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Soybean-Derived Biodiesel and Renewable Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, we used Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model to assess the life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of four soybean-derived fuels: biodiesel fuel produced via transesterification, two renewable diesel fuels (I and II) produced from different hydrogenation processes, and renewable gasoline produced from catalytic cracking. Five approaches were employed to allocate the coproducts: a displacement approach; two allocation approaches, one based on the energy value and the other based on the market value; and two hybrid approaches that integrated the displacement and allocation methods. The relative rankings of soybean-based fuels in terms of energy and environmental impacts were different under the different approaches, and the reasons were analyzed. Results from the five allocation approaches showed that although the production and combustion of soybean-based fuels might increase total energy use, they could have significant benefits in reducing fossil energy use (>52%), petroleum use (>88%), and GHG emissions (>57%) relative to petroleum fuels. This study emphasized the importance of the methods used to deal with coproduct issues and provided a comprehensive solution for conducting a life-cycle assessment of fuel pathways with multiple coproducts.

Huo, H.; Wang, M.; Bloyd, C.; Putsche, V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

STATUS OF SCOPING PLAN RECOMMENDED MEASURES The estimated 2020 greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions for measures described in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the projection is based on future demand for electricity and transportation fuels described in the California and 4.0 as Advanced Clean Cars. The California Energy Commission (CEC) 2009 Integrated Energy Policy inventories. http://www.arb.ca.gov/cc/ccms/ccms.htm Advanced Clean Cars In the Scoping Plan this measure

276

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage differs by technology. For fossil-fueled technologies, fuel combustion during operation of the facility emits the vast majority of GHGs. For nuclear and renewable energy technologies, the majority of GHG emissions occur upstream of operation. LCA of Energy Systems

277

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Industry, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion[2] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or Mobil Sources[3]

278

Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions from hydropower complexes on large rivers in Eastern Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water bodies, such as freshwater lakes, are known to be net emitters of carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4). In recent years, significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from tropical, boreal, and mid-latitude reservoirs have been reported. At a time when hydropower is increasing worldwide, better understanding of seasonal and regional variation in GHG emissions is needed in order to develop a predictive understanding of such fluxes within man-made impoundments. We examined power-producing dam complexes within xeric temperate locations in the northwestern United States. Sampling environments on the Snake (Lower Monumental Dam Complex) and Columbia Rivers (Priest Rapids Dam Complex) included tributary, mainstem, embayment, forebay, and tailrace areas during winter and summer 2012. At each sampling location, GHG measurement pathways included surface gas flux, degassing as water passed through dams during power generation, ebullition within littoral embayments, and direct sampling of hyporheic pore-water. Measurements were also carried out in a free-flowing reach of the Columbia River to estimate unaltered conditions. Surface flux resulted in very low emissions, with reservoirs acting as a sink for CO2 (up to –262 mg m-2 d-1, which is within the range previously reported for similarly located reservoirs). Surface flux of methane remained below 1 mg CH4 m-2d-1, a value well below fluxes reported previously for temperate reservoirs. Water passing through hydroelectric projects acted as a sink for CO2 during winter and a small source during summer, with mean degassing fluxes of –117 and 4.5 t CO2 d-1, respectively. Degassing of CH4 was minimal, with mean fluxes of 3.1 × 10-6 and –5.6 × 10-4 t CH4 d-1 during winter and summer, respectively. Gas flux due to ebullition was greater in coves located within reservoirs than in coves within the free flowing Hanford Reach–and CH4 flux exceeded that of CO2. Methane emissions varied widely across sampling locations, ranging from 10.5 to 1039 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, with mean fluxes of 324 mg CH4 m-2 d-1in Lower Monumental Dam reservoir and 482 mg CH4 m-2d-1 in the Priest Rapids Dam reservoir. The magnitude of methane flux due to ebullition was unexpectedly high, and falls within the range recently reported for other temperate reservoirs around the world, further suggesting that this methane source should be considered in estimates of global greenhouse gas emissions. Methane flux from sediment pore-water within littoral embayments averaged 4.2 mg m-2 d-1 during winter and 8.1 mg m-2 d-1 during summer, with a peak flux of 19.8 mg m-2d-1 (at the same location where CH4 ebullition was also the greatest). Carbon dioxide flux from sediment pore-water averaged approximately 80 mg m-2d-1 with little difference between winter and summer. Similar to emissions from ebullition, flux from sediment pore-water was higher in reservoirs than in the free flowing reach.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; O'Toole, Amanda C.; Niehus, Sara E.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 11:13am Addthis After all cost-effective energy efficiency projects have been explored as part of a Federal agency's planning efforts for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation in buildings, renewable energy may be considered as an option for meeting the agency's GHG reduction goals. Renewable energy can reduce emissions in all three GHG emission scopes by displacing conventional fossil fuel use. The focus of this guidance is prioritizing on-site renewable energy projects that will best support GHG reduction goals. It is intended to provide a high-level screening approach for on-site renewable energy projects to support agency- or program-level portfolio planning. General

280

Marginal Abatement Costs and Marginal Welfare Costs for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Results from the EPPA Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves, relationships between tons of emissions abated and the CO2 (or GHG) price, have been widely used as pedagogic devices to illustrate simple economic concepts such as the benefits of ...

Morris, Jennifer

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

08(96) 08(96) Distribution Category UC-950 Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting October 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. For More Information Individuals or members of organizations wishing to report reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases under the auspices of the Voluntary Reporting Program can contact the Energy Information Administration (EIA) at: Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Energy Information Administration U.S. Department

282

Axion emission from a magnetized neutron gas  

SciTech Connect

By using the polarization density matrix for a neutron in a magnetic field, the axion luminosity of magnetic neutron stars that is associated with the flip of the anomalous magnetic moment of degenerate nonrelativistic neutrons is calculated. It is shown that, at values of the magnetic-field induction in the region B Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10{sup 18} G, this mechanism of axion emission is dominant in 'young' neutron stars of temperature about a few tens of MeV units. At B {approx} 10{sup 17} G, it is one of the basic mechanisms. The Fermi energy of a degenerate neutron gas in a magnetic field is found, and it is shown that there is no such mechanism of axion emission in the degenerate case.

Skobelev, V. V., E-mail: v.skobelev@inbox.ru [Moscow State Industrial University (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

A greenhouse-gas information system monitoring and validating emissions reporting and mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Current GHG-mitigating regimes, whether internationally agreed or self-imposed, rely on the aggregation of self-reported data, with limited checks for consistency and accuracy, for monitoring. As nations commit to more stringent GHG emissions-mitigation actions and as economic rewards or penalties are attached to emission levels, self-reported data will require independent confirmation that they are accurate and reliable, if they are to provide the basis for critical choices and actions that may be required. Supporting emissions-mitigation efforts and agreements, as well as monitoring energy- and fossil-fuel intensive national and global activities would be best achieved by a process of: (1) monitoring of emissions and emission-mitigation actions, based, in part, on, (2) (self-) reporting of pertinent bottom-up inventory data, (3) verification that reported data derive from and are consistent with agreed-upon processes and procedures, and (4) validation that reported emissions and emissions-mitigation action data are correct, based on independent measurements (top-down) derived from a suite of sensors in space, air, land, and, possibly, sea, used to deduce and attribute anthropogenic emissions. These data would be assessed and used to deduce and attribute measured GHG concentrations to anthropogenic emissions, attributed geographically and, to the extent possible, by economic sector. The validation element is needed to provide independent assurance that emissions are in accord with reported values, and should be considered as an important addition to the accepted MRV process, leading to a MRV&V process. This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a system that meets specifications derived from imposed requirements; the need for rigorous calibration, verification, and validation (CV&V) standards, processes, and records for all measurement and modeling/data-inversion data; the need to develop and adopt an uncertainty-quantification (UQ) regimen for all measurement and modeling data; and the requirement that GHGIS products can be subjected to third-party questioning and scientific scrutiny. This report examines and assesses presently available capabilities that could contribute to a future GHGIS. These capabilities include sensors and measurement technologies; data analysis and data uncertainty quantification (UQ) practices and methods; and model-based data-inversion practices, methods, and their associated UQ. The report further examines the need for traceable calibration, verification, and validation processes and attached metadata; differences between present science-/research-oriented needs and those that would be required for an operational GHGIS; the development, operation, and maintenance of a GHGIS missions-operations center (GMOC); and the complex systems engineering and integration that would be required to develop, operate, and evolve a future GHGIS. Present monitoring systems would be heavily relied on in any GHGIS implementation at the outset and would likely continue to provide valuable future contributions to GHGIS. However, present monitoring systems were developed to serve science/research purposes. This study concludes that no component or capability presently available is at the level of technological maturity and readiness required for implementation in an operational GHGIS today. However, purpose-designed and -built components could be developed and implemented in support of a future GHGIS. The study concludes that it is possible to develop and provide a capability-driven prototype GHGIS, as part of a Phase-1 effort, within three years from project-funding start, that would make use of and integrate existing sensing and system capabilities. As part of a Phase-2 effort, a requirem

Jonietz, Karl K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimotakis, Paul E [JPL/CAL TECH; Roman, Douglas A [LLNL; Walker, Bruce C [SNL

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

Centre on Innovation and Energy Demand The UK's climate goals are ambitious and challenging. Achieving an 80% reduction in GHG emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate and scale of emission reduction is without historical precedent and presents an enormous policy of the electricity sector; the rapid and widespread deployment of innovative technologies such as heat pumps and battery electric vehicles; dramatic improvements in energy efficiency in all sectors of the economy

Jensen, Max

285

Application of microturbines to control emissions from associated gas  

SciTech Connect

A system for controlling the emission of associated gas produced from a reservoir. In an embodiment, the system comprises a gas compressor including a gas inlet in fluid communication with an associated gas source and a gas outlet. The gas compressor adjusts the pressure of the associated gas to produce a pressure-regulated associated gas. In addition, the system comprises a gas cleaner including a gas inlet in fluid communication with the outlet of the gas compressor, a fuel gas outlet, and a waste product outlet. The gas cleaner separates at least a portion of the sulfur and the water from the associated gas to produce a fuel gas. Further, the system comprises a gas turbine including a fuel gas inlet in fluid communication with the fuel gas outlet of the gas cleaner and an air inlet. Still further, the system comprises a choke in fluid communication with the air inlet.

Schmidt, Darren D.

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

286

Key Institutional Design Considerations and Resources Required to Develop a Federal Greenhouse Gas Offsets Program in the United Sta tes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets have emerged as a critical element of evolving U.S. climate policy and a critical factor in determining the future price of CO2 emissions and the economic costs of proposed policies. This report evaluates the governmental institutional requirements and resources needed to develop a large-scale national domestic GHG emissions offset program. It also describes potential institutional barriers that might limit the ability of the evolving carbon market to generate signi...

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

287

Regulating Greenhouse Gas Emissions Date: March 7, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulating Greenhouse Gas Emissions Date: March 7, 2011 To: Michigan's Congressional Delegation From: Michigan College, University, Agency and NGO Researchers RE: Clean Air Act and Greenhouse Gas note that the EPA's rules to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from new vehicles were welcomed

Shyy, Wei

288

Greenhouse gas emissions, waste and recycling policy Kaylee Acuff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions, waste and recycling policy Kaylee Acuff and Daniel T. Kaffine We thank@mines.edu.) 1 #12;Greenhouse gas emissions, waste and recycling policy Abstract This paper examines least-cost policies for waste reduction, incorporating upstream greenhouse gas externalities associated

289

Invited Article: A materials investigation of a phase-change micro-valve for greenhouse gas collection and other potential applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deleterious consequences of climate change are well documented. Future climate treaties might mandate greenhouse gas(GHG) emissions measurement from signatories in order to verify compliance. The acquisition of atmospheric chemistry would benefit from low cost

Ronald P. Manginell; Matthew W. Moorman; Jerome A. Rejent; Paul T. Vianco; Mark J. Grazier; Brian D. Wroblewski; Curtis D. Mowry; Komandoor E. Achyuthan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Data (Redirected from UNFCCC GHG Inventory Data) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Data AgencyCompany Organization: United...

291

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cameron KC. Nitrous oxide emissions from two dairy pastureand land use on N 2 O emissions from an imperfectly drainedoptions for N 2 O emissions from differently managed

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling[1] Logo: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jointly sponsored by Greenhouse Gas Inventory & Research (GIR) Center of

293

Alternative Approaches to Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Global Climate Change in CEQA Documents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global climate change (GCC) is a change in the average weather of the earth that can be measured by wind patterns, storms, precipitation, and temperature. This paper is not a scientific analysis of the existence or potential causes of GCC. Further, this paper does not address National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements. Instead, the intent of this paper is to provide practical, interim information to California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) practitioners to help Lead Agencies determine how to address GCC in CEQA documents prior to the development and adoption of guidance by appropriate government agencies. A typical individual project does not generate enough greenhouse gas emissions to influence GCC significantly on its own; the issue of GCC is by definition a cumulative environmental impact. Therefore, if the Lead Agency chooses to address GCC effects in a CEQA document, it should be discussed in the context of a cumulative impact. A complicating factor, however, is that there are currently no published CEQA thresholds or approved methods for determining whether a project’s potential contribution to a cumulative GCC impact is considerable. This paper provides a summary of background information on GCC, the current regulatory environment surrounding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and the various approaches that a Lead

Tony Held, Ph.D.; Terry Rivasplata; Tim Rimpo; Kenneth M. Bogdan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inventories and Performance Inventories and Performance Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance October 7, 2013 - 10:07am Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides links to progress data tables illustrating Federal agency progress in meeting the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets established under Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, as well as the comprehensive greenhouse gas inventories as reported by the Federal agencies: Federal GHG Requirements Overview E.O. 13514 required Federal agencies to set individual targets for reduction of combined Scope 1 and 2 GHG emissions in FY 2020 compared to FY 2008. When all agency targets are combined, the overall target for the entire Federal Government is a 28% reduction in FY 2020 compared to FY 2008. GHG emissions from certain

295

Impact of the renewable oxygenate standard for reformulated gasoline on ethanol demand, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assure a place for renewable oxygenates in the national reformulated gasoline (RFG) program, the US Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated the renewable oxygenate standard (ROS) for RFG. It is assumed that ethanol derived from corn will be the only broadly available renewable oxygenate during Phase I of the RFG program. This report analyzes the impact that the ROS could have on the supply of ethanol, its transported volume, and its displacement from existing markets. It also considers the energy and crude oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that could result from the production and use of various RFGs that could meet the ROS requirements. The report concludes that on the basis of current and projected near-term ethanol capacity, if ethanol is the only available renewable oxygenate used to meet the requirements of the ROS, diversion of ethanol from existing use as a fuel is likely to be necessary. Year-round use of ethanol and ETBE would eliminate the need for diversion by reducing winter demand for ethanol. On an RFG-program-wide basis, using ethanol and ETBE to satisfy the ROS can be expected to slightly reduce fossil energy use, increase crude oil use, and have essentially no effect on GHG emissions or total energy use relative to using RFG oxygenated only with MTBE.

Stork, K.C.; Singh, M.K.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Eco-efficiency for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation of municipal solid waste management: A case study of Tianjin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The issue of municipal solid waste (MSW) management has been highlighted in China due to the continually increasing MSW volumes being generated and the limited capacity of waste treatment facilities. This article presents a quantitative eco-efficiency (E/E) analysis on MSW management in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. A methodology for E/E analysis has been proposed, with an emphasis on the consistent integration of life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC). The environmental and economic impacts derived from LCA and LCC have been normalized and defined as a quantitative E/E indicator. The proposed method was applied in a case study of Tianjin, China. The study assessed the current MSW management system, as well as a set of alternative scenarios, to investigate trade-offs between economy and GHG emissions mitigation. Additionally, contribution analysis was conducted on both LCA and LCC to identify key issues driving environmental and economic impacts. The results show that the current Tianjin's MSW management system emits the highest GHG and costs the least, whereas the situation reverses in the integrated scenario. The key issues identified by the contribution analysis show no linear relationship between the global warming impact and the cost impact in MSW management system. The landfill gas utilization scenario is indicated as a potential optimum scenario by the proposed E/E analysis, given the characteristics of MSW, technology levels, and chosen methodologies. The E/E analysis provides an attractive direction towards sustainable waste management, though some questions with respect to uncertainty need to be discussed further.

Zhao Wei, E-mail: zhaowei.tju@gmail.com [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Liaoning University of Technology, 121000 Jinzhou (China); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Huppes, Gjalt, E-mail: huppes@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Voet, Ester van der, E-mail: Voet@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Impact of Canada’s Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions form RoadConsiders Copying California’s Greenhouse Gas Law. ” http://Regulations to Control Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Motor

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Impact of Canada's Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions form RoadConsiders Copying California’s Greenhouse Gas Law. ” http://Regulations to Control Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Motor

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Semiconductors: GHG...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

2005, the industry's PFC emissions were equivalent to 4.3 million metric tons of CO2 (Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2005, U.S. EPA, 2007). Since...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

San Diego's carbon footprint : measuring and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Climate Change is one of the most pressing issues of our time. The best way to measure and mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions causing climate… (more)

Bushman, Tara Rose

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Gas emissions from dairy cow and fattening pig buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this research is to contribute to the knowledge concerning the abatement of gas emissions from livestock production. Investigations regarding the choice of… (more)

Ngwabie, Ngwa Martin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES III NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not...

304

Greenhouse gas emissions from public consumption in Gothenburg.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis is to explore and estimate greenhouse gas emissions from the public consumption in Gothenburg. By doing so it should be… (more)

Sinclair, Robin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Greenhouse gas emissions from cultivated peat soils in Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse gas emissions and peat subsidence are major concerns both from an environmental perspective and for farmers with declining soil production capacity. Agricultural databases, digitised… (more)

Berglund, Örjan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Rough surface mitigates electron and gas emission  

SciTech Connect

Heavy-ion beams impinging on surfaces near grazing incidence (to simulate the loss of halo ions) generate copious amounts of electrons and gas that can degrade the beam. We measured emission coefficients of {eta}{sub e} {le} 130 and {eta}{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup 4} respectively, with 1 MeV K{sup +} incident on stainless steel. Electron emission scales as {eta}{sub e} {proportional_to} 1/cos({theta}), where {theta} is the ion angle of incidence relative to normal. If we were to roughen a surface by blasting it with glass beads, then ions that were near grazing incidence (90{sup o}) on smooth surface would strike the rims of the micro-craters at angles closer to normal incidence. This should reduce the electron emission: the factor of 10 reduction, Fig. 1(a), implies an average angle of incidence of 62{sup o}. Gas desorption varies more slowly with {theta} (Fig. 1(b)) decreasing a factor of {approx}2, and along with the electron emission is independent of the angle of incidence on a rough surface. In a quadrupole magnet, electrons emitted by lost primary ions are trapped near the wall by the magnetic field, but grazing incidence ions can backscatter and strike the wall a second time at an azimuth where magnetic field lines intercept the beam. Then, electrons can exist throughout the beam (see the simulations of Cohen, HIF News 1-2/04). The SRIM (TRIM) Monte Carlo code predicts that 60-70% of 1 MeV K{sup +} ions backscatter when incident at 88-89{sup o} from normal on a smooth surface. The scattered ions are mostly within {approx}10{sup o} of the initial direction but a few scatter by up to 90{sup o}. Ion scattering decreases rapidly away from grazing incidence, Fig. 1(c ). At 62 deg. the predicted ion backscattering (from a rough surface) is 3%, down a factor of 20 from the peak, which should significantly reduce electrons in the beam from lost halo ions. These results are published in Phys. Rev. ST - Accelerators and Beams.

Molvik, A

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fugitive Emissions at the Department of Energy: An Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 GHG inventory - Fugitive emissions reduction is highlighted in DOE's Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) as a key strategy for achieving DOE GHG reduction goals *...

308

FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Energy Technology Center Federal Energy Technology Center Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Morgantown, West Virginia FETC's Customer Service Line: (800) 553-7681 FETC's Homepage: http://www.fetc.doe.gov/ DOE/FETC-98/1058 (DE98002029) FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions John A. Ruether February 1998 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

309

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A farm-focused calculator for emissions from crop and livestock production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agriculture and deforestation contribute approximately one third of global greenhouse gas emissions. Major sources of emissions in this sector are from loss of soil carbon due to repeated soil disturbance under typical crop cultivation, fossil fuel use ... Keywords: Agriculture, Cool farm tool, Emissions, GHG

Jonathan Hillier; Christof Walter; Daniella Malin; Tirma Garcia-Suarez; Llorenç Mila-i-Canals; Pete Smith

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance and Guidance and Reporting Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting October 7, 2013 - 10:05am Addthis Federal agencies are required to inventory and manage their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change. Federal Guidance Read the White House Council on Environmental Quality's (CEQ), Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance, and associated Technical Support Document. Accounting and Reporting Resources Visit the FedCenter Greenhouse Gas Inventory Reporting website to find the following resources and tools to help complete GHG inventory reporting requirements under Executive Order 13514: FEMP and CEQ Reporting Resources: Core documents for Federal GHG reporting Checklist: Step-by-step introduction to GHG accounting

312

The reduction of gas emissions from the use of bioethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work deals with the examination of farm Tractor with Diesel engine from the viewpoint of power and gas emissions, using as fuel Diesel-ethanol mixtures. A series of laboratory instruments was used for the realization of the experiments. The tractor ... Keywords: bioethanol, biofuels, gas emissions

Charalampos Arapatsakos

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Treatment of Gas Emissions in Potrooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the solutions developed by Fives to eliminate two of the main sources of HF emissions in the potrooms: - Emissions from pots, when they ...

314

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing: GHG  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information This section provides various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions (MMTCO2) based upon the Annual Energy Outlook 2007. According to EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2007" data, energy-related CO2 emissions projected for the Bulk Chemical industry was 349.0 MMTCO2 in 2004. (The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2005-2030. The AEO2007 reflects data and information available as of September 15, 2006. Source: Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with projections to 2030, U.S.

315

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Iron and Steel: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information This section provides various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions (MMTCO2) based upon the Annual Energy Outlook 2007. According to EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2007" data, energy-related CO2 emissions projected for the Iron and Steel industry were 133.5 MMTCO2 in 2006. The AEO Supplementary Tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2005-2030. The AEO2007 reflects data and information available as of September 15, 2006. Source: Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (PDF 38.44 KB) with

316

DOE Strengthens Public Registry to Track Greenhouse Gas Emissions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Registry to Track Greenhouse Gas Emissions Public Registry to Track Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Strengthens Public Registry to Track Greenhouse Gas Emissions April 17, 2006 - 10:20am Addthis Announces Revised Guidelines for U.S. Companies to Report and Register Reductions WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced revised guidelines for the department's Voluntary Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program, known as "1605 (b)" that encourage broader reporting of emissions and sequestration by utilities, and industries, as well as small businesses and institutions. The revised guidelines strengthen the existing public registry for emissions and sequestration data and introduce new methods for U.S. businesses and institutions to calculate entity-wide emission reductions that contribute to the President's goal of substantially

317

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Hydropower Reservoirs: FY2011 Annual Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to quantify the net emissions of key greenhouse gases (GHG) - notably, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} - from hydropower reservoirs in moist temperate areas within the U.S. The rationale for this objective is straightforward: if net emissions of GHG can be determined, it would be possible to directly compare hydropower to other power-producing methods on a carbon-emissions basis. Studies of GHG emissions from hydropower reservoirs elsewhere suggest that net emissions can be moderately high in tropical areas. In such areas, warm temperatures and relatively high supply rates of labile organic matter can encourage high rates of decomposition, which (depending upon local conditions) can result in elevated releases of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} emissions also tend to be higher for younger reservoirs than for older reservoirs, because vegetation and labile soil organic matter that is inundated when a reservoir is created can continue to decompose for several years (Galy-Lacaux et al. 1997, Barros et al. 2011). Water bodies located in climatically cooler areas, such as in boreal forests, could be expected to have lower net emissions of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} because their organic carbon supplies tend to be relatively recalcitrant to microbial action and because cooler water temperatures are less conducive to decomposition.

Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Measuring of exhaust gas emissions using absorption spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an optical fibre sensor for the detection of NOx (NO2 and NO) and CO2 in the exhaust system of a road vehicle. The measurement is based on a free path interaction zone which is interrogated using ... Keywords: absorption spectroscopy, air pollution, carbon dioxide, emissions measurement, exhaust gas emissions, gas sensors, infrared, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxide, optical fibre sensors, ultraviolet, vehicle emissions

Eamonn Hawe; Gerard Dooly; Colin Fitzpatrick; Paul Chambers; Elfed Lewis; W. Z. Zhao; T. Sun; K. T. V. Grattan; M. Degner; H. Ewald; S. Lochmann; G. Bramman; C. Wei; D. Hitchen; J. Lucas; A. Al-Shamma'a; E. Merlone-Borla; P. Faraldi; M. Pidria

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Sequestration ..... 199 62 Halogenated Substances ..... 22 18 Other Emissions Reductions ..... 59 45 Total ...

320

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Corn Ethanol.” Paper presented at the 8 th Bio-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study has been undertaken at the request of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs (DCCA) on the twin premises that (1) data and information essential to an informed choice about the corn-to-ethanol cycle are in need of updating, thanks to scientific and technological advances in both corn farming and ethanol production; and (2) generalized national estimates of energy intensities and greenhouse gas (GHG) production are of less relevance than estimates based specifically on activities and practices in the principal domestic corn production and milling region-- the upper Midwest. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) contracted with DCCA to apply the ANL Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model with updated information appropriate to corn operations in America’s heartland in an effort to examine the role of corn-feedstock ethanol with respect to GHG emissions given present and near future production technology and practice. Information about these technologies and practices has been obtained from a panel of outside experts consisting of representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, midwestern universities with expertise in corn production and soil emissions, and acknowledged authorities in the field of ethanol plant

Michael Wang; Christopher Saricks

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools (Redirected from US EPA GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: US EPA GHG inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/ghginventorycapacitybuilding/swtoo Country: Nicaragua, Panama, Guatemala, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Belize Cost: Free Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America

322

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Planning The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section of the FEMP website is designed to provide Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG...

323

Meeting an 80% Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transportation by 2050: A Case Study in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from ,Board, 2008. California Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventory.A. , 2003. Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from US

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Incorporating Offset Projects into Corporate Greenhouse Gas Strategies: Risk Management Under Conditions of Policy and Market Uncert ainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information for electric sector companies considering the development of project-based strategies to offset or reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, as well as insights to help them assess what kinds of projects and strategies are appropriate to their own situations. Effective project-based strategies link investments in specific activities with the emissions reductions they generate, resulting in the creation of mitigation credits with economic value in the emerging GHG marketplace...

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

325

What are the likely roles of fossil fuels in the next 15, 50, and 100 years, with or without active controls on greenhouse gas emissions  

SciTech Connect

Since the industrial revolution, the production and utilization of fossil fuels have been an engine driving economic and industrial development in many countries worldwide. However, future reliance on fossil fuels has been questioned due to emerging concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, particularly carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and its potential contribution to global climate change (GCC). While substantial uncertainties exist regarding the ability to accurately predict climate change and the role of various greenhouse gases, some scientists and policymakers have called for immediate action. As a result, there have been many proposals and worldwide initiatives to address the perceived problem. In many of these proposals, the premise is that CO{sub 2} emissions constitute the principal problem, and, correspondingly, that fossil-fuel combustion must be curtailed to resolve this problem. This paper demonstrates that the worldwide fossil fuel resource base and infrastructure are extensive and thus, will continue to be relied on in developed and developing countries. Furthermore, in the electric generating sector (the focus of this paper), numerous clean coal technologies (CCTs) are currently being demonstrated (or are under development) that have higher conversion efficiencies, and thus lower CO{sub 2} emission rates than conventional coal-based technologies. As these technologies are deployed in new power plant or repowering applications to meet electrical load growth, CO{sub 2} (and other GHG) emission levels per unit of electricity generated will be lower than that produced by conventional fossil-fuel technologies. 37 refs., 14 figs., 11 tabs.

Kane, R.L. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (USA)); South, D.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Environment. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from AviationD17): 4560. EPA (2006). Greenhouse Gas Emissions from theInventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

PPPL Celebrates Earth Day with Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPPL Celebrates Earth Day with Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions PPPL Celebrates Earth Day with Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions By Patti Wieser April 25, 2011 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. In an effort to respond to President Obama's call to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 28 percent by the year 2020, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have identified ways to cut emissions that will allow the facility to exceed that goal - a decade early. Staff members at the laboratory, where scientists are finding ways to produce fusion energy, have trimmed the facility's greenhouse gas emissions

328

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

agricultural productivity, enhancing food security and increasing environmental sustainability. Main activities of the project are to enhance global knowledge on GHG for the...

329

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory San Francisco State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) eGRID database and APS supplied SF State with its fuel mix for 2006. GHG

de la Torre, José R.

330

Decision-Making to Reduce Manufacturing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity GHG factors from the WRI - part II [g-CO 2eq /kWh] Nicaragua Nigeria Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Peru Philippines

Reich-Weiser, Corinne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Energy Efficiency in CO2 Emissions Trading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update explores methods to account for carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reductions specifically associated with the implementation of energy efficiency programs into greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading or offset markets. It focuses on how to understand, account for, quantify, verify, and optimize how electricity savings may both reduce CO2 emissions and potentially be granted credits for CO2 savings that may be traded in cap-and-trade regimes.

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

332

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers: GHG  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information This section provides various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the million metric tons of carbon equivalents (MMTCE) based upon the Annual Energy Outlook 2003. According to EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2003" data, energy-related CO2 emissions for the automobile industry were 3.5 MMTCE in 1995. (The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2000-2025. The AEO2003 reflects data and information available as of August 30, 2002. These include mostly data from 2000 and partial data from

333

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information This section provides various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the million metric tons of carbon equivalents (MMTCE) based upon the Annual Energy Outlook 2003. According to EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2003" data, energy-related CO2 emissions for the mining industry were 31.2 MMTCE in 2002. (The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2000-2025. The AEO2003 reflects data and information available as of August 30, 2002.) Source: Annual Energy Outlook 2003 with Projections to 2025, U.S.

334

Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Climate Policies Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

335

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction Act (Maryland) Reduction Act (Maryland) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act requires the Department of the Environment to publish and update an inventory of statewide greenhouse gas emissions for calendar year 2006 and requires the State to reduce statewide

336

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of Uncertainty of GHG Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of Uncertainty of GHG Emissions Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: GHG Uncertainty Guide[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Uncertainty Tool is designed to facilitate a quantitative and qualitative estimation of uncertainty associated with a

337

Canada’s Voluntary Agreement on Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions: When the Details Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ?uorinated greenhouse gases. greenhouse gas emissions. Washington,ective e?orts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. C.D. Howe

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Transportation Greenhouse Gas Inventory: A First Step Toward City-Driven Emissions Rationalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for greenhouse gas emissions, Department of Chemical andStep Toward City-Driven Emissions Rationalization ChrisStep toward City-Driven Emissions Rationalization Submitted

Ganson, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impacts of Liberalizing Trade in Environmental  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impacts of Liberalizing Trade in Environmental Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impacts of Liberalizing Trade in Environmental Goods Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impacts of Liberalizing Trade in Environmental Goods Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Industry Topics: Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2009/bali_2_copenhagen_egs.pdf References: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impacts of Liberalizing Trade in Environmental Goods[1] Background "As part of a suite of activities under the From Bali to Copenhagen project, IISD's work on low-carbon goods has focused on trying to measure the actual potential climate gains from what's now on the table in the WTO

340

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Table-Figure Notes and Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon sequestration in U.S. croplands and grasslands, 1990-2008: Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Volcano (Rome, Italy)- Geochemical Evidence Of Magmatic Degassing? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Volcano (Rome, Italy)- Geochemical Evidence Of Magmatic Degassing? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent studies suggested that Alban Hills (Rome) is a quiescent and not an extinct volcano, as it produced Holocene eruptions and several lahars until Roman times by water overflow from the Albano crater lake. Alban Hills are presently characterized by high PCO2 in groundwaters and by several cold gas emissions usually in sites where excavations removed the

342

Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine Seep  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California, Marineet al. , 2007, Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from aand P.G. Mikolaj, Natural oil seepage at Coal Oil Point,

Leifer, Ira; Boles, J R; Luyendyk, B P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Cal Climate Action Partnership: Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cal Climate Action Partnership: Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions at UC Berkeley Speaker(s): Fahmida Ahmed Date: January 11, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of...

344

Review of Potential Federal and State Green House Gas Policy Drivers for Combined Heat and Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power generation sector contributes about one-third of all green house gas (GHG) emissions in the United States. To curb the reduction of green house gas emissions, all options in the electric power value chain must be considered and evaluated. The more efficient utilization of natural gas fuel via use of distributed combined cooling, heating, and power (CHP) systems in the end-use sector may be one option to mitigating GHG emissions. This research project was undertaken to assess the extent...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

345

NATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol. Given that future natural gas supply is limited, despite forecasts of increased domestic. If the objective of a policy were the reduction of GHG emissions using a limited supply of natural gas, the bestNATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11 Natural

346

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Guidelines to Defra's Greenhouse Gas Conversion Factors for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Guidelines to Defra's Greenhouse Gas Conversion Factors for Company Reporting June 2008 What are Greenhouse Gas Conversion Factors? These conversion factors allow companies and individuals to calculate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from a range

347

Potential of solar domestic hot water systems in rural areas for greenhouse gas emission reduction in Poland  

SciTech Connect

Application of solar energy for preparing domestic hot water is one of the easiest methods of utilization of this energy. At least part of the needs for warm tap water could be covered by solar systems. At present, mainly coal is used for water heating at dwellings in rural areas in Poland. Warm tap water consumption will increase significantly in the future as standards of living are improved. This can result in the growth of electricity use and an increase in primary fuel consumption. Present and future methods of warm sanitary water generation in rural areas in Poland is discussed, and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are estimated. It is predicted that the emission of CO{sub 2} and NOx will increase. The emission of CO and CH{sub 4} will decrease because of changes in the structure of the final energy carriers used. The economic and market potentials of solar energy for preparing warm water in rural areas are discussed. It is estimated that solar systems can meet 30%-45% of the energy demand for warm water generation in rural areas at a reasonable cost, with a corresponding CO{sub 2} emission reduction. The rate of realization of the economic potential of solar water heaters depends on subsidies for the installation of equipment. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Skowronski, P. [Polish Foundation for Energy Efficiency, Warsaw (Poland); Wisniewski, G. [Institute for Building, Mechanization and Electrification of Agriculture, Warsaw (Poland)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Fuel composition effects on natural gas vehicle emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under a contract from DOE`s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and support from Brooklyn Union Gas Company (BUG), Northern Illinois Gas Co., the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) evaluated four state-of-the-art, electronic, closed-loop natural gas vehicle (NGV) conversion systems. The systems included an Impco electronic closed-loop system, Mogas electronic closed-loop system, Stewart and Stevenson`s GFI system, and an Automotive Natural Gas Inc. (ANGI) Level 1 electronic closed-loop conversion system. Conversion system evaluation included emission testing per 40 CFR Part 86, and driveability. All testing was performed with a 1993 Chevy Lumina equipped with a 3.1 liter MPFI V6 engine. Each system was emission tested using three different certified compositions of natural gas, representing the 10th, mean and 90th percentile gas compositions distributed in the United States. Emission testing on indolene was performed prior to conversion kit testing to establish a base emission value. Indolene testing was also performed at the end of the project when the vehicle was converted to its OEM configuration to ensure that the vehicle`s emissions were not altered during testing. The results of these tests will be presented.

Blazek, C.F.; Grimes, J.; Freeman, P. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bailey, B.K.; Colucci, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Greenhouse Gas Management Institute (GHGMI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute (GHGMI) Institute (GHGMI) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Greenhouse Gas Management Institute (GHGMI) Name Greenhouse Gas Management Institute (GHGMI) Address Washington, D.C. Place Washington, District of Columbia Phone number 1-888-778-1972 Website http://ghginstitute.org/housek References http://ghginstitute.org/housekeeping/contact-us/ No information has been entered for this organization. Add Organization The Greenhouse Gas Management Institute (GHGMI) was founded in response to the growing demand for qualified greenhouse gas (GHG) professionals. Just as engineering and financial accounting rely on certified professionals, GHG emissions management requires a highly competent and ethical professional class to undertake measurement, reporting, auditing, and

350

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

53 Wood products originating from forests outside the United States are not included in the U.S. greenhouse gas inventory. 54 Source: U.S. Energy Information ...

351

UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study (Redirected from UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series) Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy, Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.uneprisoe.org/Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations[1] Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia Regional Studies: Andean Region, Southern African Development Community (SADC) References ↑ "Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNEP-Risoe-Economics_of_GHG_Limitations:_Country_Study_Series&oldid=377226"

352

carbon emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords capacity carbon emissions energy demand Energy Generation fossil fuels GHG emissions UK Data applicationvnd.openxmlformats-office...

353

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles and Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:48am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 Reducing petroleum consumption is the principal means to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from vehicles and mobile equipment. Each agency has the flexibility to evaluate a variety of options to ensure its strategy best fits the mission and makeup of its fleets. The purpose of this evaluation is to: Identify strategies that will best encourage the reduction of petroleum use in Federal vehicles Estimate the GHG reduction potential and cost effectiveness of these strategies. Next Step After evaluating GHG reduction strategies, the next step in the GHG mitigation planning for vehicles and mobile equipment is to estimate the

354

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion) - GHG Emissions - Biodiversity Biofuel Production Inputs Export Animal Feed Other (chemicals,

Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E; Plevin, Richard J; Jones, Andrew; Nemet, Gregory F; Delucchi, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Table-Figure Notes and Sources  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A1. Notes and Sources A1. Notes and Sources Tables Chapter 1: Greenhouse gas emissions overview Table 1. U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential, 1990-2009: Sources: Emissions: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009). Global warming potentials: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis: Errata (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2008), website http://ipcc-wg1.ucar.edu/wg1/Report/AR4WG1_Errata_2008-12-01.pdf. Table 2. U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors, 1990-2009: Sources: Emissions: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the

356

DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Deployment of Advanced Technology DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Deployment of Advanced Technology September 22, 2005 - 10:45am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today released for public review and comment a plan for accelerating the development and reducing the cost of new and advanced technologies that avoid, reduce, or capture and store greenhouse gas emissions - the technology component of a comprehensive U.S. approach to climate change. The technologies developed under the Climate Change Technology program will be used and deployed among the United States' partners in the Asia-Pacific Partnership for Clean Development that was announced earlier this year.

357

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES III Speaker(s): Ronald Briggs Date: August 15, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer Do emissions from natural gas stoves in American homes degrade respiratory health? The combustion of natural gas yields byproducts such as NOx , PM2.5 , and CO that the US EPA regulates outdoors. But while ambient air quality has improved in the US over the last few decades as a consequence of the Clean Air Act of and its amendments, the prevalence of asthma and morbidity and mortality associated with asthma continue to rise (Mannino /et al./, 1998). Concentrations of most air pollutants are higher indoors than outdoors in the US, however, and people in the US spend more than 90%

358

Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These technology pathways (which are described in greater detail in Appendix B, Technology Pathways) address three areas: energy efficiency, clean energy, and carbon sequestration (removing carbon from emissions and enhancing carbon storage). Based on an assessment of each of these technology pathways over a 30-year planning horizon, the directors of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories conclude that success will require pursuit of multiple technology pathways to provide choices and flexibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Advances in science and technology are necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the United States while sustaining economic growth and providing collateral benefits to the nation.

National Lab Directors, . .

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

359

Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These technology pathways (which are described in greater detail in Appendix B, Technology Pathways) address three areas: energy efficiency, clean energy, and carbon sequestration (removing carbon from emissions and enhancing carbon storage). Based on an assessment of each of these technology pathways over a 30-year planning horizon, the directors of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories conclude that success will require pursuit of multiple technology pathways to provide choices and flexibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Advances in science and technology are necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the United States while sustaining economic growth and providing collateral benefits to the nation.

National Lab Directors, . .

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

360

Designing a Large-Scale Federal Greenhouse Gas Offsets Program in the United States: Policy Choices and Lessons Learned from the Cle an Development Mechanism and Other Offsets Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If the United States decides to take broader action in the future to mitigate climate change, policy discussions may once again focus on development of a greenhouse gas (GHG) cap-and-trade program combined with development of a large-scale GHG emissions offsets program. The compliance flexibility offered by these programs, and the economic incentives they create to identify and implement low-cost compliance options, have the potential to reduce significantly the costs to achieve significant emissions lim...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

362

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Employee Commuting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Commuting Employee Commuting Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 2:25pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 3 This section will help agencies to determine the most visible alternatives to single occupancy vehicle (SOV) commuting at the agencies major worksites establish the number of employees that may reasonably switch to non-SOV methods and estimate the resulting impact greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at their worksites. Learn how to: Identify relevant alternatives and supporting strategies Evaluate potential adoption of alternatives Estimate the GHG emission impact Identify Employee Commuting Alternatives Alternative employee commuting approaches for Federal agency consideration include both alternative travel methods and alternative work arrangements.

363

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Data Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Data AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate...

364

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and A. Schafer, Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S.Marintek, Study of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Ships .Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Green Power Network: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Offsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects include renewable electricity generation, energy efficiency measures, methane capture at landfill sites, soil carbon sequestration, and reforestation projects....

366

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - High-GWP gases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. High-GWP gases 5. High-GWP gases 5.1. Total emissions Greenhouse gases with high global warming potential (high-GWP gases) are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which together represented 3 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. Emissions estimates for the high-GWP gases are provided to EIA by the EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. The estimates for emissions of HFCs not related to industrial processes or electric transmission are derived from the EPA Vintaging Model. Emissions from manufacturing and utilities are derived by the EPA from a mix of public and proprietary data, including from the EPA's voluntary emission reduction partnership programs. For this year's EIA inventory, 2008 values for HFC-23 from HCFC-22

367

EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/ghginventorycapacitybuilding/swtoo Country: Nicaragua, Panama, Guatemala, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Belize Cost: Free Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America Coordinates: 13.7040888°, -89.1814075°

368

Kenya-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Kenya-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification in East Africa Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid-Tropics (ICRISAT), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

369

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information on voluntary actions to reduce greenhouse gases or remove such gases from the atmosphere in 1995. It provides an overview of participation in the Voluntary Reporting Program, a perspective on the composition of activities reported, and a review of some key issues in interpreting and evaluating achievements associated with reported emissions mitigation initiatives.

Information Center

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

LOW NOx EMISSIONS IN A FUEL FLEXIBLE GAS TURBINE  

SciTech Connect

In alignment with Vision 21 goals, a study is presented here on the technical and economic potential for developing a gas turbine combustor that is capable of generating less that 2 ppm NOx emissions, firing on either coal synthesis gas or natural gas, and being implemented on new and existing systems. The proposed solution involves controlling the quantity of H2 contained in the fuel. The presence of H2 leads to increased flame stability such that the combustor can be operated at lower temperatures and produce less thermal NOx. Coal gas composition would be modified using a water gas shift converter, and natural gas units would implement a catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) reactor to convert part of the natural gas feed to a syngas before fed back into the combustor. While both systems demonstrated technical merit, the economics involved in implementing such a system are marginal at best. Therefore, Praxair has decided not to pursue the technology any further at this time.

Raymond Drnevich; James Meagher; Vasilis Papavassiliou; Troy Raybold; Peter Stuttaford; Leonard Switzer; Lee Rosen

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Agency/Company /Organization Government of Costa Rica, Peace with Nature Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Co-benefits assessment, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.paxnatura.org/pax_n Country Costa Rica UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Costa Rica[1] Overview References ↑ "Costa Rica" Retrieved from

373

FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

Ruether, J.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Land use 6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2 emissions. The largest sequestration category in 2008 was forest lands and harvested wood pools,49 with estimated sequestration increasing from 730 MMTCO2e in 1990 to 792 MMTCO2e in 2008. The second-largest carbon sequestration category was urban trees,50 responsible for 57 MMTCO2e in 1990 and 94

375

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:29am Addthis Energy use in buildings represents the single largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the Federal sector. Buildings can contribute to Scope 1 emissions from direct stationary combustion sources; Scope 2 from indirect electricity, heat, or steam purchases; and Scope 3 emissions from transmission and distribution losses. Also see Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation. Step 1: Assess Agency Size Changes Step 2: Evaluate Emissions Profile Step 3: Evaluate Reduction Strategies Step 4: Estimate Implementation Costs Step 5: Prioritize Strategies Helpful Data and Tools See GHG planning data and tools for buildings.

376

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: Greenhouse Gas Emissions | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

377

Small gas turbines exhibit single-digit emissions in service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 10 MW-class, THM 1304-10D gas turbine from MAN-GHH, equipped with dry low-NO[sub x] combustion chambers, including hybrid burners, entered service last October. The unit was installed on the Stegal long-distance natural gas pipeline from the Olbernhau compression station on the Czech border. The pipeline transmits gas from Russia to the central part of Germany. A similar compression station, featuring three THM 1304-D driven compressor packages, started commercial operation last March in the Rehden station on the Midal pipeline. A test program carried out by MAN-GHH has demonstrated that the THM 1304 gas turbine has a wide operating range with NO[sub x] emission well under TA luft limits and, at the same time, negligible CO emissions. This is accomplished by combined effect of large volume combustion chambers, optimized wall cooling and premix dry low-NO[sub x] burners. 3 figs.

Chellini, R.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Unanticipated Consequences of Regional Greenhouse Gas Policies: Criteria Emissions and the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiave.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) has been developed by 10 Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic states in an attempt to curb emissions of carbon dioxide (C02)… (more)

Olesniewicz, Timothy J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Near-zero Emissions Oxy-combustion Flue Gas Purification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Near-zero Emissions Oxy-combustion Near-zero Emissions Oxy-combustion Flue Gas Purification Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) R&D Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The EPEC R&D Program portfolio of post- and

380

Sensitivity of Multi-gas Climate Policy to Emission Metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-gas greenhouse emission targets require that different emissions be combined into an aggregate total. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) index is currently used for this purpose, despite various criticisms of the underlying concept. It is not possible to uniquely define a single metric that perfectly captures the different impacts of emissions of substances with widely disparate atmospheric lifetimes, which leads to a wide range of possible index values. We examine the sensitivity of emissions and climate outcomes to the value of the index used to aggregate methane emissions using a technologically detailed integrated assessment model. We find that the sensitivity to index value is of order 4-14% in terms of methane emissions and 2% in terms of total radiative forcing, using index values between 4 and 70 for methane, with larger regional differences in some cases. The sensitivity to index value is much higher in economic terms, with total 2-gas mitigation cost decreasing 4-5% for a lower index and increasing 10-13% for a larger index, with even larger changes if the emissions reduction targets are small. The sensitivity to index value also depends on the assumed maximum amount of mitigation available in each sector. Evaluation of the maximum mitigation potential for major sources of non-CO2 greenhouse gases would greatly aid analysis

Smith, Steven J.; Karas, Joseph F.; Edmonds, James A.; Eom, Jiyong; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Projections of U. S. GHG Reductions from Nuclear Power New Capacity Based on Historic Levels of Investment  

SciTech Connect

Historical rates of capital investment in nuclear plant construction was used as a guide to estimate the rate of future capacity introduction. The magnitude of nuclear capacity was then used to determine the effect on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electrical production in the U.S. to 2050. Total capital investment in nuclear power plant construction for every U.S. nuclear unit from 1964 to 1990 were obtained and the total investment and divided by their construction period to provide a value for possible rate of investment. The total linear rate of capital expenditure over the entire period was determined as well as that for the period of peak construction from 1973 to 1985, $11.5 billion/y and $17.9 billion/y, respectively in 2004$. These were used with a variety of capital cost estimates for nuclear construction to obtain several scenarios for nuclear capacity additions. Total nuclear generation out to 2050 was calculated assuming current plants would be constrained by 60-year operating licenses (i.e., a single 20-year life extension). The effect on nuclear generating capacity was projected and the resultant impact on GHG emissions determined assuming nuclear would directly replace coal-fired generation. It was concluded that actually reductions in emissions would not be experienced until 2038, yet growth in emissions from electrical production would be slowed up through that point. Nuclear energy, therefore cannot have a dramatic short-term effect on emissions, as likely cannot any energy producing technology due to the significant time to introduce large-scale changes. Nuclear power, however, can have a major longer term impact on emissions, particularly under more favorable cost and investment conditions.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

D i s c l a i m e r The Proposed Final Opinion on Greenhouse Gas Regulatory Strategies has been  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;D i s c l a i m e r The Proposed Final Opinion on Greenhouse Gas Regulatory Strategies has been its contents. #12;1 Summary of Proposed Final Opinion on Greenhouse Gas Policies The Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (Assembly Bill 32) caps California's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the 1990 level

383

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials (Redirected from UNFCCC GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: unfccc.int/national_reports/non-annex_i_natcom/training_material/metho Cost: Free References: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials[1] Logo: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials

384

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: unfccc.int/national_reports/non-annex_i_natcom/training_material/metho Cost: Free References: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials[1] Logo: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials Visit the website for GHG inventory training materials, software support

385

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program (Redirected from UNFCCC GHG Inventory Review Training Program) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Training materials Website: unfccc.int/national_reports/annex_i_ghg_inventories/inventory_review_t UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program Screenshot References: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program[1] Logo: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program The Basic Course of the updated training programme covers technical aspects of the review of GHG inventories under the Convention. It consists of seven modules, including a general module and six individual modules on the

386

Aspects on Bioenergy as a Technical Measure to Reduce Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse gas emission assessments of energy supply systems have traditionally included the CO2 emissions produced as the fuel is burned. A lot of models and… (more)

Wihersaari, Margareta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Aspects on bioenergy as a technical measure to reduce energy related greenhouse gas emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse gas emission assessments of energy supply systems have traditionally included the CO2 emissions produced as the fuel is burned. A lot of models and… (more)

Wihersaari, Margareta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Greenhouse gas emissions associated with different meat-free diets in Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The production of food is responsible for large share of the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. There is a wide range of emissions associated with… (more)

Baumann, Andreas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Landfill gas emission prediction using Voronoi diagrams and importance sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are among the nation's largest emitters of methane, a key greenhouse gas, and there is considerable interest in quantifying the surficial methane emissions from landfills. There are limitations in obtaining accurate ... Keywords: Air dispersion modeling, Delaunay tessellation, Kriging, Least squares, MSW landfill, Voronoi diagram

K. R. Mackie; C. D. Cooper

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

CHBE 484: Term Report Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHBE 484: Term Report Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis of Future UBC Transportation Options Curtis of UBC transportation in: 2007, 2020 based on the current transportation methods, the elimination for cars and 2316.08 tonnes CO2 for trolley and conventional buses traveling to UBC. If the transportation

391

Greenhouse gas emissions related to ethanol produced from corn  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report confers the details of a panel meeting discussion on greenhouse gases. The topic of this discussion was ethanol. Members discussed all aspects of growing corn and producing ethanol. Then the question was raised as to whether or not this is a suitable substitute to fossil fuel usage in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Marland, G.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Modeling Swtichgrass Biomass Production and Associated Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Swtichgrass Biomass Production and Associated Greenhouse Gas Emissions Weiyuan Zhu, Johan in the atmosphere have led to renewed interest in energy from plant biomass. Surfing the internet or flipping to a series of concerns, apprehensions and challenges presented by a shift to a heavier reliance on biomass

California at Davis, University of

393

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Shale Gas, Nuraral Gas, Coal,Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas, ENvr_. Ries. LTRs. , Aug.acknowledge, "Marcellus shale gas production is still in its

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since greenhouse gases are a global concern, rather than a local concern as are some kinds of effluents, one must compare the entire lifecycle of nuclear power to alternative technologies for generating electricity. A recent critical analysis by Sovacool (2008) gives a clearer picture. "It should be noted that nuclear power is not directly emitting greenhouse gas emissions, but rather that lifecycle emissions occur through plant construction, operation, uranium mining and milling, and plant decommissioning." "[N]uclear energy is in no way 'carbon free' or 'emissions free,' even though it is much better (from purely a carbon-equivalent emissions standpoint) than coal, oil, and natural gas electricity generators, but worse than renewable and small scale distributed generators" (Sovacool 2008). According to Sovacool, at an estimated 66 g CO2 equivalent per kilowatt-hour (gCO2e/kWh), nuclear power emits 15 times less CO2 per unit electricity generated than unscrubbed coal generation (at 1050 gCO2e/kWh), but 7 times more than the best renewable, wind (at 9 gCO2e/kWh). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2009) has long recognized CO2 emissions in its regulations concerning the environmental impact of the nuclear fuel cycle. In Table S-3 of 10 CFR 51.51(b), NRC lists a 1000-MW(electric) nuclear plant as releasing as much CO2 as a 45-MW(e) coal plant. A large share of the carbon emissions from the nuclear fuel cycle is due to the energy consumption to enrich uranium by the gaseous diffusion process. A switch to either gas centrifugation or laser isotope separation would dramatically reduce the carbon emissions from the nuclear fuel cycle.

Strom, Daniel J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

Mark Scotto

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have been raised whether development of shale gas resources results in an overall lower greenhouse gas, "Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas," appeared in Environmental Research Letters

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

398

Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE): Case of Batangas City...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policiesdeployment programs Resource Type Case studies...

399

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RFG Running Hot Soak Diurnal CNG :Diesel Fuels Emissions RFGwith compressednatural gas (CNG),the hydrocarbontaitpipemethanol, natural gas (CNG),and hydrogen. As noted above,

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ng/J) distributions from residential natural gas appliances.ng/J) distribution from residential natural gas appliances.Pollutant Emissions from Residential Heating Systems, EPA-

Traynor, G.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Well-to-wheels analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed for mass production by the automotive industry. PHEVs have been touted for their potential to reduce the US transportation sector's dependence on petroleum and cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by (1) using off-peak excess electric generation capacity and (2) increasing vehicles energy efficiency. A well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis - which examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation - can help researchers better understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for PHEV recharging, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs. For the WTW analysis, Argonne National Laboratory researchers used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne to compare the WTW energy use and GHG emissions associated with various transportation technologies to those associated with PHEVs. Argonne researchers estimated the fuel economy and electricity use of PHEVs and alternative fuel/vehicle systems by using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) model. They examined two PHEV designs: the power-split configuration and the series configuration. The first is a parallel hybrid configuration in which the engine and the electric motor are connected to a single mechanical transmission that incorporates a power-split device that allows for parallel power paths - mechanical and electrical - from the engine to the wheels, allowing the engine and the electric motor to share the power during acceleration. In the second configuration, the engine powers a generator, which charges a battery that is used by the electric motor to propel the vehicle; thus, the engine never directly powers the vehicle's transmission. The power-split configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 10- and 20-mile electric range because they require frequent use of the engine for acceleration and to provide energy when the battery is depleted, while the series configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 30- and 40-mile electric range because they rely mostly on electrical power for propulsion. Argonne researchers calculated the equivalent on-road (real-world) fuel economy on the basis of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency miles per gallon (mpg)-based formulas. The reduction in fuel economy attributable to the on-road adjustment formula was capped at 30% for advanced vehicle systems (e.g., PHEVs, fuel cell vehicles [FCVs], hybrid electric vehicles [HEVs], and battery-powered electric vehicles [BEVs]). Simulations for calendar year 2020 with model year 2015 mid-size vehicles were chosen for this analysis to address the implications of PHEVs within a reasonable timeframe after their likely introduction over the next few years. For the WTW analysis, Argonne assumed a PHEV market penetration of 10% by 2020 in order to examine the impact of significant PHEV loading on the utility power sector. Technological improvement with medium uncertainty for each vehicle was also assumed for the analysis. Argonne employed detailed dispatch models to simulate the electric power systems in four major regions of the US: the New England Independent System Operator, the New York Independent System Operator, the State of Illinois, and the Western Electric Coordinating Council. Argonne also evaluated the US average generation mix and renewable generation of electricity for PHEV and BEV recharging scenarios to show the effects of these generation mixes on PHEV WTW results. Argonne's GREET model was designed to examine the WTW energy use and GHG emissions for PHEVs and BEVs, as well as FCVs, regular HEVs, and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs). WTW results are reported for charge-depleting (CD) operation of PHEVs under different recharging scenarios. The combined WTW results of CD and charge-sustaining (CS) PHEV operations (using the utility factor method) were also examined and reported. According to the utility factor method, the share of veh

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Business Travel | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Travel Business Travel Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Business Travel October 7, 2013 - 1:20pm Addthis Business travel is among the largest sources of Scope 3 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions accounted for by Federal agencies. For some agencies, business travel can represent up to 60% of Scope 3 emissions, but represents about 20% of Scope 3 emissions for the Federal sector as whole. While other emissions categories have been the focus of efficiency improvements for several years, few agencies have been actively planning to manage business travel for GHG reduction purposes. Travel management due to budgetary constraints has typically been more common for Federal agencies in the past. Because air travel emissions are the biggest source of travel emissions for most agencies, this guidance focuses on planning for

403

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Employee Commuting Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 2:29pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 5 Proposed programs to reduce employee commute greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions should be prioritized at individual worksites and across agency worksites to help the agency understand what actions and worksites are most critical to reaching its goal. This section aims to help the employee transportation coordinators (ETCs) and telework coordinators to understand what commute reduction programs will yield the greatest "bang-for-the-buck" and what level of GHG reductions a site or program can achieve get with available resources. Criteria may include: GHG emission reduction potential by the 2020 target date Cost effectiveness ($ invested per MTCO2e avoided)

404

A physics-based emissions model for aircraft gas turbine combustors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a physics-based model of an aircraft gas turbine combustor is developed for predicting NO. and CO emissions. The objective of the model is to predict the emissions of current and potential future gas turbine ...

Allaire, Douglas L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy, Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.uneprisoe.org/Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations[1] Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia Regional Studies: Andean Region, Southern African Development Community (SADC) References ↑ "Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNEP-Risoe-Economics_of_GHG_Limitations:_Country_Study_Series&oldid=377226"

406

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy, Water Focus Area: Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/report_ers.html Cost: Free CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series Screenshot References: CDM Emission Reductions Calculation Sheet Series[1] "IGES ERs Calculation Sheet aims at providing a simplified spreadsheet for demonstrating emission reductions based on the approved methodologies corresponding to eligible project activities. The sheet will provide you

407

8/25/07 11:49 PMCLIMATE CHANGE: Equity and Greenhouse Gas Responsibility --Baer et al. 289 (5488): 2287 --Science Page 1 of 4http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/289/5488/2287  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8/25/07 11:49 PMCLIMATE CHANGE: Equity and Greenhouse Gas Responsibility -- Baer et al. 289 (5488: Equity and Greenhouse Gas Responsibility Paul Baer, John Harte, Barbara Haya, Antonia V. Herzog, John, industrialized nations have approved commitments to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These commitments

Kammen, Daniel M.

408

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Training materials Website: unfccc.int/national_reports/annex_i_ghg_inventories/inventory_review_t UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program Screenshot References: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program[1] Logo: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program The Basic Course of the updated training programme covers technical aspects of the review of GHG inventories under the Convention. It consists of seven modules, including a general module and six individual modules on the review of individual IPCC sectors.

409

Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of emissions of natural gas and diesel buses operated by the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority.

Melendez, M.; Taylor, J.; Wayne, W. S.; Smith, D.; Zuboy, J.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington October 2007 ............................................................................................6 Operational Boundaries.......................................................................................................................21 Montlake Landfill

Kaminsky, Werner

411

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a given facility were divided by its throughput to develop emissions factors Distribution curves were and Storage (99%) Transportation, Storage, and Distribution of Gasoline (99.5%) MTBE or EtOH for Gasoline.5%) Steam or Electricity Export NA: North American nNA: non-North American NG: natural gas G.H2 Compression

Argonne National Laboratory

412

Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s energy-related CO 2 emissions from 1996 to 1999: thefoot: In measuring carbon emissions, it’s easy to confuseChina’s greenhouse gas emissions. Science, 294, 1835– 1837.

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Greenhouse Gas Management Program Overview (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program fact sheet highlighting federal requirements for GHG emissions management, FEMP services to help agencies reduce emissions, and additional resources. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) assists Federal agencies with managing their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. GHG management entails measuring emissions and understanding their sources, setting a goal for reducing emissions, developing a plan to meet this goal, and implementing the plan to achieve reductions in emissions. FEMP provides the following services to help Federal agencies meet the requirements of inventorying and reducing their GHG emissions: (1) FEMP offers one-on-one technical assistance to help agencies understand and implement the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance and fulfill their inventory reporting requirements. (2) FEMP provides training, tools, and resources on FedCenter to help agencies complete their annual inventories. (3) FEMP serves a leadership role in the interagency Federal Working Group on Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting that develops recommendations to the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance. (4) As the focus continues to shift from measuring emissions (completing inventories) to mitigating emissions (achieving reductions), FEMP is developing a strategic planning framework and resources for agencies to prioritize among a variety of options for mitigating their GHG emissions, so that they achieve their reduction goals in the most cost-effective manner. These resources will help agencies analyze their high-quality inventories to make strategic decisions about where to use limited resources to have the greatest impact on reducing emissions. Greenhouse gases trap heat in the lower atmosphere, warming the earth's surface temperature in a natural process known as the 'greenhouse effect.' GHGs include carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}). Human activities have caused a rapid increase in GHG concentrations. This rising level contributes to global climate change, which contributes to environmental and public health problems.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Yale University committed to reducing its primary greenhouse gas emissions 43% below 2005 levels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yale University committed to reducing its primary greenhouse gas emissions 43% below 2005 levels. Beginning in 2013, emissions from the University fleet are included in the reduction target. Greenhouse Gas. 2005 2013 In 2005,Yale University pledged to reduce its primary greenhouse gas emissions forty

415

Projecting Insect Voltinism Under High and Low Greenhouse Gas Emission Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVIEW Projecting Insect Voltinism Under High and Low Greenhouse Gas Emission Conditions SHI CHEN,1 change can alter insect voltinism under varying greenhouse gas emissions scenarios by using input climate data until 2099 under both high (A1Ã?) and low (B1) greenhouse gas emission scenarios, we used

416

A graphical technique for explaining the relationship between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greenhouse gas emissions Larry Hughes and Nikita Sheth Energy Research Group Department of Electrical the relationship between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions Larry Hughes and Nikita Sheth Abstract and the differences between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions. This paper presents a graphical technique

Hughes, Larry

417

RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several perialpine and alpine investigated greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from reservoirs located across an altitude gradient in Switzerland. These are the first results of greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs at high elevations

Wehrli, Bernhard

418

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES: Agricultural Economics #12;AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation in the United States. (December 2000) Uwe Schneider, M.Ag., Humboldt

McCarl, Bruce A.

419

Field validation of the DNDC model for greenhouse gas emissions in East Asian cropping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field validation of the DNDC model for greenhouse gas emissions in East Asian cropping systems annual variations of greenhouse gas emissions from cropping systems and effects of land management a powerful tool for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from terrestrial ecosystems. INDEX TERMS: 1610 Global

420

Summary of Environmental Performance at Harvard Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Harvard University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Environmental Performance at Harvard Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Harvard University of emissions reductions associated with central utilities. Harvard University Greenhouse Gas Emissions: FY2006 AND SAFETY The 2010 Harvard University Greenhouse Gas Inventory represents the full breadth of the University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Summary of Environmental Performance at Harvard Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Harvard University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Environmental Performance at Harvard Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Harvard University of emissions reductions associated with central utilities. Harvard University Greenhouse Gas Emissions: FY2006 AND SAFETY The 2011 Harvard University Greenhouse Gas Inventory represents the full breadth of the University

422

Climate Change Standards Working Group, SUDS Policy and Planning Committee Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Transit Abstract: This Recommended Practice provides guidance to transit agencies for quantifying their greenhouse gas emissions, including both emissions generated by transit and the potential reduction of emissions through efficiency and displacement by laying out a standard methodology for transit agencies to report their greenhouse gas emissions in a transparent, consistent and cost-effective manner.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit Identify your property type Enter data into Portfolio Manager The data quality checker

424

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. natural gas composition is expected to be more variable in the future. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Unconventional gas supplies, like coal-bed methane, are also expected to grow. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from existing domestic natural gas supplies. To allow the greatest use of gas supplies, end-use equipment should be able to accommodate the widest possible gas composition. For this reason, the effect of gas composition on combustion behavior is of interest. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 589K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx emissions. These results vary from data reported in the literature for some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences are discussed.

D. Straub; D. Ferguson; K. Casleton; G. Richards

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Greenhouse gas emissions trading in U.S. States: observations and lessons from the OTC NOx Budget Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of U.S. states are considering market-based policies to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The experience gained from emissions trading for sulfur dioxide and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) offers a useful body of information and data to draw on to design a GHG emissions trading system. This report examines NOx trading under the Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) NOx Budget Program, which resulted principally from the leadership, decisions, and actions by a group of states, ultimately becoming the first multilateral cap-and-trade system for emissions of air pollutants. 72 refs.

Andrew Aulisi; Alexander E. Farrell; Jonathan Pershing; Stacy VanDeveer [World Resources Institute, Washington, DC (United States). Sustainable Enterprise Program

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Vehicle Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Emissions Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions When used as a vehicle fuel, biodiesel offers some tailpipe and considerable greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions benefits over conventional

427

Exploring the hidden impacts of HomeSys: energy and emissions of home sensing and automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Home sensing and automation systems are rarely discussed with reference to their direct energy demand, much less other environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas (GhG) emissions arising from their manufacture and transport. It is imperative that designers ... Keywords: embodied carbon, home energy, home systems

Oliver Bates, Mike Hazas

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Carbon Emissions Primer Symposium on Greenhouse Gas andSymposium on Greenhouse Gas and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6/5/2013 1 Carbon Emissions Primer Symposium on Greenhouse Gas andSymposium on Greenhouse Gas Council June 4, 2013 Portland, OR 1 CO2 Chemistry 1 molecule of CO 1 atom carbon1 molecule of CO2 = 1 atom carbon + 2 atoms oxygen 2 #12;6/5/2013 2 CO2 Chemistry 1 mole of carbon = 6 02 x 1023 carbon atoms 1

429

Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 10:53am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 After estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by building type, building location is an important consideration in evaluating the relevance of energy-saving strategies due to variations in heating and cooling needs, and the GHG reduction potential due to variability of emissions factors across regions of the grid. If site-level energy use estimates are available for each of the program's key building types, the program can identify building locations with the greatest emission reduction potential by using the benchmarking approach. Locations with the worst energy performance relative to the benchmark are

430

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Vehicle Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

431

LowCostGHG ReductionCARB 3/03 Low-Cost and Near-Term Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manufacturers to focus on high fuel-economy cars. And Toyota Prius and Honda Civic Hybrid are wonderful Prius Corolla Highlander I4 Sienna V6 Acura CL V6 Tacoma I4 Corvette V8 Camaro V6 S-10 I4 "intensity (g-sized Prius. It's hard

Edwards, Paul N.

432

Quantification of greenhouse gas emissions from waste management processes for municipalities - A comparative review focusing on Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) emitted due to waste management in the cities of developing countries is predicted to rise considerably in the near future; however, these countries have a series of problems in accounting and reporting these gases. Some of these problems are related to the status quo of waste management in the developing world and some to the lack of a coherent framework for accounting and reporting of greenhouse gases from waste at municipal level. This review summarizes and compares GHG emissions from individual waste management processes which make up a municipal waste management system, with an emphasis on developing countries and, in particular, Africa. It should be seen as a first step towards developing a more holistic GHG accounting model for municipalities. The comparison between these emissions from developed and developing countries at process level, reveals that there is agreement on the magnitude of the emissions expected from each process (generation of waste, collection and transport, disposal and recycling). The highest GHG savings are achieved through recycling, and these savings would be even higher in developing countries which rely on coal for energy production (e.g. South Africa, India and China) and where non-motorized collection and transport is used. The highest emissions are due to the methane released by dumpsites and landfills, and these emissions are predicted to increase significantly, unless more of the methane is captured and either flared or used for energy generation. The clean development mechanism (CDM) projects implemented in the developing world have made some progress in this field; however, African countries lag behind.

Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Challenge of Limiting Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Activities implemented Jointly in Developing Countries: A Brazilian Perspective  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses, from the Brazilian perspective, the main problems with Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly (JI/AIJ) between industrialized (Annex I) and developing (non-Annex I) countries, as defined by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Four possible GHG emissions abatement measures are presented for Brazil: forest protection, reforestation projects for carbon sequestration or charcoal manufacturing, use of ethanol produced from sugar cane as a car fuel, and electrical energy conservation through an increase in end-use efficiencies. These four case studies form the basis of a discussion regarding the validity of developing countries' concerns about JI/AIJ. Recommendations are offered for overcoming the present shortcomings of JI/AIJ in developing countries. The primary conclusion is that Annex I countries' funding of JI/AIJ projects in developing countries in return for GHG emissions credits is not the best means to implement the UNFCCC. However, JI/AIJ projects can be a productive means of preventing global climate change if combined with other measures, including GHG emissions reduction targets for all countries involved in JI/AIJ projects and limits on the percentage of industrialized countries' emissions reductions that can be met through projects in developing countries.

La Rovere, E.L.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) Guidance Manuals and Toolkits Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) Guidance Manuals and Toolkits Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Finance, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.undp.org/environment/climatestrategies_toolkits.shtml Cost: Free UNDP-Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Strategies (LECRDS) Guidance Manuals and Toolkits Screenshot

435

Internet-based information resource and discussion platform on GHG reduction strategies in Asia  

SciTech Connect

The website (www.ccasia.teri.res.in) provides a consolidated Internet based information source and platform for discussions on climate change issues in Asia. The effort has been successful in reaching the target audience and in stimulating awareness about the crucial debate on GHG (greenhouse gas) reduction strategies in Asia.

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

436

TransAlta Corporation GHG Risk Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(35) Permits (34) 2010 Offsets (4) GAP (6) 5 Past and Future Emission Credit Permit Prices Greenhouse Gas Reductions Market, 1990-2020 Completed Transactions Wind Energy...

437

Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: pdf.wri.org/navigating_numbers.pdf References: Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy[1] Overview "This report examines greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the global, national, sectoral, and fuel levels and identifies implications of the data for international cooperation on global climate change. Emissions are assessed within the broader socioeconomic context faced by countries,

438

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:23am Addthis Once Federal sites have been screened for viability of different renewable energy resources to evaluate emissions profile, the next step is to establish what renewable energy resources developed at which particular sites would have the greatest impact on the agency's overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions goals. It is important to consider that some types of renewable energy generation could impact not only Scope 1 and 2 GHG goals, but also Scope 3 goals through avoided transmission and distribution losses. Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential It is important to note that solar systems can have the greatest reduction

439

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated Carbon dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activity. Carbon dioxide is emitted mostly as a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, although certain industrial processes (e.g., cement manufacture) also emit carbon dioxide. The estimates of energy-related carbon emissions require both data on the energy use and carbon emissions coefficients relating energy use to the amount of carbon emitted. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the main source of data on U.S. energy use. Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 used annual data provided by energy suppliers. However, to obtain more detail on how different sectors use energy, the emissions estimates in Energy and GHG Analysis rely data from on surveys of energy users, such as manufacturing establishments and commercial buildings.

440

Federal Greenhouse Gas Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements Requirements Federal Greenhouse Gas Requirements October 7, 2013 - 10:02am Addthis Executive Order (E.O.) 13514 expands the energy reduction and environmental requirements of Executive Order 13423 by making greenhouse gas (GHG) management a priority for the Federal government. Under Section 2 of E.O. 13514, each Federal agency must: Within 90 days of the order, establish and report to the CEQ Chair and OMB Director a percentage reduction target for agency-wide reductions of Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions in absolute terms by fiscal year 2020 relative to a fiscal year 2008 baseline of the agency's Scope 1 greenhouse gas emissions. In establishing the target, agencies shall consider reductions associated with: Reducing agency building energy intensity Increasing agency renewable energy use and implementing on-site renewable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas emissions ghg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as the technology basis of a needed national climate change technology strategy, with the confidence that a strong technology R&D program will deliver a portfolio of technologies with the potential to provide very substantial greenhouse gas emission reductions along with continued economic growth. Much more is needed to define such a strategy, including identification of complementary deployment policies and analysis to support the seeping and prioritization of R&D programs. A national strategy must be based upon governmental, industrial, and academic partnerships.

Not Available

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Velocity Field of Quasar Broad Emission Line Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Letter, the broad emission line (BEL) profiles of superluminal quasars with apparent jet velocities, $\\beta_{a}>10$, (ultraluminal QSOs, or ULQSOs hereafter) are studied as a diagnostic of the velocity field of the BEL emitting gas in quasars. The ULQSOs are useful because they satisfy a very strict kinematical constraint, their parsec scale jets must be propagating within $12^{\\circ}$ of the line of sight. We know the orientation of these objects with great certainty. The large BEL FWHM, $\\sim 3,000 \\mathrm{km/s} - 6,000 \\mathrm{km/s}$, in ULQSOs tend to indicate that the BEL gas has a larger component of axial velocity (either random or in a wind) along the jet direction than previously thought.

Brian Punsly

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Likewise, it is expected that changes to the domestic gas supply may also introduce changes in natural gas composition. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from conventional domestic natural gas supplies. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 588 K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx or CO emissions. These results are different from data collected on some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences will be described.

Straub, D.L.; Ferguson, D.H.; Casleton, K.H.; Richards, G.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

LEDS Global Partnership in Action: Advancing Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development Around the World (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Many countries around the globe are designing and implementing low emission development strategies (LEDS). These LEDS seek to achieve social, economic, and environmental development goals while reducing long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increasing resiliency to climate change impacts. The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) harnesses the collective knowledge and resources of more than 120 countries and international donor and technical organizations to strengthen climate-resilient low emission development efforts around the world.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:00am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 Once key building types and priority sites have been identified, a Federal agency can identify appropriate energy management measures and estimate their impact on each program's building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To support this evaluation, energy managers can use the Buildings GHG Mitigation Worksheet Estimator in tandem with this guidance to estimate of GHG savings and cost. Figure 1 - An image of an organizational-type flowchart. A rectangle labeled 'Program' has a line pointing to a rectangle labeled 'Building Type.' 'Building Type' has a lines pointing to rectangles labeled 'Site Ranked Overall #1,' 'Site Ranked Overall #2,' and 'Site Ranked Overall #3.'

446

APPENDIX E: METHANE EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION, OIL PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX E: METHANE EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION, OIL PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND OTHER PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND OTHER SOURCES An Appendix to the Report "A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM of natural gas, which is mostly CH4, occurs through natural gas production, oil production, and coal mining

Delucchi, Mark

447

Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Bruce A. Mc Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Today society faces important prevalent greenhouse gas (carbon dioxide - CO2), it is important in the total picture. According

McCarl, Bruce A.

448

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Results Results The following are summary descriptions of actions taken to date by the American Petroleum Institute (API) and its members, as related to the Climate VISION program and GHG emissions intensity reduction, in general. For more complete information, please visit API's website (www.api.org) and view Climate Challenge:A Progress Report and, for the most recent examples, please see Companies Address Climate Change. (Also please browse API member company websites for additional information on company climate change initiatives.) API Climate Greenhouse Gas Estimation & Reporting Challenge API has developed and is distributing accurate greenhouse gas emissions estimating tools via its Compendium of GHG Emissions Methodologies for the Oil and Gas Industry (PDF 14.6 MB). The Compendium implements more robust

449

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 1:13pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 4 Once a Federal agency identifies the various strategic opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for vehicles and mobile equipment, it is necessary to evaluate the associated costs of adopting each strategy. The costs to reduce GHG emissions can vary greatly from cost-free behavior modification to the high-cost of purchasing zero-emission battery electric vehicles and associated fueling infrastructure. This section provides an overview of the costs and savings to consider when planning for mobile source emissions reductions, including efforts to: Reduce vehicle miles traveled

450

Thermal emissions and climate change: a nuclear problem and a photovoltaic solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global warming is a consequence of 'temperature forcing', a net imbalance between energy fluxes entering and leaving the global climate system and energy generation within this system. Humanity introduces positive forcings through greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, agriculture, and increasingly thermal emissions - heat released as a result of energy generation and use. Up to now, climate change projections have neglected thermal emissions, and typically assume a peak in forcing due to GHG emissions around the middle of this century [1,2]. Here we show that, if humanity's future energy use grows at just 1% per year, slower than in recent history, and if thermal emissions are not controlled through changes in technology, the total forcing due to all emissions will not peak and decline significantly as currently predicted, but after a slight dip will continue to rise. This problem can be combated by geoengineering [3] and mitigated by renewable energy sources that minimize waste heat. Such approaches could be combi...

Cowern, Nick E B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to close the gap on unregulated greenhouse gas emissions.a higher lifecycle greenhouse gas content than conventionalIN- FORMATION ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONs AssocIATEIDn wrri

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Greenhouse gas emissions control by economic incentives: Survey and analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a survey of issues and concerns raised in recent literature on the application of market-based approaches to greenhouse effect policy with an emphasis on tradeable emission permits. The potential advantages of decentralized decision-making -- cost-effectiveness or allocation efficiency, stimulation of innovations, and political feasibility are discussed. The potential difficulties of data recording, monitoring, enforcement, and of creating viable emission permit contracts and markets are examined. Special attention is given to the problem of designing a greenhouse effect policy that is cost-effective over time, a problem that has been given little attention to date. Proposals to reduce or stabilize greenhouse gas emission (especially CO{sub 2}) in the short run require high carbon tax rates or permit prices and impose heavy adjustment costs on the fossil fuel industry. A more cost-effective time path of permit prices is proposed that achieves the same long-run climate change stabilization goals. 21 refs., 3 figs.

South, D.W.; Kosobud, R.F.; Quinn, K.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Greenhouse gas emissions control by economic incentives: Survey and analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a survey of issues and concerns raised in recent literature on the application of market-based approaches to greenhouse effect policy with an emphasis on tradeable emission permits. The potential advantages of decentralized decision-making -- cost-effectiveness or allocation efficiency, stimulation of innovations, and political feasibility are discussed. The potential difficulties of data recording, monitoring, enforcement, and of creating viable emission permit contracts and markets are examined. Special attention is given to the problem of designing a greenhouse effect policy that is cost-effective over time, a problem that has been given little attention to date. Proposals to reduce or stabilize greenhouse gas emission (especially CO{sub 2}) in the short run require high carbon tax rates or permit prices and impose heavy adjustment costs on the fossil fuel industry. A more cost-effective time path of permit prices is proposed that achieves the same long-run climate change stabilization goals. 21 refs., 3 figs.

South, D.W.; Kosobud, R.F.; Quinn, K.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

GHG - P3 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Motor vehicles: emissions. ... This presumed that auto manufacturers will capitalize low-NOx emissions potential into savings on emission-control equipment.

455

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de