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1

Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many of the operating flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems throughout the world, materials corrosion leads to considerable costs and downtime. Utilities are often required to maintain, repair, replace, and/or upgrade existing materials to combat corrosion issues. This document provides the results of a recent EPRI survey that examined the various types of corrosion and materials damage in FGD systems.

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

2

A pilot-scale Process Development Unit for transport and fluid-bed hot-gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has designed and is currently constructing an on-site, hot gas desulfurization (HGD) Process Development Unit (PDU). The PDU is designed to use regenerable solid metal oxide sorbents that absorb hydrogen sulfide from high-temperature, high-pressure simulated coal-gasification fuel gas that is generated by a METC designed syngas generator. The simulated coal gas is a mixture of partially combusted natural gas, water, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. PDU process conditions will be representative of anticipated commercial applications in terms of temperatures, pressures, compositions, velocities, and sorbent cycling. The PDU supports the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) mission at METC by providing a test bed for development of IGCC cleanup systems that offer low capital cost, operating costs, and costs of electricity. METC intends to develop additional industrial involvement opportunities as the project progresses towards operations. The primary objectives of the PDU are to (1) fill the gap between small-scale testing and large-scale demonstration projects by providing a cost effective test site for transport and fluid-bed desulfurization reactor and sorbent development, (2) demonstrate sorbent suitability over a wide range of parameters, and (3) generate significant information on process control for transport and fluidized bed based desulfurization. PDU data is expected to be used to optimize process performance by expanding the experience for larger scale demonstration projects such as Sierra Pacific Power Company`s Clean Coal Technology project.

McMillian, M.H.; Bissett, L.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a solid produced by wet FGD systems with forced air oxidation and is chemically similar to mined gypsum. These gypsums, used as beneficial agricultural amendments, were evaluated for their effects on earthworm populations and trace element concentrations in soils and earthworms at four field sites (Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, and Wisconsin). These sites are part of a network study on agricultural uses of FGD gypsum conducted at sites across the United States. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

4

Flue gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has been conducted under the auspices of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, and universities. This report describes work conducted in northwestern New Mexico in 2008–2012 as part of that effort. Two separate ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing volumes of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum will become available for agricultural use as more utilities install forced oxidation scrubbers and the wallboard market for the resulting gypsum becomes saturated. This interim report describes work performed in 2007 and 2008 to develop a national research network to gain data and experience to support the beneficial uses of FGD products, especially FGD gypsum, in agriculture and other land applications.

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

Flue Gas Desulfurization Equipment Issues Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As electric utilities enter a more competitive environment, every aspect of electric power generation is under scrutiny to determine where costs can be reduced. Because flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems represent significant capital, operating, and maintenance expenses for many coal-fired power plants, identification and implementation of cost reduction options are crucial. This report documents successful approaches for determining the cost-effectiveness of key FGD optimization strategies.

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Advanced Hot-Gas Desulfurization Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems are being advanced worldwide for generating electricity from coal due to their superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. Hot gas cleanup offers the potential for higher plant thermal efficiencies and lower cost. A key subsystem of hot-gas cleanup is hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable sorbents. Sorbents based on zinc oxide are currently the leading candidates and are being developed for moving- and fluidized- bed reactor applications. Zinc oxide sorbents can effectively reduce the H{sub 2}S in coal gas to around 10 ppm levels and can be regenerated for multicycle operation. However, all current first-generation leading sorbents undergo significant loss of reactivity with cycling, as much as 50% or greater loss in only 25-50 cycles. Stability of the hot-gas desulfurization sorbent over 100`s of cycles is essential for improved IGCC economics over conventional power plants. This project aims to develop hot-gas cleanup sorbents for relatively lower temperature applications, 343 to 538{degrees}C with emphasis on the temperature range from 400 to 500{degrees}. Recent economic evaluations have indicated that the thermal efficiency of IGCC systems increases rapidly with the temperature of hot-gas cleanup up to 350{degrees}C and then very slowly as the temperature is increased further. This suggests that the temperature severity of the hot-gas cleanup devices can be reduced without significant loss of thermal efficiency. The objective of this study is to develop attrition-resistant advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents which show stable and high sulfidation reactivity at 343{degrees}C (650{degrees}F) to 538{degrees}C(1OOO{degrees}F) and regenerability at lower temperatures than leading first generation sorbents.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Gangwal, S.K.; Gupta, R.; Turk, B.S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Effect of Water on Natural Gas Desulfurization by Adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 15, 2006 ... The Effect of Water on Natural Gas Desulfurization by Adsorption by Ambalavanan Jayaraman, Gokhan Alptekin, Margarita Dubovik, Robert ...

10

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Indiana Kingman Research Station (Corn and Soybeans)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is an excellent source of gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O) that is created when sulfur dioxide is removed from the exhaust gases during the combustion of coal for energy production. Research on FGDG has been conducted as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. EPA, the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural ...

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

11

Flue gas desulfurization wastewater treatment primer  

SciTech Connect

Purge water from a typical wet flue gas desulfurization system contains myriad chemical constituents and heavy metals whose mixture is determined by the fuel source and combustion products as well as the stack gas treatment process. A well-designed water treatment system can tolerate upstream fuel and sorbent arranged in just the right order to produce wastewater acceptable for discharge. This article presents state-of-the-art technologies for treating the waste water that is generated by wet FGD systems. 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Higgins, T.E.; Sandy, A.T.; Givens, S.W.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Enviropower hot gas desulfurization pilot  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the project are to develop and demonstrate (1) hydrogen sulfide removal using regenerable zinc titanate sorbent in pressurized fluidized bed reactors, (2) recovery of the elemental sulfur from the tail-gas of the sorbent regenerator and (3) hot gas particulate removal system using ceramic candle filters. Results are presented on pilot plant design and testing and modeling efforts.

Ghazanfari, R.; Feher, G.; Konttinen, J.; Ghazanfari, R.; Lehtovaara, A.; Mojtahedi, W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Sorbent for use in hot gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple metal oxide sorbent supported on a zeolite of substantially silicon oxide is used for the desulfurization of process gas streams, such as from a coal gasifier, at temperatures in the range of about 1200.degree. to about 1600.degree. F. The sorbent is provided by a mixture of copper oxide and manganese oxide and preferably such a mixture with molybdenum oxide. The manganese oxide and the molybdenum are believed to function as promoters for the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with copper oxide. Also, the manganese oxide inhibits the volatilization of the molybdenum oxide at the higher temperatures.

Gasper-Galvin, Lee D. (Washington, PA); Atimtay, Aysel T. (Cankaya, TR)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Hot gas desulfurization sorbent and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple metal oxide sorbent supported on a zeolite of substantially silicon oxide is used for the desulfurization of process gas streams, such as from a coal gasifier, at temperatures in the range of about 1200{degrees} to about 1600{degrees}F. The sorbent is provided by a mixture of copper oxide and manganese oxide and preferably such a mixture with molybdenum oxide. The manganese oxide and the molybdenum are believed to function as promoters for the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with copper oxide. Also, the manganese oxide inhibits the volatilization of the molybdenum oxide at the higher temperatures.

Gasper-Galvin, L.D.; Atimtay, A.T.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hot gas desulfurization sorbent and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple metal oxide sorbent supported on a zeolite of substantially silicon oxide is used for the desulfurization of process gas streams, such as from a coal gasifier, at temperatures in the range of about 1200[degrees] to about 1600[degrees]F. The sorbent is provided by a mixture of copper oxide and manganese oxide and preferably such a mixture with molybdenum oxide. The manganese oxide and the molybdenum are believed to function as promoters for the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with copper oxide. Also, the manganese oxide inhibits the volatilization of the molybdenum oxide at the higher temperatures.

Gasper-Galvin, L.D.; Atimtay, A.T.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

16

Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization State of the Art Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies, including circulating dry scrubbers (CDS), spray dryer absorbers (SDA), and the Alstom Novel Integrated Desulfurization (NID) technology. These can all be considered “semi-dry” technologies, as the flue gas is cooled and humidified as part of each of these processes. This report also discusses a completely dry FGD technology, dry sorbent injection (DSI), which is ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project, A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project A DOE Assessment August 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

18

Flue gas desulfurization: Physicochemical and biotechnological approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various flue gas desulfurization processes - physicochemical, biological, and chemobiological - for the reduction of emission of SO{sub 2} with recovery of an economic by-product have been reviewed. The physicochemical processes have been categorized as 'once-through' and 'regenerable.' The prominent once-through technologies include wet and dry scrubbing. The wet scrubbing technologies include wet limestone, lime-inhibited oxidation, limestone forced oxidation, and magnesium-enhanced lime and sodium scrubbing. The dry scrubbing constitutes lime spray drying, furnace sorbent injection, economizer sorbent injection, duct sorbent injection, HYPAS sorbent injection, and circulating fluidized bed treatment process. The regenerable wet and dry processes include the Wellman Lord's process, citrate process, sodium carbonate eutectic process, magnesium oxide process, amine process, aqueous ammonia process, Berglau Forchung's process, and Shell's process. Besides these, the recently developed technologies such as the COBRA process, the OSCAR process, and the emerging biotechnological and chemobiological processes are also discussed. A detailed outline of the chemistry, the advantages and disadvantages, and the future research and development needs for each of these commercially viable processes is also discussed.

Pandey, R.A.; Biswas, R.; Chakrabarti, T.; Devotta, S. [National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur (India)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Evaluation of the NeuStream-S™ Flue Gas Desulfurization Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harris Group Inc. (HGI) of Denver, Colorado, was contracted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to monitor, evaluate, and prepare this report on a dual-alkali flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process developed by Neumann Systems Group, Inc. (NSG). The process is being demonstrated in a nominal 20-MW demonstration plant, treating a slip stream of flue gas from the Colorado Springs Utilities 142-MW Drake Unit 7. HGI evaluated performance, operability, and readiness for scale-up of the process. Co...

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration with Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonation of industrial alkaline residues can be used as a CO2 sequestration technology to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. In this study, alkaline Ca-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum samples were carbonated to a varying extent. These materials ... Keywords: FGD gypsum, carbonation, carbon dioxide

Hongqi Wang; Ningning Sun; Rona J. Donahoe

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Gypsum Dewatering Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Gypsum Dewatering Area provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system. This report will assist the plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability and reducing the maintenance costs for this area of their scrubber system.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

22

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Absorber Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Absorber Area provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system and will help to improve the reliability of and reduce the maintenance costs for this area of their scrubber system.

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

23

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Reagent Preparation Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Reagent Preparation Area provides the fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system and will help improve the reliability and reduce the maintenance costs for this area of their scrubber system.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Investigation of Flue Gas Desulfurization Chemical Process Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of flue gas desulfurization process chemistry is crucial in troubleshooting problems in operating FGD systems. This report discusses a variety of problems and solutions associated with process chemistry for 25 different wet FGD systems, including lime/limestone and double alkali processes. Among the problems addressed are SO2 removal, mist eliminator scaling, poor solids dewatering, and water management.

1990-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

25

METC fluid-bed hot-gas desulfurization PDU  

SciTech Connect

METC is constructing an on-site, hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process development unit (PDU) to support the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power systems program. With industrial participation, this PDU will be used for the further development of fluid-bed and transport reactor HGD configurations. The fluid-bed absorber and regenerator in the PDU were designed to operate in a turbulent as well as a bubbling regime. In addition, when encouraging results from a small-scale transport reactor unit became known, the decision was made to incorporate transport reactor provisions on both the sulfidation and regeneration sides of the PDU. With completion of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation requirements, the preliminary process and equipment design, and the April groundbreaking to prepare the project site, the project is now proceeding at a faster, more visible pace. Equipment installation should be completed in about 2 years. This report describes the project.

Bissett, L.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

2009 Update on Mercury Capture by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update presents results of four research and development projects focused on understanding and enhancing mercury emissions control associated with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology. The first project was directed at characterizing partitioning of elemental and oxidized mercury species in solid, liquid, and gas phases within process streams involved in an operating commercial system. The second project explored dewatering options with an objective of producing low-mercury-conten...

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of Selenium Species in Flue Gas Desulfurization Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a process used in the electrical power industry to remove sulfur dioxide from flue gas produced by coal-fired power plants. The trace element selenium is found in coal and can become concentrated in the wastewater from the FGD process. Some chemical forms, or species, of selenium are more resistant to removal by water treatment processes than others; thus, understanding the speciation of selenium is important to designing effective wastewater treatment systems. In additi...

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

28

Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Wastewater Characterization and Management: 2007 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tightened air regulations on acid-gas-forming emissions are leading more electric utilities to install flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, typically wet scrubbers. However, there are challenges associated with such decisions in terms of utility wastewater management. Volatile metals, such as selenium and mercury, are better captured in wet scrubber systems than in electrostatic precipitators and may be present at higher concentrations in utility wastewater systems. This report is designed to help pow...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Guidelines for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Water Sampling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers are being installed on coal-fired power plants in response to federal and state air pollution regulations limiting sulfur dioxide emissions. FGD scrubbers produce an aqueous waste stream that contains metals adsorbed from flue gas. At the same time, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is reviewing, and may tighten, water discharge limits on trace metals. Collection of accurate data on the trace metal composition of FGD water discharges is therefore esse...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

Trace Metals Determination in Flue Gas Desulfurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers are used on coal-fired power plants to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions to air. While effective for this purpose, wet FGD scrubbers produce an aqueous blowdown stream that contains trace levels of metals adsorbed from flue gas. Power plant owners need to measure concentrations of these metals for purposes of process control, discharge monitoring, or design and operation of wastewater treatment systems. FGD water has proven to be a very difficult matrix to analyze a...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

31

Performance Evaluation of a Radial Deionization System for Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed effluent limitation guidelines for steam electric power generating units could affect not only how power plants use water but also how they discharge it. The revised guidelines propose discharge limits for selenium, mercury, arsenic, and nitrite/nitrate in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. Final rule approval is expected by the middle of 2014. Additional regulation of these contaminants and other constituents may occur through ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

A Review of Agricultural and Other Land Application Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products, especially FGD gypsum, is expected to increase substantially over the next ten to twenty years in response to clean air initiatives. There are a large number of agricultural and other land application uses of FGD products that have received previous research and development attention, but only in specific locations of the United States and under limited conditions of crops, climate and soil types. This report discusses current and potential futur...

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

33

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products: Phase 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry currently generates about 25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products annually in the United States -- a quantity that is expected to increase as utilities apply new controls to comply with Clean Air Act Amendments. This report presents results of the third and final phase of a large-scale study of beneficial land-use applications for these by-products.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

34

Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop hot-gas desulfurization sorbent formulations for relatively lower temperature application, with emphasis on the temperature range from 343--538 C. The candidate sorbents include highly dispersed mixed metal oxides of zinc, iron, copper, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum. The specific objective was to develop suitable sorbents, that would have high and stable surface area and are sufficiently reactive and regenerable at the relatively lower temperatures of interest in this work. Stability of surface area during regeneration was achieved by adding stabilizers. To prevent sulfation, catalyst additives that promote the light-off of the regeneration reaction at lower temperature was considered. Another objective of this study was to develop attrition-resistant advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents which show stable and high sulfidation reactivity at 343 to 538 C and regenerability at lower temperatures than leading first generation sorbents.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Adeyiga, A.A.; Gangwal, S.K.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on three tasks associated with the EPRI project, Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems. The first task is an investigation of the factors that influence and control the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) at which a limestone forced oxidation FGD system operates. Both a literature review and a numerical analysis of full-scale wet FGD data were conducted. Results from this task are presented and discussed in Section 2 of the ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

New process for coke-oven gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

With the EPA reclassifying spent iron oxide as a hazardous waste material in 1990, an alternative technology was sought for desulfurizing coke-oven gas. Vacasulf technology was adopted for reasons that included: producing of coke battery heating gas without further polishing and high-quality elemental sulfur; lowest operating cost in comparison with other methods; no waste products; and integrates with existing ammonia destruction facility. Vacasulf requires a single purchased material, potassium hydroxide, that reacts with carbon dioxide in coke-oven gas to form potassium carbonate which, in turn, absorbs hydrogen sulfide. Operation of the system has been successful following the resolution of relatively minor start-up problems.

Currey, J.H. [Citizens Gas and Coke Utility, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Spray tower: the workhorse of flue-gas desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recently developed spray tower system for use in a utility flue gas desulfurization system is simple, durable, and capable of achieving very high sulfur dioxide removal efficiencies, possibly approaching 100%. The principles behind the design and operation of the spray tower are discussed. The quality of water used for washing, tower size limitations, construction materials liquid distribution, gas-inlet design, gas distribution, mass transfer, and operating characteristics are examined. Procedures to maintain the reliability and high performance of the spray tower are described. (5 diagrams, 5 photos, 12 references, 1 table)

Saleem, A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Identification of Unknown Selenium Species in Flue Gas Desulfurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a process used in the electrical power industry to remove sulfur dioxide (SO2) from flue gas produced by coal-fired power plants. In a wet FGD system, circulating water must be periodically blown down and treated to remove solids and dissolved chemicals. Along with SO2, other substances in flue gas may dissolve in water, including selenium (Se). In addition to the common selenium species selenite and selenate, past research has identified selenium-containing species that...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

39

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the WES, which involves injection into the flue gas duct upstream of the existing electrostatic 11 precipitator (ESP). The hot flue gas evaporates the water and the...

40

Status of METC investigations of coal gas desulfurization at high temperature. [Zinc ferrite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the continuing effort at the US Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to develop a hot-gas desulfurization process for coal-derived gas, primarily for application to molten carbonate fuel cells. Metal oxide sorbents were tested on lab-scale test equipment, and it was determined that scale-up of the process was warranted. A larger, skid-mounted test unit was therefore designed, constructed, and installed on a sidestream of the DOE/METC fixed-bed gasifier. A first series of tests was conducted during Gasifier Run 101. These tests served to shake down the test unit, and provide data on the performance of the test unit operating on coal-derived gas. Overall, the process operated well on fixed-bed, air-blown gasifier gas. Sulfur levels in exit dry gas were reduced to less than 10 ppM. Regeneration appears to restore the sulfur-removing capacity of the sorbent. Sorbent integrity was maintained during the test period, which incorporated three sulfidations. It is recommended that treatment of the regeneration offgas be investigated, and that testing and development of a system to reduce the sulfur in this gas to elemental sulfur be initiated. In addition, it is suggested that a multiple reactor system be planned for continuous operation, to allow for long-term tests of downstream users of desulfurized gas. 7 references, 18 figures, 9 tables.

Steinfeld, G.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Desulfurized gas production from vertical kiln pyrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas, formed as a product of a pyrolysis of oil shale, is passed through hot, retorted shale (containing at least partially decomposed calcium or magnesium carbonate) to essentially eliminate sulfur contaminants in the gas. Specifically, a single chambered pyrolysis vessel, having a pyrolysis zone and a retorted shale gas into the bottom of the retorted shale zone and cleaned product gas is withdrawn as hot product gas near the top of such zone.

Harris, Harry A. (Rifle, CO); Jones, Jr., John B. (Grand Junction, CO)

1978-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Process for the desulfurization of flue gas  

SciTech Connect

A process for the removal of sulfur oxides from gases is described that is comprised of the steps of contacting the gas with a cerium oxide sorbent at conditions whereby the sulfur oxides present in the gas are sorbed by the cerium oxide sorbent and regenerate the cerium oxide sorbent by contacting it with a reducing atmosphere at conditions whereby the sorbent is substantially converted to a sulfur-free state. The gas may be an exhaust gas, e.g., from an automobile or a flue gas. This invention is especially preferred for treating flue gas. In this preferred embodiment, the flue gas may be contacted with the cerium oxide sorbent at a temperature of from 300/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C, to form cerium sulfate and/or sulfite and the sorbent is regenerated by contacting with a reducing gas, for example, hydrogen in admixture with steam or other inert gases at a temperature of from 500/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C to convert the cerium sulfate or sulfite to cerium oxide. During the regeneration step, the desorbed species is initially sulfur dioxide. However, when about 50% of the sulfur is removed from the sorbent, the desorbed species becomes H/sub 2/S. Thus, the instant invention provides SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in admixture with the excess reducing gas, which can be fed conveniently to the Claus plant for conversion into elemental sulfur.

Longo, J.M.

1977-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

Takahax-Hirohax process for coke oven gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Takahax-Hirohax process to desulfurize coke oven gas and to produce an ammonium sulfate end product. A review is also made of current operating experience and recent technical developments. The Takahax-Hirohax process is extremely useful when the COG contains a suitable ammonia to sulfur ratio and when ammonium sulfate is a desirable end product. No contaminated effluent streams are emitted from the process. The process is simple, reliable, flexible, and responds easily to COG variations. 4 figures, 3 tables. (DP)

Gastwirth, H.; Miner, R.; Stengle, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Process for production desulfurized of synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1900.degree.-2600.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises a calcium-containing compound portion, a sodium-containing compound portion, and a fluoride-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (1) a sulfur-containing sodium-calcium-fluoride silicate phase; and (2) a sodium-calcium sulfide phase.

Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Najjar, Mitri S. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

BENCH-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents that can reduce the sulfur in coal-derived fuel-gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} or ZnTiO{sub 3}), formed by a solid-state reaction of zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), is currently one of the leading sorbents. Overall chemical reactions with Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} during the desulfurization (sulfidation)-regeneration cycle are shown below: Sulfidation: Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} + 2H{sub 2}S {yields} 2ZnS + TiO{sub 2} + 2H{sub 2}O; Regeneration: 2ZnS + TiO{sub 2} + 3O{sub 2} {yields} Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} + 2SO{sub 2} The sulfidation/regeneration cycle can be carried out in a fixed-bed, moving-bed, or fluidized-bed reactor configuration. The fluidized-bed reactor configuration is most attractive because of several potential advantages including faster kinetics and the ability to handle the highly exothermic regeneration to produce a regeneration offgas containing a constant concentration of SO{sub 2}.

Unknown

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The durability of stabilized flue gas desulfurization sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of freeze-thaw cycling on the strength and durability of samples of compacted, stabilized, wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products are reported. The results of laboratory tests show a clear relationship between higher water contents and increasing vulnerability to freeze-thaw effects. In the samples tested, water contents at or above 40% were characteristic of all the freeze-thaw specimens exhibiting low strengths. Lime content and curing time were also shown to have a marked influence on the durability of the FGD material. It was shown that samples can maintain good strength under freeze-thaw conditions provided 5% lime was added before compaction and the time from compaction to first freeze was at least 60 days.

Chen, X.; Wolfe, W.E.; Hargraves, M.D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Flue gas desulfurization : cost and functional analysis of large-scale and proven plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flue Gas Desulfurization is a method of controlling the emission of sulfurs, which causes the acid rain. The following study is based on 26 utilities which burn coal, have a generating capacity of at least 50 Megawatts ...

Tilly, Jean

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Corrosion in Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems: Technical Root Cause Analysis of Internal Corrosion on Wet FGD Alloy Absorbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies have been or are being installed on most large coal-fired electric generating units in response to new regulatory emission requirements. Aggressive corrosion has been noted in some of these systems, presumably from the low pH, high chloride environments created in the FGD process. There exists a plethora of material systems (metallic, organic, plastics, coating, and so forth) available to construct these systems, but, because of cost, fabricabi...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

A Review of Manufacturing Uses for Gypsum Produced by Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gypsum is widely used as a source material to manufacture products for building construction applications8212primarily wallboard, cement, and concrete8212and has a number of other commercial applications. The mineral is mined throughout the world (natural gypsum) and also is produced as a result of various industrial processes (synthetic gypsum). The largest source of synthetic gypsum used for manufacturing applications is flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, the product of wet flue gas desulfurization...

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Pilot-plant technical assessment of wet flue gas desulfurization using limestone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed on a countercurrent pilot-scale packed scrubber for wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The flow rate of the treated flue gas was around 300 Nm{sup 3}/h, so the pilot-plant capacity is one of the largest with respect to other published studies on a pilot-plant wet FGD. The tests were carried out at an SO{sub 2} inlet concentration of 2000 ppm by changing the recycle slurry pH to around 4.8 and the L/G ratio to between 7.5 and 15. Three types of limestone were tested, obtaining desulfurization efficiencies from 59 to 99%. We show the importance of choosing an appropriate limestone in order to get a better performance from the FGD plant. Thus, it is important to know the reactivity (on a laboratory scale) and the sorbent utilization (on a pilot-plant scale) in order to identify if a limestone is reactive enough and to compare it with another type. In addition, by using the transfer-unit concept, a function has been obtained for the desulfurization efficiency, using the L/G ratio and the recycle slurry pH as independent variables. The Ca/S molar ratio is related to these and to the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. This function, together with a simplified function of the operation variable cost, allows us to determine the pair (L/G ratio and pH) to achieve the desired SO{sub 2} removal with the minimum operation cost. Finally, the variable operation costs between packed towers and spray scrubbers have been compared, using as a basis the pilot packed tower and the industrial spray column at the Compostilla Power Station's FGD plant (in Leon, Spain).

Ortiz, F.J.G.; Vidal, F.; Ollero, P.; Salvador, L.; Cortes, V.; Gimenez, A. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Liquefaction and desulfurization of coal using synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for desulfurizing and liquefying coal by heating said coal at a temperature of 375.degree.-475.degree. C in the presence of a slurry liquid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, steam, and a catalyst comprising a desulfurization catalyst and an alkali metal salt.

Fu, Yuan C. (Bethel Park, PA)

1977-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

52

Kinetics of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents for transport reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, to understand effects of space time of reaction gas mixtures on initial reaction kinetics of the sorbent-hydrogen sulfide system, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 sorbent and AHI-1 was examined. These sorbents were obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbents in the form of 70 {micro}m particles are reacted with 1,000--4,000 ppm hydrogen sulfide at 450--600 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.03--0.09 s. The range of reaction duration is 4--14,400 s.

K.C. Kwon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The techniques employed in this project have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing sorbents that achieve greater than 99% H{sub 2}S removal at temperatures 480 C and that retain their activity over 50 cycles. Fundamental understanding of phenomena leading to chemical deactivation and high regeneration light-off temperature has enabled us to successfully prepare and scale up a FHR-32 sorbent that showed no loss in reactivity and capacity over 50 cycles. This sorbent removed H{sub 2}S below 80 ppmv and lighted-off nicely at 480 C during regeneration. Overall the test is a success with potential for an optimized FHR-32 to be a candidate for Sierra-Pacific. An advanced attrition resistant hot-gas desulfurization sorbent that can eliminate the problematic SO{sub 2} tail gas and yield elemental sulfur directly has been developed. Attrition resistant Zn-Fe sorbent (AHI-2) formulations have been prepared that can remove H{sub 2}S to below 20 ppmv from coal gas and can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} to produce elemental sulfur.

K. Jothimurugesan; Santosh K. Gangwal

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Method for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600.degree. to 1800.degree. F. and are partially quenched with water to 1000.degree. to 1200.degree. F. before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime/limestone.

Grindley, Thomas (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 was examined in this report. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 130 mm particles are reacted with 18000-ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-525 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.069-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-180 s.

K.C. Kwon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of EX-SO3 was examined in this report. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 110 {micro}m particles are reacted with 18000-ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-550 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.069-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-180 s.

K.C. Kwon

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. In this report, the reactivity of AHI-5 was examined. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 70 {micro}m particles are reacted with 9000-18000 ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-500 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.071-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-10800 s.

K.C. Kwon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

SCALE-UP OF ADVANCED HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop advanced regenerable sorbents for hot gas desulfurization in IGCC systems. The specific objective was to develop durable advanced sorbents that demonstrate a strong resistance to attrition and chemical deactivation, and high sulfidation activity at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F). Twenty sorbents were synthesized in this work. Details of the preparation technique and the formulations are proprietary, pending a patent application, thus no details regarding the technique are divulged in this report. Sulfidations were conducted with a simulated gas containing (vol %) 10 H{sub 2}, 15 CO, 5 CO{sub 2}, 0.4-1 H{sub 2}S, 15 H{sub 2}O, and balance N{sub 2} in the temperature range of 343-538 C. Regenerations were conducted at temperatures in the range of 400-600 C with air-N{sub 2} mixtures. To prevent sulfation, catalyst additives were investigated that promote regeneration at lower temperatures. Characterization were performed for fresh, sulfided and regenerated sorbents.

K. JOTHIMURUGESAN; S.K. GANGWAL

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final reprot, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluations, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Scale-Up of Advanced Hot-Gas desulfurization Sorbents.  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop regenerable sorbents for hot gas desulfurization in IGCC systems. The specific objective of the project is to develop durable advanced sorbents that demonstrate a strong resistance to attrition and chemical deactivation, and high activity at temperatures as low as 343 {degrees}C (650{degrees}F). A number of formulations will be prepared and screened in a one-half inch fixed bed reactor at high pressure (1 to 20 atm) and high temperatures using simulated coal-derived fuel- gases. Screening criteria will include chemical reactivity, stability, and regenerability over the temperature range of 343{degrees}C to 650{degrees}C. After initial screening, at least 3 promising formulations will be tested for 25-30 cycles of absorption and regeneration. One of the superior formulations with the best cyclic performance will be selected for investigating scale up parameters. The scaled-up formulation will be tested for long term durability and chemical reactivity.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Gangwal, S.K.

1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Scale-Up of Advanced Hot-Gas Desulfurization Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop regenerable sorbents for hot gas desulfurization in IGCC systems. The specific objective of the project is to develop durable advanced sorbents that demonstrate a strong resistance to attrition and chemical deactivation, and high activity at temperatures as low as 343{degrees}C (650{degrees}F). A number of formulations will be prepared and screened in a 1/2-inch fixed bed reactor at high pressure (1 to 20 atm) and high temperatures using simulated coal-derived fuel-gases. Screening criteria will include, chemical reactivity, stability, and regenerability over the temperature range of 343{degrees}C to 650{degrees}C. After initial screening, at least 3 promising formulations will be tested for 25-30 cycles of absorption and regeneration. One of the superior formulations with the best cyclic performance will be selected for investigating scale up parameters. The scaled-up formulation will be tested for long term durability and chemical reactivity.

Jothimurugesan, K.; Gangwal, S.K.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

The utilization of flue gas desulfurization waste by-products in construction brick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Millions of tons of waste by-products from Texas coal burning plants are produced each year. Two common byproducts are the fuel ashes and calcium sulfate (gypsum). Fuel ashes result from the burning of coal. Gypsum is a byproduct of the air purification system, called Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD). Abatement of these waste products is a growing concern, not only for the industry, but the environment as well. It is possible to produce a gypsum brick unit that can meet the engineering properties required by the Americans Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) standards by using these by-products. This can be accomplished at a cost less than the least expensive common fired clay brick that is used in construction operations. The gypsum brick can be manufactured using established methods that are currently in operation.

Berryman, Charles Wayne

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes  

SciTech Connect

Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3 % of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to testing the FHR-32 sorbent. FHR-32 sorbent was tested for 50 cycles of sulfidation in a laboratory scale reactor.

Jothimurugesan, K.

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

Coke oven gas desulfurization: at Republic Steel's New Coking Facility, Warren, OH  

SciTech Connect

Our performance test indicates that the Sulfiban process is an effective method for removing H/sub 2/S from coke-oven gas. The process is able to handle variations in coke-oven gas flow and composition. Continuing efforts are underway to maintain optimum desulfurization conditions while trying to reduce waste production and MEA consumption. The problems which have prevented us from operating continuously have given us a better understanding of the process. This has contributed to better plant operations and greater equipment reliability for us to obtain continuous coke-oven gas desulfurization. 2 figures, 1 table.

Boak, S.C.; Prucha, D.G.; Turic, H.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

PRODUCTION OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

Through a cooperative agreement with DOE, the Research and Development Department of CONSOL Inc. (CONSOL R and D) is teaming with SynAggs, Inc. and Duquesne Light to design, construct, and operate a 500 lb/h continuous pilot plant to produce road construction aggregate from a mixture of wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, fly ash, and other components. The proposed project is divided into six tasks: (1) Project Management; (2) Mix Design Evaluation; (3) Process Design; (4) Construction; (5) Start-Up and Operation; and (6) Reporting. In this quarter, Tasks 1 and 2 were completed. A project management plan (Task 1) was issued to DOE on October 22, 1998 . The mix design evaluation (Task 2) with Duquesne Light Elrama Station FGD sludge and Allegheny Power Hatfields Ferry Station fly ash was completed. Eight semi-continuous bench-scale tests were conducted to examine the effects of mix formulation on aggregate properties. A suitable mix formulation was identified to produce aggregates that meet specifications of the American Association of State High Transport Officials (AASHTO) as Class A aggregate for use in highway construction. The mix formulation was used in designing the flow sheet of the pilot plant. The process design (Task 3) is approximately 80% completed. Equipment was evaluated to comply with design requirements. The design for the curing vessel was completed by an outside engineering firm. All major equipment items for the pilot plant, except the curing vessel, were ordered. Pilot plant construction (Task 4) was begun in October. The Hazardous Substance Plan was issued to DOE. The Allegheny County (PA) Heat Department determined that an air emission permit is not required for operation of the pilot plant.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Wastewater Treatment and Gypsum Handling Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Wastewater Treatment and Gypsum Handling Area provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on these systems. This guide will assist plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability and reducing the maintenance costs for these areas of their scrubber system.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products: Phase 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry currently generates about 20 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products annually, and the quantity is expected to increase as utilities institute further controls to comply with Clean Air Act requirements. This report presents the results of the second phase of a large-scale study of beneficial land-use applications of these by-products.

1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

Stabilization of Flue Gas Desulfurization Sludge for Application in Marine Environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Flue Gas Desulfurization sludge (FGD, CaSO4·2H2O, CaSO3·1/2H2O) is a waste by-product produced when sorbent slurry is passed through wet scrubbers. FGD contains higher concentrations of… (more)

Kour, Tej

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Enhanced Control of Mercury by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems - Site 3 Topical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers conducted field tests to evaluate the ability of a variety of materials to oxidize vapor-phase elemental mercury at a coal-fired power plant equipped with a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results, while confounded by measurement difficulties, showed that under bituminous coal flue gas conditions, two catalysts, Pd #1 and Carbon #6, continued to oxidize at least 85 percent of the inlet elemental mercury after three months.

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

70

Thermal Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment Processes for Zero Liquid Discharge Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a worldwide inventory of power plant flue gas desulfurization (FGD) blowdown treatment systems using thermal technologies to achieve zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management. The number of thermal treatment systems presently operating is very few, with the majority using chemical pretreatment followed by evaporation in a brine concentrator and crystallizer and finally dewatering of the residual salts. Of the operating thermal ZLD systems identified, six are located in Italy and o...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: North Dakota Sites 1 and 2 (Wheat)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work performed in 2007 and 2008 to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum at two sites in North Dakota. This work was part of a national research network evaluating beneficial uses of FGD gypsum in agriculture. The objectives of this research were to determine the influence of FGD gypsum applications on soil quality and on wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) yields and seed quality. Three application rates of FGD gypsum were compared with s...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

72

Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was the investigation of the pore structure and reactivity changes occurring in metal/metal oxide sorbents used for desulfurization of hot coal gas during sulfidation and regeneration, with particular emphasis placed on the effects of these changes on the sorptive capacity and efficiency of the sorbents. Commercially available zinc oxide sorbents were used as model solids in our experimental investigation of the sulfidation and regeneration processes.

Sotirchos, S.V.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Demonstration Test of Iron Addition to a Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Absorber to Enhance Mercury Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the findings from a full-scale demonstration test of the effects on trace elements of adding iron to a forced oxidation flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber. Three specific effects were evaluated: lowering mercury emissions to the atmosphere; lowering the concentration of soluble or sub-micron-sized mercury particles in FGD purge water, which could improve removal of mercury in FGD purge water treatment; and lowering the concentration of selenate in FGD purge water, which could i...

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New sulfur dioxide removal technologies produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products that contain sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. The scarcity of landfill disposal sites for such flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products has led to a long-term study on possible large-volume beneficial applications. To date, FGD by-products have been successfully used in agriculture, construction, and strip mine reclamation.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

Characteristics and reactivity of rapidly hydrated sorbent for semidry flue gas desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The semidry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process has many advantages over the wet FGD process for moving sulfur dioxide emissions from pulverized coal-fired power plants. Semidry FGD with a rapidly hydrated sorbent was studied in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) experimental facility. The sorbent was made from lumps of lime and coal fly ash. The desulfurization efficiency was measured for various operating parameters, including the sorbent recirculation rate and the water spray method. The experimental results show that the desulfurization efficiencies of the rapidly hydrated sorbent were 1.5-3.0 times higher than a commonly used industrial sorbent for calcium to sulfur molar ratios from 1.2 to 3.0, mainly due to the higher specific surface area and pore volume. The Ca(OH){sub 2} content in the cyclone separator ash was about 2.9% for the rapidly hydrated sorbent and was about 0.1% for the commonly used industrial sorbent, due to the different adhesion between the fine Ca(OH){sub 2} particles and the fly ash particles, and the low cyclone separation efficiency for the fine Ca(OH){sub 2} particles that fell off the sorbent particles. Therefore the actual recirculation rates of the active sorbent with Ca(OH){sub 2} particles were higher for the rapidly hydrated sorbent, which also contributed to the higher desulfurization efficiency. The high fly ash content in the rapidly hydrated sorbent resulted in good operating stability. The desulfurization efficiency with upstream water spray was 10-15% higher than that with downstream water spray. 20 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Jie Zhang; Changfu You; Suwei Zhao; Changhe Chen; Haiying Qi [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Method and apparatus for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier is described. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600 to 1800 F and are partially quenched with water to 1000 to 1200 F before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime /limestone. 1 fig.

Grindley, T.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Integrated operation of a pressurized fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this contract continues to be the demonstration of high fuel gas desulfurization of high temperature fuel gas desulfurization and particulate removal using a moving bed process with regenerable metal oxide sorbent. The fuel gas source for test operation is a fixed bed, air blown gasifier located at GE Corporate Research and Development in Schenectady, New York. The demonstration project also includes the design, construction, installation and test operation of a gas turbine simulator which includes a modified GE MS6000 type gas turbine combustor and a film cooled, first stage LM 6000 nozzle assembly. The hot gas cleanup (HGCU) system and the gas turbine simulator have been designed to operate with the full 8000 lb/hr fuel gas flow from the gasification of 1800 lb/hr of coal at 280 psig and 1000 to 1150 F. An advanced formulation of zinc ferrite as well as zinc titanate have been used as the regenerable metal oxide sorbents in testing to date. Demonstration of halogen removal as well as characterization of alkali and heavy metal concentrations in the fuel gas remain objectives, as well. Results are discussed.

Cook, C.S.; Gal, E.; Furman, A.H.; Ayala, R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Integrated operation of a pressurized fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this contract continues to be the demonstration of high fuel gas desulfurization of high temperature fuel gas desulfurization and particulate removal using a moving bed process with regenerable metal oxide sorbent. The fuel gas source for test operation is a fixed bed, air blown gasifier located at GE Corporate Research and Development in Schenectady, New York. The demonstration project also includes the design, construction, installation and test operation of a gas turbine simulator which includes a modified GE MS6000 type gas turbine combustor and a film cooled, first stage LM 6000 nozzle assembly. The hot gas cleanup (HGCU) system and the gas turbine simulator have been designed to operate with the full 8000 lb/hr fuel gas flow from the gasification of 1800 lb/hr of coal at 280 psig and 1000 to 1150 F. An advanced formulation of zinc ferrite as well as zinc titanate have been used as the regenerable metal oxide sorbents in testing to date. Demonstration of halogen removal as well as characterization of alkali and heavy metal concentrations in the fuel gas remain objectives, as well. Results are discussed.

Cook, C.S.; Gal, E.; Furman, A.H.; Ayala, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Reclamation of abandoned surface coal mined land using flue gas desulfurization products  

SciTech Connect

Details are given of a field-scale research project where the Fleming site, in Ohio, of highly degraded and acid-forming abandoned surface coal-mined land, was reclaimed using a dry flue gas desulfurization product from an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion burner at a General Motors plant Pontiac, MI, which burned eastern Ohio coal and used dolomitic limestone for desulfurization. Plots were seeded with a mixture of grasses, wheat and clover, in 1994 and soil and water samples were analysed in 1995 and in 2009. It was found that FGD-treated plots promoted good regenerative growth, similar to that in plots using more concentrated re-soil material. The FGD treatment also greatly improved overall water quality. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Chen, L.; Kost, D.; Dick, W.A. [Ohio State University, OH (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Production of manufactured aggregates from flue gas desulfurization by-products  

SciTech Connect

CONSOL R and D has developed a disk pelletization process to produce manufactured aggregates from the by-products of various technologies designed to reduce sulfur emissions produced from coal utilization. Aggregates have been produced from the by-products of the Coolside and LIMB sorbent injection, the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), spray dryer absorption (SDA), and lime and limestone wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. The aggregates produced meet the general specifications for use as road aggregate in road construction and for use as lightweight aggregate in concrete masonry units. Small field demonstrations with 1200 lb to 5000 lb of manufactured aggregates were conducted using aggregates produced from FBC ash and lime wet FGD sludge in road construction and using aggregates made from SDA ash and lime wet FGD sludge to manufacture concrete blocks. The aggregates for this work were produced with a bench-scale (200--400 lb batch) unit. In 1999, CONSOL R and D constructed and operated a 500 lb/hr integrated, continuous pilot plant. A variety of aggregate products were produced from lime wet FGD sludge. The pilot plant test successfully demonstrated the continuous, integrated operation of the process. The pilot plant demonstration was a major step toward commercialization of manufactured aggregate production from FGD by-products. In this paper, progress made in the production of aggregates from dry FGD (Coolside, LIMB, SDA) and FBC by-products, and lime wet FGD sludge is discussed. The discussion covers bench-scale and pilot plant aggregate production and aggregate field demonstrations.

Wu, M.M.; McCoy, D.C.; Fenger, M.L.; Scandrol, R.O.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Statnick, R.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Utilizing secondary heat to heat wash oil in the coke-oven gas desulfurization division  

SciTech Connect

Removal of hydrogen sulfide from the coke-oven gas by the vacuum-carbonate method involves significant energy costs, comprising about 47% of the total costs of the process. This is explained by the significant demand of steam for regeneration of the wash oil, the cost of which exceeds 30% of the total operating costs. The boiling point of the saturated wash oil under vacuum does not exceed 70/sup 0/C, thus the wash oil entering the regenerator can be heated either by the direct coke-oven gas or by the tar supernatant from the gas collection cycle. Utilizing the secondary heat of the direct coke-oven gas and the tar supernatant liquor (the thermal effect is approximately the same) to heat the wash oil from the gas desulfurization shops significantly improves the industrial economic indices. Heating the wash oil from gas desulfurization shops using the vacuum-carbonate method by the heat of the tar supernatant liquor may be adopted at a number of coking plants which have a scarcity of thermal resources and which have primary coolers with vertical tubes.

Volkov, E.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Bench-Scale Demonstration of Hot-Gas Desulfurization Technology  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs.

Jeffrey W. Portzer; Santosh K. Gangwal

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Development of a hot-gas desulfurization system for IGCC applications  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are being advanced worldwide to produce electricity from coal because of their superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. One key component of an advanced IGCC power plant is a hot-gas desulfurization system employing regenerable sorbents. To carry out hot-gas desulfurization in a fluidized-bed reactor, it is necessary that the sorbents have high attrition resistance, while still maintaining high chemical reactivity and sulfur absorption capacity. Also, efficient processes are needed for the treatment of SO{sub 2}-containing regeneration off-gas to produce environmentally benign waste or useful byproducts. A series of durable zinc titanate sorbents were formulated and tested in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor system. Reactive sorbents were developed with addition resistance comparable to fluid-bed cracking (FCC) catalysts used in petroleum refineries. In addition, progress continues on the development of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for converting SO{sub 2} in the regeneration off-gas to elemental sulfur. Plans are under way to test these bench-scale systems at gasifier sites with coal gas. This paper describes the status and future plans for the demonstration of these technologies.

Gupta, R.; McMichael, W.J.; Gangwal, S.K. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Jain, S.C.; Dorchak, T.P. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Longer-term Characterization of Mercury Partitioning and Re-emissions in a Full-scale Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization System, Site 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents and discusses results from an EPRI project focused on understanding and enhancing how mercury is captured by a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system and how it partitions among the FGD liquor, fine solids, and bulk FGD solid byproduct. A second objective was to close a mercury balance around the host unit by determining what portion of the coal mercury exits the stack with the scrubbed flue gas and how much ends up in the fly ash, byproduct gypsum, and FGD wastewater. During t...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

BUILDING MATERIALS MADE FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Flue gas desulphurization (FGD) materials are produced in abundant quantities by coal burning utilities. Due to environmental restrains, flue gases must be ''cleaned'' prior to release to the atmosphere. They are two general methods to ''scrub'' flue gas: wet and dry. The choice of scrubbing material is often defined by the type of coal being burned, i.e. its composition. Scrubbing is traditionally carried out using a slurry of calcium containing material (slaked lime or calcium carbonate) that is made to contact exiting flue gas as either a spay injected into the gas or in a bubble tower. The calcium combined with the SO{sub 2} in the gas to form insoluble precipitates. Some plants have been using dry injection of these same materials or their own Class C fly ash to scrub. In either case the end product contains primarily hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}O) with smaller amounts of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O). These materials have little commercial use. Experiments were carried out that were meant to explore the feasibility of using blends of hannebachite and fly ash mixed with concentrated sodium hydroxide to make masonry products. The results suggest that some of these mixtures could be used in place of conventional Portland cement based products such as retaining wall bricks and pavers.

Michael W. Grutzeck; Maria DiCola; Paul Brenner

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Fate of Mercury Absorbed in Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are known to remove a percentage of the mercury in coal flue gases. This raises several questions about the fate of mercury removed by wet FGD systems: Does the absorbed mercury stay in the FGD liquor or does it leave with the byproduct solids? What happens to mercury in the FGD liquor and solid byproducts when they leave the FGD system? To address such questions, this report describes results from an EPRI project that involves field sample collection and labora...

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

87

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Wisconsin Arlington Research Station Fields 295 and 27 (Alfalfa)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes field research in Wisconsin as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) Agricultural Network. The objective of this study, conducted during 2009-2010, was to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of FGDG as a soil amendment to improve alfalfa production. FGDG was compared to a commercially available gypsum product (C-GYP) widely sold in the U.S. Midwest and other areas. A study was established in two fields (Field 295 in 2009/2010 and Field 27 in 2010) at ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

88

Enhanced Control of Mercury by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems - Site 2 Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI are co-funding this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project is investigating catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installation...

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

89

Leaching Assessment of Fly Ash, Flue Gas Desulfurization Filter Cake, and Fixated Scrubber Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The by-products of coal combustion (for example, fly ash and flue gas desulfurization filter cake) are an important environmental concern due to potential leaching of trace constituents and the large volume of residues produced. About 40% of these by-products may be utilized as raw materials outside of the energy sector; the remaining 60% of the coal combustion products (CCPs) are disposed of as waste. At Plant 14090, the subject of this report, fly ash and scrubber sludge are blended with quicklime ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

90

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: North Dakota Sites 3, 4, and 5 (Canola)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a very pure form of gypsum that is a by-product from the combustion of coal for energy production. This report describes 2008-2009 work to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of FGDG at three sites near Langdon, North Dakota. This work was part of a national research network evaluating beneficial uses of FGDG in agriculture, in this case, fertilization of dryland canola by FGDG. The objectives of this research were to 1) determine the influence of FGD...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Durable zinc oxide-containing sorbents for coal gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Durable zinc-oxide containing sorbent pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream at an elevated temperature are made up to contain titania as a diluent, high-surface-area silica gel as a matrix material, and a binder. These materials are mixed, moistened, and formed into pellets, which are then dried and calcined. The resulting pellets undergo repeated cycles of sulfidation and regeneration without loss of reactivity and without mechanical degradation. Regeneration of the pellets is carried out by contacting the bed with an oxidizing gas mixture.

Siriwardane, R.V.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Flue gas desulfurization/denitrification using metal-chelate additives  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of simultaneously removing SO/sub 2/ and NO from oxygen-containing flue gases resulting from the combustion of carbonaceous material by contacting the flue gas with an aqueous scrubber solution containing an aqueous sulfur dioxide sorbent and an active metal chelating agent which promotes a reaction between dissolved SO/sub 2/ and dissolved NO to form hydroxylamine N-sulfonates. The hydroxylamine sulfonates are then separated from the scrubber solution which is recycled. 3 figs.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Wingender, R.J.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Flue Gas Desulfurization Bid Preparation and Proposal Review Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prospect of more stringent limits for sulfur dioxide (SO2) has led power producers to begin planning for the future installation of FGD systems to meet new emission limits for their power plants. Major activity has already begun with the announcements of system-wide FGD system installations by many utilities in the southeastern United States. Contractor selection is a critical component to the successful compliance with regulatory requirements. This document provides utilities with the tools that the...

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

94

Desulfurization mixture and process for desulfurizing pig iron  

SciTech Connect

Process and composition for desulfurizing pig iron in which the desulfurization agent consists essentially of calcium carbide, a gas-evolving component and fluorspar; the advantage of the process and composition is that it reduces dust pollution and danger of flaming in the handling of the slag after the desulfurization of pig iron.

Freissmuth, A.; Gmohling, W.; Rock, H.

1982-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

95

Potential Agricultural Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum in the Northern Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a byproduct from the combustion of coal for electrical energy production. Currently, FGDG is being produced by 15 electrical generating stations in Alabama, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. Much of this byproduct is used in the manufacturing of wallboard. The National Network for Use of FGDG in Agriculture was initiated to explore alternative uses of this byproduct. In the northern Great Plains (North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana), FGDG has the potential to be used as a Ca or S fertilizer, as an acid soil ameliorant, and for reclaiming or mitigating sodium-affected soils. Greater than 1.4 million Mg of FGDG could initially be used in these states for these purposes. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum can be an agriculturally important resource for helping to increase the usefulness of problem soils and to increase crop and rangeland production. Conducting beneficial use audits would increase the public awareness of this product and help identify to coal combustion electrical generating stations the agriculturally beneficial outlets for this byproduct.

DeSutter, T.M.; Cihacek, L.J. [North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States). Department of Soil Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Model predictive control of a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

A model predictive control (MPC) strategy based on a dynamic matrix (DMC) is designed and applied to a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (WLFGD) pilot plant to evaluate what enhancement in control performance can be achieved with respect to a conventional decentralized feedback control strategy. The results reveal that MPC can significantly improve both reference tracking and disturbance rejection. For disturbance rejection, the main control objective in WLFGD plants, selection of tuning parameters and sample time, is of paramount importance due to the fast effect of the main disturbance (inlet SO{sub 2} load to the absorber) on the most important controlled variable (outlet flue gas SO{sub 2} concentration). The proposed MPC strategy can be easily applied to full-scale WLFGD plants.

Perales, A.L.V.; Ollero, P.; Ortiz, F.J.G.; Gomez-Barea, A. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain). Dept. of Chemical & Environmental Engineering

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Controllability analysis and decentralized control of a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presently, decentralized feedback control is the only control strategy used in wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (WLFGD) plants. Proper tuning of this control strategy is becoming an important issue in WLFGD plants because more stringent SO{sub 2} regulations have come into force recently. Controllability analysis is a highly valuable tool for proper design of control systems, but it has not been applied to WLFGD plants so far. In this paper a decentralized control strategy is designed and applied to a WLFGD pilot plant taking into account the conclusions of a controllability analysis. The results reveal that good SO{sub 2} control in WLFGD plants can be achieved mainly because the main disturbance of the process is well-aligned with the plant and interactions between control loops are beneficial to SO{sub 2} control.

Perales, A.L.V.; Ortiz, F.J.G.; Ollero, P.; Gil, F.M. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Method for reducing sulfate formation during regeneration of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The regeneration of sulfur sorbents having sulfate forming tendencies and used for desulfurizing hot product gas streams such as provided by coal gasification is provided by employing a two-stage regeneration method. Air containing a sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen is used in the first stage for substantially fully regenerating the sorbent without sulfate formation and then regeneration of the resulting partially regenerated sorbent is completed in the second stage with air containing a quantity of oxygen slightly greater than the stoichiometric amount adequate to essentially fully regenerate the sorbent. Sulfate formation occurs in only the second stage with the extent of sulfate formation being limited only to the portion of the sulfur species contained by the sorbent after substantially all of the sulfur species have been removed therefrom in the first stage.

Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV); Strickland, Larry D. (Morgantown, WV); Rockey, John M. (Westover, WV)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry with Collision/Reaction Cell Technology for Analysis of Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastew aters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater is produced by pollution control equipment used on coal-fired power plants to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions to air. Wet FGD scrubbers produce an aqueous blowdown stream that contains trace levels of metals that have been adsorbed from flue gas. Power plant owners need to measure concentrations of these metals for purposes of process control, discharge monitoring, or design and operation of wastewater treatment systems. FGD water is a very difficult matrix ...

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

100

Desulfurization of Fisher-Tropsch synthesis gas in coal-to-gasoline pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, a coal-to-gasoline pilot plant was installed and operated successfully in China, and a dry desulfurization process was used in this plant. This paper presents an overview of the dry desulfurization process. It includes design and operation of the process, and a description of ST801, T305 adsorbents and TGH COS hydrolysis catalyst. In addition, the desulfurization process used in a planned demonstration plant scheduled for completion in 1991 is presented.

Shishao, T.; Ju, S.; Shenzhao, L.; Maoqian, M.; Hanxian, G. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan Univ. of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (CN))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SOLOX coke-oven gas desulfurization ppm levels -- No toxic waste  

SciTech Connect

For sulfur removal from coke-oven gas, the reduction/oxidation processes such as Stretford are the most effective, capable of removing the H[sub 2]S down to ppm levels. However, these processes have, in the past, suffered from ecological problems with secondary pollutant formation resulting from side reactions with HCN and O[sub 2]. The SOLOX gas desulfurization system is a development of the Stretford process in which the toxic effluent problems are eliminated by installing a salt decomposition process operating according to the liquid-phase hydrolysis principle. In this process, the gaseous hydrolysis products H[sub 2]S, NH[sub 3] and CO[sub 2] are returned to the untreated gas, and the regenerated solution is recycled to the absorption process. The blowdown from the absorption circuit is fed into a tube reactor where the hydrolysis process takes place. The toxic salts react with water, producing as reaction products the gases H[sub 2]S, NH[sub 3] and CO[sub 2], and the nontoxic salt Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]. From the hydrolysis reactor the liquid stream flows into a fractionating crystallization plant. This plant produces a recycle stream of regenerated absorption solution and a second stream containing most of the Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]. This second stream comprises the net plant waste and can be disposed of with the excess ammonia liquor or sprayed onto the coal.

Platts, M. (Thyssen Still Otto Technical Services, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Tippmer, K. (Thyssen Still Otto Anlagentechnik GmbH, Bochum (Germany))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Evaluation of the Origin of Dissolved Organic Carbon and the Treatability of Mercury in Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulations for reducing the dissolved mercury (Hg) concentrations in wastewater discharged by electric generating power plants are becoming more stringent via federal regulatory limits proposed by the EPA and regulatory limits set by select states. Data obtained in a previous EPRI study conducted in 2009 suggested a potential negative impact of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and iodide concentrations present in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater on mercury treatability (EPRI report 1019867). ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

103

Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report, September 1987--January 1991  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the project was the investigation of the pore structure and reactivity changes occurring in metal/metal oxide sorbents used for desulfurization of hot coal gas during sulfidation and regeneration, with particular emphasis placed on the effects of these changes on the sorptive capacity and efficiency of the sorbents. Commercially available zinc oxide sorbents were used as model solids in our experimental investigation of the sulfidation and regeneration processes.

Sotirchos, S.V.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Advanced gasifier-desulfurizer process development for SNG (substitute natural gas) application. Final report, August 1987-December 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

KRW conducted investigations of calcium-promoted coal pyrolysis and gasification by means of bench-scale studies and an oxygen-blown PDU test. Results were used in a design study of a commercial KRW gasifier-desulfurizer, operating on Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and limestone for production of SNG. Bench-scale fluid-bed reactor studies were conducted with various fluidizing gases at temperatures and pressures of 1650 to 1950 F and 40 to 450 psig, with and without limestone, to give methane-yield and tar-yield data. The gasification kinetics studies of chars produced gave data which showed that limestone increases char reactivity and exerts a catalytic effect. Methane yields correlated exponentially to pressure. The bench-scale test results lead to an expectation that feeding some of the coal to the upper portion of the gasifier will increase methane yield and decrease oxygen consumption. In two PDU test-set points, expected operability and performance of the oxygen-blown gasifier-desulfurizer were confirmed. In Set Point 2, in-bed desulfurization efficiency was 88% and the product-gas higher heating value was 302 Btu/scf. The test results provided inputs to the design study of a KRW gasifier-desulfurizer island for production of 125 MM Btu/day of SNG. Results included a 4 to 6% improvement in feedstock inputs when compared to an earlier GRI-sponsored study. Methane yield decreased but the number of operating gasifier-desulfurizers remained at five. Equipment costs are expected to remain well within the previous + or - 25% cost estimate.

Blinn, M.B.; Cover, A.E.; Haldipur, G.B.; Datta, S.C.; Holmgren, J.D.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Investigation of a mercury speciation technique for flue gas desulfurization materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to benefit from the partial mercury control that these systems provide, some mercury is likely to be bound in with the FGD gypsum and wallboard. In this study, the feasibility of identifying mercury species in the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples was investigated using a large sample size thermal desorption method and samples from power plants in Pennsylvania. Potential candidates of pure mercury standards including mercuric chloride, mercurous chloride, mercury oxide, mercury sulfide, and mercuric sulfate were analyzed to compare their results with those obtained from FGD gypsum and dry wallboard samples. Although any of the thermal evolutionary curves obtained from these pure mercury standards did not exactly match with those of the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, it was identified that Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and HgCl{sub 2} could be candidates. An additional chlorine analysis from the gypsum and wallboard samples indicated that the chlorine concentrations were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the mercury concentrations, suggesting possible chlorine association with mercury. 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, J.Y.; Cho K.; Cheng L.; Keener, T.C.; Jegadeesan G.; Al-Abed, S.R. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Recycle/reuse of boiler chemical cleaning wastes in wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler chemical cleaning wastes (BCCW) are generated by the periodic waterside cleaning of utility boilers to remove metallic deposits from boiler tube surfaces. Depending on boiler metallurgy, BCCW generally contain high concentrations of iron and copper or both, as well as other heavy metals such as chromium, lead, nickel, and zinc. BCCW treatment and disposal methods include precipitation, coponding in an ash pond, evaporation in the fireside of an operating boiler (for organic solvents), and contracted off-site disposal. Depending on the type of BCCW chemical treatment methods achieve varying degrees of success. BCCW which contain organic chelating agents can be especially difficult to treat to national pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES) limits (1 mg/L for both iron and copper) with conventional lime precipitation.Research is being done to evaluate different BCCW treatment and disposal methods. One waste management option under consideration is reuse of BCCW in utility wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. To investigate this option, a series of laboratory tests were performed in which five different types of BCCW were added to the reaction tank of EPRI's bench-scale wet limestone FGD system. This paper presents the results and conclusions from this study.

Stohs, M.; Owens, D.R. (Radian Corp. (US)); Micheletti, W. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

NONE

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 2, Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Data from sidestream testing are presented. 18 refs.

Underkoffler, V.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Quarterly report, October--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt% ore + 25 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This Fifth Quarterly Report documents progress in pellet testing via thermogravimetric analysis of pellet formulation FORM4-A of a manganese ore/alumina combination. This formulation, described more fully in the Quarterly Technical Progress Report of October 15, 1993, consists of manganese carbonate combined with alundum. A 2-inch fixed-bed reactor has been fabricated and is now ready for subjecting pellets to cyclic loading and regeneration; however, a minor problem has arisen during the regeneration cycle in that sulfur tends to form and plug the exit tube during the early stage of regeneration. This problem is about to be overcome by increasing the flow rate of air during the regeneration cycle resulting in more oxidizing conditions and hence less tendency for sulfide sulfur (S{sup =}) to oxidize to the intermediate elemental form (S{sup o}) rather than to 4-valent (S{sup +4}).

Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Optimization on Seawater Desulfurization Efficiency Based on LSSVM-GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seawater flue gas Desulfurization (SFGD) was adopted in many coal-fired power plants of littoral for its low cost and high desulfurization efficiency. Operating Parameters would seriously affect SFGD efficiency, the desulfurization efficiency can be ... Keywords: SFGD, desulfurization efficiency, LSSVM, GA, optimization

Liu Ding-ping; Li Xiao-wei

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Case Studies to Evaluate Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Physical/Chemical Treatment Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on physical/chemical wastewater treatment technologies used to remove trace metals from flue gas desulphurization (FGD) wastewater. The scope of this study includes FGD wastewater treatment for trace metals.BackgroundThe United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently revising the Effluent Limitations Guidelines (ELGs) for the steam electric power generating industry. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project. Technical progress report No. 15, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to demonstrate that, by combining state-of-the-art technology, highly efficient plant operation and maintenance capabilities and by-product gypsum sales, significant reductions of SO{sub 2} emissions can be achieved at approximately one-half the life cycle cost of a conventional Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Further, this emission reduction is achieved without generating solid waste and while minimizing liquid wastewater effluent. Basically, this project entails the design, construction and operation of a nominal 600 MWe AFGD facility to remove SO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company`s Bailly Generating Station.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Partitioning of mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride in a full-scale coal combustion process equipped with selective catalytic reduction, electrostatic precipitation, and flue gas desulfurization systems  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale field study was carried out at a 795 MWe coal-fired power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of selected trace elements (i.e., mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride) from coal, FGD reagent slurry, makeup water to flue gas, solid byproduct, and wastewater streams. Flue gases were collected from the SCR outlet, ESP inlet, FGD inlet, and stack. Concurrent with flue gas sampling, coal, bottom ash, economizer ash, and samples from the FGD process were also collected for elemental analysis. By combining plant operation parameters, the overall material balances of selected elements were established. The removal efficiencies of As, Se, Hg, and B by the ESP unit were 88, 56, 17, and 8%, respectively. Only about 2.5% of Cl was condensed and removed from flue gas by fly ash. The FGD process removed over 90% of Cl, 77% of B, 76% of Hg, 30% of Se, and 5% of As. About 90% and 99% of the FGD-removed Hg and Se were associated with gypsum. For B and Cl, over 99% were discharged from the coal combustion process with the wastewater. Mineral trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dehydrate, Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) was injected before the ESP unit to control the emission of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). By comparing the trace elements compositions in the fly ash samples collected from the locations before and after the trona injection, the injection of trona did not show an observable effect on the partitioning behaviors of selenium and arsenic, but it significantly increased the adsorption of mercury onto fly ash. The stack emissions of mercury, boron, selenium, and chloride were for the most part in the gas phase. 47 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Chin-Min Cheng; Pauline Hack; Paul Chu; Yung-Nan Chang; Ting-Yu Lin; Chih-Sheng Ko; Po-Han Chiang; Cheng-Chun He; Yuan-Min Lai; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues (CCBs) in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground CCB placement. This report describes progress in the following areas: environmental characterization, mix development and geotechnical characterization, material handling and system economics, underground placement, and field demonstration.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Desulfurization of hot fuel gas produced from high-chlorine Illinois coals. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

In this project, simulated gasifier-product streams were contacted with the zinc titanate desulfurization sorbent in a bench-scale atmospheric fluidized-bed reactor at temperatures ranging from 538 to 750 {degree}C (1000 to 1382 {degree}F). The first set of experiments involved treating a medium-Btu fuel gas (simulating that of a ``Texaco`` oxygen-blown, entrained-bed gasifier) containing 1.4 percent H{sub 2}S and HCl concentrations of 0, 200, and 1500 ppmv. The second experimental set evaluated hot-gas desulfurization of a low-Btu fuel gas (simulating the product of the ``U-Gas`` air-blown gasifier), with HCl concentrations of 0, 200, and 800 ppmv. These operating conditions were typical of the gas-treatment requirements of gasifiers fueled by Illinois basin coals containing up to 0.6 percent chlorine. The results of the experiments at 538 and 650 {degree}C at all the HCl concentrations revealed no deleterious effects on the capability of the sorbent to remove H{sub 2}S from the fuel gas mixtures. In most cases, the presence of the HCl significantly enhanced the desulfurization reaction rate. Some zinc loss, however, was encountered in certain situations at 750 {degree}C when low-steam operating conditions were present. Also of interest, a portion of the incoming HCl was removed from the gas stream and was retained permanently by the sorbent. This behavior was examined in more detail in a limited set of experiments aimed at identifying ways to modify the sorbents composition so that the sorbent could act as a simultaneous desulfurization and dechlorination agent in the hot-gas cleanup process.

O`Brien, W.S. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States); Gupta, R.P. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Effect of H{sub 2}O on the desulfurization of simulated flue gas by an ionic liquid  

SciTech Connect

Functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) have been demonstrated to absorb SO{sub 2} from mixed gases or simulated flue gases efficiently. However, after absorbing a large amount of SO{sub 2}, the viscosity of the ILs increases greatly, which might limit their eventual applications in large-scale desulfurization from mixed gases or flue gases. In this work, the effect of the presence of water in a simulated flue gas on the absorption of SO{sub 2} by a functionalized ionic liquid, 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidinium lactate, has been studied at different temperatures. It is found that the presence of water in the simulated flue gas can decrease the viscosity of the IL greatly, and it has no effect on the absorptivity of SO{sub 2} from the flue gas. The densities of the IL absorbing SO{sub 2} from the flue gas with or without water are also studied. They increase with the increase of the amount of SO{sub 2} absorbed from the flue gas in both cases.

Ren, S.H.; Hou, Y.C.; Wu, W.Z.; Chen, X.T.; Fan, J.L.; Zhang, J.W. [Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing (China)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Catalytic seawater flue gas desulfurization process: an experimental pilot plant study  

SciTech Connect

In previous articles by the authors on seawater S(IV) oxidation kinetics, a significant catalytic effect was demonstrated by means of a commercially available activated carbon. The aims of this study carried out at pilot plant scale were to assess the use of high-efficiency structured packing and to validate the positive results obtained previously in laboratory studies. A comparison between a packed tower and a spray column was made by maintaining the same desulfurization efficiency. A 47% reduction in seawater flow can be obtained with a packed tower. This option seems to be more economical, with a reduction in operation costs of least of 33%. With the appropriate activated carbon, it is possible to reach a greater oxidation rate at a low pH level than by operating conventionally at a high pH level without a catalyst. A preliminary technical and financial comparison between the advanced seawater desulfurization process (equipped with a packed tower and a catalytic oxidation plant) and the conventional process (spray tower and noncatalytic oxidation) was carried out. 18 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

F. Vidal B.; P. Ollero; F.J. Gutierrez Ortiz; A. Villanueva [University of Seville, Seville (Spain). Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Gas generator and turbine unit  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine power unit is disclosed in which the arrangement and configuration of parts is such as to save space and weight in order to provide a compact and self-contained assembly. An air-intake casing supports the upstream end of a gas generator, the down-stream end of which is integral with a power turbine. The stator casing of the turbine is connected to a cone thermally insulated and completely inserted into any exhaust casing having a vertical outlet, wherein the turbine exhaust is conveyed into the exhaust casing by an annular diffusing cone. The turbine casing is supported on four legs. In addition, the turbine rotor and thus the turbine shaft are overhangingly supported by an independent structure, the weight of which bears on the machine base outside the exhaust casing and away of the power turbine space.

Vinciguerra, C.

1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

119

Selenium Removal by Iron Cementation from a Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater in a Continuous Flow System-- a Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes work funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and performed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) at a coal-fired power plant burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal (identified in this report as Plant E). This work was based on encouraging results obtained during previous EPRI-funded work on flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater treatability testing by MSE, which focused on selenium removal from a variety of FGD wastewater sources. The results from th...

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

120

Pilot-Scale Demonstration of Hybrid Zero-Valent Iron Water Treatment Technology: Removing Trace Metals from Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous laboratory- and field bench-scale tests, the hybrid zero-valent iron (hZVI) process had been demonstrated capable of removing selenium, mercury, nitrates, and other pollutants from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. By incorporating zero-valent iron (ZVI) with magnetite and certain Fe(II) species, the hZVI technology creates a highly reactive mixture that can transform and immobilize various trace metals, oxyanions, and other impurities from aqueous streams. To further evaluate ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

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121

NETL's Gas Process Development Unit for Hot/Warm Gas Cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The long-term objectives for the GPDU project are to: (1) assess transport and fluidized bed reactor control and performance to determine the most suitable mode for continuous gas desulfurization, and (2) evaluate candidate sorbents for bulk removal of sulfurous compounds from syngas to assess the readiness of sorbents for commercial scale. The DOE has funded desulfurization and sorbent research for over 20 years and extensive laboratory-scale and bench-scale work has been conducted by government, academia and industry on the development and testing of regenerable sorbents for bulk sulfur removal from syngas (Cicero, et.al, 2000; Mitchell, 1998; Lew, 1989). However, the technologies still need to be proven in controlled conditions at a larger scale. Several Clean Coal Technology projects (i.e, the Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project, the Pinon Pine IGCC Power Project and the Tampa Electric Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Project) had proposed demonstrations of hot-gas desulfurization technology, but were not seen to completion (Clean Coal Technology Compendium website, 2002). As a result, there is a lack of data on sorbent and reactor performance under longer-term continuous conditions at a large scale. For commercial acceptance of hot- or warm-gas desulfurization, technology reliability is a question yet to be answered. The GPDU will fill the gap and has the objective to provide the proof-of-concept that is needed to foster commercialization of hot (greater than 538 C (1,000 F)) and/or warm (260 to 427 C (500 to 800 F)) gas desulfurization for IGCC processes. The GPDU facility, which includes a separate Syngas Generator (SGG) that supplies a simulated coal gas to the GPDU, is in the shakedown phase of operations with an initial reactor configuration of transport absorber-transport regenerator. The status and preliminary results of shakedown activities are presented to provide insight into startup and operations of a continuous transport desulfurization process.

Everitt, E.; Bissett, L.A.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, April 1, 1996--April 30, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents the Final Technical Progress Report for Phase II of the overall program for a cooperative research agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy - MORGANTOWN Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC). Under the agreement, SIUC will develop and demonstrate technologies for the handling, transport, and placement in abandoned underground coal mines of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products, such as fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized bed combustion by-products, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground placement. The overall program is divided into three (3) phases. Phase II of the program is primarily concerned with developing and testing the hardware for the actual underground placement demonstrations. Two technologies have been identified and hardware procured for full-scale demonstrations: (1) hydraulic placement, where coal combustion by-products (CCBs) will be placed underground as a past-like mixture containing about 70 to 75 percent solids; and (2) pneumatic placement, where CCBs will be placed underground as a relatively dry material using compressed air. 42 refs., 36 figs., 36 tabs.

Chugh, Y.P.; Brackebusch, F.; Carpenter, J. [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative agreement entitled ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines`` (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. The major event during the quarter was the demonstration of the SEEC, Inc. technology for loading and transporting coal combustion residues in the SEEC developed Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC). The demonstration was held on November 17, 1994, at the Illinois Power Company Baldwin power plant, and was attended by about eighty (80) invited guest. Also during the quarter meetings were held with Peabody Coal Company officials to finalize the area in the Peabody No. 10 mine to be used for the placement of coal combustion residues. Work under the Materials Handling and Systems Economics area continued, particularly in refining the costs and systems configuration and in economic evaluation of various systems using equipment leasing rather than equipment purchases. Likewise, work progressed on residues characterization, with some preparations being made for long-term testing.

Chugh, Y.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Hot-gas desulfurization. II. Use of gasifier ash in a fluidized-bed process. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three gasifier coal ashes were used as reactant/sorbents in batch fluidized-beds to remove hydrogen sulfide from hot, made-up fuel gases. It is predominantly the iron oxide in the ash that reacts with and removes the hydrogen sulfide; the sulfur reappears in ferrous sulfide. Sulfided ashes were regenerated by hot, fluidizing streams of oxygen in air; the sulfur is recovered as sulfur dioxide, exclusively. Ash sorption efficiency and sulfur capacity increase and stabilize after several cycles of use. These two parameters vary directly with the iron oxide content of the ash and process temperature, but are independent of particle size in the range 0.01 - 0.02 cm. A western Kentucky No. 9 ash containing 22 weight percent iron as iron oxide sorbed 4.3 weight percent sulfur at 1200/sup 0/F with an ash sorption efficiency of 0.83 at ten percent breakthrough. A global, fluidized-bed, reaction rate model was fitted to the data and it was concluded that chemical kinetics is the controlling mechanism with a predicted activation energy of 19,600 Btu/lb mol. Iron oxide reduction and the water-gas-shift reaction were two side reactions that occurred during desulfurization. The regeneration reaction occurred very rapidly in the fluid-bed regime, and it is suspected that mass transfer is the controlling phenomenon.

Schrodt, J.T.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report. Volume 2. Appendices G, H, and I  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final report, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluation, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as Appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The impact of wet flue gas desulfurization scrubbing on mercury emissions from coal-fired power stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article introduces a predictive capability for mercury (Hg) retention in any Ca-based wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber, given Hg speciation at the FGD inlet, the flue gas composition, and the sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) capture efficiency. A preliminary statistical analysis of data from 17 full-scale wet FGDs connects flue gas compositions, the extents of Hg oxidation at FGD inlets, and Hg retention efficiencies. These connections show that solution chemistry within the FGD determines Hg retention. A more thorough analysis based on thermochemical equilibrium yields highly accurate predictions for total Hg retention with no parameter adjustments. For the most reliable data, the predictions were within measurement uncertainties for both limestone and Mg/lime systems operating in both forced and natural oxidation mode. With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Information Collection Request (ICR) database, the quantitative performance was almost as good for the most modern FGDs, which probably conform to the very high SO{sub 2} absorption efficiencies assumed in the calculations. The large discrepancies for older FGDs are tentatively attributed to the unspecified SO{sub 2} capture efficiencies and operating temperatures and to the possible elimination of HCl in prescrubbers. The equilibrium calculations suggest that Hg retention is most sensitive to inlet HCl and O{sub 2} levels and the FGD temperature; weakly dependent on SO{sub 2} capture efficiency; and insensitive to HgCl{sub 2}, NO, CA:S ratio, slurry dilution level in limestone FGDs, and MgSO{sub 3} levels in Mg/lime systems. Consequently, systems with prescrubbers to eliminate HCl probably retain less Hg than fully integrated FGDs. The analysis also predicts re-emission of Hg{sub 0} but only for inlet O{sub 2} levels that are much lower than those in full-scale FGDs. 12 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Stephen Niksa; Naoki Fujiwara [Niksa Energy Associates, Belmont, CA (US)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines: Phase 1 -- Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, July--September 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts primarily focused on Subtask 2.2, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization and Subtask 4.3, Selection and Testing of Transport System. As part of Subtask 2.2, samples were collected from the Freeman United Crown Mine III FBC disposal facility representing a verity of ages and weathering. A laboratory scale transport system has been built at the CAER to evaluate the potential of pneumatic transport for flue gas desulfurization material (FGDM) emplacement and to provide essential data for the mine emplacement demonstration as part of the Subtask 4.3 effort. The system is modeled after shotcreting systems and has the advantage that the material can be remotely placed without the need for forms. The test program is focusing on determining the pneumatic conditions necessary to maximize the strength of the emplaced FGDM under anticipated mine curing conditions while minimizing dust formation. Work on Subtask 4.1, Mine Selection, also proceeded during the quarter. A new mine site, located in the south-central section of the Pikeville quadrangle, Pike County, Kentucky, was examined for the field study. The proposed fill site is in the Middle Pennsylvanian Breathitt Formation Middle Amburgy coal bed, a coal previously mined by Costain elsewhere on the property. Efforts on Subtask 4.2, Hydrologic Monitoring Plan, focused primarily on theoretical issues concerning the effects of the mining and backfill activity on the ground water and surface water due to uncertainties in the location of the final field site. There are three major concerns about the effects of the mining activity: changes in the ground water flow field, changes in ground water quality, and consequential induced changes on stream flow.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Effects of Ammonia and Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Wastewater on Power Plant Effluent Toxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments and subsequently the Clean Air Interstate Rule and other state-level actions have resulted in implementation of a variety of technologies to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), and to further reduce emissions of sulfur oxides (SOx). Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and SNCR (non-catalytic) are two of the primary NOx emission reduction technologies. Often, ammonia is injected into flue gas as the reductant for the chemical reaction that converts NOx to nitrogen gas. ...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

Pilot-Scale Demonstration of hZVI Process for Treating Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater at Plant Wansley, Carrollton, GA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hybrid Zero Valent Iron (hZVI) process is a novel chemical treatment platform that has shown great potential in our previous bench-scale tests for removing selenium, mercury and other pollutants from Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. This integrated treatment system employs new iron chemistry to create highly reactive mixture of Fe^0, iron oxides (FeOx) and various forms of Fe (II) for the chemical transformation and mineralization of various heavy metals in water. To further evaluate and develop the hZVI technology, a pilot-scale demonstration had been conducted to continuously treat 1-2 gpm of the FGD wastewater for five months at Plant Wansley, a coal-fired power plant of Georgia Power. This demonstrated that the scaled-up system was capable of reducing the total selenium (of which most was selenate) in the FGD wastewater from over 2500 ppb to below 10 ppb and total mercury from over 100 ppb to below 0.01 ppb. This hZVI system reduced other toxic metals like Arsenic (III and V), Chromium (VI), Cadmium (II), Lead (II) and Copper (II) from ppm level to ppb level in a very short reaction time. The chemical consumption was estimated to be approximately 0.2-0.4 kg of ZVI per 1 m^3 of FGD water treated, which suggested the process economics could be very competitive. The success of the pilot test shows that the system is scalable for commercial application. The operational experience and knowledge gained from this field test could provide guidance to further improvement of technology for full scale applications. The hZVI technology can be commercialized to provide a cost-effective and reliable solution to the FGD wastewater and other metal-contaminated waste streams in various industries. This technology has the potential to help industries meet the most stringent environmental regulations for heavy metals and nutrients in wastewater treatment.

Peddi, Phani 1987-

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. Previous quarterly Technical Progress Reports have set forth the specific objectives of the program, and a discussion of these is not repeated here. Rather, this report discusses the technical progress made during the period April 1 - June 30, 1995. A final topical report on the SEEC, Inc. demonstration of its technology for the transporting of coal combustion residues was completed during the quarter, although final printing of the report was accomplished early in July, 1995. The SEEC technology involves the use of Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC`s) developed by SEEC, and the transportation of such containers - filled with fly ash or other coal combustion residues - on rail coal cars or other transportation means. Copies of the final topical report, entitled {open_quotes}The Development and Testing of Collapsible Intermodal Containers for the Handling and Transport of Coal Combustion Residues{close_quotes} were furnished to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The Rapid Aging Test colums were placed in operation during the quarter. This test is to determine the long-term reaction of both the pneumatic and hydraulic mixtures to brine as a leaching material, and simulates the conditions that will be encountered in the actual underground placement of the coal combustion residues mixtures. The tests will continue for about one year.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Integrated operation of a pressurized fixed-bed gasifier, hot gas desulfurization system, and turbine simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the General Electric Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) Program is to develop a commercially viable technology to remove sulfur, particulates, and halogens from a high-temperature fuel gas stream using a moving bed, regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbent based process. The HGCU Program is based on the design and demonstration of the HGCU system in a test facility made up of a pilot-scale fixed bed gasifier, a HGCU system, and a turbine simulator in Schenectady, NY, at the General Electric Research and Development Center. The objectives of the turbine simulator testing are (1) to demonstrate the suitability of fuel gas processed by the HGCU system for use in state-of-the-art gas turbines firing at 2,350 F rotor inlet temperature and (2) to quantify the combustion characteristics and emissions on low-Btu fuel gas. The turbine simulator program also includes the development and operation of experimental combustors based on the rich-quench-lean concept (RQL) to minimize the conversion of ammonia and other fuel-bound nitrogen species to NO{sub x} during combustion. The HGCU system and turbine simulator have been designed to process approximately 8,000 lb/hr of low heating value fuel gas produced by the GE fixed bed gasifier. The HGCU system has utilized several mixed metal oxide sorbents, including zinc ferrite, zinc titanate, and Z-Sorb, with the objective of demonstrating good sulfur removal and mechanical attrition resistance as well as economic cost characteristics. Demonstration of halogen removal and the characterization of alkali and trace metal concentrations in the fuel gas are subordinate objectives of the overall program. This report describes the results of several long-duration pilot tests.

Bevan, S.; Ayala, R.E.; Feitelberg, A.; Furman, A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Method and apparatus for hot-gas desulfurization of fuel gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for removing sulfur values from a hot fuel gas stream in a fluidized bed contactor containing particulate sorbent material by employing a riser tube regeneration arrangement. Sulfur-laden sorbent is continuously removed from the fluidized bed through a stand pipe to the riser tube and is rapidly regenerated in the riser tube during transport of the sorbent therethrough by employing an oxygen- containing sorbent regenerating gas stream. The riser tube extends from a location below the fluidized bed to an elevation above the fluidized bed where a gas-solid separating mechanism is utilized to separate the regenerated particulate sorbent from the regeneration gases and reaction gases so that the regenerated sorbent can be returned to the fluidized bed for reuse. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Bissett, L.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Method and apparatus for hot-gas desulfurization of fuel gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for removing sulfur values from a hot fuel gas stream in a fluidized bed contactor containing particulate sorbent material by employing a riser tube regeneration arrangement. Sulfur-laden sorbent is continuously removed from the fluidized bed through a stand pipe to the riser tube and is rapidly regenerated in the riser tube during transport of the sorbent therethrough by employing an oxygen- containing sorbent regenerating gas stream. The riser tube extends from a location below the fluidized bed to an elevation above the fluidized bed where a gas-solid separating mechanism is utilized to separate the regenerated particulate sorbent from the regeneration gases and reaction gases so that the regenerated sorbent can be returned to the fluidized bed for reuse. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Bissett, L.A.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Integrated operation of a pressurized gasifier, hot gas desulfurization system and turbine simulator  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the General Electric Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) Program is to develop a commercially viable technology to remove sulfur, particulates, and halogens from a high-temperature fuel gas stream using a moving bed, regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbent based process. This technology will ultimately be incorporated into advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. The objectives of the turbine simulator testing are (1) to demonstrate the suitability of fuel gas processed by the HGCU system for use in state-of-the-art gas turbines firing at F conditions (2,350 F rotor inlet temperature) and (2) to quantify the combustion characteristics and emissions of such a combustor. Testing of the GE HGCU system has been underway since December 1990. The two most recent tests, Test 5 and Test 6, represent the latest advancements in regenerator configuration, type of sorbent, and chloride control systems. Test 5 was based on the use of zinc titanate sorbent and included a revised regenerator configuration and a sodium bicarbonate injection system for chloride control. Test 6 incorporated the use of Z-Sorb, a chloride guard in the regenerator recycle loop, and further modifications to the regenerator internal configuration. This report describes the test conditions in detail and discusses the test results.

Bevan, S.; Najewicz, D.; Gal, E.; Furman, A.H.; Ayala, R.; Feitelberg, A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Numerical Modeling of Reactive Multiphase Flow for FCC and Hot Gas Desulfurization Circulating Fluidized Beds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work was carried out to understand the behavior of the solid and gas phases in a CFB riser. Only the riser is modeled as a straight pipe. A model with linear algebraic approximation to solids viscosity of the form, {musubs} = 5.34{epsisubs}, ({espisubs} is the solids volume fraction) with an appropriate boundary condition at the wall obtained by approximate momentum balance solution at the wall to acount for the solids recirculation is tested against experimental results. The work done was to predict the flow patterns in the CFB risers from available experimental data, including data from a 7.5-cm-ID CFB riser at the Illinois Institute of Technology and data from a 20.0-cm-ID CFB riser at the Particulate Solid Research, Inc., facility. This research aims at modeling the removal of hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gas using zinc oxide as the sorbent in a circulating fluidized bed and in the process indentifying the parameters that affect the performance of the sulfidation reactor. Two different gas-solid reaction models, the unreacted shrinking core (USC) and the grain model were applied to take into account chemical reaction resistances. Also two different approaches were used to affect the hydrodynamics of the process streams. The first model takes into account the effect of micro-scale particle clustering by adjusting the gas-particle drag law and the second one assumes a turbulent core with pseudo-steady state boundary condition at the wall. A comparison is made with experimental results.

None

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Choosing a coke-oven gas desulfurization system: a review of current technology  

SciTech Connect

Installation of coke-oven gas desulphurizing systems is primarily the result of air pollution control regulations. Although not currently profitable, operating costs can be minimized by choosing the technology most suited to the particular application. The Stretford Holmes, Takahax/Hirohax, Koppers Vacuum Carbonate, Sulfiban and Dravo/Still processes are discussed, together with criteria for economic analysis based on technical and by-product market evaluations.

Lynch, P.A.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Ohio Sites 1 (Mixed Hay) and 2 (Corn)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this work conducted during 2008–2010 were to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of flue gas desulphurization gypsum (FGDG) in eastern Ohio and to assess the potential for environmental effects of the use of FGDG. Two field experiments were conducted at the eastern Ohio research site, one involving a mixed-grass hay field and the other a corn (Zea mays L.) field. FGDG and mined gypsum product were applied one time at rates of 0.2, 2.0, and 20 megagrams ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

Desulfurization of fuel gases in fluidized bed gasification and hot fuel gas cleanup systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A problem with the commercialization of fluidized bed gasification is that vast amounts of spent sorbent are generated if the sorbent is used on a once-through basis, especially if high sulfur coals are burned. The requirements of a sorbent for regenerative service in the FBG process are: (1) it must be capable of reducing the sulfur containing gas concentration of the FBG flue gas to within acceptable environmental standards; (2) it must not lose its reactivity on cyclic sulfidation and regeneration; (3) it must be capable of regeneration with elimination of substantially all of its sulfur content; (4) it must have good attrition resistance; and, (5) its cost must not be prohibitive. It has now been discovered that calcium silicate pellets, e.g., Portland cement type III pellets meet the criteria aforesaid. Calcium silicate removes COS and H/sub 2/S according to the reactions given to produce calcium sulfide silicate. The sulfur containing product can be regenerated using CO/sub 2/ as the regenerant. The sulfur dioxide can be conveniently reduced to sulfur with hydrogen or carbon for market or storage. The basic reactions in the process of this invention are the reactions with calcium silicate given in the patent. A convenient and inexpensive source of calcium silicate is Portland cement. Portland cement is a readily available, widely used construction meterial.

Steinberg, M.; Farber, G.; Pruzansky, J.; Yoo, H.J.; McGauley, P.

1983-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

The United States has significant natural gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States has significant natural gas United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to locate and bring into production. To help meet this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy over the years has amassed wide ranging expertise in areas related to deepwater resource location, production, safety and environmental protection. The goal of these activities has been to not only help overcome

140

Adsorption and desorption of sulfur dioxide on novel adsorbents for flue gas desulfurization. Final report, September 1, 1994--February 29, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sol-gel granulation method was developed to prepare spherical {gamma}-alumina granular supports and supported CuO granular sorbents for flue gas desulfurization. The prepared {gamma}-alumina supported CuO sorbents exhibit desirable pore structure and excellent mechanical properties. The sorbents contain higher loading (30-40 wt. %) of CuO dispersed in the monolayer or sub-monolayer form, giving rise to a larger SO{sub 2} sorption capacity ({gt}20 wt.%) and a faster sorption rate as compared to similar sorbents reported in the literature. With these excellent sulfation and mechanical properties, the sol-gel derived {gamma}-alumina supported CuO granular sorbents offer great potential for use in the dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization process. Research efforts were also made to prepare DAY zeolite supported sorbents with various CuO contents by the microwave and conventional thermal dispersion methods at different conditions. Monolayer or sub-monolayer coating of Cu(NO{sub 3})sub 2 or CuO was achieved on several DAY supported sorbents by the microwave heating method but not by the conventional thermal dispersion method. The DAY zeolite supported CuO sorbents prepared by the microwave heating method can adsorb up to 15 wt.% of SO{sub 2}. The results obtained have demonstrated the feasibility of effective preparation of zeolite supported CuO sorbents by the microwave heating method.

Lin, Y.S.; Deng, S.G.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer This Primer on Modern Shale Gas Development in the United...

142

Unit Cost Natural Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281532 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Natural Gas Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

143

Economical Desulfurization of Petroleum Coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Economical Desulfurization of Petroleum Coke ... " Desulfurization of Petroleum Coke Beyond 1600'C" by Christopher A. Paul of Great Lakes ...

144

Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer Modern Shale Gas Development in the...

145

Price Liquefied Freeport, TX Natural Gas Exports Price to United...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United Kingdom (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Liquefied Freeport, TX Natural Gas Exports Price to United Kingdom (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

146

Sabine Pass, LA Exports to United kingdom Liquefied Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United kingdom Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Exports to United kingdom Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

147

Two-stage coal gasification and desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a system which effectively integrates a two-stage, fixed-bed coal gasification arrangement with hot fuel gas desulfurization of a first stream of fuel gas from a lower stage of the two-stage gasifier and the removal of sulfur from the sulfur sorbent regeneration gas utilized in the fuel-gas desulfurization process by burning a second stream of fuel gas from the upper stage of the gasifier in a combustion device in the presence of calcium-containing material. The second stream of fuel gas is taken from above the fixed bed in the coal gasifier and is laden with ammonia, tar and sulfur values. This second stream of fuel gas is burned in the presence of excess air to provide heat energy sufficient to effect a calcium-sulfur compound forming reaction between the calcium-containing material and sulfur values carried by the regeneration gas and the second stream of fuel gas. Any ammonia values present in the fuel gas are decomposed during the combustion of the fuel gas in the combustion chamber. The substantially sulfur-free products of combustion may then be combined with the desulfurized fuel gas for providing a combustible fluid utilized for driving a prime mover. 1 fig.

Bissett, L.A.; Strickland, L.D.

1990-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

149

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, [October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines`` program is one of the largest programs ever undertaken by the Mining Engineering Department of Southern Illinois university, both in terms of complexity and in terms of funding. Total funding over the expected four-year extent of the program, including both Department of Energy, matching Southern Illinois University funds, and contributed funds, this program exceeds three million dollars. The number of cooperating organizations adds to the management complexity of the program. It was believed, therefore, that sound management plan and management base is essential for the efficient and effective conduct of the program. This first quarter period (i.e., October 1--December 31, 1993) was developed to establishing the management base, developing a sound management plan, developing a test plan, and developing sound fiscal management and control. Actual technical operations, such as residue sample acquisition, residue analyses, groundwater sample acquisition and analyses, and material handling studies will get underway early in the next quarter (i.e., January 1--March 31, 1994). Some early results of residue analyses and groundwater analyses should be available by the end of the second quarter. These results will be reported in the next Technical Progress Report.

Thomasson, E.M.; Chugh, Y.P.; Esling, S.; Honaker, R.; Paul, B.; Sevin, H.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Other Construction Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate See Page Four of Utility Application: $100-$50,000/customer/year depending on utility and remaining funding Custom:40% of project cost Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Trap Repair or Replacement: $50/unit Boilers: $1-$1.50/MBH Furnace Replacement: $1.50/MBH or $150/unit Boiler Modulation Burner Control Retrofit: $1000/unit Boiler Water Reset Control: $300/unit

152

Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

153

COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporation, 5-25~79. on Coal Liquefaction at ChevronHamersma, et a L, "Meyers Process for Coal Desulfurization,"in Wheelock, Coal Desulfurization, ACS Symp. Ser 64 (1977(.

Wrathall, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

United States Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

155

Adsorption and desorption of sulfur dioxide on novel adsorbents for flue gas desulfurization. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Dry regenerative sorption processes have recently attracted increasing attention in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) because of their several advantages over the conventional wet-scrubbing processes. Dry sorbents are usually made by coating a transition or alkaline earth metal precursor on the surface of a porous support. Major disadvantages of these sorbents prepared by the conventional methods include relatively poor attrition resistance and low SO{sub 2} sorption capacity. The physical and especially chemical attrition (associated with the sulphation-oxidation-reduction cycles in the process) deteriorates the performance of the sorbents. The low SO{sub 2} sorption capacity is primarily due to the small surface area of the support. Materials with a high surface area are not used as the supports for FGD sorbents because these materials usually are not thermally stable at high temperatures. In the past year, the research supported by Ohio Coal Development Office was focused on synthesis and properties of sol-gel derived alumina and zeolite sorbents with improved properties for FGD. The sol-gel derived alumina has large surface area, mesopore size and excellent mechanical strength. Some alumina-free zeolites not only posses the basic properties required as a sorbent for FGD (hydrophobicity, thermal and chemical stability, mechanical strength) but also have extremely large surface area and selective surface chemistry. The major objectives of this research program were to synthesize the sol-gel derived sorbents and to explore the use of the zeolites either directly as adsorbents or as sorbent support for FGD. The research was aimed at developing novel FGD sorbents possessing better sorption equilibrium and kinetic properties and improved physical and chemical attrition resistance.

Lin, Y.S. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with prospective refineries led to the conclusion that there were not likely prospects for the licensing of the CED process.

James Boltz

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

First U. S. sulfreen unit in Dakota gas plant  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the first natural gas processing plant in the U.S. that uses Sulfreen as the optimum process for tail gas cleanup. A minimum overall recovery of 98.9% is expected. The Sulfreen process appears to be a viable tail gas treater for Claus units in the U.S., providing high overall recoveries and process reliability. The North Dakota plant joins more than 30 other units operating in Canada, Greece, China and throughout Europe.

Davis, G.W.

1985-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

158

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg0) in flue gas from coal combustion. The project was conducted from July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. It was conducted with cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, "Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System." Private secto...

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

OpenEI - Unit Cost Natural Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005...

160

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization Measures: 50% of the cost Windows: $150 Water Heaters/Clothes Washers: 1 Pipe Wrap: Limit of 10 linear ft. Faucet Aerators: 2 High Efficiency Shower Head: 2 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boiler: $200 Furnace: $100 - $200

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Coal desulfurization with sodium hypochlorite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wet desulfurization of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Illinois No. 6 coal were conducted with sodium hypochlorite in the laboratory. Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was… (more)

Li, Wei, M.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

EIA Data: 2009 United States Oil and Gas Supply  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA Data: 2009 United States Oil and Gas Supply This dataset is the 2009...

163

EIA Data: 2010 United States Oil and Gas Supply  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA Data: 2010 United States Oil and Gas Supply This dataset is the 2010...

164

The value of United States oil and gas reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this research is to estimate a time series, starting in 1979, for the value of in-ground oil reserves and natural gas reserves in the United States. Relatively good statistics exist for the physical quantities. ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants in the United States as of 2009 and highlights characteristics of this segment of the industry. The purpose of the paper is to examine the role of natural gas processing plants in the natural gas supply chain and to provide an overview and summary of processing plant characteristics in the United States, such as locations, capacities, and operations. Key Findings There were 493 operational natural gas processing plants in the United States with a combined operating capacity of 77 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. Overall, operating capacity increased about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009, not including the processing capacity in Alaska1. At the same time, the number of all processing plants in the lower 48 States decreased

166

Coal Liquefaction desulfurization process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a solvent refined coal liquefaction process, more effective desulfurization of the high boiling point components is effected by first stripping the solvent-coal reacted slurry of lower boiling point components, particularly including hydrogen sulfide and low molecular weight sulfur compounds, and then reacting the slurry with a solid sulfur getter material, such as iron. The sulfur getter compound, with reacted sulfur included, is then removed with other solids in the slurry.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Puerto Rico Refinery Desulfurization, Gasoline Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Desulfurization, Gasoline Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

168

Two-stage coal gasification and desulfurization apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a system which effectively integrates a two-stage, fixed-bed coal gasification arrangement with hot fuel gas desulfurization of a first stream of fuel gas from a lower stage of the two-stage gasifier and the removal of sulfur from the sulfur sorbent regeneration gas utilized in the fuel-gas desulfurization process by burning a second stream of fuel gas from the upper stage of the gasifier in a combustion device in the presence of calcium-containing material. The second stream of fuel gas is taken from above the fixed bed in the coal gasifier and is laden with ammonia, tar and sulfur values. This second stream of fuel gas is burned in the presence of excess air to provide heat energy sufficient to effect a calcium-sulfur compound forming reaction between the calcium-containing material and sulfur values carried by the regeneration gas and the second stream of fuel gas. Any ammonia values present in the fuel gas are decomposed during the combustion of the fuel gas in the combustion chamber. The substantially sulfur-free products of combustion may then be combined with the desulfurized fuel gas for providing a combustible fluid utilized for driving a prime mover.

Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV); Strickland, Larry D. (Morgantown, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method for desulfurization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus are disclosed for desulfurizing coal which removes sulfur in the inorganic and organic form by preferentially heating the inorganic iron sulfides in coal in a flowing gas to convert some of the inorganic iron sulfides from a pyrite form FeS[sub 2] to a troilite FeS form or a pyrrhotite form Fe[sub 1[minus]x]S and release some of the sulfur as a gaseous compound. The troilite and pyrrhotite forms are convenient catalyst for removing the organic sulfur in the next step, which is to react the coal with chemical agents such as alcohol, thus removing the organic sulfur as a liquid or a gas such as H[sub 2]S. The remaining inorganic sulfur is left in the predominantly higher magnetic form of pyrrhotite and is then removed by magnetic separation techniques. Optionally, an organic flocculant may be added after the organic sulfur has been removed and before magnetic separation. The flocculant attaches non-pyrite minerals with the pyrrhotite for removal by magnetic separation to reduce the ash-forming contents. 2 figs.

Kelland, D.R.

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

171

A NOVEL APPROACH TO CATALYTIC DESULFURIZATION OF COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Column chromatographic separation of the S=PBu{sub 3}/PBu{sub 3} product mixture followed by weighing the S=PBu{sub 3}, and by vacuum distillation of S=PBu{sub 3}/PBu{sub 3}mixture followed by gas chromatographic analysis are described. Effects of coal mesh size, pre-treatment with methanol Coal (S) + excess PR{sub 3} {yields} Coal + S=PR{sub 3}/PBu{sub 3} and sonication on sulfur removal by PBu{sub 3} revealed that particle size was not observed to affect desulfurization efficiency in a consistent manner. Coal pretreatment with methanol to induce swelling or the addition of a filter aid such as Celite reduced desulfurization efficiency of the PBu{sub 3} and sonication was no more effective than heating. A rationale is put forth for the lack of efficacy of methanol pretreatment of the coal in desulfurization runs with PBu{sub 3}. Coal desulfurization with PBu{sub 3} was not improved in the presence of miniscule beads of molten lithium or sodium as a desulfurizing reagent for SPBu{sub 3} in a strategy aimed at regenerating PBu{sub 3} inside coal pores. Although desulfurization of coals did occur in sodium solutions in liquid ammonia, substantial loss of coal mass was also observed. Of particular concern is the mass balance in the above reaction, a problem which is described in some detail. In an effort to solve this difficulty, a specially designed apparatus is described which we believe can solve this problem reasonably effectively. Elemental sodium was found to remove sulfur quantitatively from a variety of polycyclic organosulfur compounds including dibenzothiophene and benzothiophene under relatively mild conditions (150 C) in a hydrocarbon solvent without requiring the addition of a hydrogen donor. Lithium facilitates the same reaction at a higher temperature (254 C). Mechanistic pathways are proposed for these transformations. Curiously, dibenzothiophene and its corresponding sulfone was virtually quantitatively desulfurized in sodium solutions in liquid ammonia at -33 C, although the yield of biphenyl was only about 20 to 30%. On the other hand, benzothiophene gave a high yield of 2-ethylthiophenol under these conditions. Although our superbase P(MeNCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 3}N, which is now commercially available, is a more effective desulfurizing agent for a variety of organophosphorus compounds than PPh{sub 3} or its acyclic analogue P(NMe){sub 3}, it does not desulfurize benzothiophene or dibenzothiophene.

John G. Verkade

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Repowering reheat units with gas turbines: Final report. [Adding gas turbines and heat recovery to present units  

SciTech Connect

Although conventional repowering on nonreheat units replaces existing boilers with gas turbines and heat recovery steam generators, options investigated by Virginia Power use gas turbine waste heat to supplement, rather than replace, the output of existing steam generators. Virginia Power's experience in considering feedwater heater repowering (FHR) and hot windbox repowering (HWR) as repowering options is described here. Studying five plants identified as potential repowering candidates, investigators first evaluated FHR, which uses a gas turbine generator set equipped with an economizer to heat boiler feedwater. This reduces the steam turbine extraction flow and increases the steam turbine capacity. HWR, the second method investigated, routes the hot, relatively oxygen-rich exhaust flow from a gas turbine into the boiler windbox, eliminating the need for an air preheater. A boiler stack gas cooler then heats feedwater, again increasing turbine capacity by reducing extraction steam flow requirements for feedwater heating. FHR provided the lowest installed cost, especially at Mount Storm unit 3, a coal-fired minemouth plant. Use of a gas turbine to heat feedwater at this plant resulted in a $523/kW (1985) installed cost and 124-MWe unit capacity increase at a design incremental heat rate of 8600 Btu/kWh. FHR at Mount Storm units 1, 2, and 3 cost less overall than installation and operation of a new combined cycle. Although the findings and conclusions in this series of repowering reports are largely unique to the individual plants, units, and applications studied, other utilities performing repowering studies can draw on the types of consideration entertained, alternatives examined, and factors and rationale leading to rejection or acceptance of a given repowering approach. 12 figs., 12 tabs.

Rives, J.D.; Catina, J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Biocatalytic Desulfurization Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The material in this report summarizes the Diversa technical effort in development of a biocatalyst for the biodesulfurization of Petro Star diesel as well as an economic report of standalone and combined desulfurization options, prepared by Pelorus and Anvil, to support and inform the development of a commercially viable process. We will discuss goals of the projected as originally stated and their modification as guided by parallel efforts to evaluate commercialization economics and process parameters. We describe efforts to identify novel genes and hosts for the generation of an optimal biocatalyst, analysis of diesel fuels (untreated, chemically oxidized and hydrotreated) for organosulfur compound composition and directed evolution of enzymes central to the biodesulfurization pathway to optimize properties important for their use in a biocatalyst. Finally we will summarize the challenges and issues that are central to successful development of a viable biodesulfurization process.

David Nunn; James Boltz; Philip M. DiGrazia; Larry Nace

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

174

Performance of Gas-Engine Driven Heat Pump Unit  

SciTech Connect

Air-conditioning (cooling) for buildings is the single largest use of electricity in the United States (U.S.). This drives summer peak electric demand in much of the U.S. Improved air-conditioning technology thus has the greatest potential impact on the electric grid compared to other technologies that use electricity. Thermally-activated technologies (TAT), such as natural gas engine-driven heat pumps (GHP), can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. GHP offers an attractive opportunity for commercial building owners to reduce electric demand charges and operating expenses. Engine-driven systems have several potential advantages over conventional single-speed or single-capacity electric motor-driven units. Among them are variable speed operation, high part load efficiency, high temperature waste heat recovery from the engine, and reduced annual operating costs (SCGC 1998). Although gas engine-driven systems have been in use since the 1960s, current research is resulting in better performance, lower maintenance requirements, and longer operating lifetimes. Gas engine-driven systems are typically more expensive to purchase than comparable electric motor-driven systems, but they typically cost less to operate, especially for commercial building applications. Operating cost savings for commercial applications are primarily driven by electric demand charges. GHP operating costs are dominated by fuel costs, but also include maintenance costs. The reliability of gas cooling equipment has improved in the last few years and maintenance requirements have decreased (SCGC 1998, Yahagi et al. 2006). Another advantage of the GHP over electric motor-driven is the ability to use the heat rejected from the engine during heating operation. The recovered heat can be used to supplement the vapor compression cycle during heating or to supply other process loads, such as water heating. The use of the engine waste heat results in greater operating efficiency compared to conventional electric motor-driven units (SCGC 1998). In Japan, many hundreds of thousands of natural gas-driven heat pumps have been sold (typically 40,000 systems annually) (Yahagi et al. 2006). The goal of this program is to develop dependable and energy efficient GHPs suitable for U.S. commercial rooftop applications (the single largest commercial product segment). This study describes the laboratory performance evaluation of an integrated 10-ton GHP rooftop unit (a 900cc Daihatsu-Aisin natural gas engine) which uses R410A as the refrigerant (GEDAC No.23). ORNL Thermally-Activated Heat Pump (TAHP) Environmental Chambers were used to evaluate this unit in a controlled laboratory environment.

Abdi Zaltash; Randy Linkous; Randall Wetherington; Patrick Geoghegan; Ed Vineyard; Isaac Mahderekal; Robert Gaylord

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

EIA Data: 2009 United States Oil and Gas Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon EIA Data: 2009 United States Oil and Gas Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2009 United States Oil...

176

EIA Data: 2010 United States Oil and Gas Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon EIA Data: 2010 United States Oil and Gas Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2010 United States Oil...

177

Where is shale gas found in the United States? | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Where is shale gas found in the United States? Where is shale gas found in the United States? Where...

178

A 32-month gasifier mechanistic study and downstream unit process development program for the pressurized ash-agglomerating fluidized bed gasification system: Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work is underway at KRW Energy Systems to develop operating experience and process performance information for a pressurized fluidized-bed agglomerating-ash coal gasification system. The KRW Process Development Unit at Waltz Mill, PA, will be operated from 1985 through 1987 to test (1) an in-bed desulfurization and alkali removal system, and (2) an external hot gas zinc ferrite desulfurization system, and (3) an intergrated in-bed/external-bed system to provide for collection and anaylsis of mechanistic process data. An exploratory test(TP-036-1) was conducted in December 1984 on the newly installed in-bed desulfurization system. Five set points were completed, including an initial air-blown baseline set point without dolomite and four in the dolomite, desulfurization mode. An evaluation of spent reactivity decreased rapidly as the utilization during TP-036-1 indicated that sorbent reactivity decreased rapidly as the utilization of the sorbent approached 60%. 31 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES: Agricultural Economics #12;AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation in the United States. (December 2000) Uwe Schneider, M.Ag., Humboldt

McCarl, Bruce A.

180

Evaluation of gasification and gas cleanup processes for use in molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Final report. [Contains lists and evaluations of coal gasification and fuel gas desulfurization processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report satisfies the requirements for DOE Contract AC21-81MC16220 to: List coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants; extensively characterize those coal gas cleanup systems rejected by DOE's MCFC contractors for their power plant systems by virtue of the resources required for those systems to be commercially developed; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC tolerance for particulates on the anode (fuel gas) side of the MCFC; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC anode side tolerance for chemical species, including sulfides, halogens, and trace heavy metals; choose from the candidate gasifier/cleanup systems those most suitable for MCFC-based power plants; choose a reference wet cleanup system; provide parametric analyses of the coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems when integrated into a power plant incorporating MCFC units with suitable gas expansion turbines, steam turbines, heat exchangers, and heat recovery steam generators, using the Westinghouse proprietary AHEAD computer model; provide efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effect rankings of the system; and provide a final report incorporating the results of all of the above tasks. Section 7 of this final report provides general conclusions.

Jablonski, G.; Hamm, J.R.; Alvin, M.A.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Patel, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

THE BIOCATALYTIC DESULFURIZATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis of Petro Star diesel sulfur species is complete and a report is attached. Further analytical efforts will concentrate on characterization of diesel fuel, hydrodesulfurized to varying degrees, in order to determine sulfur species that may be problematic to hydrogen treatment and represent potential target substrates for biodesulfurization in a combined HDS-BDS process. Quotes have been received and are being considered for the partial treatment of Petro Star Inc. marine diesel fuel. Direction of research is changing slightly; economic analysis of the hyphenated--BDSHDS, BDS-CED--has shown the highest probability of success to be with a BDS-HDS process where the biodesulfurization precedes hydrodesulfurization. Thus, the microorganisms will be tailored to focus on those compounds that tend to be recalcitrant to hydrodesulfurization and decrease the severity of the hydrodesulfurization step. A separate, detailed justification for this change is being prepared. Research activities have continued in the characterization of the desulfurization enzymes from multiple sources. Genes for all DszA, -B, -C and -D enzymes (and homologs) have been cloned and expressed. Activity determinations, on a variety of substituted benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene substrates, have been carried out and continue. In addition, chemical synthesis efforts have been carried out to generate additional substrates for analytical standards and activity determinations. The generation of a GSSM mutant library of the ''Rhodococcus IGTS8 dszA'' gene has been completed and development of protocols for a high throughput screen to expand substrate specificity are nearing completion. In an effort to obtain improved hosts as biocatalyst, one hundred-thirty ''Rhodococcus'' and related strains are being evaluated for growth characteristics and other criteria deemed important for an optimal biocatalyst strain. We have also begun an effort to generate derivatives of the entire IGTS8 BDS plasmid that will allow for its easy transfer and manipulation into a variety of hosts. To support this activity and to gain an understanding of additional genes that may potentially affect BDS activity, the nucleotide sequence of the entire complement of plasmids in IGTS8 is being determined. Lastly, we continue to develop genetic screens and selections for the discovery and improvement of the biodesulfurization genes and strains.

Scott Collins; David Nunn

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Processing Plants and Production Basins, 2009 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, GasTran Natural Gas Transportation ...

183

Economic Potential for Agricultural NonEconomic Potential for Agricultural Non--CO2 GreenhouseCO2 Greenhouse Gas Mitigation:Gas Mitigation: An Investigation in the United StatesAn Investigation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation:Gas Mitigation: An Investigation in the United StatesAn Investigation in the United for Agricultural Non--CO2 Greenhouse GasCO2 Greenhouse Gas Mitigation:Mitigation: An Investigation in the United revealing an "optimal" portfolio of agricultural greenhouse gas emission related management alternatives. We

McCarl, Bruce A.

184

Desulfurization sorbent regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF DIESEL FUELS BY A NOVEL INTEGRATED APPROACH  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to explore a new desulfurization system concept, which consists of efficient separation of the refractory sulfur compounds from diesel fuel by selective adsorption, and effective hydrodesulfurization of the concentrated fraction of the refractory sulfur compounds in diesel fuels. Our approaches focused on (1) selecting and developing new adsorbents for selective adsorption of sulfur or sulfur compounds in commercial diesel fuel; (2) conducting the adsorption desulfurization of model fuels and real diesel fuels by the selective-adsorption-for-removing-sulfur (PSUSARS) process over various developed adsorbents, and examining the adsorptive desulfurization performance of various adsorbents; (3) developing and evaluating the regeneration methods for various spent adsorbent; (4) developing new catalysts for hydrodesulfurization of the refractory sulfur existing in the commercial diesel fuel; (5) on the basis of the fundamental understanding of the adsorptive performance and regeneration natures of the adsorbents, further confirming and improving the conceptual design of the novel PSU-SARS process for deep desulfurization of diesel fuel Three types of adsorbents, the metal-chloride-based adsorbents, the activated nickel-based adsorbents and the metal-sulfide-based adsorbents, have been developed for selective adsorption desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons. All of three types of the adsorbents exhibit the significant selectivity for sulfur compounds, including alkyl dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), in diesel fuel. Adsorption desulfurization of real diesel fuels (regular diesel fuel (DF), S: 325 ppmw; low sulfur diesel fuel (LSD-I), S: 47 ppmw) over the nickel-based adsorbents (A-2 and A-5) has been conducted at different conditions by using a flowing system. The adsorption capacity of DF over A-2 corresponding to an outlet sulfur level of 30 ppmw is 2.8 mg-S/g-A. The adsorption capacity of LSD-I over A-5 corresponding to the break-through point at 5.0 ppmw sulfur level is 0.35 mg-S/g-A. The spent A-5 can be regenerated by using H2 gas at a flowing rate of 40-50 ml/min, 500 C, and ambient pressure. Adsorption desulfurization of model diesel fuels over metal-sulfide-based adsorbents (A-6-1 and A-6-2) has been conducted at different temperatures to examine the capacity and selectivity of the adsorbents. A regeneration method for the spent metal-sulfide-based adsorbents has been developed. The spent A-6-1 can be easily regenerated by washing the spent adsorbent with a polar solvent followed by heating the adsorbent bed to remove the remainder solvent. Almost all adsorption capacity of the fresh A-6-1 can be recovered after the regeneration. On the other hand, a MCM-41-supported HDS catalyst was developed for deep desulfurization of the refractory sulfur compounds. The results show that the developed MCM-41-supported catalyst demonstrates consistently higher activity for the HDS of the refractory dibenzothiophenic sulfur compounds than the commercial catalyst. On the basis of the fundamental understanding of the adsorptive performance and regeneration natures of the adsorbents, the conceptual design of the novel PSU-SARS process for deep desulfurization of diesel fuel is confirmed and improved further.

Xiaoliang Ma; Uday Turaga; Shingo Watanabe; Subramani Velu; Chunshan Song

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

How much natural gas does the United States have and how ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including ... How much natural gas does the United States have and how ... 2012. Other ...

187

Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from United...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

188

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release...

189

United States Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: 9/30/2013: Next Release Date: 10/31/2013: Referring Pages: Natural Gas Industrial Price ; U.S. Natural Gas Prices; Natural Gas Industrial Price

190

Low temperature aqueous desulfurization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a chemical process for desulfurizing coal, especially adaptable to the treatment of coal-water slurries, at temperatures as low as ambient, comprising treating the coal with aqueous titanous chloride whereby hydrogen sulfide is liberated and the desulfurized coal is separated with the conversion of titanous chloride to titanium oxides.

Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); Healy, Francis E. (Massapequa, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Low temperature aqueous desulfurization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a chemical process for desulfurizing coal, especially adaptable to the treatment of coal-water slurries, at temperatures as low as ambient, comprising treating the coal with aqueous titanous chloride whereby hydrogen sulfide is liberated and the desulfurized coal is separated with the conversion of titanous chloride to titanium oxides.

Slegeir, W.A.; Healy, F.E.; Sapienza, R.S.

1985-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

single-family home construction market, the choice of what gas furnace and gas water heater combination to install is primarily driven by first cost considerations. In this...

193

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Natural Gas Processing Plants Utilization Rates Based on 2008 Flows Figure 3. Natural Gas Processing Plants Utilization Rates Based on 2008 Flows Note: Average utilization rates...

194

High-volume, high-value usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines Phase 1: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, July 1994--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

During the quarter a second series of samples were collected and partially characterized chemically and mineralogically. The samples were collected at the disposal site operated by Freeman United Coal Co. The second collection was necessary because of deterioration due to hydration of the original samples. A study of the hydration characteristics was completed during the quarter. Important reactions included the immediate formation of ettringite and portlandite. The hydration and transformation was found to be a slow process. A second phase of gypsum formation from ettringite deterioration was identified. The slow hydration of anhydrite with its resultant swell is a potential problem which will be addressed further. Geotechnical characterization, during the quarter included completion of the preliminary characterization, analysis of the findings, experimentation with sample preparation for the final characterization/mix design, and design of the final experimental program. The analysis of the coals collected during the core drilling and hydrologic planning were completed. Also during the quarter a meeting was held with representatives of the shotcrete industry to discuss transport systems for emplacement. The pros and cons of pneumatic and hydraulic systems were discussed and plans formulated for further investigations.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Economic analysis of shale gas wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas produced from shale formations has increased dramatically in the past decade and has altered the oil and gas industry greatly. The use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has enabled the production ...

Hammond, Christopher D. (Christopher Daniel)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

2.01 GAS-FIRED UNIT HEATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a. Requirement for gas fired equipment is limited to structures which are constructed outside the practical limits of the campus central steam distribution system and have access to natural gas from Public Service Company utility distribution system.

Section Basic Mechanical Requirements; A. Design Requirements; A. Manufacturers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by- products in underground mines: Phase 1, Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics study which is investigating hydration reactions of the ADM by-product (Subtask 2.2) was continued this quarter. This study further aided in gaining information on mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions during hydration of the ADM materials. The information is of importance for a comprehensive understanding of the factors that control strength and long-term stability during aging of FGD materials. The decision was made by Addington, Inc., DOE, and the University of Kentucky that the originally selected mine site for the emplacement demonstration must be changed, mainly for safety reasons. Mine selection will be a priority for the next quarter (Jul--Sep, 1995). Another activity during this reporting period was related to Subtask 4.3, the selection and testing of the transport system for the FGD material. A laboratory-scale pneumatic emplacement test unit (ETU) for dry FGD materials was built at the CAER to generate data so that a final selection of the field demonstration technology can be made. A dry pneumatic system was chosen for laboratory testing because the equipment and expertise available at the CAER matched this sort of technology best. While the design of the laboratory system was based on shotcrete technology, the physical properties of the emplaced FGD material is expected to be similar for other transport techniques, either pneumatic or hydraulic. In other words, the selection of a dry pneumatic transport system for laboratory testing does not necessarily imply that a scaled-up version will be used for the field demonstration. The ETU is a convenient means of producing samples for subsequent chemical and physical testing by a representative emplacement technology. Ultimately, the field demonstration technology will be chosen based on the laboratory data and the suitability of locally available equipment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Methods, systems, and devices for deep desulfurization of fuel gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly effective and regenerable method, system and device that enables the desulfurization of warm fuel gases by passing these warm gasses over metal-based sorbents arranged in a mesoporous substrate. This technology will protect Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts and other sulfur sensitive catalysts, without drastic cooling of the fuel gases. This invention can be utilized in a process either alone or alongside other separation processes, and allows the total sulfur in such a gas to be reduced to less than 500 ppb and in some instances as low as 50 ppb.

Li, Liyu (Richland, WA); King, David L. (Richland, WA); Liu, Jun (Richland, WA); Huo, Qisheng (Richland, WA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and...

200

Desulfurization with transition metal catalysts. Quarterly summary  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research is to develop desulfurizing transition metal catalysts, which are active in homogeneous media at moderate temperatures and pressures for the purification of coal-derived fuels and chemicals. To this end, the mechanism of action is being examined whereby newly identified nickel(0) complexes desulfurize organosulfur compounds in solution at 65 to 70/sup 0/C. The sulfur compounds under investigation are typical of those commonly encountered in coal-derived liquids and solids, such as thiophenes, sulfides and mercaptans. The following studies on the homogeneous, stoichiometric desulfurizing agent, bis(1,5-cyclooctadiene) nickel(0) ((COD)/sub 2/Ni), were continued: (a) activation of the agent by means of added mono-, bi-/sup 2/ and tri-dentate amines, either of the tertiary or primary amine type; (b) labeling studies designed to reveal the source of the hydrogen that replaces the sulfur in the desulfurization of dibenzothiophene; (c) comparison of the desulfurizing activity of (COD)/sub 2/Ni, both in the presence and in the absence of lithium aluminum hydride; and (d) testing for the role of any biphenylene intermediate in these desulfurizations. Results are reported.

Eisch, J J

1980-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control. Topical report for Subtask 3.1, In-bed sulfur capture tests; Subtask 3.2, Electrostatic desulfurization; Subtask 3.3, Microbial desulfurization and denitrification  

SciTech Connect

This topical report on ``Sulfur Control`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT`s electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Future gas consumption in the United States. [Monograph  

SciTech Connect

The ninth biennial market report on consumption and forecasts of future demand provides a planning tool for consumers and government officials as well as for the natural-gas industry. The report summarizes the actual 1980 consumption by market sector, notes changes in consumption patterns and market restrictions, and presents an operational forecast of sales to each sector through 1995 and in each of eleven regions surveyed by the Gas Requirements Committee. 9 references, 4 figures, 11 tables. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

EIA Data: 2011 United States Oil and Gas Supply  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

small;" class"Apple-style-span">This dataset is the 2011 United States Oil and Gas Supply, <...

204

Corporate bodies and chemical bonds : an STS analysis of natural gas development in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas extraction in the United States in the early 21st century has transformed social, physical, legal and biological landscapes. The technique of hydraulic fracturing, which entails the high-pressure injection into ...

Wylie, Sara Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A BP neural network predictor model for desulfurizing molten iron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desulfurization of molten iron is one of the stages of steel production process. A back-propagation (BP) artificial neural network (ANN) model is developed to predict the operation parameters for desulfurization process in this paper. The primary objective ...

Zhijun Rong; Binbin Dan; Jiangang Yi

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1993--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Dec 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy selected 13 projects for funding under the Federal Clean Coal Technology Program (Round III). One of the projects selected was the project sponsored by LIFAC North America, (LIFAC NA), titled {open_quotes}LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project.{close_quotes} The host site for this $22 million, three-phase project is Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 in Richmond, Indiana. The LIFAC technology uses upper-furnace limestone injection with patented humidification of the flue gas to remove 75-85% of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas. In November 1990, after a ten month negotiation period, LIFAC NA and the U.S. DOE entered into a Cooperative Agreement for the design, construction, and demonstration of the LIFAC system. This report is the thirteenth Technical Progress Report covering the period October 1, 1993 through the end of December 1993. Due to the power plant`s planned outage in March 1991, and the time needed for engineering, design and procurement of critical equipment, DOE and LIFAC NA agreed to execute the Design Phase of the project in Aug 1990, with DOE funding contingent upon final signing of the Cooperative Agreement.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hydrogen Sulfide, Oil and Gas, and People's Lana Skrtic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at sewage treatment plants, manure-handling plants, tanneries, and coke oven plants.5 2 EPA, "Report standard cubic feet)."9 Sour gas is routinely `sweetened' at processing facilities called desulfurization Process for Desulfurizing Ultra-deep Natural Gas Near the Wellhead," presented at Natural Gas Technologies

Kammen, Daniel M.

208

Portugal Egypt Figure 2. Natural gas supply and disposition in the United States, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Portugal Egypt Figure 2. Natural gas supply and disposition in the United States, 2012 (trillion cubic feet) Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 29.5 0.8 0.2 3.3 2.963 0.112 0.620 0.971 0.014 24.1 1.3 2.9 2.8 2.5 2.9 7.2 0.03 9.1 0.003 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and

209

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States New Construction Market Speaker(s): Alex Lekov Gabrielle Wong-Parodi James McMahon Victor Franco Date: May 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the new single-family home construction market, the choice of what gas furnace and gas water heater combination to install is primarily driven by first cost considerations. In this study, the authors use a life-cycle cost analysis approach that accounts for uncertainty and variability of inputs to assess the economic benefits of installing different gas furnace and water heater combinations. Among other factors, it assesses the economic feasibility of eliminating the traditional metal vents and replacing them with vents made of plastic materials used in condensing and power vent

210

LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

41 41 LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment January 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 website: www.netl.doe.gov Disclaimer 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

211

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to United Kingdom  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

212

United States Producing and Nonproducting Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States Producing and Nonproducing Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004 By Philip M. Budzik Abstract The Form EIA-23 survey of crude oil and natural gas producer reserves permits reserves to be differentiated into producing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are available to the crude oil and natural gas markets, and nonproducing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are unavailable to the crude oil and natural gas markets. The proportion of nonproducing reserves relative to total reserves grew for both crude oil and natural gas from 1985 through 2004, and this growth is apparent in almost every major domestic production region. However, the growth patterns in nonproducing crude oil and natural gas reserves are

213

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to United Kingdom  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Kenai, AK Port Nikiski, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA San Diego, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Exports from Cameron, LA LNG Exports from Kenai, AK LNG Exports from Freeport, TX LNG Exports from Nogales, AZ LNG Exports from Otay Mesa, CA LNG Exports from Sabine Pass, LA LNG Exports from Sweetgrass, MT Period: Monthly Annual

214

United States, Canada and Mexico Release the "North American Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Mexico Release the "North American and Mexico Release the "North American Natural Gas Vision" United States, Canada and Mexico Release the "North American Natural Gas Vision" February 25, 2005 - 10:29am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- The North American Energy Working Group (NAEWG), a group of senior energy officials from Canada, Mexico and the United States, today released the "North American Natural Gas Vision," a trilateral report by the three governments that includes information on the natural gas market in the North American region, including forecasts through the year 2012. U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman joined Minister of Natural Resources Canada R. John Efford and Mexico's Energy Secretary Fernando Elizondo in announcing the report's release. "This document is a key cooperative effort among the three countries to

215

Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2013 (million cubic feet per day) Alabama 1,403 Arkansas 24 California 926 Colorado 5,450 Florida 90 Illinois 2,100 Kansas 1,818 Kentucky 240 Louisiana 10,737 Michigan 479 Mississippi 1,123

216

Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

Rambosek, John (Seattle, WA); Piddington, Chris S. (Seattle, WA); Kovacevich, Brian R. (Seattle, WA); Young, Kevin D. (Grand Forks, ND); Denome, Sylvia A. (Thompson, ND)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

218

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Volume 1, Bench-scale testing and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research & Development Center (AMAX R&D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

219

A1. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION GROWTH IN THE UNITED STATES..............................1 A2. VARIABILITY IN SHALE WELL PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE ............................1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 APPENDIX1 Contents A1. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION GROWTH IN THE UNITED STATES..............................1 A2. VARIABILITY IN SHALE WELL PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE ............................1 A3. GHG FOR FLOWBACK GAS CAPTURE IN SHALE PLAYS..9 A5. REFERENCES

220

Assessing the viability of compressed natural gas as a transportation fuel for light-duty vehicles in the United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent optimistic revisions to projections for recoverable natural gas resources in the United States have generated renewed interest in the possibility of greater utilization of… (more)

Kennedy, Castlen Moore

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Reactivity of target compounds for chemical coal desulfurization. Technical report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to identify representative organosulfur compounds which are removed by known coal desulfurization reactions. Demineralized coals are solvent extracted and the extracts fractionated to concentrate organosulfur compounds for analysis by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy. After sulfur compounds are characterized, the parent extracts are subjected to reactions previously shown to reduce the organic sulfur content of Illinois coals, fractionated and again analyzed for organosulfur content to determine if the identified compounds reacted during the chemical treatment. The original coal also will be subjected to chemical desulfurization, extraction, fractionation and analysis in order to correlate changes in organic sulfur content of the coal with reactions of specific sulfur compounds. These compounds can thus be reliably considered as target molecules for the next generation of desulfurization processes. Work during this quarter has shown that fractionation and chromatography of pyridine extracts to isolate suitable samples for GC/MS analysis, although time-consuming, appears to be better than direct toluene extraction in terms of providing a representative set of compounds for analysis. The toluene soluble fractions prepared by this route contain aromatic sulfur compounds and O, N, S-containing hetrocycles. A set of these compounds has been identified and their fate following desulfurization of the parent coal extracts is under investigation. Previously studied desulfurization reactions using the single electron transfer reagent, K/THF/naphthalene, and the reactive nickel boride reagent have been repeated and analyzed by GC/MS. SET and nickel boride reactions of the THF soluble portions of pyridine coal are currently in progress.

Buchanan, D.H.; Amin, M.; Cunningham, R.; Galyen, J.; Ho, K.K.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States The Gulf of Mexico area, which includes the States of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, has in the past accounted for the majority of natural gas production. Processing plants are especially important in this part of the country because of the amount of NGLs in the natural gas produced and existence of numerous petro-chemical plants seeking that feedstock in this area. Consequently, the States along the Gulf of Mexico are home to the largest number of plants and the most processing capacity in the United States. Natural gas produced in this area of the country is typically rich in NGLs and requires processing before it is pipeline-quality dry natural gas. Offshore natural gas production can contain more than 4 gallons of

223

EIA Data: 2011 United States Oil and Gas Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Supply Oil and Gas Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2011 United States Oil and Gas Supply, part of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. Source EIA Date Released December 16th, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO EIA energy gas oil Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Oil and Gas Supply (xls, 32.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

224

Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants Associated With Coal Combustion. • E.P.A.Control Guidelines for Coal-Derived Pollutants .Forms of Sulfur in Coal • . . . . Coal Desulfurization

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Appendix  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Appendix Appendix The preceding report is the most comprehensive report published by the EIA on natural gas processing plants in the United States. The data in the report for the year 2008 were collected on Form EIA-757, Natural Gas Processing Survey Schedule A, which was fielded to EIA respondents in the latter part of 2008 for the first time. This survey was used to collect information on the capacity, status, and operations of natural gas processing plants and to monitor constraints of natural gas processing plants during periods of supply disruption in areas affected by an emergency, such as a hurricane. EIA received authorization to collect information on processing plants from the Office of Management and Budget in early 2008. The form consists of two parts, Schedule A and Schedule B. Schedule A is

227

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Background The use of horizontal drilling in conjunction with hydraulic fracturing has greatly expanded the ability of producers to profitably produce natural gas from low permeability geologic formations, particularly shale formations. Application of fracturing techniques to stimulate oil and gas production began to grow rapidly in the 1950s, although experimentation dates back to the 19 th century. Starting in the mid-1970s, a partnership of private operators, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) endeavored to develop technologies for the commercial production of natural gas from the relatively shallow Devonian (Huron) shale in the Eastern United States. This partnership helped foster technologies that eventually became crucial to producing natural gas from shale rock, including horizontal wells, multi-stage fracturing, and slick-water fracturing. 1 Practical application of horizontal drilling to oil production began in the early 1980s, by which time the advent of improved downhole drilling motors and the invention of other necessary supporting equipment, materials, and technologies, particularly downhole telemetry equipment, had brought some applications within the realm of

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 12, July--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy selected 13 projects for funding under the Federal Clean Coal Technology Program (Round III). One of the projects selected was the project sponsored by LIFAC North America, (LIFAC NA), titled {open_quotes}LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project.{close_quotes} The LIFAC technology uses upper-furnace limestone injection with patented humidification of the flue gas to remove 75-85% of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas. The host site for this $22 million, three-phase project is Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 in Richmond, Indiana. The three project phases are: (1) Design; (2A) Long Lead Procurement; (2B) Construction; and (3) Operations. The design phase began on August 8, 1990 and was scheduled to last six months. Phase 2A, long lead procurement, overlaps the design phase and was expected to require about four months to complete. The construction phase was then to continue for another seven months, while the operations phase was scheduled to last about twenty-six months. In November 1990, after a ten (10) month negotiation period, LIFAC NA and the U.S. DOE entered into a Cooperative Agreement for the design, construction, and demonstration of the LIFAC system. This report is the twelfth Technical Progress Report covering the period July 1, 1993 through the end of September 1993. Due to the power plant`s planned outage in March 1991, and the time needed for engineering, design and procurement of critical equipment, DOE and LIFAC NA agreed to execute the Design Phase of the project in August 1990, with DOE funding contingent upon final signing of the Cooperative Agreement.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Development of a digital control unit to displace diesel fuel with natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Full Circle Engineering (FCE), supported by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), proposed a Small Business CRADA with Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies/Kansas City (FM&T/KC) for the development of a fumigation digital control unit (DCU) that would allow the displacement of diesel fuel with natural gas. Nationwide, diesel trucks and buses consumed over 21 billion gallons of fuel in 1992. The development of systems that allow the use of alternative fuels, natural gas in particular, for transportation would significantly reduce emissions and pollutants. It would also help implement DOE`s mandate for energy security (use of domestic fuels) required by the Energy Policy Act (EPACT).

Talbott, A.D. [AlliedSignal FM& T, Kansas City, MO (United States)]|[Full Circle Engineering, Northglenn, CO (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Oil and Gas Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Unitization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Unitization (Minnesota) Oil and Gas Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Unitization (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Department of Natural Resources is given the authority to create and promulgate regulations related to spacing, pooling, and utilization of oil

231

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) investigated methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbents. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For this program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation. Two base case sorbents, a spherical pellet and a cylindrical extrude used in related METC-sponsored projects, were used to provide a basis for the aimed enhancement in durability and reactivity. Sorbent performance was judged on the basis of physical properties, single particle kinetic studies based on thermogravimetric (TGA) techniques, and multicycle bench-scale testing of sorbents. A sorbent grading system was utilized to quantify the characteristics of the new sorbents prepared during the program. Significant enhancements in both reactivity and durability were achieved for the spherical pellet shape over the base case formulation. Overall improvements to reactivity and durability were also made to the cylindrical extrude shape. The primary variables which were investigated during the program included iron oxide type, zinc oxide:iron oxide ratio, inorganic binder concentration, organic binder concentration, and induration conditions. The effects of some variables were small or inconclusive. Based on TGA studies and bench-scale tests, induration conditions were found to be very significant.

Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Case Studies of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects Implemented in the United Nations Clean Development Mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes case studies of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offset project activities undertaken within the United Nations Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) program. This paper is designed to communicate key lessons learned from the implementation of different types of GHG emissions offsets projects in the CDM to policy makers in the U.S. who may be interested in developing national, regional or state-based GHG offsets programs. This paper also is designed to provide important insights to entitie...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

233

Development of a Desulfurization Strategy for a NOx Adsorber Catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improve NOx regeneration calibration developed in DECSE Phase I project to understand full potential of NOx adsorber catalyst over a range of operating temperatures. Develop and demonstrate a desulfurization process to restore NOx conversion efficiency lost to sulfur contamination. Investigate effect of desulfurization process on long-term performance of the NOx adsorber catalyst.

Tomazic, Dean

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur removal will be mandatory for all power generation coal gas applications in order to comply with future environmental standards. Two promising technologies that are currently being optimized for coal-based power generation are the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and the gasifier/molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) systems. Zinc ferrite is currently the leading candidate to serve as a sulfur removal agent in the IGCC systems. GE has developed a patented moving-bed coal gas desulfurization system that has been shown to achieve a reduction in complexity and cost in a simplified IGCC system relative to conventional IGCC configurations (Cook et al, 1988).

Ayala, R.E. (GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (USA)); Gal, E. (GE Environmental Systems, Lebanon, PA (USA)); Gangwal, S.K. (Research Triangle Institute, NC (USA)); Jain, S. (Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) has been directed to further develop an anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept that has been developed and tested on a limited scope for feasibility. From environmental as well as the economic viewpoints, it is necessary that the soluble sulfates of alkali metal sorbents be desulfurized (regenerated) and recycled to make regenerative flue gas desulfurization and MHD spent seed regeneration options more attractive. In order to achieve this, a low-temperature, low-cost desulfurization process to reactivate spent alkali metal sorbents is necessary. UTSI`s anion-exchange, resin-based concept uses the available technology and is believed to satisfy this requirement. In this DOE-sponsored project, UTSI, will perform the following investigations: Screening of commercially available resins; process variables study and improving resin performance; optimization of resin-regeneration step; evaluation of performance enhancers; development of Best-Process Schematic and related economics, and planning for proof-of-concept (POC) scale testing. The above activities have been grouped into five major tasks and the entire project is expected to take thirty-six months to complete.

Sheth, A.C.; Dharmapurikar, R.; Strevel, S.D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Method for the desulfurization of hot product gases from coal gasifier  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gasification of sulfur-bearing coal produces a synthesis gas which contains a considerable concentration of sulfur compounds especially hydrogen sulfide that renders the synthesis gas environmentally unacceptable unless the concentration of the sulfur compounds is significantly reduced. To provide for such a reduction in the sulfur compounds a calcium compound is added to the gasifier with the coal to provide some sulfur absorption. The synthesis gas from the gasifier contains sulfur compounds and is passed through an external bed of a regenerable solid absorbent, preferably zinc ferrite, for essentially completed desulfurizing the hot synthesis gas. This absorbent is, in turn, periodically or continuously regenerated by passing a mixture of steam and air or oxygen through the bed for converting absorbed hydrogen sulfide to sulfur dioxide. The resulting tail gas containing sulfur dioxide and steam is injected into the gasifier where the sulfur dioxide is converted by the calcium compound into a stable form of sulfur such as calcium sulfate.

Grindley, Thomas (Morgantown, WV)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Method for the desulfurization of hot product gases from a coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gasification of sulfur-bearing coal produces a synthesis gas which contains a considerable concentration of sulfur compounds, especially hydrogen sulfide that renders the synthesis gas environmentally unacceptable unless the concentration of the sulfur compounds is significantly reduced. To provide for such a reduction in the sulfur compounds a calcium compound is added to the gasifier with the coal to provide some sulfur absorption. The synthesis gas from the gasifier contains sulfur compounds and is passed through an external bed of a regenerable solid absorbent, preferably zinc ferrite, for essentially completed desulfurizing the hot synthesis gas. This absorbent is, in turn, periodically or continuously regenerated by passing a mixture of steam and air or oxygen through the bed for converting absorbed hydrogen sulfide to sulfur dioxide. The resulting tail gas containing sulfur dioxide and steam is injected into the gasifier where the sulfur dioxide is converted by the calcium compound into a stable form of sulfur such as calcium sulfate. 2 figs.

Grindley, T.

1986-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Development Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the hot-gas cleanup (HGC) work on the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU) located at the Environmental Research Center is to demonstrate acceptable performance of hot-gas filter elements in a pilot-scale system prior to long-term demonstration tests. The primary focus of the experimental effort in the 2-year project will be the testing of hot- gas filter elements as a function of particulate collection efficiency, filter pressure differential, filter cleanability, and durability during relatively short-term operation (100-200 hours). A filter vessel will be used in combination with the TRDU to evaluate the performance of selected hot- gas filter elements under gasification operating conditions. This work will directly support the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the M.W. Kellogg transport reactor located at Wilsonville, Alabama and indirectly the Foster Wheeler advanced pressurized fluid-bed combustor, also located at Wilsonville and the Clean Coal IV Pinon Pine IGCC Power Project. This program has a phased approach involving modification and upgrades to the TRDU and the fabrication, assembly, and operation of a hot-gas filter vessel (HGFV) capable of operating at the outlet design conditions of the TRDU. Phase 1 upgraded the TRDU based upon past operating experiences. Additions included a nitrogen supply system upgrade, upgraded LASH auger and 1807 coal feed lines, the addition of a second pressurized coal feed hopper and a dipleg ash hopper, and modifications to spoil the performance of the primary cyclone. Phase 2 included the HGFV design, procurement, and installation. Phases 3 through 5 consist of 200-hour hot-gas filter tests under gasification conditions using the TRDU at temperatures of 540-650{degrees}C (1000-1200{degrees}F), 9.3 bar, and face velocities of 1.4, 2. and 3.8 cm/s, respectively. The increased face velocities are achieved by removing candles between each test.

Swanson, M.L.; Ness, R.O., Jr. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hot-gas filter testing with the transport reactor demonstration unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the hot-gas cleanup (HGC) work on the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU) located at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to demonstrate acceptable performance of hot-gas filter elements in a pilot-scale system prior to long-term demonstration tests. The primary focus of the experimental effort in the 2-year project will be the testing of hot-gas filter element performance (particulate collection efficiency, filter pressure differential, filter cleanability, and durability) as a function of temperature and filter face velocity during short-term operation (100-200 hours). This filter vessel will be utilized in combination with the TRDU to evaluate the performance of selected hot-gas filter elements under gasification operating conditions. This work will directly support the power systems development facility (PSDF) utilizing the M.W. Kellogg transport reactor located at Wilsonville, Alabama and, indirectly, the Foster Wheeler advanced pressurized fluid-bed combustor, also located at Wilsonville.

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Ness, R.O.; Haley, J.S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Shale Gas Production in the United States: Environmental and Economic Resource Challenges and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shale gas production has rapidly expanded in the United States over the past decade, largely as a result of the combination of hydraulic fracturing with horizontal drilling, and is already influencing a dramatic change in fuel supply. Production in the U.S. has increased fifteen-fold between 2000 and 2010 to 4.5 trillion cubic feet, and is expected by the Energy Information Administration to more than triple between 2009 and 2035. Numerous studies point to potential environmental impacts from shale ...

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Corrective action decision document, Second Gas Station, Tonopah test range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 403) has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-0360 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. The Second Gas Station CAS was formerly known as the Underground Diesel Tank Site, Sandia Environmental Restoration Site Number 118. The gas station was in use from approximately 1965 to 1980. The USTs were originally thought to be located 11 meters (m) (36 feet [ft]) east of the Old Light Duty Shop, Building 0360, and consisted of one gasoline UST (southern tank) and one diesel UST (northern tank) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The two associated fuel dispensary stations were located northeast (diesel) and southeast (gasoline) of Building 0360 (CAU 423). Presently the site is used as a parking lot, Building 0360 is used for mechanical repairs of vehicles.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Communications to the Editor Room-Temperature Desulfurization of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difficult to remove in the hydroprocessing of crude oil.3 In homogeneous models, orga- nometallic nickel of polynuclear complexes in the desulfurization of various thiophenes,6 led us to prepare a dinuclear nickel

Jones, William D.

243

Table 1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, 2007-2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, 2007-2011 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 14,991,891 R 15,134,644 R 14,414,287 R 13,247,498 12,291,070 From Oil Wells R 5,681,871 R 5,609,425 R 5,674,120 R 5,834,703 5,907,919 From Coalbed Wells R 1,999,748 R 2,022,228 R 2,010,171 1,916,762 1,779,055 From Shale Gas Wells 1,990,145 R 2,869,960 R 3,958,315 5,817,122 8,500,983 Total 24,663,656 25,636,257 26,056,893 R 26,816,085 28,479,026 Repressuring 3,662,685 3,638,622 3,522,090 3,431,587 3,365,313 Vented and Flared 143,457 166,909 165,360

244

Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey"; Form EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report"; Form EIA-64A,...

245

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Processing Plant Utilization Data collected for 2009 show that the States with the highest total processing capacity are among the States with the highest average utilization rates. This is to be expected as most of the plants are located in production areas that have been prolific for many years. In fact, the five States situated along the Gulf of Mexico accounted for nearly 49 percent of total processing volume in 2009. The total utilization rate in the United States averaged 66 percent of total capacity in 2009 (Table 2). Plants in Alaska ran at 86 percent of total capacity during the year, the highest capacity utilization rate in the country. Texas had significant utilization capacity at 71 percent, for an average of 14 Bcf per day of natural gas in 2009. However, a number of

246

Toxic emissions from a cyclone burner boiler with an ESP and with the SNOX demonstration and from a pulverized coal burner boiler with an ESP/wet flue gas desulfurization system  

SciTech Connect

Emission factors for VOC and aldehydes, dioxins/furans, and PAH/SVOC are presented in Tables 6--8, respectively. Each table includes results for Coal Creek, Niles Boiler, and the SNOX process. As shown in Table 6, benzene and toluene were measured in the Coal Creek, Niles Boiler, and SNOX stack emissions in highly variable concentrations. Over 90 percent of the VOC analyzed were not detected in the stack gases, and the emission factor for these VOC ranges from 1.1 to 1.4 {mu}g/MJ for the three systems. Emission factors for the four aldehydes that were measured range from 0.47 to 31 {mu}g/MJ for Coal Creek, 1.7 to 38 {mu}g/MJ for the Niles Boiler, and 3.6 to 167 {mu}g/MJ for the SNOX process. Acetaldehyde is at the highest concentration of the four aldehydes in all three units, a finding which is consistent with previous work. Dioxin/furan emission factors are provided in Table 7. Emission, factors for these compounds range from 0.40 to 6.51 pg/MJ for Coal Creek and 0.45 to 8.14 pg/MJ for the Niles Boiler. Dioxins/furans were not determined in the SNOX process. The compounds 1,2,3,4,6,7,8heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran were detected in both units. The predominance of these species in high SO{sub 2} environments has been previously observed. All other 2,3,7,8 substituted dioxin/furan isomers listed in Table 8 were not detected in either unit. Table 8 lists the emission factors for PAH/SVOC. Emission factors range from 0.3 to 233 ng/MJ for Coal Creek, 0.5 to 273 ng/MJ for the Niles Boiler, and 0.3 to 130 ng/MJ for the SNOX process. Acetophenone is at the highest concentration of the PAH/SVOC in all three units. Naphthalene, dibenzofuran, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene are also present at relatively high concentrations in comparison to the other PAH/SVOC.

Sverdrup, G.M.; Riggs, K.B.; Kelly, T.J.; Barrett, R.E. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Peltier, R.G.; Cooper, J.A. [Chester Environmental, Monroeville, PA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by-product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, September 11, 1992--December 11, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the continual increase in the utilization of high sulfur and high nitrogen containing fossil fuels, the release of airborne pollutants into the environment has become a critical problem. The fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 2} during combustion. Fuel nitrogen and a fraction of the nitrogen from the combustion air are converted to nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide, NO{sub x}. For the past five years Combustion Engineering (now Asea Brown Boveri or ABB) and, since 1986, the University of Tulsa (TU) have been investigating the oxidation of H{sub 2}S by the facultatively anaerobic and autotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans and have developed a process, concept for the microbial removal of H{sub 2}S from a gas stream the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO by D. desulfuricans and T. denitrificans co-cultures and cultures-in-series was demonstrated. These systems could not be sustained due to NO inhibition of D. desulfuricans. However, a preliminary economic analysis has shown that microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}S with subsequent conversion to elemental sulfur by the Claus process is both technically and economically feasible if a less expensive carbon and/or energy source can be found. It has also been demonstrated that T. denitrificans can be grown anaerobically on NO(g) as a terminal electron acceptor with reduction to elemental nitrogen. Microbial reduction of NO{sub x} is a viable process concept for the disposal of concentrated streams of NO{sub x} as may be produced by certain regenerable processes for the removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gas.

Sublette, K.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 shows the monthly natural gas price forecast for 2010 forthe winter when the natural gas prices are lower compared toSep Oct Nov Dec Fig 11 Natural gas price forecast for 2010

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 shows the monthly natural gas price forecast for 2010 forwinter when the natural gas prices are lower compared to theannual prices. Nat. Gas Price (2007$ / MMBtu) New England

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Adjusting to Overcapacity: Impacts of New Gas-Fired Units on Power Supply and Fuel Use: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Relia bility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capacity additions of gas-fired combined-cycle units reached a peak in 2003 and will drop sharply in 2004. While the extraordinary boom of merchant capacity is now largely over, it has resulted in overbuilding in many regions and will have impacts that are widespread. The overall efficiency of this new capacity has been strong, but trends toward greater capacity utilization have been arrested by the combination of overbuilding and high natural gas prices. Capacity premiums have been driven to low levels,...

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2002-2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2002-2006 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year .................................. 387,772 393,327 406,147 R 425,887 448,641 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 503,894 506,356 506,454 R 494,748 508,075 From Oil Wells ................................................ 174,047 176,617 172,292 R 169,476 157,583 Total ................................................................. 677,942 682,973 678,746 R 664,223 665,657 Repressuring .................................................... 97,839 100,462 104,819 R 104,759 92,453 Vented and Flared

252

Improving the accuracy of flow units prediction through two committee machine models: An example from the South Pars Gas Field, Persian Gulf Basin, Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intelligent reservoir characterization is a prerequisite study for development of oil and gas fields. Hydraulic flow units are mappable portions of hydrocarbon-bearing rocks that control fluid flow, and their modeling allows an accurate understanding ... Keywords: Committee machine, Flow units, Fuzzy logic, Genetic algorithm, Iran, Neural network, Neuro-fuzzy, South Pars Gas Field

Javad Ghiasi-Freez; Ali Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi; Mansur Ziaii

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 3 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Edwards Unit 1, Central Illinois Light Company. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design work has been completed for a Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) system to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} from a wall fired unit at Central Illinois Light Company`s Edwards Station Unit 1, located in Bartonville, Illinois. The goal of the project was to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} by 60%, from the as found baseline of 0.98 lb/MBtu and to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2} by 50%. Since the unit currently fires a blend of high sulfur Illinois coal and low sulfur Kentucky coal to meet an SO{sub 2} limit of 1.8 lb/MBtu, the goal at this site was amended to meeting this limit while increasing the fraction of high sulfur coal to 57% from the current 15% level. GR-SI requires injection of natural gas into the furnace at the level of the top burner row, creating a fuel-rich zone in which NO{sub x} formed in the coal zone is reduced to N{sub 2}. Recycled flue gas is used to increase the reburning fuel jet momentum, resulting in enhanced mixing. Recycled flue gas is also used to cool the top row of burners which would not be in service during GR operation. Dry hydrated lime sorbent is injected into the upper furnace to react with SO{sub 2}, forming solid CaSO{sub 4} and CaSO{sub 3}, which are collected by the ESP. The system was designed to inject sorbent at a rate corresponding to a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 2.0. The SI system design was optimized with respect to gas temperature, injection air flow rate, and sorbent dispersion. Sorbent injection air flow is equal to 3% of the combustion air. The design includes modifications of the ESP, sootblowing, and ash handling systems.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

1. Selected average prices of natural gas in the United States,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Report”; Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports; Form EIA?857, “Monthly ...

255

How much shale gas is produced in the United States? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

256

Oil and Gas Development in the United States in the Early 1990's  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

An analysis of the growing prominence of smaller energy companies in U.S. oil and natural gas production.

Information Center

1995-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

PRODUCTION OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SLUDGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three main conclusions of this report are: (1) The pilot plant successfully demonstrated the continuous, fully-integrated, long-term process operation, including the mixing, pelletizing, and curing steps for aggregate production. The curing vessel, which was designed for the pilot plant test, was operated in a mass flow mode and performed well during pilot plant operation. (2) The pilot plant test demonstrated process flexibility. The same equipment was used to produce lightweight, medium-weight, and road aggregates. The only change was the mix formulation. Aggregates were produced from a variety of mix designs and from FGD sludge with solids concentrations between 45.0% and 56.7% and moisture contents between 55.0% and 43.3%. (3) The pilot plant provided operating data and experience to design and cost a commercial plant, which was not part of the cooperative agreement.

M.M. Wu; D.C. McCoy; R.O. Scandrol; M.L. Fenger; J.A. Withum; R.M. Statnick

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

THERMODYNAMIC DATA FOR FLUE-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy, Div. of Fossil Energy, Report FE-2710-1, pg. 24 (by the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Coalby the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Off1ce of Coal

Brewer, Leo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Inspection Guideline for Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe corrosion attack has occurred in several absorber vessels constructed of duplex 2205 and 255 stainless steels. There are also mounting concerns that earlier generation absorber vessels fabricated with austenitic stainless steels may also be subject to underdeposit and pitting corrosion attack. This corrosion attack has been found in several of the spray tower/ tray tower and jet bubble reactor designs constructed of stainless steels and are reported to be occurring with relatively little service l...

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

260

THERMODYNAMIC DATA FOR FLUE-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N.T. Ioffe, et. al. Thermodynamic Constants of Materials,Heats and Related Thermodynamic Quan- ti ties , John W i 1 eN.P.L. Computer Analysed Thermodynamic Data: Organic and

Brewer, Leo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

THERMODYNAMIC DATA FOR FLUE-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

De Carvalho, J. Chern. Thermodynamics D. Detry, J. Drowart,Vanderzee, J. Chern. Thermodynamics ! Q,lll3-36 (1978). (43)L.G. Hepler, J. Chern. Thermodynamics~~ (45) J.E. Desnoyers,

Brewer, Leo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Volume 3, Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Edwards Unit 1, Central Illinois Light Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design work has been completed for a Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) system to reduce emissions of NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} from a wall fired unit. A GR-SI system was designed for Central Illinois Light Company`s Edwards Station Unit 1, located in Bartonville, Illinois. The unit is rated at 117 MW(e) (net) and is front wall fired with a pulverized bituminous coal blend. The goal of the project was to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} by 60%, from the ``as found`` baseline of 0.98 lb/MBtu (420 mg/MJ), and to reduce emissions of S0{sub 2} by 50%. Since the unit currently fires a blend of high sulfur Illinois coal and low sulfur Kentucky coal to meet an S0{sub 2} limit Of 1.8 lb/MBtu (770 mg/MJ), the goal at this site was amended to meeting this limit while increasing the fraction of high sulfur coal to 57% from the current 15% level. GR-SI requires injection of natural gas into the furnace at the level of the top burner row, creating a fuel-rich zone in which NO{sub x} formed in the coal zone is reduced to N{sub 2}. The design natural gas input corresponds to 18% of the total heat input. Burnout (overfire) air is injected at a higher elevation to burn out fuel combustible matter at a normal excess air level of 18%. Recycled flue gas is used to increase the reburning fuel jet momentum, resulting in enhanced mixing. Recycled flue gas is also used to cool the top row of burners which would not be in service during GR operation. Dry hydrated lime sorbent is injected into the upper furnace to react with S0{sub 2}, forming solid CaSO{sub 4} and CaSO{sub 3}, which are collected by the ESP. The SI system design was optimized with respect to gas temperature, injection air flow rate, and sorbent dispersion. Sorbent injection air flow is equal to 3% of the combustion air. The design includes modifications of the ESP, sootblowing, and ash handling systems.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixes derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

Poston, James A. (Star City, WV)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixtures derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

Poston, J.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2005-2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2005-2009 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year .... 425,887 440,516 452,945 R 476,652 493,100 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 494,748 509,577 483,238 R 442,265 420,197 From Oil Wells ................................................ 169,476 156,860 164,759 R 162,742 164,611 From Coalbed Wells ....................................... NA NA 50,400 R 56,249 55,990 From Shale Gas Wells .................................... NA NA NA 64,682 95,811 Total ................................................................. 664,223 666,438 698,397 R 725,938 736,609

266

Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

Denholm, P.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

EPRI NMAC Maintainability Review of the International Gas-Turbine Modular Helium Reactor Power Conversion Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information of interest to the designers of modular helium-reactor-driven gas turbines and persons considering the purchase of this type of plant.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Oil and Gas Development in the United States in the Early 1990's ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

oil and gas reserves, production, and exploration and development expenditures. The firm of Arthur Ander-sen and Company has compiled these disclosures for

269

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States: 2007 Update  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an update to an estimate for U.S. aggregate natural gas storage capacity that was released in 2006.

Information Center

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

270

Natural Gas Storage in the United States in 2001: A Current ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2The estimates of working gas levels presented in this analysis are ... 3Historical data used in the scenario analyses are from: •Monthly data

271

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiences of residential consumers and utilities. OakStar (2008). Energy Star Residential Water Heaters: Finalefficiency improvements for residential gas furnaces in the

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington, DC 20585The information presented in this overview is based on the report “World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment, ” which

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the flue gas in a separate activation reactor, which increases SO 2 removal. An electrostatic precipitator downstream from the point of injection captures the reaction...

274

Operation of a 200-kW PAFC Unit on Anaerobic Digestor Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anaerobic digestor process used by over 90% of wastewater treatment plants generates methane-rich gas as a byproduct. This report describes the initial phases of a twelve-month demonstration project in which a fuel cell power plant in Yonkers, New York, is being successfully run on anaerobic digestor gas (ADG).

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Tyrer, H.; Thornton, M.; Kubsh, J.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Btu Content The natural gas received and transported by the major intrastate and interstate mainline transmission systems must be within a specific energy (Btu) content range. Generally, the acceptable Btu content is 1,035 Btu per cubic foot, with an acceptable deviation of +/-50 Btu. However, when natural gas is extracted, its Btu content can be very different from acceptable pipeline specifications. The Btu content of natural gas extracted varies depending on the presence of water, NGLs, as well as CO2, nitrogen, helium, and others. Significant amounts of NGLs in natural gas is generally associated with higher Btu values. Consistent with this, Btu values reported by plants in Texas and other Gulf of Mexico States are comparatively high (Table 3). On

277

Relations between Temperature and Residential Natural Gas Consumption in the Central and Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased U.S. natural gas price volatility since the mid-to-late-1980s deregulation generally is attributed to the deregulated market being more sensitive to temperature-related residential demand. This study therefore quantifies relations ...

Reed P. Timmer; Peter J. Lamb

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Unit Conversions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... volume flow units, which contain "atm", assume that the gas is: ideal; at a pressure of 101325 Pa; at a temperature of 0 °C. Be aware that the unit "atm ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Pacific Gas and Electric Company preliminary staff review, Geysers Unit 16  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The existing documentation on the Geysers Unit 16 and Geysers to Lakeville transmission line projects is reviewed and data deficiencies and areas requiring clarification for filing a Notice of Intention on these projects are identified. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2004-2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2004-2008 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year .... 406,147 425,887 440,516 R 452,945 478,562 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 506,454 494,748 509,577 R 483,238 510,019 From Oil Wells ................................................ 172,292 169,476 156,860 R 164,759 165,506 From Coalbed Wells ....................................... NA NA NA 50,400 53,757 Total ................................................................. 678,746 664,223 666,438 R 698,397 729,282 Repressuring .................................................... 104,819 104,759

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2003-2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2003-2007 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year .... 393,327 406,147 425,887 R 440,516 452,768 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 506,356 506,454 494,748 R 509,577 530,629 From Oil Wells ................................................ 176,617 172,292 169,476 R 156,860 165,699 Total ................................................................. 682,973 678,746 664,223 R 666,438 696,328 Repressuring .................................................... 100,462 104,819 104,759 92,453 107,274 Vented and Flared ............................................

282

Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report: United States/Federal Republic of Germany nuclear licensing comparison  

SciTech Connect

In order to compare US and FRG Nuclear Licensing, a summary description of United States Nuclear Licensing is provided as a basis. This is followed by detailed information on the participants in the Nuclear Licensing process in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). FRG licensing procedures are described and the rules and regulations imposed are summarized. The status of gas reactor licensing in both the U.S. and the FRG is outlined and overall conclusions are drawn as to the major licensing differences. An appendix describes the most important technical differences between US and FRG criteria.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Price Discovery in the Natural Gas Markets of the United States and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of the U.S. and Canada natural gas spot markets are evolving through deregulation policies and technological advances. Economic theory suggests that these markets will be integrated. The key question is the extent of integration among the markets. This thesis characterizes the degree of dynamic integration among 11 major natural gas markets, six from the U.S. and five from Canada, and determines each individual markets’ role in price discovery. This is the first study to include numerous Canadian markets in a North American natural gas market study. Causal flows modeling using directed acyclic graphs in conjunction with time series analysis are used to explain the relationships among the markets. Daily gas price data from 1994 to 2009 are used. The 11 natural gas market prices are tied together with nine long-run co-integrating relationships. All markets are included in the co-integration space, providing evidence the markets are integrated. Results show the degree of integration varies by region. Further results indicate no clear price leader exists among the 11 markets. Dawn market is exogenous in contemporaneous time, while Sumas market is an information sink. Henry Hub plays a significant role in the price discovery of markets in the U.S. Midwest and Northeast, but little to markets in the west. The uncertainty of a markets’ price depends primarily on markets located in nearby regions. Policy makers may use information on market integration for important policy matters in efforts of attaining efficiency. Gas traders benefit from knowing the price discovery relationships.

Olsen, Kyle

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Material: Four turbine- based ventilators and nine conventional servo-valve compressed-gas ventilators were1 A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators Arnaud W. Thille,1 MD; Aissam Lyazidi,1 Biomed Eng MS; Jean-Christophe M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

285

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report examines the aggregate maximum capacity for U.S. natural gas storage. Although the concept of maximum capacityseems quite straightforward, there are numerous issues that preclude the determination of a definitive maximum volume. Thereport presents three alternative estimates for maximum capacity, indicating appropriate caveats for each.

Information Center

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Natural-gas-fired CC unit holds NO[sub x] emissions below 9. 0 ppm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the East Syracuse generating plant, one of first commercial stations to include LM6000 gas turbines, designed to solve noise and emissions problems. This natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility provides 97 MW of power to Niagara Mohawk Power Corp and up to 80,000 lb/hr of process steam to a nearby Bristol-Myers Squibb Co plant. The plant's original design had contemplated a base-loaded facility. This stemmed from the original power sales agreement with Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. Flexibility of original design proved advantageous to the East Syracuse (NY) plant when, during the latter stages of construction, the original agreement was renegotiated into a schedulable'' contract. The new agreement now in force, providing for limited dispatch of one of the two gas turbines, is designed around other pre-existing project agreements. Design flexibility and the choice of two gas turbines made the plant capable of meeting dispatch requirements with only minor modifications of plant design and staffing.

Grunbeck, G.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Analysis Regional Analysis Rocky Mountain States and California Rocky Mountain States and California The Rocky Mountain States, which include all of the States west of the Great Plains and Texas and those east of California, have seen significant natural gas production increases over the last decade. With the development of new production basins, including the San Juan Basin, Powder River Basin, and Green River Basin, natural gas processing capacity in this region has expanded significantly. In 2009, California and Rocky Mountain States accounted for a total of 16.9 Bcf per day or about 22 percent of total U.S. capacity. Since 2004, only California and New Mexico noted a decrease in overall processing capacity, falling by 17 and 12 percent, respectively. Processing capacity in all of the remaining States (Colorado, Montana, New

288

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Processing Capacity Processing plants are typically clustered close to major producing areas, with a high number of plants close to the Federal Gulf of Mexico offshore and the Rocky Mountain production areas (Figure 1). In terms of both the number of plants and processing capacity, about half of these plants are concentrated in the States along the Gulf of Mexico. Gulf States have been some of the most prolific natural gas producing areas. U.S. natural gas processing capacity showed a net increase of about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009 (not including the State of Alaska), with the largest increase occurring in Texas, where processing capacity rose by more than 4 Bcf per day. In fact, increases in Texas' processing capacity accounted for 57 percent of the total lower 48 States' capacity increase

289

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Processing Plant Capacity by State 1. Natural Gas Processing Plant Capacity by State Natural Gas Processing Capacity (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Number of Natural Gas Plants Average Plant Capacity (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Change Between 2004 and 2009 State 2009 Percent of U.S. Total 2009 Percent of U.S. Total 2004 2009 Capacity (Percent) Number of Plants Texas 19,740 25.5 163 33.1 95 121 24.7 -3 Louisiana 18,535 23.9 60 12.2 271 309 12.3 -1 Wyoming 7,273 9.4 37 7.5 154 197 5.1 -8 Colorado 3,791 4.9 44 8.9 49 86 81.1 1 Oklahoma 3,740 4.8 58 11.8 58 64 8.8 -1 New Mexico 3,022 3.9 24 4.9 137 126 -11.8 -1 Mississippi 2,273 2.9 4 0.8 262 568 44.6 -2 Illinois 2,102 2.7 2 0.4 1101 1,051 -4.6 0 Kansas 1,250 1.6 6 1.2 353 208 -64.6 -4 Alabama 1,248 1.6 12 2.4 87 104 -4.7 -3 Utah 1,185 1.5 12 2.4 61 99 22.2 -4 Michigan 977 1.3 10 2.0 30 98 102.2 -6 California 876 1.1 20 4.1 43 44 -15.5 -4 Arkansas 710 0.9 4 0.8 10 178

290

Prototype demonstration of dual sorbent injection for acid gas control on municipal solid waste combustion units  

SciTech Connect

This report gathered and evaluated emissions and operations data associated with furnace injection of dry hydrated lime and duct injection of dry sodium bicarbonate at a commercial, 1500 ton per day, waste-to-energy facility. The information compiled during the project sheds light on these sorbents to affect acid gas emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. The information assesses the capability of these systems to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act and 1991 EPA Emission Guidelines.

None

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Project SAGE: Solar Assisted Gas Energy Project. United States special format report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the report is to give a preliminary description of Project SAGE, the solar assisted gas energy (SAGE) water heating system currently being tested and evaluated in Southern California. The report contains a statement of the goals and objectives of the SAGE water heating program, a general description of the project in addition to system performance data, evaluations and economic analyses of the various pilot studies and field test installations. (WDM)

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Control system for single shaft combined cycle gas and steam turbine unit  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for starting and controlling a combined cycle turbine of the type having a gas turbine with a fuel flow control valve and a steam turbine with at least one steam control valve both disposed on a single shaft and having a heat recovery steam generator heated by the gas turbine and connected to supply steam to the steam control valve, the combined cycle turbine having a unified control system and driving a load, and also having an auxiliary steam source connected to the steam control valve. It comprises controlling of steam from the auxiliary steam source with the steam control valve to crank the combined cycle turbine for starting, initiating and controlling fuel flow to the gas turbine with the fuel flow control valve and initiating combustion, controlling initial acceleration of the combined cycle turbine with the steam control valve on auxiliary steam, coordinating control of the combined cycle turbine by the steam control valve and the fuel control valve with the unified control system, transferring acceleration control during a smooth acceleration phase of the combined cycle turbine by the steam control valve and the fuel control valve with the unified control system, transferring acceleration control during a smooth acceleration phase of the combined cycle turbine to the fuel flow control valve and gradually reducing the opening of the steam control valve to a minimum value when the turbine reaches rated speed.

Moore, J.H.; Kure-Jensen, J.; Rowen, W.I.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

SciTech Connect

New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

294

Decision on the Pacific Gas and Electric Company's application for certification for Geysers Unit 17  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decision in favor of Geysers Unit 17 is presented. Included in the decisions are the findings, conclusions, and conditions on the following: need, socioeconomics, cultural resources, noise, hydrology and water resources, water quality, soils, biological resources, civil engineering, safety, transmission lines, geotechnical considerations, air quality, public health, and structural engineering and reliability. Provisions for monitoring compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and conditions are incorporated. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2008-2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2008-2012 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 428,565 408,167 375,127 348,044 360,663 From Oil Wells 158,841 160,673 165,220 167,294 140,725 From Coalbed Wells 57,263 56,922 54,277 50,377 43,591 From Shale Gas Wells 81,268 112,087 164,723 240,721 291,566 Total 725,938 737,849 759,347 806,436 836,545 Repressuring 103,034 99,734 97,172 95,295 92,304 Vented and Flared 4,726 4,682 4,699 5,931 6,027 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 20,351 20,431 23,693 24,577 21,573

296

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgA Retrospective Review of Shale Gas Development in the United States: What Led to the Boom?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the first academic paper that reviews the economic, policy, and technology history of shale gas development in the United States. The primary objective of the paper is to answer the question of what led to the shale gas boom in the United States to help inform stakeholders in those countries that are attempting to develop their own shale gas resources. This paper is also a case study of the incentive, process, and impact of technology innovations and the role of government in promoting technology innovations in the energy industry. Our review finds that government policy, private entrepreneurship, technology innovations, private land and mineral rights ownership, high natural gas prices in the 2000s, and a number of other factors all made important contributions to the shale gas boom.

Zhongmin Wang; Alan Krupnick; Zhongmin Wang; Alan Krupnick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

FLNG compared to LNG carriers - Requirements and recommendations for LNG production facilities and re-gas units.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An increasing price and demand for natural gas has made it possible to explore remote gas fields. Traditional offshore production platforms for natural gas have… (more)

Aronsson, Erik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary kiln boiler appears inferior to the circulating fluid bed boiler.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.

1992-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

299

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

300

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States combined accounted for about 13 percent of total U.S. processing capacity in 2009, accounting for the smallest portion of any region in the lower 48 States. The combined processing capacity in these States more than doubled, although a few of the States saw decreased capacity compared with 2004. Processing capacity in Illinois, Kansas, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania fell since 2004, with the highest decrease occurring in Kansas, which saw a 65 percent drop in processing capacity. At the same time, the number of plants in Kansas decreased by four. The decrease was likely the result of falling natural gas proved reserves, which decreased in this State between 1995 and 2005. While the proved reserves have

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Analysis Regional Analysis Alaska Alaska The State of Alaska had the third-largest processing capacity, trailing only Texas and Louisiana. While much of the natural gas processed in Alaska does not enter any transmission system and is instead re-injected into reservoirs, its processing capability is nonetheless significant. At 9.5 Bcf per day of processing capacity, the State of Alaska accounted for about 12 percent of total U.S. capacity. As of 2009, there were a total of 4 plants in the State, with the largest one reporting a capacity of 8.5 Bcf per day. Average plant size of 2.4 Bcf per day far exceeded any other State, with Illinois noting the next largest average plant size of 1.1 Bcf per day. In addition to the significant processing total capacity, plants in

302

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Table 2  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Average Annual Flows and Utilization Rates for Processing Plants in the United States 2. Average Annual Flows and Utilization Rates for Processing Plants in the United States Average Annual Flows (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Minimum Plant Utilization Rate Maximum Plant Utilization Rate Average Utilization Rate (Percent) 2008 Percent of U.S. Total Texas 14,020 27.3 3 100 71 Louisiana 10,462 20.4 3 100 56 Alaska 8,105 15.8 77 100 86 Wyoming 4,462 8.7 21 100 61 Colorado 2,934 5.7 15 100 77 Oklahoma 2,789 5.4 12 100 75 New Mexico 2,221 4.3 17 95 73 Illinois 1,601 3.1 35 76 76 Kansas 852 1.7 51 84 68 Alabama 746 1.5 32 80 60 Utah 728 1.4 22 100 61 Mississippi 688 1.3 29 67 30 California 557 1.1 2 100 64 West Virginia 382 0.7 70 91 82 Kentucky 217 0.4 40 92 75 Michigan 182 0.4 5 100 19 North Dakota 158 0.3 33 94 80 Montana 89 0.2 27 88 54 Pennsylvania 36 0.1 43 89 70 Arkansas 27 0.1 3 90 4 Florida 20 0.0 22 22 22 Tennessee 16 0.0 64 64 64 TOTAL U.S. 51,289 100.0 2 100 66 Note: Average utilization rates are based on 2008 flows and 2009 capacity,

303

Emissions of Transport Refrigeration Units with CARB Diesel, Gas-to-Liquid Diesel, and Emissions Control Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel in situ method was used to measure emissions and fuel consumption of transport refrigeration units (TRUs). The test matrix included two fuels, two exhaust configurations, and two TRU engine operating speeds. Test fuels were California ultra low sulfur diesel and gas-to-liquid (GTL) diesel. Exhaust configurations were a stock muffler and a Thermo King pDPF diesel particulate filter. The TRU engine operating speeds were high and low, controlled by the TRU user interface. Results indicate that GTL diesel fuel reduces all regulated emissions at high and low engine speeds. Application of a Thermo King pDPF reduced regulated emissions, sometimes almost entirely. The application of both GTL diesel and a Thermo King pDPF reduced regulated emissions at high engine speed, but showed an increase in oxides of nitrogen at low engine speed.

Barnitt, R. A.; Chernich, D.; Burnitzki, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Miyasato, M.; Lucht, E.; van der Merwe, D.; Schaberg, P.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Development of 1200-kV compressed-gas-insulated transmission and substation equipment in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Major research and development (R and D) programs for the development of sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) compressed-gas-insulated (CGI) equipment for ultrahighvoltage (uhv) application at 100-1200 kV have been under way independently in both the United States and Japan. The CGI transmission and substation equipment under study and development in these countries has included the surge arrester, circuit breaker, CGI transmission bus, disconnect and ground switches, and an air-SF/sub 6/ termination. The US CGI program has also included development of a power transformer, shunt reactor, voltage- and current-sensing instrumentation, and a line trap, all for 1200-kV application. This paper presents the overall status of development of CGI substation equipment for uhv application in the United States. It describes the major CGI components developed, highlights their key design aspects, indicates the present status of development and testing, and addresses the work remaining to establish final design consepts. The paper also includes 23 references, a number of which have not been widely distributed or included in any of the recently published bibliographies of uhv substation equipment.

Walldorf, S.P.; Gnadt, P.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Comparison of resource assessment methods and geologic controls--deep natural gas plays and zones, United States and Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep (greater than 4.5 km--15,000 ft) conventional natural gas resources will play an important role in the future energy needs of the United States and Russia. Deep sedimentary basins are widespread in these countries and have formed in a variety of depositional and tectonic settings. Significant volumes of undiscovered deep natural gas are in the Gulf Coast, Anadarko, Permian, and Rocky Mountain basins of the U.S., and in the Timan-Pechora, West Siberia, East Siberia, and North and South Caspian basins of the former Soviet Union. Deep natural gas resources are regularly assessed by the All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Institute (VNIGRI) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of their normal research activities. Both VNIGRI and the USGS employ similar assessment methods involving play (or zone) analysis using geological data and based on an analysis of confirmed and hypothetical plays using field-size distributions, discovery-process models, and statistical estimation procedures that yield probabilistic estimates of undiscovered accumulations. Resource estimates for the deep structural and statigraphic plays of the Anadarko basin and deep Paleozoic zones in the Timan-Pechora basin are compared and contrasted using both methods. Differences in results of assessments between VNIGRI and USGS arise due to (1) the way in which plays/zones are defined, (2) different geochemical models for hydrocarbon generation as applied to hypothetical plays, (3) variations in the ways in which statistical estimation procedures are applied to plays and regions, and (4) differences in economic and technologic assumptions, reserve growth calculations, and accumulation size limits and ranges.

Dyman, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Belonin, M.D. (All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Coke oven gas desulphurization by the Carl Still process  

SciTech Connect

The Steubenville East Coke Plant need a desulfurization process that would desulfurize an eventual 95 million standard cubic feet per day of coke oven gas from an inlet of 450 gr/DSCF to an outlet of 45 gr/DSCF of hydrogen sulfide. The Dravo/Still plant process was selected, due to the use of ammonia which was available in the gas, as the absorbing agent. It was also a proven process. Dravo/Still also was capable of building a sulfuric acid plant. The desulfurization efficiency of the plant has consistently provided an average final gas sulfur loading below the guaranteed 45 gr/DSCF. This removal efficiency has enabled production of an average of 4615 tons per day of 66/sup 0/Be acid. Also SO/sub 2/ to SO/sub 3/ conversion has averaged 98%. 3 figures. (DP)

Knight, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Method for processing coke oven gas  

SciTech Connect

Coke oven gas is subjected, immediately after the discharge thereof from coke ovens, and without any preliminary cooling operation or any purification operation other than desulfurization, to a catalytic cracking operation to form a hot cracked gas which is rich in hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The catalytic cracking reaction is carried out in the presence of a hydrogen-containing and/or CO2-containing gas, with a steam reforming catalyst.

Flockenhaus, C.; Meckel, J.F.; Wagener, D.

1980-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

308

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Performance Retention for GE 7F Unit in Peaking Operation: Durability Surveillance at Potomac Elect ric Power Company's Station H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures to reduce power generation costs have encouraged domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines implementing the latest technological advances. To assure the staying power of these turbines, EPRI launched a multi-year durability surveillance program. This report discusses performance monitoring and analysis of a General Electric 7F unit in peaking operation.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas & North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: 350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: 500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas & North Shore Gas Furnace: 200 - 500...

310

The use of gypsum and a coal desulfurization by-product to ameliorate subsoil acidity for alfalfa growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acid soils limit the growth of aluminum-(Al) sensitive crops such as alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Management of acid subsoils can be difficult due to physical and economic constraints. Field experiments were conducted at two locations to evaluate the effectiveness of surface-applied gypsum and a flue gas desulfurization by-product for reducing the toxic effects of acid subsoils on alfalfa. The materials were applied at rates of 0, 5, 10, and 15 Mg ha-1. In addition, a glasshouse experiment was conducted that used 0, 5, and 10 Mg ha-1 of gypsum only. Field studies were concluded 41 and 45 months after treatment application at the two locations. No effect of material on alfalfa yield or tissue mineral concentration was observed. Also, rate did not affect yield. However, there were differences in plant tissue mineral concentration in several harvests that were related to rate. Soil was sampled periodically to 120 cm and indicated movement of Ca and S into the soil profile to depths of 60 and 120 cm, respectively. Subsoil pHH2O and pHCaCl2 were not affected by treatment. Extractable and exchangeable Al were not reduced by movement of Ca and S into the soil. In the glasshouse study, alfalfa yields and root growth were not affected by gypsum rate. As gypsum rate increased, plant tissue S increased, but K and Mg decreased. Alfalfa roots did not grow below 60 cm, even though there was indication of material movement to 90 cm in the soil. Although sulfur moved to 75 cm, no effect on soil Al was observed. Leachate collected from the bottoms of columns indicated that soil cations were leached as a result of gypsum application. Gypsum and the flue gas desulfurization by-product did not significantly affect the acid soils used in these studies or improve alfalfa growth.

Chessman, Dennis John

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Advancing strategic environmental assessment in the offshore oil and gas sector: Lessons from Norway, Canada, and the United Kingdom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) for offshore oil and gas planning and development is utilized in select international jurisdictions, but the sector has received limited attention in the SEA literature. While the potential benefits of and rationale for SEA are well argued, there have been few empirical studies of SEA processes for the offshore sector. Hence, little is known about the efficacy of SEA offshore, in particular its influence on planning and development decisions. This paper examines SEA practice and influence in three international offshore systems: Norway, Atlantic Canada and the United Kingdom, with the intent to identify the challenges, lessons and opportunities for advancing SEA in offshore planning and impact assessment. Results demonstrate that SEA can help inform and improve the efficacy and efficiency of project-based assessment in the offshore sector, however weak coordination between higher and lower tiers limit SEA's ability to influence planning and development decisions in a broad regional environmental and socioeconomic context. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA can inform and improve the efficacy and efficiency of project EA offshore Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scope and deliverables of SEA offshore often differ from stakeholder expectations Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerable variability in influence of SEA output beyond licensing decisions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sector-based SEA offshore is often too restrictive to generate expected benefits.

Fidler, Courtney, E-mail: crfidler@gmail.com [Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A5 (Canada); Noble, Bram, E-mail: b.noble@usask.ca [Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A5 (Canada)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications. Option 2 Program: Development and testing of zinc titanate sorbents  

SciTech Connect

One of the most advantageous configurations of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system is coupling it with a hot gas cleanup for the more efficient production of electric power in an environmentally acceptable manner. In conventional gasification cleanup systems, closely heat exchangers are necessary to cool down the fuel gases for cleaning, sometimes as low as 200--300{degree}F, and to reheat the gases prior to injection into the turbine. The result is significant losses in efficiency for the overall power cycle. High-temperature coal gas cleanup in the IGCC system can be operated near 1000{degree}F or higher, i.e., at conditions compatible with the gasifier and turbine components, resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for IGCC power systems in which mixed-metal oxides are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. The objective of this contract is to identify and test fabrication methods and sorbent chemical compositions that enhance the long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical durability of zinc ferrite and other novel sorbents for moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases. Zinc ferrite was studied under the base program of this contract. In the next phase of this program novel sorbents, particularly zinc titanate-based sorbents, are being studied under the remaining optional programs. This topical report summarizes only the work performed under the Option 2 program. In the course of carrying out the program, more than 25 zinc titanate formulations have been prepared and characterized to identify formulations exhibiting enhanced properties over the baseline zinc titanate formulation selected by the US Department of Energy.

Ayala, R.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Final environmental information volume for the coke oven gas cleaning project at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Sparrows Point Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethelehem Steel Corporation (BSC) is planning to conduct a demonstration project involving an integrated system that can be retrofitted into coke oven gas handling systems to address a variety of environmental and operational factors in a more cost-effective manner. Successful application of this technology to existing US coke plants could: (1) reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, cyanide, and volatile organic compounds (including benzene) (2) reduce the cost and handling of processing feed chemicals, (3) disposal costs of nuisance by-products and (4) increase reliability and reduce operation/maintenance requirements for coke oven gas desulfurization systems. The proposed system will remove sulfur from the coke oven gas in the form of hydrogen sulfide using the ammonia indigenous to the gas as the primary reactive chemical. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide are also removed in this process. The hydrogen sulfide removed from the coke oven gas in routed to a modified Claus plant for conversion to a saleable sulfur by-product. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide will be catalytically converted to hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. The tail gas from the sulfur recovery unit is recycled to the coke oven gas stream, upstream of the new gas cleaning system. The proposed demonstration project will be installed at the existing coke oven facilities at BSC's Sparrows Point Plant. This volume describes the proposed actions and the resulting environmental impacts. 21 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

314

Durable Zinc Oxide-Based Regenerable Sorbents for Desulfurization of Syngas in a Fixed-Bed Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fixed-bed regenerable desulfurization sorbent, identified as RVS-land developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was awarded the R&D 100 award in 2000 and is currently offered as a commercial product by Sued-Chemie Inc. An extensive testing program for this sorbent was undertaken which included tests at a wide range of temperatures, pressures and gas compositions both simulated and generated in an actual gasifier for sulfidation and regeneration. This testing has demonstrated that during these desulfurization tests, the RVS-1 sorbent maintained an effluent H2S concentration of <5 ppmv at temperatures from 260 to 600 C (500-1100 F) and pressures of 203-2026 kPa(2 to 20 atm) with a feed containing 1.2 vol% H{sub 2}S. The types of syngas tested ranged from an oxygen-blown Texaco gasifier to biomass-generated syngas. The RVS-1 sorbent has high crush strength and attrition resistance, which, unlike past sorbent formulations, does not decrease with extended testing at actual at operating conditions. The sulfur capacity of the sorbent is roughly 17 to 20 wt.% and also remains constant during extended testing (>25 cycles). In addition to H{sub 2}S, the RVS-1 sorbent has also demonstrated the ability to remove dimethyl sulfide and carbonyl sulfide from syngas. During regeneration, the RVS-1 sorbent has been regenerated with dilute oxygen streams (1 to 7 vol% O{sub 2}) at temperatures as low as 370 C (700 F) and pressures of 304-709 kPa(3 to 7 atm). Although regeneration can be initiated at 370 C (700 F), regeneration temperatures in excess of 538 C (1000 F) were found to be optimal. The presence of steam, carbon dioxide or sulfur dioxide (up to 6 vol%) did not have any visible effect on regeneration or sorbent performance during either sulfidation or regeneration. A number of commercial tests involving RVS-1 have been either conducted or are planned in the near future. The RVS-1 sorbent has been tested by Epyx, Aspen Systems and McDermott Technology (MTI), Inc for desulfurization of syngas produced by reforming of hydrocarbon liquid feedstocks for fuel cell applications. The RVS-1 sorbent was selected by MTI over other candidate sorbents for demonstration testing in their 500-kW ship service fuel cell program. It was also possible to obtain sulfur levels in the ppbv range with the modified RVS-1 sorbent.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Cicero, Daniel C. (U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown); Stiegel, Gary J.; Gupta, Raghubir P. (U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh); Turk, Brian S. (Research Triangle Institute)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

315

Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is designed followed by the supervisory control layer. Finally, an optimization layer is designed. In this paper, the proposed two-stage control system design approach is applied to the AGR unit for an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Aspen Plus Dynamics® is used to develop the dynamic AGR process model while MATLAB is used to perform the control system design and for implementation of model predictive control (MPC).

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong production and trade model with a greenhouse gas model to assess leakage associated with modified beef

Zhou, Yaoqi

317

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

318

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

A NOVEL VAPOR-PHASE PROCESS FOR DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF NAPHTHA/DIESEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tier 2 regulations issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) require a substantial reduction in the sulfur content of gasoline. Similar regulations have been enacted for the sulfur level in on-road diesel and recently off-road diesel. The removal of this sulfur with existing and installed technology faces technical and economic challenges. These challenges created the opportunity for new emerging technologies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) with subcontract support from Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc., (KBR) used this opportunity to develop RTI's transport reactor naphtha desulfurization (TReND) process. Starting with a simple conceptual process design and some laboratory results that showed promise, RTI initiated an accelerated research program for sorbent development, process development, and marketing and commercialization. Sorbent development has resulted in the identification of an active and attrition resistant sorbent that has been prepared in commercial equipment in 100 lb batches. Process development has demonstrated both the sulfur removal performance and regeneration potential of this sorbent. Process development has scaled up testing from small laboratory to pilot plant transport reactor testing. Testing in the transport reactor pilot plant has demonstrated the attrition resistance, selective sulfur removal activity, and regeneration activity of this sorbent material. Marketing and commercialization activities have shown with the existing information that the process has significant capital and operating cost benefits over existing and other emerging technologies. The market assessment and analysis provided valuable feedback about the testing and performance requirements for the technical development program. This market analysis also provided a list of potential candidates for hosting a demonstration unit. Although the narrow window of opportunity generated by the new sulfur regulations and the conservative nature of the refining industry slowed progress of the demonstration unit, negotiations with potential partners are proceeding for commercialization of this process.

B.S. Turk; R.P. Gupta; S.K. Gangwal

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Natural Gas Storage in the United States in 2001: A Current Assessment and Near-Term Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report examines the large decline of underground natural gas storage inventories during the 2000-2001 heating season and the concern that the nation might run out of working gas in storage prior to the close of the heating season on March 31, 2001. This analysis also looks at the current profile and capabilities of the U.S. natural gas underground storage sector.

Information Center

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Steam Generating Units (duct burners) 40 CFR Part 60 Subpart GG- Standards of Performance for Stationary Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For nitrogen oxides has been determined to be selective catalytic reduction. l As authorized by the Northwest Clean Air Agency Regulation Section 300, this order is issued subject to the following restrictions and conditions: 1) The gas turbines shall burn either pipeline natural gas, or number 2 distillate oil with a sulfur content not to exceed 0.05 weight percent. The HRSG duct burners shall burn only pipeline natural gas. 2) Pollutant concentrations for each gas turbinelheat recovery steam generator stack shall not exceed the following:

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Simulating aerosol formation and effects in NOx absorption in oxy-fired boiler gas processing units using Aspen Plus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oxy-fired boilers are receiving increasing focus as a potential response to reduced boiler emissions limits and greenhouse gas legislation. Among the challenges in cleaning boiler… (more)

Schmidt, David Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation : the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and policy-making in Panama.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Framework Convention on Climate Change has yet to deal with tropical deforestation although it represents an important source of greenhouse gas emissions. In December… (more)

Guay, Bruno.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103ua3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103ua3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

326

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, September 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-004-0360, Underground Storage Tanks. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

DRY FLUE GAS CLEANING PROCESSES FOR ACHIEVING AIR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was mercury adsorption onto calcium sulfate (CaSO4), a byproduct of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wet., Powers K.W., and Pitoniak E.R. (2004) Method for Purifying Flue Gases from Combustion Sources. PatentCoupling of Advanced Oxidation and Adsorption Processes onto Silica-Titania Composites for Low

Columbia University

328

Signposts of Change in Evolving Natural Gas Markets: Key Factors Affecting Expected Future Supply and Demand for Natural Gas in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the North American natural gas industry has undergone a major restructuring as a result of the so-called “shale revolution.” This is an amazing situation when one considers the magnitude of the changes the shale revolution has spurred not only in domestic natural gas markets, but across many sectors of the overall economy. In essence, the shale revolution is a “black swan” event that many industry observers consider to have been a once in more than ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the "Sulfate Reducing Bacteria." These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing.

Lizama, Hector M. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the ``Sulfate Reducing Bacteria``. These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 5 figs.

Lizama, H.M.; Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NOX reduction (70%) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was performed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado Bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NOX emission level of 0.73 lb/106 Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50%. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NOX in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NOX emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. Toward the end of the program, a Second Generation gas injection system was installed. Higher injector gas pressures were used that eliminated the need for flue gas recirculation as used in the first generation design. The Second Generation GR resulted in similar NOX reduction performance as that for the First Generation. With an improvement in the LNB performance in combination with the new gas injection system , the reburn gas could be reduced to 12.5% of the total boiler heat input to achieve al 64?40 reduction in NO, emissions. In addition, the OFA injectors were modified to provide for better mixing to lower CO emissions.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Energy Savings and Economics of Advanced Control Strategies for Packaged Air-Conditioning Units with Gas Heat  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies Program (BTP) evaluated a number of control strategies that can be implemented in a controller, to improve the operational efficiency of the packaged air conditioning units. The two primary objectives of this research project are: (1) determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged air conditioning units with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units and (2) estimating what the installed cost of a replacement control with the desired features should be in various regions of the U.S. This document reports results of the study.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Executive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 19902009 1 n emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stone, flue gas desulfurization, and glass manufacturing), soda ash production and consumption, titaniumExecutive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990­2009 1 n, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention, stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations

Little, John B.

334

Oil and gas development in the United States in the early 1990`s: An expanded role for independent producers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1991, the major petroleum companies` foreign exploration and development expenditures have exceeded their US exploration and development expenditures. The increasing dependence of US oil and gas development on the typically much smaller nonmajor companies raises a number of issues. Did those companies gain increased prominence largely through the reduced commitments of the majors or have they been significantly adding to the US reserve base? What are the characteristics of surviving and growing producers compared with companies exiting the US oil and gas business? Differences between majors` development strategies and those of other US oil and gas producers appear considerable. As the mix of exploration and development strategies in US oil and gas increasingly reflects the decisions of smaller, typically more specialized producers, what consequences can be seen regarding the costs of adding to US reserves? How are capital markets accessed? Are US oil and gas investments by the nonmajors likely to be undertaken only with higher costs of capital? This report analyzes these issues. 20 figs., 6 tabs.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Emissions trading to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States : the McCain-Lieberman Proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Climate Stewardship Act of 2003 (S. 139) is the most detailed effort to date to design an economy-wide cap-and-trade system for US greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The Act caps sectors at their 2000 emissions in ...

Paltsev, Sergey.

336

6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant gas systems. Design baseline package, Volume 8. [DEA process  

SciTech Connect

Volume 8 contains the design of the fuel gas desulfurization process (DEA) and of the liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) section of the plant. The removal of acid gases is accomplished by intimately contacting the feed stream with the descending DEA solution. A partially regenerated semi-lean DEA solution is fed to an intermediate tray of the column for the bulk removal of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ while a fully regenerated lean DEA solution is fed at the top tray for the removal of the remaining acid gases in the top section of the absorber. The lean solution stream temperature is maintained at 10 to 15/sup 0/F above the absorber feed gas temperature to prevent hydrocarbon condensation in the column with consequent foaming and flooding of the column. The overhead gas (Stream 6305) leaving the H.P. DEA absorber is cooled and passed through the Sweet Gas K.O. Drum (bottom section of V-15305) to separate any condensate. The gas leaving the drum is further contacted with a 3 weight percent caustic solution in the bottom section of the Treated Gas Wash Column (T-15303) for removal of residual acid gases in order to comply with the sweet gas specifications of 1 ppMv H/sub 2/S and 10 ppMv CO/sub 2/. The LPG Recovery Unit is designed to process 15.95 MMSCFD of low pressure fuel reject gas from the HPU to recover approximately 60 percent of the propane and most of the heavier hydrocarbons. The recovered hydrocarbons are produced as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) product. Specifications for the LPG product are: (1) Ethane/Propane (Vol/Vol) 0.02; and (2) LPG product should meet GPA Publication 2140-77 Commercial B-P mixture specifications.

1983-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

Key Institutional Design Considerations and Resources Required to Develop a Federal Greenhouse Gas Offsets Program in the United Sta tes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets have emerged as a critical element of evolving U.S. climate policy and a critical factor in determining the future price of CO2 emissions and the economic costs of proposed policies. This report evaluates the governmental institutional requirements and resources needed to develop a large-scale national domestic GHG emissions offset program. It also describes potential institutional barriers that might limit the ability of the evolving carbon market to generate signi...

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

338

FGDExpert Demonstration at NIPSCO Schahfer Unit 17: Oxidation Reduction Potential Effects on Scrubber Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems have been shown to remove soluble oxidized mercury (Hg), as well as selenium (Se), from flue gas. However, one phenomenon that has been observed, but not well characterized, is the re-emission of oxidized Hg captured in the FGD scrubber as elemental Hg. Several studies have shown that oxidation reduction potential (ORP) influences the re-emission of Hg from FGD scrubbers. Other studies have demonstrated that ORP influences the speciation of Se in the scrubber ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Costs of Existing Flue Gas Desulfurization Units, 2007 - 2011 ... Average Installed Capital Costs (Dollars per Kilowatt) Note: Data for 2010 have been revised.

340

Reduction of NO[sub x] emissions coke oven gas combustion process  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes by-product processing at Clairton Works which uses a unique cryogenic technology. Modifications to the desulfurization facility, nitrogen oxide formation in combustion processes (both thermal and fuel NO[sub x]), and the boilers plants are described. Boilers were used to study the contribution of fuel NO[sub x] formation during the combustion of coke oven gas. Results are summarized. The modifications made to the desulfurization facility resulted in the overall H[sub 2]S emission being reduced by 2-4 grains/100scf and the NO[sub x] emission being reduced by 21-42% in the boiler stacks.

Terza, R.R. (USS Clairton Works, PA (United States)); Sardesai, U.V. (Westfield Engineering and Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

H.R. 432: A Bill to amend chapter 601 of title 49, United States Code, to improve natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline safety, in response to the natural gas pipeline accident in Edison, New Jersey, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session  

SciTech Connect

This document contains H.R. 432, A Bill to amend chapter 601 of title 49, United States Code, to improve natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline safety, in response to the natural gas pipeline accident in Edison, New Jersey, and for other purposes. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 5, 1995.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Widget:GasMap | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Widget:GasMap Jump to: navigation, search Gas map widget: The Gas Map displays real-time gas prices for the United States Example Output Gas map widget: Denver Gas Prices provided...

343

Integrating desulfurization with CO{sub 2}-capture in chemical-looping combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean combustion. We have previously demonstrated that the embedding of metal nanoparticles into a nanostructured ceramic matrix can result in unusually active and sinter-resistant nanocomposite oxygen carrier materials for CLC which maintain high reactivity and high-temperature stability even when sulfur contaminated fuels are used in CLC. Here, we propose a novel process scheme for in situ desulfurization of syngas with simultaneous CO{sub 2}-capture in chemical looping combustion by using these robust nanocomposite oxygen carriers simultaneously as sulfur-capture materials. We found that a nanocomposite Cu-BHA carrier can indeed strongly reduce the H{sub 2}S concentration in the fuel reactor effluent. However, during the process the support matrix is also sulfidized and takes part in the redox process of CLC. This results in SO{sub 2} production during the reduction of the oxygen carrier and thus limits the degree of desulfurization attainable with this kind of carrier. Nevertheless, the results suggest that simultaneous desulfurization and CO{sub 2} capture in CLC is feasible with Cu as oxygen carrier as long as appropriate carrier support materials are chosen, and could result in a novel, strongly intensified process for low-emission, high efficiency combustion of sulfur contaminated fuel streams.

Solunke, Rahul; Veser, Goetz

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Edward S. Steinfeld Richard K. Lester  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The exceptions are 9 small units that burn oil, one that burns coke oven gas, and 13 that burn coal gangue in the combustion unit. In other cases, flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, or "scrubbers," enabling post-combustion flue-gas desulfurization systems. Should Chinese environmental regulations strengthen in the near term

345

Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems: 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With proposed changes in current emissions regulations and recent EPA initiatives, most power producers have concluded that tighter limits on mercury, NOx, SO2, and primary particulates are inevitable. Likewise, more stringent controls for power plant emissions emphasize the need for more cost-effective pollutant reduction approaches. This report provides an update on results from an ongoing EPRI project directed at enhancing “co-benefit” capture of mercury and ...

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

346

Vacuum carbonate desulfurization and claus sulfur recovery system at No. 11 battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vacuum carbonate process functions above 90% efficiency and satisfactorily removes the HCN and sulfur compounds from the coke oven gas generated at No. 11 Battery. It has been noted that a large quantity of energy is required for the operation of the vacuum carbonate system. Normally 544,617 kg (1.2 million lbs of steam) and 5.4 thousand kWh of electricity are used per day to maintain the system's temperatures and pressures. The processed coke oven gases from the system satisfy industrial and environmental standards as a combustible fuel. The HCN destruction unit reduces the corrosive HCN to concentrations below .07% of the acid gas stream and offers the necessary protection to the downstream modified Claus unit. The Claus unit at No. 11 Battery operates at 98% efficiency and produces 5896 kg (6.5 tons) of sulfur per day. The liquid sulfur generated in the Claus unit is a high quality product of 99% purity. 7 figures, 3 tables.

Ellis, A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Problem of improving coke oven gas purification systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discussion of the problems of improving desulfurization processes of coke oven gas was presented. Of particular interest were control systems and increasing capacity of the coke ovens. Included in the discussion were the vacuum-carbonate and arsenic-soda sulfur removal systems. Problems involved with these systems were the number of treatment operations, the volume of the reagents used, and the operation of equipment for naphthalene and cyanide removal.

Goldin, I.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

S. 625: Natural Gas Regulatory Reform Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, March 16, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

S. 625 would eliminate artificial distortions in the natural gas marketplace to promote competition in the natural gas industry. It would do this by amending certain sections of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. Title I: Decontrol of Natural Gas describes provisions for elimination of wellhead price controls; coordination with the Natural Gas Act; application to first sales; technical and conforming amendments; effective date (January 1, 1993). Title II: Transitional Provisions describes the decontrol of natural gas subject to a newly executed contract, a renegotiated contract, a terminated contract, or to a contract which expires; coordination with the Natural Gas Act; and effective date (enactment of this bill).

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Unit Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unit Conversion. ... Unit Conversion Example. "If you have an amount of unit of A, how much is that in unit B?"; Dimensional Analysis; ...

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

350

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources The United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to...

351

united stadium. united station.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??DC United is one of Major League Soccerâs most decorated franchises, yet it still plays its home games within the crumbling confines of RFK Stadium.… (more)

Groff, David R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB® environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Molecular Gas, AGN Feedback and the Unusual Case of K. A. Alatalo (UC, Berkeley), T. A. Davis (Oxford University, United King-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Gas, AGN Feedback and the Unusual Case of NGC1266 K. A. Alatalo (UC, Berkeley), T. A effort. It remarkably hosts about 109 M of molecular gas and has a spectrum that exhibits extended wings of an AGN and molecular gas outflowing faster than vesc, this galaxy is an excellent candidate for AGN

Bureau, Martin

355

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

356

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United Arab Emirates (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from United Arab Emirates (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

357

Thermostabilization of desulfurization enzymes from Rhodococcos sp. IGTS8. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop thermophilic cultures capable of expressing the desulfurization (dsz) operon of Rhodococcus sp. IGTS8. The approaches taken in this project included the development of plasmid and integrative expression vectors that function well in Thermus thermophilus, the cloning of Rhodococcus dsz genes in Thermus expression vectors, and the isolation of bacterial cultures that express the dsz operon at thermophilic temperatures. This project has resulted in the development of plasmid and integrative expression vectors for use in T. thermophilus. The dsz genes have been expressed at moderately thermophilic temperatures (52 C) in Mycobacterium phlei and at temperatures as high as 72 C in T. thermophilus. The tools and methods developed in this project will be generally useful for the expression of heterologous genes in Thermus. Key developments in the project have been the isolation of a Mycobacterium phlei culture capable of expressing the desulfurization operon at 52 C, development of plasmid and integrative expression vectors for Thermus thermophilus, and the development of a host-vector system based on the malate dehydrogenase gene that allows plasmids to be stably maintained in T. thermophilus and provides a convenient reporter gene for the accurate quantification of gene expression. Publications have been prepared regarding each of these topics; these preprints are included.

John J. Kilbane II

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Designing a Large-Scale Federal Greenhouse Gas Offsets Program in the United States: Policy Choices and Lessons Learned from the Cle an Development Mechanism and Other Offsets Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If the United States decides to take broader action in the future to mitigate climate change, policy discussions may once again focus on development of a greenhouse gas (GHG) cap-and-trade program combined with development of a large-scale GHG emissions offsets program. The compliance flexibility offered by these programs, and the economic incentives they create to identify and implement low-cost compliance options, have the potential to reduce significantly the costs to achieve significant emissions lim...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

359

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

360

OPTIMIZING TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MERCURY AND ACID GAS EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Maps showing potential mercury, sulfur, chlorine, and moisture emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin were made from publicly available data (plates 1, 2, 3, and 4). Published equations that predict mercury capture by emission control technologies used at U.S. coal-fired utilities were applied to average coal quality values for 169 U.S. counties. The results were used to create five maps that show the influence of coal origin on mercury emissions from utility units with: (1) hot-side electrostatic precipitator (hESP), (2) cold-side electrostatic precipitator (cESP), (3) hot-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (hESP/FGD), (4) cold-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (cESP/FGD), and (5) spray-dry adsorption with fabric filter (SDA/FF) emission controls (plates 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9). Net (lower) coal heating values were calculated from measured coal Btu values, and estimated coal moisture and hydrogen values; the net heating values were used to derive mercury emission rates on an electric output basis (plate 10). Results indicate that selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hESP, cESP, or hESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions. Comparison of in-ground coal quality with the quality of commercially mined coal indicates that existing coal mining and coal washing practice results in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Further pre-combustion mercury reductions may be possible, especially for coal from Texas, Ohio, parts of Pennsylvania and much of the western U.S.

Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Coal ................................................ 4,367 4,077 4,747 4,181 4,473 4,125 4,983 4,330 4,414 4,003 4,796 4,178 4,344 4,479 4,348 Natural Gas .................................... 2,802 2,843 3,694 2,863 2,713 2,880 3,636 2,707 2,792 2,972 3,815 2,849 3,052 2,986 3,109 Petroleum (a) .................................. 74 73 81 67 73 70 75 66 75 70 76 66 74 71 71 Other Gases ................................... 32 33 36 32 32 34 37 33 33 35 39 34 33 34 35 Nuclear ........................................... 2,176 2,044 2,257 2,170 2,106 2,037 2,167 2,010 2,144 2,074 2,206 2,055 2,162 2,080 2,120 Renewable Energy Sources: Conventional Hydropower ........... 736 886 716 633 765 887 708 646 767 919 729 659 742 751 768 Wind ............................................ 491 520 353 449 477 521 379 475

362

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Performance Retention for GE 7FA Unit in Baseload Operation: Durability Surveillance at Florida Pow er & Lights Company's Martin Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures for reducing power generation costs have encouraged domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines implementing the latest technological advances. This report discusses performance monitoring and analysis in a multiyear project, launched in 1991, to assure the staying power of industrial gas turbines produced by major turbine manufacturers.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

363

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of United States oil and gas resources on CD-ROM:Assessment of United States Oil and Gas Resources conductedto assess conventional oil and gas resources. In order to

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Demonstration of a high S. P. F. gas heat pump for the north--central United States. Monthly narrative report No. 17  

SciTech Connect

Progress in studying the cost and market potential of HSPF gas heat pumps of the 7/sup 1///sub 2/ ton and larger size level and in testing components of the system is reported. (LCL)

Swenson, P.F.

1977-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Assessment of hot gas contaminant control  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Legend Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Syntax: LEGEND UNIT units> where is an integer number or parameter in the range 1 to 100 that specifies the legend identifier; and ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

367

Production Optimization in Shale Gas Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Natural gas from organic rich shales has become an important part of the supply of natural gas in the United States. Modern drilling and… (more)

Knudsen, Brage Rugstad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Pipeline constraints in wholesale natural gas markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Natural gas markets in the United States depend on an extensive network of pipelines to transport gas from production fields to end users. While these… (more)

Avalos, Roger George.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) - Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, ... Spot Prices of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Plant Liquids in the United States, ...

370

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment By Fuel and Equipment Type, 2010 Total Units by Equipment Type, 1985-2010² Coal Units by Equipment Type, Petroleum and Natural Gas Units 1985-2010² by Equipment Type, 1985-2010² 318 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Coal Units Petroleum and Natural Gas Units Particulate Collectors Thousand Megawatts 329 165 185 26 75 1 Particulate Collectors Cooling Towers Flue Gas Particulate Collectors Cooling Towers Flue Gas 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 100 200 300 400 Thousand Megawatts Flue Gas Desulfurization¹ Particulate Collectors Cooling Towers Flue Gas Desulfurization¹ Particulate Collectors Desulfurization¹ Desulfurization¹ Cooling Towers

371

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

373

PRISM 2.0: Regional Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential in the United States for 2010-2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While CO2 is the most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), a number of other gases contribute to increasing concentration of GHGs including methane and nitrous oxide. These GHGs also represent opportunities for mitigating potential future climate change. Non- CO2 GHG abatement measures provide policy-makers and compliance entities with another potential strategy for managing GHGs. Having additional strategies implies greater flexibility for managing compliance costs and uncertainty. ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

English Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

English Units. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J. 1, Steam Point Calculator: English Units, ... 6, Height of steam point apparatus above ground (ft.), 0, ft. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

375

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

376

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Natural Gas Reources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Research Project Summaries Reference Shelf O&G Document Archive The United States is endowed with an abundance of natural gas resources. Besides its use for...

378

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supply Technologies Oil and Natural Gas Supply Oil and natural gas are the lifeblood of our economy, accounting for more than 60 percent of the energy consumed in the United...

379

4. Natural Gas Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4. Natural Gas Statistics Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves The United States had 192,513 billion cubic feet of dry natural gas reserves as of December 31, 2004, a 2

380

EPRI Environmental Control Technology Center: FGD Wet Scrubber Performance At High Flue Gas Velocities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the impact of operating a wet flue gas desulfurization scrubber system at high flue gas velocities up to 20ft/sec (6.1 m/sec). It includes results for countercurrent spray, tray, and packing designs a variety of nozzle types. The report also describes the effect of adding dibasic acid and the impact of operation of state-of-the-art mist elimination systems. These results will be useful for planning compliance with SO2 emission regulations whether a new system is planned or addition...

1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

LIFAC Demonstration at Richmond Power and Light Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 Volume II: Project Performance and Economics  

SciTech Connect

The C1ean Coal Technology (CCT) Program has been recognized in the National Energy Strategy as a major initiative whereby coal will be able to reach its full potential as a source of energy for the nation and the international marketplace. Attainment of this goal depends upon the development of highly efficient, environmentally sound, competitive coal utilization technologies responsive to diverse energy markets and varied consumer needs. The CCT Program is an effort jointly funded by government and industry whereby the most promising of the advanced coal-based technologies are being moved into the marketplace through demonstration. The CCT Program is being implemented through a total of five competitive solicitations. LIFAC North America, a joint venture partnership of ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., and Tampella Power Corporation, is currently demonstrating the LIFAC flue gas desulfurization technology developed by Tampella Power. This technology provides sulfur dioxide emission control for power plants, especially existing facilities with tight space limitations. Sulfur dioxide emissions are expected to be reduced by up to 85% by using limestone as a sorbent. The LIFAC technology is being demonstrated at Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, a 60-MW coal-fired power plant owned and operated by Richmond Power and Light (RP&L) and located in Richmond, Indiana. The Whitewater plant consumes high-sulfur coals, with sulfur contents ranging from 2.0-2.9 $ZO. The project, co-funded by LIFAC North America and DOE, is being conducted with the participation of Richmond Power and Light, the State of Indiana, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Black Beauty Coal Company. The project has a total cost of $21.4 million and a duration of 48 months from the preliminary design phase through the testing program.

None

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary environmental risk assessment on the FGD by-products to be placed underground is virtually complete. The initial mixes for pneumatic and hydraulic placement have been selected and are being subject to TCLP, ASTM, and modified SLP shake tests as well as ASTM column leaching. Results of these analyses show that the individual coal combustion residues, and the residues mixes, are non-hazardous in character. Based on available information, including well logs obtained from Peabody Coal Company, a detailed study of the geology of the placement site was completed. The study shows that the disposal site in the abandoned underground mine workings at depths of between 325 and 375 feet are well below potable groundwater resources. This, coupled with the benign nature of the residues and residues mixtures, should alleviate any concern that the underground placement will have adverse effects on groundwater resources. Seven convergence stations were installed in the proposed underground placement area of the Peabody Coal Company No. 10 mine. Several sets of convergence data were obtained from the stations. A study of materials handling and transportation of coal combustion residues from the electric power plant to the injection site has been made. The study evaluated the economics of the transportation of coal combustion residues by pneumatic trucks, by pressure differential rail cars, and by SEEC, Inc. collapsible intermodal containers (CICs) for different annual handling rates and transport distances. The preliminary physico-chemical characteristics and engineering properties of various FBC fly ash-spent bed mixes have been determined, and long-term studies of these properties are continuing.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Demonstration/evaluation of the Cat-Ox flue gas desulfurization system. Final report, June 1970-October 1975  

SciTech Connect

The report gives a comprehensive summary of the experience gained and the problems encountered during the Cat-Ox demonstration program. The report outlines the process design and construction, as well as operating experience and problems. Test results and conclusions derived from baseline testing, acceptance testing, ESP testing, transient testing, and a number of special tests and studies associated with the system are reported.

Bee, R.; Reale, R.; Wallo, A.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Management of dry gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry coal combustion by-products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of combustion by-products with about 70% solids. Phase 2 of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase 2 is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a limited, small-scale shakedown test of the pneumatic and hydraulic placement equipment. The shakedown test originally was to take place on the surface, in trenches dug for the tests. However, after a thorough study it was decided, with the concurrence of DOE-METC, to drill additional injection wells and conduct the shakedown tests underground. This will allow a more thorough test of the placement equipment.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Pilot-Scale and Full-Scale Evaluation of Treatment Technologies for the Removal of Mercury and Selenium in Flue Gas Desulphurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overall evaluation of the various advanced treatment technologies that the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has tested for removal of mercury and selenium from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water. EPRI conducted a literature survey followed by a preliminary laboratory-scale evaluation to screen promising technologies. For the technologies that were selected based on the success of laboratory-scale testing, EPRI worked with treatment vendors to further evaluate these techn...

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

388

Metric Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J. 1, Steam Point Calculator: Metric Units, Elevation Converter, ... 6, Height of steam point apparatus above ground (m), 0, m, ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

389

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- I - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

390

U.S. natural gas exports to Mexico reach record high in 2012 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas consumption is rising faster in Mexico than natural gas production, and as a result, Mexico is relying more on natural gas imports from the United States.

391

Opportunities for LNG supply infrastructure and demand growth in US and International markets; Opportunities for liquefied natural gas supply infrastructure and demand growth in United States and International markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Countries are looking beyond their borders for options to satiate a forecasted increase in natural gas consumption. A strong option for importing natural gas is… (more)

Connell, Richard Perry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Microsoft PowerPoint - IGFC_Cleanup_SECA_Presentation_072910...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the removal of organic sulfur species from various hydrocarbons * Natural gas, LPG and biogas desulfurization * Warm gas and hot reformate gas desulfurization * Diesel fuel and...

393

Studies involving high temperature desulfurization/regeneration reactions of metal oxides for fuel cell development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research conducted at Giner, Inc. during 1981 to 1983 under the present contract has been a continuation of the investigation of a high temperature regenerable desulfurization process capable of reducing the sulfur content in coal gases from 200 ppM to 1 ppM. The overall objective has been the integration of a coal gasifier with a molten carbonate fuel cell, which requires that the sulfur content be below 1 ppM. Commercially available low temperature processes incur an excessive energy penalty. Results obtained with packed-bed and fluidized bed reactors have demonstrated that a CuO/ZnO mixed oxide sorbent is regenerable and capable of lowering the sulfur content (as H/sub 2/S and COS) from 200 ppM in simulated hot coal-derived gases to below 1 ppM level at 600 to 650/sup 0/C. Four potential sorbents (copper, tungsten oxide, vanadium oxide and zinc oxide) were initially selected for experimental use in hot regenerable desulfurization in the temperature range 500 to 650/sup 0/C. Based on engineering considerations, such as desulfurization capacity in per weight or volume of sorbents, a coprecipitated CuO/ZnO was selected for further study. A structural reorganization mechanism, unique to mixed oxides, was identified: the creation of relatively fine crystallites of the sulfided components (Cu/sub 2/S and ZnS) to counteract the loss of surface area due to sintering during regeneration. Studies with 9 to 26% water vapor in simulated coal gases show that sulfur levels below 1 ppM can be achieved in the temperature range of 500/sup 0/ to 650/sup 0/C. The ability of CuO/ZnO to remove COS, CS/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/SH at these conditions has been demonstrated in this study. Also a previously proposed pore-plugging model was further developed with good success for data treatment of both packed bed and fluidized-bed reactors. 96 references, 42 figures, 21 tables.

Jalan, V.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Intermountain Gas Company (IGC) - Gas Heating Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intermountain Gas Company (IGC) - Gas Heating Rebate Program Intermountain Gas Company (IGC) - Gas Heating Rebate Program Intermountain Gas Company (IGC) - Gas Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $200/unit Provider Customer Service The Intermountain Gas Company's (IGC) Gas Heating Rebate Program offers customers a $200 per unit rebate when they convert to a high efficiency natural gas furnace that replaces a heating system using another energy source. New furnaces must meet a minimum AFUE efficiency rating of 90%, and the home must have been built at least three years prior to the furnace conversion to qualify for the rebate. Visit IGC's program web site for more

395

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

396

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

397

Figure 5. Percentage change in natural gas dry production and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 5. Percentage change in natural gas dry production and number of gas wells in the United States, 2007?2011 annual ...

398

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports 2012 - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This growth led to greater domestic natural gas supply and relatively low prices in the United States, thus reducing U.S. reliance on foreign natural gas.

399

Fire and Ice: Failure at a Gas Compressor Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, There are more than 1,200 natural gas compressor stations in the United States. Compressor stations are an integral part of gas pipelines since  ...

400

December natural gas prices spike in Boston - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Although growth in domestic natural gas production has driven down natural gas prices throughout most of the United States in recent years, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...

402

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the...

403

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States, 2009 Update The aggregate peak capacity for U.S. underground natural gas storage is ...

404

Canada Week: Natural gas net imports from Canada continue to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net imports of natural gas from Canada have been falling for years. Rising shale gas production in the United States, especially in the Northeast, is ...

405

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Energy Company BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) . On May 22,2006, BP Energy Company (BP Energy) applied to DOE for an authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. BP Energy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export that energy to ~Mexico. The cnergy

406

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Research and EPA 600/R-941209 Environmental Protection Development January 1993 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Offsite Environmental 57,,7 Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 891 93-3478 702/798-2100 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its predecessor the U.S, Public Health Service (PHs) has conducted radiological monitoring in the offsite areas around United States nuclear test areas. The primary objective of this monitoring has been the protection of the health and safety of

407

Numerical modeling of well performance in shale gas reservoirs: the impact of fracture spacing on production of adsorbed gas .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Shale gas became an important source of natural gas in the United States and is expected to contribute significantly to worldwide energy supply. This has… (more)

Kalantarli, A.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Task 4.7 - diesel fuel desulfurization. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reductions in the maximum permissible sulfur content of diesel fuel to less than 0.05 wt% will require deep desulfurization to meet these standards. In some refineries, a new hydrogenation catalyst may be required for diesel fuel production. The work very briefly described in this document is on the use of hydrotalcite-supported molybdenum sulfide in the catalysis of ethanol. The catalyst reaction was highly selective for 1-butanol, providing a very clean reaction. Since the catalysis contains the MoS{sub 2} needed for the dehydrogenation and hydrogenation steps, the reaction can be performed at lower temperatures and higher selectivity. The catalyst was very stable and not destroyed by the water produced in the reaction.

Olson, E.S.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Exterior Wall Insulation: $350 (single family), $150 (multifamily) Windows: $2.50/sq. ft. Gas Furnace: $200 - $400 Gas Storage Water Heater: $50-$100 Gas Condensing Water Heater: $350 Gas Boiler: $400 -$600 Tankless Gas Water Heater: $350 Single Family Homes (New Construction): $50 - $500 Multifamily Homes (New Construction): $50 - $300/unit

410

Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources The single largest source of energy information available is the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA). The EIA publishes extensive reports on natural gas and other energy sources. Domestic natural gas markets are regulated in part by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The commission's chief area of concern is the interstate natural gas market. Natural gas moves for the most part by pipeline in the United States. The safety of those pipelines is the concern of the Department of Transportation's Office of Pipeline Safety. In Canada the regulation of interprovincial and international natural gas is the responsibility of the National Energy Board. Their areas of

411

EIA - Natural Gas Analysis Basics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Natural Gas Basics for Natural Gas Basics Where Our Natural Gas Comes From Natural Gas Prices Natural Gas Statistics Natural Gas Kid's Page (Not Just for Kids) How natural gas was formed, how we get it, how it is stored and delivered, how it is measured, what it is used for, how it affects the environment and more. Natural Gas Residential Choice This site provides an overview of the status of natural gas industry restructuring in each state, focusing on the residential customer class. About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines State Energy Profiles What role does liquefied natural gas (LNG) play as an energy source for the United States? This Energy In Brief discusses aspects of LNG industry in the United States. LNG is natural gas that has been cooled to about minus 260 degrees Fahrenheit for shipment and/or storage as a liquid. Growth in LNG imports to the United States has been uneven in recent years, with substantial changes in year-over-year imports as a result of suppliersÂ’ decisions to either bring spare cargos to the United States or to divert cargos to countries where prices may be higher. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 12/11/2009)

412

Intermediates formed during supercritical desulfurization of coal: Sixteenth quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1987 to June 30, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Last month, data was presented on a series of eight runs performed in the two liter reactor system under different reaction conditions, utilizing an Illinois No. 6 coal. The coal and solvent charges were held constant at 200 g each for all runs, and reaction time was one hour at a reaction temperature of 350/sup 0/C. Four of the runs utilized coal that had been treated with nitric acid solution, employing the ASTM procedure for sulfur forms analysis to remove the pyritic sulfur prior to reaction with alcohol. Both methanol and ethanol were utilized, and the effect of potassium hydroxide addition in an amount equal to 5% of the coal charged was also evaluated. Table 2 from last quarter's report is included here as Table 1 for convenient reference; it summarizes the processing conditions employed, desulfurization attained, and material balance information for the series of eight runs. The main objective of this series of runs was to permit a comparison to be made of the fluid phase composition between the various treatments employed; maximum desulfurization was not possible due to the current lower pressure limitation of the two liter reactor. Chromatographic analyses of the sulfur compounds present in the fluid phase samples taken during the course of the reactions are presented in Figures 1 through 8. All samples were collected at temperatures above supercritical. Vertical lines indicate the time during which the reaction temperature of 350/sup 0/C was maintained. The left vertical line denotes the end of the preheating time period, whereas the right one indicates the last data point completed before the final venting was performed. Relatively little fluid was removed from the reactor by sampling during the main reaction period. 8 figs., 1 tab.

Muchmore, C.B.; Chen, Juh W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Development and testing of low-Btu fuel gas turbine combustors  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) concept represents a highly efficient and environmentally compatible advanced coal fueled power generation technology. When IGCC is coupled with high temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), the efficiency and cost advantage of IGCC is further improved with respect to systems based on conventional low temperature gas cleanup. Commercialization of the IGCC/HGCU concept requires successful development of combustion systems for high temperature low Btu fuel in gas turbines. Toward this goal, a turbine combustion system simulator has been designed, constructed, and fired with high temperature low Btu fuel. Fuel is supplied by a pilot scale fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system. The primary objectives of this project are: (1) demonstration of long term operability of the turbine simulator with high temperature low Btu fuel; (2) characterization of particulates and other contaminants in the fuel as well as deposits in the fuel nozzle, combustor, and first stage nozzle; and (3) measurement of NO{sub x}, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, trace element, and particulate emissions.

Bevan, S.; Abuaf, N.; Feitelberg, A.S.; Hung, S.L.; Samuels, M.S.; Tolpadi, A.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Oregon State University Greg Smith Sustainability Program of oxygen. (2) "Carbon dioxide equivalent" (CO2e) represents the quantity of a greenhouse gas multiplied of one mass-based unit of a given greenhouse gas relative to an equivalent unit of carbon dioxide over

Escher, Christine

415

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

416

Efficiency United (Gas) - Home Performance Program (Michigan...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Air sealing, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Programmable Thermostats, Water Heaters, Windows, Energy Audit, Shower Head, Faucet Aerator, Pipe Wrap Active Incentive No...

417

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program (Michigan...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Air sealing, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Programmable Thermostats, Water Heaters, Windows, Energy Audit, Shower Head, Faucet Aerator, Pipe Wrap Active Incentive Yes...

418

UNITED STATES NATURAL GAS PRICES TO 2015  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The contents of this paper are the sole responsibility of the author. They do not necessarily represent the views of the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies or any of its Members. Copyright © 2007 Oxford Institute for Energy Studies (Registered Charity, No. 286084) This publication may be reproduced in part for educational or non-profit purposes without special permission from the copyright holder, provided acknowledgment of the source is made. No use of this publication may be made for resale or for any other commercial purpose whatsoever without prior

Michelle Michot Foss, Ph.D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program (Michigan...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boilers, Building Insulation, Clothes Washers, CustomOthers pending approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Motor VFDs,...

420

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-T Global Energy, LLC E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) 1 * On May 10,2011, DOE received an application from E-T Global Energy, LLC (E-T Global) for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for five years as a power marketer using existing international transmission facilities. E-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1983 @nngmeional Ruord United States of America .__ -- . . ,- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9@ CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmgton, D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $xX Congresstonal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prlnhng 0ffv.X 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' C.QNGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOUND. Mr. W~.XMAN. Mr. OBERSTAR, Mr. BEDELL. Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB, Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL; Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JACT. Mr. TRAKLER, and Mr. Vxrrro. H. Con. Res. 107: Mr. KASICH. Mr. AUCOIN. Mr. CARPER, and Mr. SIZHFIJER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH. Mr. LANTOS.

422

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ongrees;ional Record ongrees;ional Record United States of America __._ -.. I. :- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9tth CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmcqton. Cl C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $300 Congressmal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Governme3n:jPnntmg OfIce SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' June 28, 1983 -: I H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOLAND, Mr. WA-. Mr. OBERSTAFC, M' r. BEDELL, Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB. Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL,. Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JAGT. Mr. TRAKLER. and Mr. VENTO. H. Con. Res. iO7: Mr. KASICH. Mr. ALCOIN. Mr. CARPER. and Mr. SCHEUER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH, Mr. LANTOS. Mr. KILDEE. Mr. SOLARZ Mr. Bmrr, Mr. BELWLL, Mr. RANG~L, Mr. DYMALLY. Mr.

423

Reduction in Unit Steam Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2001 the company's Arch-Brandenburg facility faced increased steam costs due to high natural gas prices and decreased production due to shutdown of a process. The facility was challenged to reduce unit steam consumption to minimize the effects of thes

Gombos, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Liquefied Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Natural gas plays a vital role in the U.S. energy supply and in achieving the nation's economic and environmental goals. One of several supply options involves increasing imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to ensure that American consumers have adequate supplies of natural gas for the future. Natural gas consumption in the United States is expected to increase slightly from about 24.3 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2011 to 26.6 Tcf by 2035. Currently, most of the demand for natural gas in the United States is met with domestic production and imports via pipeline from Canada. A small percentage of gas supplies are imported and received as liquefied natural gas. A significant portion of the world's natural gas resources are

425

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Where is shale gas found Where is shale gas found in the United States? Shale gas is located in many parts of the United States. These deposits occur in shale "plays" - a set of discovered, undiscovered or possible natural gas accumulations that exhibit similar geological characteristics. Shale plays are located within large-scale basins or accumulations of sedimentary rocks, often hundreds of miles across, that also may contain other oil and gas resources. 1 Shale gas production is currently occurring in 16 states. 1 U.S. Government Accountability Office, Report to Congressional Requesters, "Oil and Gas: Information on Shale Resources, Development, and

426

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

427

NNSA Small Business Week Day 2: United Drilling, Inc. | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

business based in Roswell, N.M. United Drilling drills oil, gas, water, geothermal, and environmental wells throughout the southwestern U.S. The small business has...

428

United Arab Emirates - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The United Arab Emirates has the seventh-largest proved reserves of both crude oil and natural gas. Enhanced oil recovery techniques continued to underpin strong ...

429

Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Business Efficiency Incentives (Illinois...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 6,000 Gas Furnace Replacement: 200 - 800unit Gas Boiler Tune-Up: 100 - 2400 Steam Trap Survey (HVAC): 30trap (<15 psig) Steam Trap Repair Replacement (HVAC): 100...

430

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CC-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives served through the facilities of Carolina Power & Light Company, Western Division (hereinafter called the Customers). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in wholesale quantities. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

431

Efficiency Maine Business Programs (Unitil Gas) - Commercial...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Furnaces; 1000 Condensing Boilers: 1500 - 4500 Non-Condensing Boilers: 750-3,000 Steam Boiler: 800 or 1MBtuh Infrared Unit Heaters: 500 Natural Gas Warm-Air Unit...

432

Efficiency Maine Business Programs (Unitil Gas) - Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boilers: 750-3,000 Steam Boiler: 800 or 1MBtuh Infrared Unit Heaters: 500 Natural Gas Warm-Air Unit Heaters: 600 CustomECM: Contact Unitil Cooking Equipment: 600-2000...

433

Natural gas consumption reflects shifting sectoral patterns ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For many years, while coal-fired generation was less expensive, those natural gas-fired combined-cycle units were used at relatively low rates.

434

EIA'S Natural Gas Residential Programs by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Summary. Marketer ... is the division of those services required to supply natural gas to consumers ... Specialized Services from NEIC: For Technical ...

435

Advanced Materials and Processes for Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2003 ... Out of Print. Description These proceedings from the United Engineering Foundation's Advanced Materials and Processes for Gas Turbines ...

436

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

53 Wood products originating from forests outside the United States are not included in the U.S. greenhouse gas inventory. 54 Source: U.S. Energy Information ...

437

Mercury Sorbent Delivery System for Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,494,632 entitled "Mercury Sorbent Delivery System for Flue Gas." Disclosed in...

438

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

439

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2008 The Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2008 ranks the United States’ largest oil and gas fields by their estimated

440

Energy Basics: Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Propane Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Vehicles Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas desulfurization units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tenaslta Power Services Co. Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) ( Z 6 U. s.c.824a(e)j1. On August 16,2001, DOE issued Order No. EA-243 authorizing Tenaska Power Scrvices Co. (Tenaska) to transmit electric cncrgy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 16,2003. On August 14,2006, Teilaska applied to renew the electricity export authority

442

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TexMex Energy, LLC TexMex Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-294-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-294-A February 22, 2007 TexMex Energy, LLC Order No. EA-294-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign count~y are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 71 72(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) . On August 25,2004, DOE issued Order No. EA-294 authorizing TexMex Energy LLC (TexMex) to transmit electric energy fiom the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 25, 2006. On September 8, 2006, TexMex applied to renew the electricity export authority

443

Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Expected U.S. Natural Gas Consumption Inverse PriceTotal Expected U.S. Natural Gas Consumption Inverse Pricetotal natural gas consumption in the United States (U.S. )

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Natural gas pipeline technology overview.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-E 2-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available public bodies and cooperatives (any one of which is hereinafter called the Customer) in South Carolina to whom power may be wheeled pursuant to contracts between the Government and the South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (hereinafter called the Company). The customer is responsible for providing a scheduling arrangement with the Government. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude an eligible customer from electing service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B.

446

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-E 4-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available public bodies and cooperatives (any one of which is hereinafter called the Customer) in South Carolina served through the transmission facilities of South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (hereinafter called the Company). The customer is responsible for providing a scheduling arrangement with the Government and for providing a transmission arrangement. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude an eligible customer from electing service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B.

447

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCE&G-1-E SCE&G-1-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available public bodies and cooperatives (any one of which is hereinafter called the Customer) in South Carolina to whom power may be wheeled and scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government and the South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (hereinafter called the Company). Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude an eligible customer from electing service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B. Russell Projects and sold under appropriate contracts between the Government and

448

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the borders of the United States. DOE may issue such a permit if it determines that the permit is in the public interest and after obtaining favorable recommendations from the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. On December 16, 1988, Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) applied to DOE

449

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTV-1-H Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and TVA. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating current at a frequency of approximately 60 hertz at the outgoing terminals of the Cumberland

450

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTVI-1-A Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to customers (hereinafter called the Customer) who are or were formerly in the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA) service area. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and the Customer. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

451

UNITED STATES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG WASHINOTDN 28.0. C. ' -lr ' \ ' ' --- ".I ?--" ' z I. .~;-4.' J frr*o& 2 ii, - - -4 70-147 LRL:JCD JAN !! 8 1958 Oregon Metallurgical Corporation P. 0. Box 484 Albany, Oregon Attention: Mr. Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-144, as amended. Very 33uly yours, r:; I,;, ll)~gQ""d".- Lyall Johnson Chief, Licensing Branch Division of Licensing & Regulation Enclosure: SNM-144, as amended Distribution: bRO0 Attn: Dr. H.M.Roth DFMusser NMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIN (2) HSteele LRL SRGustavson LRL Document room Formal file Suppl. file Br & Div rf's ' .b liwwArry s/VW- ' q+ ' yj/ 2; 2-' , COP' 1 J JAM01958 -- UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

452

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule JW-2-F Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Florida Power Corporation (or Progress Energy Florida, hereinafter called the Company). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric energy generated at the Jim Woodruff Project (hereinafter called the Project) and sold to the Company in wholesale quantities. Points of Delivery: Power sold to the Company by the Government will be delivered at the connection of the Company's transmission system with the Project bus. Character of Service: Electric power delivered to the Company will be three-phase alternating current at a nominal frequency of 60 cycles per second.

453

Energy Management in Olefins Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The previous generations of olefin units were typically importers of utilities such as high pressure steam and electricity. But, in the new generation of units, diligent energy conservation efforts have reduced the high pressure steam demand to the point where waste heat from pyrolysis generates more than enough steam to power the olefins unit recovery section. Furthermore, incorporating gas turbine driven electrical generators or process compressors adds to the utility export potential of the unit. It is necessary, therefore, to consider utility export as a valuable byproduct of olefins production and incorporate it within the utility network of the petrochemical complex. As with any byproduct of a process, it is necessary to be able to control its production and distribution.

Wells, T. A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

455

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

456

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

457

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

458

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

459

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

This project Final Report is submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41987, 'Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas.' Sorbent injection technology is targeted as the primary mercury control process on plants burning low/medium sulfur bituminous coals equipped with ESP and ESP/FGD systems. About 70% of the ESPs used in the utility industry have SCAs less than 300 ft2/1000 acfm. Prior to this test program, previous sorbent injection tests had focused on large-SCA ESPs. This DOE-NETL program was designed to generate data to evaluate the performance and economic feasibility of sorbent injection for mercury control at power plants that fire bituminous coal and are configured with small-sized electrostatic precipitators and/or an ESP-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) configuration. EPRI and Southern Company were co-funders for the test program. Southern Company and Reliant Energy provided host sites for testing and technical input to the project. URS Group was the prime contractor to NETL. ADA-ES and Apogee Scientific Inc. were sub-contractors to URS and was responsible for all aspects of the sorbent injection systems design, installation and operatio